The Proceedings of the Cambridge Historical Society 1906–1979

History Cambridge was founded in 1905 as the Cambridge Historical Society. Members would write articles about Cambridge history and present them at meetings held in private homes and on the Harvard University campus. Between 1906 and 1979, these lectures were published as The Proceedings of the Cambridge Historical Society.

The full text of these lectures and articles are digitized and available as PDFs, which you can access by clicking the links in the finding aid below.

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Volume I. 1905-1906 [1906]

Reminiscences of Old Cambridge. By Charles Eliot Norton
Changes between 1830 and 1905. Especially interesting on the Kirkland Street Region.

Celebration of the Two Hundred and Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the Founding of Cambridge. By Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Others.

Report on Historic Sites.
“…a list of the most important Historic Sites in Cambridge, with the location of each. It contains also all the existing inscriptions.”

Reminiscences of John Bartlett. By John Willard, Thomas Went worth Higginson, and Woodward Emory.
Appreciative account of John Bartlett, proprietor of a famous bookstore, compiler of Familiar Quotations, editor of Shakespearian Concordance.

*Also contains full reports of the first year’s meetings, very interesting for their account of the purposes of the Society, the distinguished membership, gifts and other information.


Volume 2. 1906-1907[1907]

Nehemiah Walter’s Elegy on Elijah Corlet. By William Coolidge Lane.
Brief account of Cambridge’s first schoolmaster (d. 1687). The elegy reprinted here is by Corlet’s assistant.

Cambridge Eighty Years Since. By Thomas Wentworth Higginson.
Letters of Higginson’s mother to his brother (1827-1828).

Nathanial Jarvis Wyeth. By Stephen Paschall Sharples.
Wyeth was an energetic Cambridge character, inventor of ice-cutting machinery and a pioneer in the Oregon Territory.

The Washington Home Guard. By Franklin Perrin.
A volunteer Company organized for local protection when other military companies left Cambridge during the Civil War.

Celebration of the Longfellow’s Centenary. By William Dean Howells and Others.

Celebration of the Agassiz Centenary. By A. Lawrence Lowell and Others.

Cornelius Conway Felton. By William Watson Goodwin.


Volume 3. 1908 [1908]

The Seal of the Society. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Chiefly an account of Joseph Glover, whose press appears on the seal of the Society.

Some Cambridge Men I Have Known. By Alexander Mckenzie.
Among others: President Walker, Dr. Andrew Peabody, Professors Felton, Sophocles, Asa Gray, Charles William Eliot, Torrey, child.

First Award of the Longfellow Centenary Medal Prize.
Includes remarks by Richard Henry Dana, William Roscoe Thayer, and Charles Eliot Norton and the prize essay by John Kirtland Wright.

Second Report on Historic Sites.
Correction of errors and omissions in the First Report. Includes map of Harvard Yard, showing original ownership of the lots now included in it.

Francis Dana. By Richard Henry Dana.

The Writings of Thomas Shepard. By Andrew McFarland Davis.

The Tudor House at Fresh Pond. By Ellen Susan Bulfinch.
Fascinating account of country life in house built before the Revolution and long owned by the Storer family.

Gleanings from the Records of the First Church in Cambridge. By Hollis Russell Bailey.


Volume 4. 1909 [1909]

Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse and Harvard University. By William Coolidge Lane.

Journal of Benjamin Waterhouse. By William Roscoe Thayer.
Excellent articles about an original, testy, and thoroughly engaging character who stimulated the study of natural history at Harvard.

Celebration of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Centenary. By Charles William Eliot, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, David Williams Cheever, Edward Waldo Emerson, and Samuel McCord Crothers.

The Lawrence Scientific School. By Stephen Paschall Sharples.


Volume 5. 1910 [1911]

Certain Defects in the Publications of Historical Societies. By Worthington Chauncey Ford.
The proper objectives of a local historical society.

Lieutenant James Dana at the Battle of Bunker Hill. By Elizabeth Ellery Dana.

The Ancient Fish Weir on the Menotomy River. By John Albert Holmes.

Report on the Committee on Early Settlers’ Descendants.
List of fourteen members who had filed their genealogy with the Society.

Adventures of John Nutting, Cambridge Loyalist. By Samuel Francis Batchelder.
The life of a master builder who threw in his lot with the British.


Volume 6. 1911 [1912]

The State Arsenal and the identification of the Cannon on Cambridge Common. By Archibals Murray Howe.

The arsenal stood on the site of the Hotel Continental in Arsenal Square.

The Aims of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. By Charles Knowles Bolton.
Summary of an illustrated address.

A Few Old Cambridge Houses. ByMary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Particularly interesting for listing of old houses which once stood between Harvard Square and the river.

The Cambridge Humane Society. By Edward Henry Hall.

Why I Started the Index to Paige’s History of Cambridge. By Charles John McIntire.
“I commenced the index for my own personal use and comfort … as its proportions grew… more time was devoted to it, depriving me of necessary rest and exercise.”

The History and Meaning of the Proposed New Charter for Cambridge. By Lewis Jerome Johnson.
Arguments for preferential voting.

Volume 7. 1911-1912 [1913]

Thomas Wentworth Higginson Memorial. By Samuel W. McCall, Lucia Ames Mead, Samuel McChord Crothers, and Bliss Perry.

The Place of Judge Story in the Making of American Law. By Roscoe Pound.

An Historical Account of Some Bridges over the Charles River. By Lewis M. Hastings.
Brief Account of all bridges from the beginning to the construction of the Harvard Bridge. Invaluable map.

The Building of Holworthy Hall. By William Coolidge Lane.
The construction of a dormitory north and east of the older buildings is hailed aslooking “far into the future.”

A Petition of Dr. Daniel Stone. By William E. Stone.
Stone was a “chirurgeon” who lived at the corner of Dunster and Mount Auburn Streets unitil 1657. His geneology.

John Taylor Gilman Nichols, M.D., 1859-1911. By Oscar F. Allen.

Major-General Daniel Gookin. By Warner Foote Gookin.
Gookin was the Indian Commissioner in Massachusetts in the 1660’s and 1670’s.


Volume 8. 1913 [1914]

Thomas Wellington “of Cambridge,” His Ancestors and Some of His Descendants. By Albert Harrison Hall.
Includes an interesting map of early landholdings in Watertwon, once part of Cambridge. Much genealogy.

Merchants of Old Cambridge in the Early Days. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Fascinating backgrounds of Harvard Square and the firms doing business there: Kent’s Bookstore, Frank P. Merrill Company, Worcester Brothers, and many others, and their predecessors from the earliest days.


Volume 9, 1914 [1915]

Letters to Mrs. William Jenks, 1806-1813. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Good pictures of the first decade of the century.

A Letter from Thomas Hollis. By Archibald Murray Howe.
Written to Edmund Quincy, Jr., of Boston by an English benefactor of Harvard, October 1, 1766.

The Pocumtuck Valley memorial Association.
An account of its activities as suggestive of aims of local historical societies.

The Female Humane Society. By Mrs. Richard Henry Dana.
The Society was ancestor of the Cambridge Associated Charities. Extracts from the records.

Cambridge Grants and Families in Billericam 1641-1655. By A. Warren Stearns.
Detailed account of landholdings.


Volume 10. 1915 [1917] [1/2] [2/2]

Colonel Henry Vassal and His Wife Penelope Vassal. By Samuel Francis Batchelder.
Very detailed and most interesting. The Copley portraits, now owned by the Society, had just been purchased from a descendant in Philadelphia. Numerous Illustrations.

The Beginning of the First Church in Cambridge. By Hollis Russell Bailey.
Documentary paper on the Hooker-Shepard period.

Note on the Deacon’s Books of the First Church. By Henry Herbert Edes.

The Longfellow Prize Essay (“Descriptions of Nature in Longfellow’s Poems”) 1915. By Margaret Charlton Black.

Celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of Richard Henry Dana. By Bliss Perry, Moorfiled Storey and Joseph Hodges Choate.


Volume 11. 1916 [1920]

Letters of the Reverend Joseph Willard, President of Harvard, and of Some of His Children, 1794-1830. By Susanna Willard.
Travel, academic doings, and family life in the first quarter of the 1800’s.

Diary of Timothy Fuller, Jr., and Undergraduate in Harvard College, 1798-1801. By Edith Davenport Fuller.
“Miss Orne, Sam’s sister is very Pretty and Well-bred,” etc.

Early Cambridge Diaries. By Harriette M. Forbes.
Valuable list of early diaries. Many are described as “Unpublished” or “privately Owned.” Ownership in the latter case is not indicated, but a brief statement for the nature of the contents is given in all cases.


Volume 12. 1917 [1925]

Class Day, Commencement, and Phi Beta Kappa Day, 1829.
Programs and a Newspaper Abstract.

Archibald Murray Howe. By Samuel McCord Crothers.

Person Recollections of Dr. Morrill Wyman, Professor Dunbar, Professor Sophocles, and Professor Shaler. By Charles William Eliot.
A paper not to be missed for it flavor of Cambridge in the mid-century.

Longfellow Prize Essay for 1917. By Dorothy Henderson.


Volume 13. 1918 [1925]

No-License in Cambridge. By Frank Foxcroft.
By a prohibitionist.

Burgoyne and His Officers in Cambridge, 1777-1778. By Samuel Francis Batchelder.
Includes splendid map of Cambridge in 1777.

Gerry’s Landing and Its Neighborhood. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Principal families from the earliest times: Saltonstall, Vassall, Oliver, Coolidge, Thatcher, Gerry, Stone, White, Forbes, Webster.

The Schools of Cambridge, 1800-1870. By George Grier Wright.


Volume 14. 1818 [1926]

Celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of James Russell Lowell. By Charles Williem Eliot, Percy Mackaye (poem), and Bliss Perry.

The Streets of Cambridge, Their Origin and History. By Lewis Morey Hastings.
By the City Engineer, from old records. Begins wit records of the laying out of main roads; contains also a substantial list of dates of later streets and origins of their names. Section on “Early Maps and map-makers.” Reproduction of 1830 map.

English Homes of the Founders of Cambridge. By Joseph Gardner Bartlett.

The William Gray House in Cambridge. By Roland Gray.
About Mrs. Henry D. Tudor’s house. Williamm gray was Mrs. Tudor’s great-grandfather.

Mrs. Alexander and her Daughter Francesca. By Eunice Farley Felton.
Life in Florence of two interesting people, granddaughter and great-granddaughter of William Gray.

Elias Howe, Jr., Inventor of the Sewing Machine. By Percy H. Epler.
Thoroughly fascinating.


Volume 15. 1920-1921 [1931]

Printing in Cambridge since 1800. By Norman Hill White, Jr.

Roger Harlakenden. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
The original owner (d. 1638) of the property at the corner of Bond and Garden Streets occupied by Professor Munn’s House.

Joseph Foster and Shay’s Rebellion. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Foster was an early owner of the Riedesel house.

Gleanings from Early Cambridge Directories. By George Grier Wright.
Old firms, ancestors of later ones, and their locations. Harvard Branch Railroad.

Elmwood and its Owners. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.

Some Vital Errors in the Cambridge Vital Statistics. By Irma Adelaide Rich.
Deaths recorded on Cambridge grave stones are not necessarily those of births and deaths occurring in Cambridge.


Volume 16. 1922 [1931]

Two letters from John Adams to Rev. Joseh Willard. By Walter B. Briggs.
Getting John Quincy Adams into college.

The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Brief account of the home of the society.

The Old Hooper-Lee House. By Thomas Coppin Amory.

Two Hundred Years Ago. By Sophi Shuttleworth Sompson.
Complete reprinting of a children’s Christmas and birthday book originally published in 1859. Essentially a short history of Cambridge. Notes by Thomas Francin O’Malley.

On a Certain Deplorable Tendency. By Prescott Evarts.
About Sabbath non-observance.

Some Cambridge Physicians. By Henry Pickering Walcott.
Includes an account of the founding of the Cambridge Hospital.


Volume 17. 1923-24 [1931]

The History of the Third District Court of Eastern Middlesex. By Charles Almy.

The Origin and Nature of the Old Gravestones of the Cambridge Burial Yard. By Jay Backus Woodworth.
Where the stones were quarried.

Susanna Willard. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.

Gallows Hill, the Ancient Place of Execution. By Thomas Francis O’Malley.
Executions near Linnaean Street up to 1817.

The Ruggles-Fayerweather House. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.

Shady Hill and Its Owners. By Charles William Eliot.

The Story of the Bee. By Mary Towle Palmer.
The sewing circle started in 1861.

The Cambridge Indian Association. By Sarah R. Ames.
Founded 1886. The Indians were not Cambridge Indians.

The Beginnings of the First Parish in Cambridge. By Hollis Russell Bailey.


Volume 18. 1925 [1926]

Historical sketch of Charitable Societies in Cambridge. By Edwin Herbert Hall.

Quincy Street in the Fifties. By Lillian Horsford Farlow.
Invaluable, detailed account of houses and gardens.

The Washington Elm Tradition. By Samuel Francis Batchelder.

Volume 19. 1926 [1927]

Cambridge History in the Cambridge Schools. By Leslie Linwood Cleveland.

The Riverside Press. By James Duncan Phillips.

Early Glass Making in East Cambridge. By Doris Hayes-Cavanaugh.
An excellent account of this important industry.

Lieutenant George Inman. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Inman was an American who joined the British army. Extracts from Journals.

Volume 20. 1927, 1928, 1929 [1934]

Some Cambridge Reformers of the Eighties. By Philip Putnam Chase.
Especially good on William E. Russell and the Cleveland campaign, 1884.

Recollections of Sixty Years in Cambridge. By Ephram Emerton.

The Bates-Dana House. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Owners of the house that stood on the corner of Brattle Street Church Street.

One Hundred Years of Church Life. By William M. Macnair.
An account of the Prospect Congregational Church.

Early Cambridge Newspapers. By George Grier Wright.
A carefully documented account.

Reminiscences of Follen Street. By Maria Bowen.
Houses, street, and gardens from an early date.

The Value of Ancient Houses to a Community. By George Francis Dow.
Summary of an illustrated address.

Cambridge Physicians I Have Known. By Edmund H. Stevens.
Physicians practicing in 1871.

The John Hicks House. By Esther Stevens Fraser.
An Account of the reconstruction of the house carried out by the author.

Old North Cambridge. By Thomas Francis O’Malley.
Much about old hotels and taverns in and above Porter Square.

Volume 21. 1930-1931 [1936]

How Massachusetts Grew, 1630-1642. By Albert Harrison Hall.
The changing boundaries of the first towns. Thirteen maps.

Painted Decoration in Colonial Homes. By Esther Stevens Fraser.
Treats both painted furniture and painted walls, stenciling, landscaping, and floral decoration. Eleven plates.

A History of Berkeley Street. By Alice C. Allyn.

William Coolidge Lane. By Walter B. Briggs.
Lane’s Career as Harvard College Librarian.

Prescott Evarts. By Joseph H. Beale.
Brief appreciation of the Rector of Christ Church.

The Vassal House. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi, Elizabeth Ellery Dana, and David Pittinger.
The owners and the house fully treated.

Thomas Oliver. By Oliver Elton.
Summary of a longer paper.

President Cornelius Conway Felton. By Eunice W. F. Felton.
Brief notice by his daughter-in-law.

Volume 22 1932-1933 [1937]

The History of Local Government in Cambridge. By Joseph Henry Beale.
Comparison of government in 1635 and 1845.

John Burgoyne: Politician, Dandy, and Man of Letters. By David T. Pottinger.

Sparks Street. By Marie Bowen, Mary Deane Dexter, and Rosalbe Smith Proell.
People and houses.

Cambridge Land Holdings Traced from the Proprieters’ Records of 1635. By Albert P. Norris.
Account of land holdings up into the eighteenth century. Two very detailed maps.

The Distaff Side of the Ministerial Succession in the First Parish Church in Cambridge. By Julia Baynard Pickard Bailey.

Old Cambridge. By David T. Pottinger.

The Browns and Nichols School. By W. Rodman Peabody.


Volume 23. 1934-1935 [1937]

Christ Church, Cambridge. By John Perkins Brown.

Thirty-Eight Quincy Street. By David T. Pottinger.
The house designed by Henry Greenough which stood on the corner of Broadway.

Extracts from the Reminicences of Isabella Batchelder James. By Mary Isabella Gozzaldi.
Life in the 1820’s, 1830’s, and 1840’s. Fascinating. Separate section on James Russell Lowell by Mrs. James.

Mr. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. By Samuel Atkins Eliot.

Mary Isabella Gozzaldi. By Fanny Elizabeth Corne. A brief account of her life.

Kirkland Place. By Frances Fowler.

Volume 24. 1936-1937 [1938]

How Cambridge People Used to Travel. By Lois Lilley Howe.
Vivid letters of the 1830’s and 1840’s chiefly by Harriet Spelman Howe. Coach, rain, canal boat, and ocean sailing ship.

How the First Parish in Cambridge Got a new Meeting-House. By G. Frederick Robinson.
A Cambridge-Waterton dispute in the 1750’s.

Early Quakers in Cambridge. By Henry J. Cadbury.
Rough treatment given traveling quakers in the 1600’s.

William Brewster, 1851-1919. By Glover M. Allen.
Life and Character of the ornithologist.

Bits of Russian Court Life in the Seventies. By Stroughton Bell.
Letter by Mr. Bell’s aunt, Louise Stoughton.


Volume 25. 1938-1939 [1939]

Chronicles of the Craige House: the Coming of Longfellow. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.
Longfellow’s early days in the house, 1837-1841.

The Origin of the New England Town. By Joseph Henry Beale.

The Preservation of Historic Houses. By Samuel Atkins Eliot.

Cooperation between Schools and Local Historical Societies. By Edwin B. Worthen.

The Observatory of Harvard College and Its Early Founders. By Elizabeth L. Bond.
Life and work of William Cranch Bond and George Phillips Bond, father and son.

The Fayerweather House. By Mrs. James Lowell Moore.
Mrs. Moore’s family owned the house from 1827 to 1907.A vivid account.

55 Garden Street. By Lois Lilley Howe.
One of the Garden Street houses now occupied by Radcliffe College.

Charles Folsom and the McKeans. By Sarah McKean Folsom Enebuske.
Literary circles in the 1850’s and 1860’s.

“Information, Please!”By Samuel Atkins Eliot.
Questions on Cambridge history.

Dr. Estes Howe: A Citizen of Cambridge. By Lois Lilley Howe.
One of the most interesting papers in the whole series.The life of Miss Howe’s father touched many aspects of Cambridge life from the 1830’s to the 1880’s.

Volume 26. 1940 [1941]

Some Cambridge Pundits and Pedagogues. By Samuel Atkins Eliot.
Among others: Andrew Preston Peabody, Professor Sophocles, Alexander Agassiz, Francis James Child, Justin Winsor, Charles Eliot Norton.

Victorian Houses in Old Cambridge. By Roger Gilman.
Styles from Greek Revival to late Richardson, illustrated by sixteen photographs.

The Gardens and Houses of the Loyalists. By Rupert Ballou Lillie.

The Dana Saga. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.
The family and its houses, 1640-1940.


Volume 27. 1941 [1942]

The Beginnings of the Art Department and of the Fogg Museum of Art at Harvard. By Edward W. Forbes.

Sundry Observations Upon Four Decades of the Harvard College Library. By Walter B. Briggs.

The Craigies. By Frederick Haven Pratt.
By a descendant. Contains the “cellar-stair letters” relating to Andrew Craigie’s unacknowledged daughter.

Craigie Exhibition. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.
Comments on portraits, letters, silver.

Volume 28. 1942 [1943]

Thomas Fuller and His Descendants. By Arthur B. Nichols.
Thomas Fuller died 1698.His great-great-great granddaughter was Margaret Fuller.

The Wyeth Background. By Roger Gilman.
Cambridge enterprise: the ice business and migration west.

All Aboard the “Natwyethum.” By Samuel Atkins Eliot.
Nathaniel Wyeth’s overland expedition to Oregon in the 1830’s.

Longfellow and Dickens. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.

The Centenary of the Cambridge Book Club. By Lois Lilley Howe and Francis Greenwood Peabody.


Volume 29. 1943 [1948]

Allston at Harvard, 1796 to 1800. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.

Allston in Cambridgeport, 1830 to 1843. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.

An Excommunication in Harvard Square. By Willard Reed.
Deacon Hillard’s wife was excommunicated in 1809.

Volume 30. 1944 [1945]

Harvard Square in the ‘Seventies and ‘Eighties. By Lois Lilley Howe.
A real gem both for its lively style and its fund of information on the buildings and businesses of Harvard Square.Illustrations, and magnificent map by Miss Howe.

Thomas Dudley, Founder of Cambridge. By Laura Howland Dudley.
A Very carefully prepared biographical account of Dudley.

The Disloyalty of Dr. Benjamin Church, Jr.By Maude B. Vosburgh.
Church was Surgeon General and in Cambridge when his disloyalty was discovered in 1775.

Autobiography of Edward Sherman Dodge.Read by Lois Lilley Howe.
Lively reminiscences of the 1860’s.


Volume 31. 1945 [1948]

Reminiscences of Cambridge. By Mrs. Samuel McChord Crothers.
Delightful picture of people and life about 1900.

Windmill Lane to Ash Street. By Roger Gilman.
Valuable for architectural notes on Ash Street houses.

A Child in a New England Colonial Garden. By Mrs. Isabella Gozzaldi.
The Vassal House garden.

The Story of a Lost Brook. By Lois Lilley Howe and Mrs. Edward S. King.
Topography of the Craigie-Berkeley-Street neighborhood.

Historical Sketch of the First Church in Cambridge (Unitarian). By Mrs. Florence Russell Gerould.

Volume 32. 1946-1948 [1949]

Maria Denny Fay’s Letters from England, 1851-1852. By Lois Lilley Howe.
Maria Fay, daughter of Judge Samuel Fay of Fay House, was visiting her brother then living at Moore Park in England.

The Romance of Street Names in Cambridge. By Frances H. Eliot.

Memories of the Berkeley Street School. By Elizabeth B. Piper.
This famous girls’ school was founded in 1862 by Mr. Lyman Richards Williston.

Cambridge, the Focal Point of Puritan Life.By Henry Hallam Saunderson.
The Puritans as builders for the future.

Some Musical Memories of Cambridge. By Samuel A. Eliot.

The History of Coolidge Hill. By Rosamond Coolidge.
Extremely interesting account of a corner of Cambridge that remained rural almost to the present.

A Significant Cambridge Anniversary. By Samuel A. Eliot.
Remarks on the Cambridge Synod of 1648.

A Tribute to Frank Gaylord Cook. By Robert Walcott.

Volume 33. 1949-1950 [1953]

The Dana-Palmer House. By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana.
Extended account of those who lived in the house which now stands in front of the Harvard Faculty Club on Quincy Street.

The History of Garden Street. By Lois Lilley Howe.
Most interesting survey, house by house.

The Owners of Elmwood. By Lucy Kingsley Porter.

Cambridge Trees. By Lois Lilley Howe.
A record of fine specimens in the Brattle Street neighborhood.Illustrated.

The Early Life of Samuel McChord Crothers. By Katharine F. Crothers.

Charles William Eliot: Anecdotal Reminisces. By Jerome D. Greene.
Especially the early years of Mr. Greene’s association with Eliot as secretary to the President.

Historical Associations of Charlestown and Cambridge.By Charles F. Whiting.

Eldon Revere James. By David T. Pottinger.

Maude Batchelder Vosburgh. By David T. Pottinger.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana. By Robert Walcott.

Volume 34. 1951-1952 [1954]

Lawrence Lowell, President. By Julian Lowell Coolidge.
Lowell’s contribution to strengthening the college.

From a Dana Hill Widow. By Helen Ingersoll Tetlow.
The life of Henry Francis Harrington, Pastor of the Lee Street Church, 1854-1864.

Four Years at Harvard College, 1888-1892. By Charles Lane Hanson.
Recalls Professors Cooke, Shaler, Child, Hill, Royce, and others

Memories of Nineteenth-Century Cambridge. By Lois Lilley Howe.
Picture of life on Kirkland Street in the 1870’s and 1880’s.

Mount Auburn’s Sixscore Years. By Oakes I. Ames.
Contains important contributions to the history of horticulture in Massachusetts.

Frederick Hastings Rindge. By John W. Wood.
Donor of the Manual Training School, the Cambridge Public Library, the City Hall.Rindge’s family history is extraordinary.

Cambridge, a Pioneer Home of Electronics. By Harold B. Richmond.
John Stone Stone, pioneer in radio manufacture, and followers in electronics.

A Tribute to Samuel Atkins Eliot. By Louis Lilley Howe.


Volume 35. 1953-1954 [1955]

Early History of Cambridge Ornithology. By Ludlow Griscom.

The Cambridge Plant Club. By Lois Lilley Howe, Marion Jessie Dunham, Mrs. Robert Goodale, Mary B. Smith, and Edith Sloan Griscom.

The Agassiz School. By Edward Waldo Forbes.
The famous school for girls conducted by Professor and Mrs. Agassiz in their Quincy Street house.Letters by Ellen Emerson and others.

Forty Years in the Fogg Museum. By Laura Dudley Saunderson.
Mrs. Saunderson joined the Fogg Museum in 1897, two years after its founding and retired only in 1939.

Cambridgeport: a Brief History. By John W. Wood.

Pages from the History of the Cambridge High and Latin School. By Cecil Thayer Derry.
Its descent from Elijah Corlett, first schoolmaster in the 1640’s.

I, too, in Arcadia. By David T. Pottinger.
Delightful recollections of student days at Harvard.


Volume 36. 1955-1956 [1957]

The Story of the Episcopal Theological School. By Charles L. Taylor.

The Curtain-Raiser to the Founding of Radcliffe College. By Mary Hume Maguire.
Courses for women offered under Harvard auspices before the founding of Radcliffe.

The Y.W.C.A in Cambridge. By Francis Cooper-Marshal Donovan.

The Harvard Divinity School as I Have Known It. By Henry Wilder Foote.

Fire in Cambridge. By Southworth Lancaster.
Firefighting from the earliest times.

Some Aspects of the East Cambridge Story. By John W. Wood.
Among other topics, the story of the glass industry in Cambridge.

The Founder and Three Editors of the Cambridge Chronicle. By Eliot B. Spalding.


Volume 37. 1957-1958 [1959]

Notes on Some Tory Row Land Titles. By William L. Payson.

A History of Inns and Hotels in Cambridge. By Chauncey DePew Steele, Jr.

Artemas Ward and the Siege of Boston. By Catharine Kerlin Wilder.

A House and Three Centuries. By Arthur Eugene Sutherland.
This is the fullest account available of the home of the society, the Lee-Nichols House, 159 Brattle Street, and of the families who have lived in it.

Thomas Wentworth Higginson: His Ante-Bellum Years. By Tilden G. Edelstein.

The George G. Wright Collection. By F. Stuart Crawford.

David Thomas Pottinger. By Arthur Eugene Sutherland.

Volume 38. 1959-1960 [1961]

The Cost of a Harvard Education in the Puritan Period.By Margery S. Foster.
Based on the College Stewards’ records; gives many interesting sidelights on early student life.

The Harvard Branch Railroad, 1849-1855. By Robert W. Lovett.
Thorough account of this short-lived enterprise, with a map and a reproduction of a contemporary advertisement.

Recollections of the Cambridge Social Dramatic Club. By Richard W. Hall.
With a list of plays performed by seasons, 1890-1950.Also discusses the earlier Cambridge Dramatic Club.

Natural History at Harvard College, 1788-1842. By Jeanette E. Graustein.
Natural sciences at Harvard in the days of Waterhouse, Peck, and Nuttall.

The Reverend Jose Glover and the Beginnings of the Cambridge Press. By John A. Harrer.
The printing of the Cambridge Platform of Church Discipline, 1649, with an account of the nine known copies and illustrations showing the four slightly differing states.

The Evolution of Cambridge Heights. By Laura Dudley Saunderson.
Reminiscences and an account of the building up of the area above Linnaean Street.

The Avon Home. By Eileen G. Meany.
The operation of an actual home for children from 1874 to 1913, and a social agency since.

Bremer Whidden Pond. By Lois Lilley Howe.

Volume 39. 1961-1963 [1964]

Colonel Richardson and the Thirty-Eighth Massachusetts. By Richard C. Evarts.
Volunteers in the Civil War.

The Charles River Basin. By Charles W. Eliot 2nd.
Various aspects of the Charles River, with an historical map.

The Founding of the Mount Auburn Hospital. By James B. Ames.
Antecedents, founding, and early years of the Cambridge Hospital, now the Mount Auburn Hospital.

The History and Restoration of the Wallpaper in the Emerson House in Cambridge. By William J. Young.
With illustrations of the “Bay of Naples” wallpaper.

Cambridge Court Houses. By Charles S. Bolster.
Traces the history of successive court houses, both in the Harvard Square area and East Cambridge; with an 1811 map of East Cambridge and a mid-nineteenth century view of the court house.

The First Cambridge Historical Commission. By Rosamond Coolidge Howe.
Early history of the Cambridge Historical Commission.

Horse Car, Trolley, and Subway. By Foster M. Palmer.
Street railways and rapid transit in Cambridge, with an 1862 map. [A view of around 1900 is mislabeled 1890.]

The Topographical Development of Cambridge, 1793-1896. By Wendell d. Garrett.
The transformation from a village, then three villages, to a solidly built up city, with illustrations and an Embankment company plan.

The Cambridge Boat Club. By Ralph May.
Also covers the earlier Casino.

The Boston Tea Party and the American Revolution. By Benjamin W. Labaree.
Background and affects of the incident.


Volume 40. 1964-1966 [1967]

The Devil and Daniel Shays. By Robert A. Feer.
Rejects the theory that Shays’ Rebellion was fomented by Tories, or by conservatives who wished to show the need for a strong central government.

Boston Woven Hose and Rubber Company: Eighty-Four Years in Cambridge. By Alden S. Foss.
With interesting sidelights on bicycle racing and the Broad Canal.

The Middlesex Canal. By Brenton H. Dickson.
The rise and fall of the canal era, with information on other New England canals as well.

Lydia’s Conversion: An Issue in Hooker’s Departure.By Norman Pettit.
The theological background of an historical event.

Robert Frost of Brewster Village. By Erastus H. Hewitt.
An interesting view of the poet by a Brewster Street neighbor.

The Discovery of the Charles River by the Vikings According to the Book of Horsford. By Wendell D. Garrett.
A review of Professor Horsford’s scientific career as well as his theories concerning Leif Ericson and Norumbega.

Behind the Scenes at 47 Workshop. By Elizabeth W. Bolster.
With reminisces of Thomas Wolfe among others.

Jonathan Sewall: A Lawyer in Conflict. By Hiller B. Zobel.
The Boston Massacre and various slavery cases.

Seventy-Five Years of Continuing Education: The Prospect Union Association. By Zelda Lions and Gordon W. Allport.
The contributions to adult education of both the original Prospect Union, which conducted actual classes, and the later Educational Exchange, which offers a referral service.

A Historical Perspective. By David B. Potts.
Further discussion of the Prospect Union.

Volume 41. 1967-1969 [1970]

The Life Story of Cambridge Water. By John F. Davis.
Cambridge waterworks and water distribution, past and present.

Francis Avenue and the Norton Estate: The Development of a Community. By Charles F. Whiting.
A general history, with a useful appendix listing occupants of houses over the years.

Rambling Notes on the Cambridge Trust Company; or Tales of a Wayside Bank. By George A. Macomber.
History with anecdotes.

The Murder Trial of Dr. Webster, Boston 1850. By Robert Sullivan.
A preview of the author’s magisterial book on the subject, evaluating the trila critically by today’s standards.

The Musical Scene at Harvard. By Elliot Forbes.
A lively historical summary, complemented by observations from the author’s own experience.

Eighty-Five Aromatic Years in Harvard Square. By Catharine K. Wilder.
A history of Leavitt & Peirce, tobacconists and Harvard rendezvous.

The Harvard Law School’s Oldest Houses. By Arthur E. Sutherland.
College House No. 2, Dane Hall, Austin Hall, and Gannett House, with much general history of the Law School and an aside on and hitherto unpublished daguerreotype of Henry Hobson Richardson.

The Class of 1903. By Richard C. Evarts.
Reminiscences of the Peabody Grammar School at the turn of the century, including classmate Conrad Aiken.

College Redbooks and the Changing Social Mores. By Priscilla Gough Treat.
Sixty years of change at Radcliffe, as reflected in Redbooks.

From Lover’s Lane to Sparks Street. By Penelope Barker Noyes.
Reminiscences of her neighborhood and early years, by Justin Winsor’s granddaughter.


Volume 42. 1970-1972 [1978]

The History of the Utilities in Cambridge. By Harding U. Greene.

Where the Old Professors Lived. By Esther Lanman Cushman.

Cambridge Historical Commission: Progress and Prospects. By Robert Bell Rettig.

MIT in Cambridge, 1911-1970. By O. Robert Simha.

The Romance of Brick. By G. Burton Long.

A 125th Anniversary: From Village, Town, City, to ?. By Charles W. Eliot 2nd.

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Shepard. By David C. Dow, M.D.

The Harvard University Archives: A Source of Cambridge History. By Harley P. Holden.

A School for All Seasons. By Jeanette Palache Barker.


Volume 43. 1973-1975 [forthcoming]

Around the Top of The Hill: Houses and Neighbors. By Charles W. Eliot 2nd.

Brattle Street: A Resume of American Residential Architecture, 1673-1973. By Bainbridge Bunting.

Louis Agassiz and the Founding of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. By Bryan Patterson.

The Historical Development of Cambridge Common. By Paul J. Lewis.

Cambridge 1774-1779—Inspiration for 1974-1979. By Albert B. Wolfe.

The Story of the Window Shop. By Mrs. Oliver Cope.

The First Church in Cambridge, Congregational, 1633-1636: Some Events in Its Life. By Joseph Chamberlain.

The Medical Botany of the New England Area: 1782-1842. By Dr. G Edmund Gifford, Jr.

Fort Washington, 1775-1975, and Other Cambridge Fortifications.By Douglas Adams and Charles Sullivan.

Historic Books and Resource Materials for “Slide-show on Cambridge History.”By Joseph W. Chamberlain and Charles W. Eliot 2nd.

Lois Lilley Howe, Fellow, American Institute of Architects. By Elizabeth W. Reinhardt.

Volume 44. 1976-1979

Let Us Remember: A Cambridge Boyhood. By Dan Huntington Fenn.

Life in the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House: The Emerson and Dow Years. By Sterling Dow.

Newtowne, 1630-1636. By G. B. Warden.

Cambridge as Printer and Publisher: Fame, Oblivion, and Fame Again. By Max Hall.

Observations on Cambridge City Government under Plan E. By Edward A. Crane.

Recollections of the First Parish in 1905-1906.Elizabeth Woodman Wright.

Jared Sparks and His House. By Peter J. Gomes.

Radcliffe’s First Century. By Carolyn Stetson Ames.

Lakeview Avenue: Early History, Architecture, and Residents. By Patricia H. Rodgers.

Putting the Past in Place: The Making of Mount Auburn Cemetery. By Blanche Linden-Ward.


Volume 45. 1980-1985

(Note:This volume is not available online; however printed books can be obtained –email us at info@historycambridge.org)

Remembrance: Charles W. Eliot 2nd. By Charles M. Sullivan.

The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House: An Architectural History. By Anne A. Grady.

The Cambridge YMCA: 100 Years of Service. By Burdette A. Johnson.

George H. Browne of Browne & Nichols. By Thomas H. Eliot.

The Suburban Architecture of Dana Hill. By Arthur Krim.

Longfellow in Perspective. By Edward Wagenknecht.

A View Through the Lens: Photography and Cambridge, 1844-1906. By Patricia Rodgers.

Eben Norton Horsford, The Northmen, and the Founding of Massachusetts. By Richard R. John.

H.H Richardson in Cambridge. By. M. David Samson.

A Pioneer in Women’s Education: From Moorhead, Minnesota, to Cambridge, Massachusetts, With Ada Louise Comstock. By Barbara Miller Solomon.

Harvard Architecture: Integration Through Innovation at the Edges. By Margaret Henderson Floyd.

Index to the Proceedings

Download the complete Index here. [PDF]

Skip to a section of the index by using these links:

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | XYZ

Foreword

As might be expected, the forty-four volumes of Proceedings (1905-1979) covered by this index provide a solid background of history: the landing at and settlement of “Newtown[e]”; the allotment of land and establishment—and later alteration—of town boundaries; the organization and division of churches; the effects of war, from the early Indian struggles and the Revolutionary War to the Vietnam conflict; the growth of and changes in population; the rise and decline and subsequent revival of industry. Along with this, from almost the very beginning, runs the history of Harvard; “town and gown” have shared many of the same problems, and each has profoundly affected the other.

All this is enlivened by first-hand accounts from diaries and letters and recollections by people who were there while it was happening. For example:

In the 1630s, Governor Winthrop reprimands Lieutenant-Governor Dudley for “extravagance” in wainscoting his new house, to which Dudley replies that it was done “for warmth…and the charge was” We hear of a “student rebellion” at Harvard in the 1660s, apparently over religious matters; 300 years later the issues are different but the sentiments are the same. An exchange of correspondence between General Heath and General Burgoyne in 1777 reflects their frustrations in attempting to provide decent accommodations for the “Convention Troops” held prisoner in Cambridge.

Written in 1827 to her son Stephen, Louisa Storrow Higginson’s letters (read by a younger son, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, in 1906 at the sixth meeting of the newly formed Society) paint a vivid picture of family life—with ten children of her own and two stepdaughters, she says of a neighbor’s sick child, “he is a dear little boy and I longed to have him for my own to take care of.” Four companies of Harvard students guard the Arsenal in 1861, this task being taken over by the Washington Home Guard during the draft riots of 1863. In the late 1890s Miss Sarah Palfrey daringly purchases a tricycle, for which a sort of slipcover is contrived outside the pedals so that she can ride without showing her ankles. Many Cambridge “characters” are recalled, with amusement and affection.

Times and customs continue to change, as shown perhaps most succinctly by the history of Radcliffe and by its “Redbooks,” first issued in 1907. The horse-drawn railway is replaced by trolley lines; the automobile comes upon the scene. Historic preservation, always a concern of the Society, becomes a public issue in the 1960s and 1970s.

These samples hint at only a very few of the treasures buried within some seventy-five years and 5500 pages of CHS papers. If the index which follows leads the user to find others, it will have served its purpose. —Ruth Canedy Cross

Indexer’s Note

All references are identified first by volume number, followed by page number or numbers: for example, a series such as 13:81, 92; 14:34, 68, 71n3; 16:18, 75, refers to pages 81 and 92 of Volume 13; pages 34, 68, and note 3 on page 71 of Volume 14; and so on.

Volume 37 (Proceedings for 1957-1958) was misnumbered on both cover and title page as Volume 36; it has been referred to throughout this index as if it were correctly numbered. (The correctly numbered Volume 36 is for 1955-1956, Volume 38 for 1959-1960).

Paige’s HISTORY OF CAMBRIDGE, by way of Mrs. Gozzaldi’s invaluable Supplement and Index, has frequently supplied names and dates not otherwise readily available.

As to titles: to avoid confusion, “Dr.” is used only for physicians; doctors of divinity are referred to by the lesser title of “Rev.” Where a clergyman or a physician is also a professor or a dean, both titles are given. “Prof.” usually means a Harvard professor, unless otherwise indicated. “Deacon” is used for purposes of identification, usually to differentiate between two men of the same name. In most cases, military titles are considered sufficient identification; if the officer has another title, such as “Gov.” or “Sir,” it is supplied where known. Governors, unless otherwise stated, are of Massachusetts; mayors, of Cambridge.

Occasionally a name is given incorrectly in the text, as Gen. “Richard” Lee instead of Gen. Charles. In such cases, the incorrect name is also listed, but cross-referenced to the correct one.

A person like [Sarah] Margaret Fuller who is better known by the second (given) name is listed alphabetically under both names—in this instance under both “M” and “S”—but with the pertinent information appearing under the more familiar term.

Married women are usually listed under their husbands’ names. Exceptions may occur, as in the case of a woman who married more than once or whose father’s family is under discussion.

Edward James’s knowledge of Cambridge history and his painstaking scrutiny of every line of this index have added immeasurably to its value. If any errors have escaped his attention, they are of course the responsibility of the indexer.

—Ruth Canedy Cross

A

Aalto, Alvar (1898-1961; Finnish architect), 42:62
Abattoir, see Business and industry (slaughter houses)
Abbot, see also Abbott
Abbot, Miss Anne (founder of boys’ club; lived to be 100), 21:66, 67
Abbot, Anne Theresa, see Morison, Mrs. Robert Swain
Abbot, Mrs. E. (member of charitable organizations, 1860s, 1870s), 9:66; 39:44
Abbot, Edwin H. (builds Follen St. house, 1884), 18:41; 20:101; 33:49
Abbot, Elizabeth (Mrs. Gorham; later Mrs. David Wood), 10:189
Abbot, Elizabeth Warland, see Warland, Elizabeth
Abbot. Emily, see Vaughan, Mrs. Abbot
Abbot, Prof. Ezra (1819-1884; Bible scholar), 21:66: 27:37; 36:65
Abbot, Mrs. Ezra, 21:66
Abbot, Rev. Francis Ellingwood (1836-1903; philosopher), 42:118-19, 122
Abbot, Frank (Harvard 1859), 3:34
Abbot, George Jacob (Harvard 1835; schoolmaster, government official), 5:45; 12:68

– E. E. Hale letter to (1845), 4:92-93 Abbot, Mrs. George Jacob (Ann Taylor Gilman Emery), 12:68; 35:18 Abbot, Gen. Henry L. (1831-1927), 21:66 Abbot, Rev. Jacob (of New Hampshire, early 1800s), 12:68 Abbot, Dr. John (c. 1800), 11:17n1 Abbot, Mrs. John, see Warland, Elizabeth Abbot, Judge Josiah G. (1850s), 7:12 Abbot, Julia Webster, see Nichols, Mrs. Edgar H. Abbot, Miss May (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 21:67 Abbot, Robert (landowner, 1600s), 8:19 Abbot, Stanley (killed at Gettysburg, 1863), 18:41 Abbot, Wiggin (killed on Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:46, 47 Abbot family, 21:65; 25:107 Abbott, see also Abbot Abbott, Adelaide, see Pottinger, Mrs. William Abbott, Carrie Frances (1854-1909): obituary, 10:169 Abbott, Prof. Charles C. (Holden St. resident, 1953-54), 41:38 Abbott, Mrs. Charles C. Whiting), 41:38 Abbott, Daniel (landowner, 1635) (Map 1) Abbott, Rev. Edward (1841-1908), 20:88

– obituary, 10:169-70 Abbott, Mrs. Edward (Clara Davis, first wife), 10:170 Abbott, Mrs. Edward (Katherine Kelley, second wife), 10:170 Abbott, Edward Apthorp (son of Rev. Edward), 10:170 Abbott, Eleanor Hallowell (b. c. 1870; author), 10:170; 26:122n104 Abbott, Jacob (of Maine, c. 1800), 10:169 Abbott, Mrs. Jacob (Harriet Vaughan), 10:169 Abbott, Rev. Jacob (1803-1879; author of children’s books), 22:49 Abbott, Katharine M. (writer, 1901), 39:99n64 Abbott, Rev. Lyman (1835-1922), 17:87; 34:44; 40:145 Abbott, Madeline Vaughan (b. c. 1870), 10:170 Abbott, Mary Eleanor, see Gleason, Mrs. Mary Eleanor Abbott Abbott, W. C. (1940s), 26:54n54 Abbot[t] (Harvard 1801; friend of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:35, 43, 48, 49, 52 Abbott, Mr. (reader at Christ Church, 1807), 9:23, 28, 31, 37; 21:103 Abbott, Professor (c. 1810), 9:18, 23, 37

– “Abe the Cobbler,” 42:118, 119. See also Cambridge “characters” Aberdeen Avenue, 14:63; 39:97; 42:37 Aberthaw (construction) Company, 39:136 Abigail (ship), 33:141 Abingdon, Massachusetts, 39:15 Abolitionism, see Slavery Abraham, Ferdinand (tobacco merchant, 1880s), 41:111 Acacia Street, 21:111, 112; 31:29, 31, 38; 33:96 Academy of Music (Boston), see Music (schools of) Academy of Natural Sciences (Philadelphia), 28:38; 43:132; 44:125 Acadian exiles, 10:25n1; 28:89; 33:161 Accidents

– automobile (1915), 11:87; 33:55

– railroad and street railway, 24:32; 39:83

– runaway carriage, 44:131

– sleigh overturns, 18:28

– See also Death Account books, see Expenses Ackermann, Barbara (city councillor), 44:98 Acme Apparatus Company, 34:121 Acorn (ship), 37:84 Acton, Massachusetts, 21:39n1 Actors/actresses, see Theatre Acts of Trade, see Trade and commerce Acworth, A. W. (British writer, 1949), 33:61n19 AD Club, see Club(s) (at Harvard) Adams, Abigail Smith, see Adams, Mrs. John Adams, Abijah (tried for sedition, 1799), 11:40 Adams, Anna, see Hay, Mrs. Richard Adams, Annie see Fields, Mrs. James T. Adams, Dr. Benjamin F. D. (of Waltham, 1870s), 20:109 Adams, Brooks (1848-1927; historian), 5:16; 23:34, 41 Adams, Mrs. Brooks (Evelyn (“Daisy”] Davis), 23:34, 39, 41 Adams, Charles Francis (1807-1886; diplomat), 10:137, 145; 23:27, 84; 34:19; 36:27; 44:178

– as ambassador to England, 26:93n61

– edits works of John Adams, 40:125-30nn13-22 passim, 135

– naming of, 26:92-93

– as vice-presidential candidate, 10:136, 147 Adams, Charles Francis, Jr. (1835-1915; historian ), 3:36

– as presidential candidate, 20:34

– writings of, 5:13-14

– – – biography of Dana, 10:140, 151, 154, 165; 20:60; 26:93n61, 100n69, 110-15 passim, 119n103; 33:13n17 Adams, Charles Francis [3d] (Harvard Corporation member, early 20th c.), 33:131 Adams, Chary (Mrs. Jonathan Stone; later Mrs. Thomas Wellington; later Mrs. James Lane; d. 1764), 8:21, 22, 23 Adams, Prof. Comfort Avery (Farrar St. resident, 1894-1921), 41:37 Adams, Mrs. Comfort Avery (Elizabeth Parsons), 41:37 Adams, Prof. Douglas Payne (d. 1975): and Fort Washington, 43:141, 143-44, 146 Adams, Miss Emily (teacher, c. 1910), 32:47 Adams, Frances P. (of New Hampshire; buys Lake View Ave. house, 1879), 44:165 Adams, Rev. George M. (historian, 1895), 40:98n6 Adams, Hannah (1755-1831; author), 34:88; 43:124 Adams, Henry (of Braintree, d. 1646), 14:103 Adams, Henry (of Quincy, 1640s; ancestor of presidents), 21:79 Adams, Henry (1838-1918; historian), 14:21; 20:33; 23:68; 33:71n46; 34:8, 44; 44:31

– quoted (on Harvard), 34:56-57 Adams, Mrs. Henry (Marian [“Clover”] Hooper), 35:39 Adams, Henry (son of Charles F., Jr.; 1940s), 26:93n61 Adams, Herbert Baxter (1850-1901; historian), 44:128n5, 130, 135 Adams, Dr. Horatio (of Waltham, mid-1800s), 20:109 Adams, Prof, and Mrs. James Luther (Francis Ave. residents, 1960s), 41:32 Adams, Jeremy (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91 Adams, Jerry (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1) Adams, John (of Braintree; bap. 1622), 14:103 Adams, John (1735-1826; U.S. president 1796-1800), 3:56, 67, 68n1; 9:41; 16:78; 26:82; 30:55, 69; 37:52, 57; 40:12, 20n24; 42:108

– as ambassador, 3:59, 76; 4:23; 10:159; 16:14-17, 130; 26:87-88, 89; 38:73; 43; 128

– and Constitution, 43:87

– diary of, 3:57; 30:51-52; 40:128n15

– as lawyer, 3:57; 30:52, 54; 33:70; 40:127, 129, 130

– letters of, 26:81, 90; 33:71

– – – to Morse (1815), 10:43n2

– – – about and to Washington (1775, 1776), 3:58; 18:49, 50, 60; 26:84-85; 37:53-54, 55

– – – to Waterhouse (c. 1825), 16:129-30

– – – to Willard (1784, 1785), 16:14-17 (and illus.)

– portrait of, 4:31

– as president, 3:57, 61; 13:85; 15:43; 26:83, 92; 33:73

– – – criticism of, 11:45

– quoted, 18:49; 33:71

– – – on appeasement, 30:70

– – – on Church (Benjamin), 30:48

– – – on Danas (Francis, Richard), 3:58; 26:83, 84-85

– – – on government and law, 6:70-71; 7:45

– – – on Sewall (Judge Jonathan), 37:19; 40:125, 126, 127

– – – on Sons of Liberty and Caucus Club, 3:57; 30:51-52

– – – on tobacco, 16:130

– and slavery, 10:70n5; 40:131-32

– statue of, 34:89, 90

– on treaty commission board (1784), 5:94

– wife’s letters to, see Adams, Mrs. John Adams, Mrs. John (Abigail Smith), 17:57; 37:53, 55; 40:12; 42:108

– letters of, 5:68n6; 16:5; 18:62-63; 26:90, 93 Adams, John Quincy (1767-1848; U.S. president 1824-28), 3:20, 56; 4:29, 32; 28:65; 29:46; 33:16; 42:108

– as ambassador, 26:93

– diary of, 26:92-93; 28:22, 23

– as Harvard professor, 4:15; 25:104

– letters of, 15:43; 16:14-15; 34:19

– portrait of, 4:31

– as president, 4:21; 26:88; 28:23; 29:78

– visits Europe and Asia, 4:23; 16:14-15, 16, 17; 21:85; 26:88; 43:128

– Waterhouse letters to, 4:15-17, 21-22; 29:21n24 Adams, Mrs. John Quincy (Louisa Catherine Johnson), 28:23 Adams, Deacon Joseph (committee member, 1785), 17:47 Adams, Martha, see Wellington, Mrs. Joseph, Jr. (first wife) Adams, Maude (1872-1953; actress), 42:115 Adams, Capt. Nathan (Charlestown house burned; occupies Henry Vassall house, 1777), 10:54, 58; 13:58, 65; 21:101 Adams, Rev. Nehemiah, Jr. (b. 1806; at Shepard Church 1831-34), 3:80; 42:97n2; 43:121, 124 Adams, Randolph G. (author, 1937), 26:82n42 Adams, Sally, see Cushman, Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Samuel (1722-1803; statesman), 1:39; 26:85, 87; 30:49, 62; 37:49, 57; 39:153, 155

– and Battle of Lexington, 9:75; 13:85

– opposes Constitution, 3:61

– and Revolutionary committees and clubs, 5:22; 13:85; 26:81, 82; 30:51, 52, 54, 56; 33:69

– as “Vindex,” 40:127-28 Adams, Silsbee (of Ipswich, late 1800s), 21:79 Adams, Suzanne (opera singer, 1890s), 33:44 Adams, Theodore P. (Latin teacher 1869-1906; d. aet. 103), 35:104-5 Adams, Thomas (son of William; b. 1631), 21:79 Adams, William (landowner, 1635; d. in Ipswich, 1661)

– descendants of, 5:52

– house built by (94 Brattle St.), 6:19; 21:78-79, 82; 31:37 (see also Vassall houses and land [Henry Vassall]) Adams, Rev. William (Cambridge Book Club, 1839), 28:115 Adams (Harvard 1763; social position of), 10:30n1 Adams, Mr. (troops quartered in house of, 1777), 13:24 Adams (Harvard 1801; friend of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:36 Adams, Mr. (1842; nephew of John Q.), 28:65 Adams (Boat Club secretary, 1947), 39:140 Adams Academy (Quincy), see School(s) Adams family, 10:115; 14:80; 26:76 Adams Hotel (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Adams House (Harvard), see Apthorp-Borland house (“Bishop’s Palace”) Adams houses (Quincy), 25:66 Adamson, Rhoda Rindge, see Rindge, Rhoda Addison, Thayer (at Episcopal Seminary, c. 1900), 36:17, 21 Addison, Thomas (servant of Daniel Gookin, 1630), 7:96 “Addy” (Ellen Emerson’s letters to, 1850s), 35:41-43 Adelphi Theologia (Society for Religious Improvement), 11:44n4 Advertisements

– bicycle tire, 40:24-26

– in early directories, 15:31-32, 38, 39 (see also Directories [city])

– glass, 15743, 44

– by handbills or posters, 19:44; 37:98; 38:43 (illus.), 47n45; 39:9, 16 (illus. facing); 41:66, 70; 42:73, 76

– Harvard Branch Railroad, 38:42, 43 (illus.), 47n45

– – – help wanted (bilingual), 42:73, 76

– Harvard College, to buy or rent books (1770s), 44:68

– on kite over Harvard Stadium, 44:106

– in newspapers, 19:43. 20:84-90 passim; 39:80n6, 151; 41:66; 44:68

– – – omission of, 36:115

– scrapbooks containing, 42:115

– by street criers, 42:28

– street railway, 39:80n6

– tea (1770s), 39:151

– by Dr. Waterhouse, for lost snuffbox, 29:17-18n14; 32:29

– See also Business and industry; Communication(s); Trade and commerce Advocate Publishing Company (c. 1900), 20:89 Agar, Rev. (Christ Church. 1765), 10:40n2 Agassiz, Alexander (1835-1910; zoologist, oceanographer, mine operator), 1:70; 23:44-45; 25:116; 26:22, 24; 35:96; 38:56; 43:61

– and Calumet & Hecla mine, 5:109; 26:23; 35:38 (see also Calumet & Hecla Mining Company)

– home of (Quincy St. and Broadway), see Agassiz house sites

– and Museum, 2:104; 5:109; 26:23; 27:12; 35:38; 43:64 (see also Agassiz Museum)

– obituary, 5:109-10

– as oceanographer, 2:96; 5:109

– as teacher, 35:36-44 passim, 53 Agassiz, Mrs. Alexander (Anna Russell), 5:110; 26:23; 35:38, 41, 51 Agassiz, Elizabeth, see Agassiz, Mrs. (Jean) Louis (second wife) Agassiz, George (son of Alexander), 35:51

– quoted, 35:36, 37-38, 48 Agassiz, Ida, see Higginson, Mrs. Henry Lee Agassiz, [Jean] Louis (1807-1873; naturalist), 2:62; 21:123; 22:47, 23:32, 37-38, 41; 26:21, 25; 27:12, 13; 31:16; 32:27-28; 34:52, 91; 35:51-52; 38:86

– appointment of, 43:54, 60

– Centennial observances honoring (1907), 2:75-105; 32:116; 43:53-54

– at Dickens dinner (1867), 28:86, 87

– early life of, 43:54-56

– family of, 18:20; 35:47

– Gray and, 3:28; 43:59

– and Harvard presidency, 18:43

– houses of, 23:82 (see also Agassiz house sites)

– letters of, 2:83-84, 87-88, 89-91

– Longfellow on, 2:67; 3:46; 35:52-53

– medical plan of, 23:87

– memorial to, 34:88

– and Museum, 44:141

– – – “Founding of” (1973 paper), 43:53-65

– in Saturday Club, 2:75, 76, 105; 25:135; 35:51; 41:57; 43:63

– street named for, 14:63; 25:121; 32:27, 29

– as teacher, 1:70; 2:78, 99-101, 103-5; 3:34, 35; 4:47; 5:109, 111; 12:42; 26:22, 23, 33; 27:34; 33:22; 35:13, 35-38 passim, 44-53 passim, 95-96

– – – and Lawrence Scientific School, 4:81, 82; 18:35 Agassiz, Mrs. [Jean] Louis (Cecile Braun, first wife), 5:109; 35:35, 38; 43:61 Agassiz, Mrs. [Jean] Louis (Elizabeth Cabot Cary, second wife), 5:110; 18:36, 41; 23:41-42; 25:117, 121; 27:12, 60; 32:29; 35:35, 44-54 passim; 43:61

– and Agassiz School for Girls, see School(s)

– centenary of, 16:13

– dramatic enactment (1979) of life of, 44:193

– and establishment of Radcliffe (1878), 6:52; 16:13; 27:13; 35:37; 36:24; 44:141

– as first president of Radcliffe, 31:15; 43:62; 44:142-46 passim, 152 (illus. #2 following), 155, 156

– quoted, 31:16; 36:24; 44:143, 145, 146 Agassiz, Pauline, see Shaw, Mrs. Quincy Agassiz house sites

– Oxford St., 27:12; 35:35

– Quincy St. and Broadway, 5:110; 18:36; 27:12, 13, 24; 35:36, 37; 41:24 Agassiz House/Theatre (Radcliffe; Mason St.), 9:7, 32n1; 38:63; 40:111-12, 115, 118-19; 41:97, 142, 144; 44:146-47 Agassiz Museum (Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology), 2:78, 108; 18:30; 20:100; 22:97; 26:14; 30:86; 34:65; 41:19; 43:26, 45

– building of, 2:96; 4:6; 5:109; 26:23; 35:38

– curators of, 5:109; 24:95; 30:86; 35:13, 16; 43:18

– founding of, 43:53-65; 44:141

– street named for, 14:66 Agassiz Natural History Society, 33:22 Agassiz School for Girls; Agassiz (public)School, see School(s) Agassiz Street, 14:63; 32:27, 29; 38:117; 44:162 Agassiz Theatre, see Agassiz House/Theatre Agawam (later Ipswich), see Ipswich, Massachusetts Agawam, Massachusetts (near Springfield), 21:32, 44, 45 Age

– and curfew, 40: 34

– of Harvard students, see Harvard student(s)

– of high school freshmen (1926), 19:10

– of “Pilgrim Fathers,” 32:111

– and reading, 1:79; 2:25, 29

– of school children (mid-1800s), 13:99

– of soldiers, see Militia

– See also Children; Elderly, care of Age of Reason, The (Paine), 27:78; 29:22-23 Agriculture, U.S. Department of, 44:19 Agriculture and horticulture

– apples, 21:107

– – – Baldwin developed, 40:52; 42:120

– and barns, see farming, below; Houses, meetinghouses, etc.

– Cambridge Plant Club and, see Club(s)

– Cambridge Horticultural Society, 38:122

– corn

– – – “College,” 38:20; 42:105-6

– – – drying, 20:92

– – – “fishing,” 5:33-41 passim

– – – husking “frolic,” see Parties and entertainment

– – – Indian, English cattle and, 44:59

– experimental garden at Mount Auburn, see Mount Auburn Cemetery

– farming, 4:26; 8:19; 15:39; 16:23-24, 37, 47, 54; 28:12

– – – drainage and, 16:42

– – – encouragement of (1760s), 9:40-41

– – – and farm buildings on Loyalist estates, 26:56, 58, 59

– – – importance of fisheries to (1630s), 5:35-41 passim

– – – tenant, 25:24; 26:54

– – – truck, 3:104; 32:100

– – – (see also vegetable gardens, below)

– fertilizer, 44:60

– and “fishing” corn, see corn, above

– flowers and shrubs, 11:52

– – – in Christ Church grounds, 35:25, 26-27

– – – on Common, planted, see Cambridge Common

– – – at Mount Auburn, see Mount Auburn Cemetery

– – – sarsaparilla, 9:40-41

– – – water lilies, 40:47

– – – (see also hedges; private gardens, below; Botany)

– fruit, see apples, above; Trees

– grain (for animals), 4:26

– – – imported (1630s), 44:59

– – – price of (1863), 39:86

– greenhouses and conservatories, 18:34; 20:94; 32:100; 41:158, 161

– – – Craigie, 14:73-74; 25:20

– – – at Mount Auburn Cemetery, 34:85, 86-87, 90

– – – at Vassall (Henry) house, 9:7; 21:114, 116; 31:39

– hay

– – – and fire hazard, 36:76

– – – hay scales in Harvard Yard, 1:21; 8:35; 15:40; 17:62, 68; 20:55, 93; 30:25, 26

– – – and haymaking, 18:63; 22:74; 26:63, 65, 68, 69n10, 120-21

– – – as necessity, 4:18; 10:47n4

– – – neighbors’ help with, 26:68

– – – prices of, see Prices

– – – production of (1861), 15:39

– – – salt marsh (and abundance of), 16:37; 21:116; 22:63, 74; 26:63, 65, 69n10, 120-21; 29:36; 39:127; 44:60 (see also Marsh[es])

– hedges

– – – acacia, 21:108; 26:54

– – – box, 18:40; 21:116

– – – hawthorn, 16:54; 21:108; 26:55

– – – hemlock, 21:68

– – – pine, 42:17

– and horticulturists (1830s, 1840s), 38:83

– instruction in, for women (Bussey Institute, 1871), 36:30-31

– Irish, decline of (“potato famine”), 39:115; 41:57

– landscape architects and, 17:60-61; 26:52; 35:22; 38:121; 41:21, 22, 23, 168; 42:15; 43:28, 67 (see also Mount Auburn Cemetery)

– – – Harvard School of Landscape Architecture, 23:46; 43:23

– Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 15:48; 34:78-81, 83; 35:22; 44:177-89 passim

– Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture, 38:74-78 passim

– medical botany, see Medicine, practice of

– at Mount Auburn (and experimental garden), see Mount Auburn Cemetery

– “planting field lots,” 22:66

– private gardens, 16:54-55; 18:37, 40; 21:67; 25:86; 32:101, 102; 33:51, 61; 41:164

– – – Brattle (William and Thomas), 26:56; 28:12; 31:26; 37:11, 18

– – – Buckingham parterres, 18:37

– – – F. Child’s rose garden, 26:20; 41:33-34; 42:17

– – – Hayes, 32:102

– – – King, 31:44-52

– – – Vassall/Batchelder, 9:7; 10:11-12; 21:109-12, 116; 26:54-55; 31:25-31 passim, 39-43; 33:96

– strawberries, 16:55

– – – found at landing on Cape Ann (1630), 30:34

– – – and strawberry parties, see Parties and entertainment

– tenant farmers, see farming, above

– vegetable gardens, 4:26; 16:55; 21:111; 22:49; 31:42; 38:114, 126

– – – cabbages on Fitzpatricks’ lawn, 36:101 (see also farming, above)

– writings on, 21:107; 34:82-83, 84; 38:80-84 passim; 43:128, 131-39 passim

– 1600s, 5:35-41 passim; 8:19; 16:37

– 1700s, 9:40-41; 16:23-24, 37; 26:54; 28:12

– 1800s, 3:104; 4:26; 15:39; 16:42, 47, 54-55; 25:86; 38:83

– 1900s, 32:100

– See also Animals; Botanic Garden; Botany; Trees Aiken, see also Aikens; Akin Aiken, Conrad Potter (1889-1973; poet), 41:135-36 Aikens, see also Aiken; Akin Aikens, Mrs. (Newburyport, 1810), 9:32 Aircraft, 14:132

– balloon ascension (England, 1784), 16:120-21; 19:71

– Dana descendant makes record flight (1935), 26:106-7n79

– discussion of (1899), 10:156

– MIT aeronautics department, 42:57-58

– and outer space, 42:63

– See also Travel/transportation Akin, see also Aiken; Aikens Akin, Grace, see Tillinghast, Mrs. William Hopkins Akin, William Lyman (of New York, c. 1850), 8:54 Akin, Mrs. William Lyman (Emily Ford), 8:54 Albany Street, 42:65 Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, see Edward VII Albro, Rev. John Adams (b. 1799; at Shepard Church 1835-66), 2:38; 13:110; 15:34; 37:105-6; 40:82n44; 43:121, 124

– Shepard biography by, 42:100-101, 105-8nn7-14 passim; 43:121 Albro Street, 19:16 Alcock, Mrs. John (researcher. 1960s), 41:131 Alcott, Amos Bronson (1799-1888; educator), 29:39; 33:82; 34:35 Alcott, Louisa May (1832-1888; writer), 32:41 Alden, Henry Mills (1836-1919; editor), 7:9 Aldis/Aldus, Nathan (landowner, 1630s), 14:94; 22:76 (Map 1) Aldrich, Caroline B., see Durant, Mrs. William Bullard Aldrich, Judge P. B. (c. 1860), 6:77 Aldtich, Richard (1863-1937; music critic), 32:88 Aldrich, Thomas Bailey (1836-1907; writer), 2:56-57; 7:27; 19:23; 28:95; 34:91

– as Atlantic editor, 19:28, 29

– as Elmwood tenant, 15:44; 33:78, 92n108

– Longfellow anniversary poem by (1907), 2:58, 107 Aldus, see Aldis/Aldus Alert (ship): Dana sails on, 10:129, 160, 161; 26:108, 112; 28:52; 38:85 Alewife Bridge, 5:42. See also Bridge(s) Alewife Brook, 20:125, 129; 22:79

– as “Menotomy River,” 5:42; 14:35

– – – paper on ( 1910), 5:32-43

– – – as water supply, fish weir in, 41:7 (see also Fishing [as industry]; Water supply) Alewife Brook Parkway, see Streets and highways (parkways) Alewives, see Fishing (as industry) Alexander, Miss Constance G. (teacher, 1890s), 35:105 Alexander, Francesca (daughter of Francis; of Florence, 1880s), 14:105, 106-13 Alexander, Francis (1800-c. 1881; painter), 14:105; 34:23; 44:134

– Dickens portrait by, 28:55 (illus. facing), 58 Alexander, Mrs. Francis (Lucia Gray Swett), 9:65; 14:105, 106-13 Alexander, Mrs. L. D. (book collector, c. 1910), 38:108 Alexander, Pete (bicycle racer, 1920s), 40:26 Alexander I (1777-1825; czar of Russia), 26:93 Alexander II (1818-1881; czar of Russia), 24:100, 102, 109, 111, 116-33 passim Alexander VI (1431 [?]- 1503; pope), 33:134 Alford, John (of Charlestown; establishes Chair at Harvard, 1839), 33:153n8 Alford Professorship, 12:38; 33:153n8; 44: 128 Alger, Cyrus (1781-1856; ironmaster), 6:7 Alger, Francis (mineralogist, mid-1800s), 38:83 Alger, Horatio (1832-1899; author), 23:27 Alice M. Longfellow Hall (Radcliffe), 33:29 Allegiance (ship), 16:72 Allen, see also Allyn Allen, Abigail, see Belcher, Mrs. Jonathan, Jr. Allen, Rev. Alexander V. G. (1841-1908; educator), 36:8, 11, 13, 16-17 Allen, Almira Warner, see Wheeler, Mrs. William Augustus Allen, Miss Annie E. (CHS member; d. 1944), 13:123 Allen, Dr. Charles H. (1870s), 7:81; 20:103 Allen, Clare, see Haskins, Mrs. Charles Homer Allen, Miss Elizabeth, see Hayman, Mrs. Nathaniel Allen, Mrs. Elizabeth, see Stone, Mrs. Samuel (second wife) Allen, Elnathan (of Vermont, 1770s), 13:122 Allen, Col. Ethan (1737/8-1789), 6:10; 7:104; 13:122 Allen, Rev. F. (at Sterling, Mass., 1798), 11:37 Allen, Flora Viola, see Allen, Mrs. Oscar Fayette Allen, Frances Anne, see Sparks, Mrs. Jared (first wife) Allen, Francis R. (architect, 1890s), 34:76 Allen, Mayor Frank Augustus (1835-1916), 20:40, 75, 78

– obituary, 13:122-23 Allen, Mrs. Frank Augustus (Annie G. Scribner, first wife), 13:123 Allen, Mrs. Frank Augustus (Elizabeth M. Scribner, second wife), 13:123 Allen, Prof. Frederic D. (1844-1897; classical scholar), 32:88; 33:43 Allen, Dr. Gardiner (of Boston; physician and author, 1880s), 33:43 Allen, Glover M.: “William Brewster, 1851-1919” (1937 paper), 24:83-98 Allen, Goel, see Allen, Joel Asaph Allen, Herbert M. (son of Frank A., 1865), 13:123 Allen, Joel Asaph (1838-1921; ornithologist), 24:87; 35:13-14, 15 Allen, Rev. John (of Dedham, 1648), 32:109 Allen, Mrs. John, see Dudley, Mrs. Thomas (second wife) Allen, John (contractor, mid-1800s), 38:32 Allen, Rev. Joseph Henry (1820-1898), 6:28; 33:43 Allen, Mary (daughter of Rev. Joseph H.), 33:43 Allen, Mary (unacknowledged daughter of Andrew Craigie), see Allen, Polly (or Mary) Allen, Miss Mary Prentice (of Marblehead; educational pioneer, 1870s), 36:28 Allen, Matthew (brickmaker; of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 16:75; 22:60, 69, 76, 76 (Map 1), 77. See also Allyn, Matthew Allen, Oscar Fayette (d. 1926), 6:78; 13:122

– “John Taylor Oilman Nichols, M.D.” (1912 paper), 7:77-88 Allen, Mrs. Oscar Fayette (Flora Viola; 1844-1917): obituary, 13:122 Allen, Polly (or Mary) (1779-1849; unacknowledged daughter of Andrew Craigie), 27:70-86, 91 Allen, Richard (of California, 1880s), 33:43 Allen, Roswell, Jr. (of Vermont, c. 1840), 13:122 Allen, Mrs. Roswell, Jr. (May Snow), 13:122 Allen, Russell (of California, 1880s), 33:43 Allen, Samuel (purchases Inman property, 1849 ), 16:38 Allen, Mrs. Samuel (later Mrs. Lewis Colby), 16:38 Allen, Walter M. (bank director, 1850s), 20:131 Allen, Wilkes (Harvard 1801; friend of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:35, 37 Allen, Mr. (bookkeeper at Riverside Press, late 1800s), 19:20 Allen farm (before 1655), 9:72 Allen & Greenough textbooks, see Schoolbooks Allen & Kenway (architects), 34:76; 43:156 Allis, Prof. John C. (of MIT; Reservoir St. resident, 1970s), 43:29 Allport, Prof. Gordon W., 40:151

– “The Prospect Union in Perspective” (1966 paper), 40:155-58

– rebuttal to (Potts), 40:159-61 Allston, see also Alston Allston, Robert Francis Withers (1801-1864; nephew of artist), 29:40-41 Allston, Washington (1779-1843; artist and writer), 3:63; 10:162; 23:83; 25:115, 119; 33:14; 34:91

– “Adam” chair owned by, 3:96; 5:48

– aphorisms of, 29:54, 55

– appearance of, 29:39-47 passim, 57

– in Boston, 11:21, 28; 27:14; 29:60

– in Cambridgeport (1830-43; 1943 paper on), 29:34-67; 33:161

– church designed by, 29:19n21

– Dana’s friendship with, 10:144; 29:13-14

– death of, 29:61-66

– – – burial in Dana family tomb, 26:93n63

– Dickens and, 28:63, 75; 29:44-46

– at Harvard, 29:13-33, 35

– houses and studios of, 1:65; 11:32n; 21:86; 25:119; 26:99, 118; 29:26, 36, 44, 48 (illus. following), 60, 62, 67; 35:82

– paintings and caricatures by, 29:16 (illus. following), 48 (illus. following), 49-54; 33:33

– – – “Belshazzar,” 5:49n1; 11:24n2, 27; 26:99; 27:67n60; 29:37, 47-48, 58-62, 65-66; 34:19; 35:82

– – – “Buck’s Progress,” 29:16 (illus. following), 21-23

– – – exhibited (1831-81), 4:33; 5:49; 29:41-42, 49-53nn61-76 passim

– poems by, 29:43n39, 49nn61, 63, 50nn66, 68, 54n81; 33:12

– – – honoring Washington, 11:40, 41n2, 45; 29:28, 30-31

– portraits of, 21:114; 23:15; 29:16 (four illus. following); 38:137; 44:38

– prose writings (novel and lectures) by, 29:43, 45, 48, 50n66, 54n81, 56

– street named for, 14:62, 63; 26:95n64; 29:35; 35:82 (see also Allston Street)

– tomb designed by, 25:56n58; 29:55 Allston, Mrs. Washington (Anne Channing, first wife; d. 1815), 29:34 Allston, Mrs. Washington (Martha Remington Dana, second wife), 3:63; 10:144; 26:93n63, 95n64, 118; 27:67n61; 29:34-35, 62; 33:14, 161

– before marriage, 9:65; 11:24, 32n; 21:85, 86; 33:10, 11 Allston, Massachusetts, 34:75; 44:83

– included in “Newtown[e],” 44:57

– trolley line to, 39:95, 98 Allston Grammar School, see School(s) Allston Street, 1:56; 10:190; 14:62, 63; 26:95n64; 29:35; 35:82 Allyn, see also Allen Allyn, Alice C., 17:67

– “A History of Berkeley Street, Cambridge” (1931 paper), 21:58-71; 25:107, 109; 31:55, 58; 43:7n1 Allyn, Anna (“Bee” member, mid-1800s), 17:74 Allyn, Miss Dorothea (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 21:70 Allyn, Helen, see Gade, Mrs. Gerhard Allyn, John (of Allyn & Bacon; builds Berkeley St. house c. 1885), 21:70 Allyn, Mrs. John, 17:63; 21:70 Allyn, Matthew (early settler, 1630s), 14:102. See also Allen, Matthew Allyn, Mrs. Rufus (sister of Helen Upton; d. 1897), 33:50

– houses of, 21:60, 64, 70 Allyn & Bacon (publishers), 21:70 Allyn family, 32:34 Almanacs, 38:95

– importance of, 44:65-66

– interleaved or annotated, 10:64n2; 11:69-74 passim, 83 (see also Diaries and journals)

– printed by “Daye Press,” 3:17; 44:64, 65-66

– See also Periodicals Alms House quarry (Somerville), 17:34 Almshouses, see Charity Almy, Judge Charles (holds office 1891-1921), 17:22

– “The History of the Third District Court of Eastern Middlesex” (1923 paper), 17:16-27; 39:68, 69 Almy, Mrs. Charles, 42:124 Almy, Charles, Jr. (businessman, 1930s), 35:23; 41:52

– house of (built 1926), 43:160 (illus. #8 following), 163-64, 166 Almy, Miss Mary (MIT 1920; architect), 27:98; 43:163; 44:106, 114, 117. 118 Almy family, 44:117, 119 Alphabet school, see School(s) Alphonsa, Mother (Rose Hawthorne Lathrop; 1851-1926), 29:42n36 Alsop, Aimee: greenhouse built for (c. 1910[?]), 43:167 Alsop, Francis (Willard family friend, c. 1820), 11:20 Alston, see also Allston Alston, Charles (1683-1760; Scottish botanist), 43:137 Amazeen, Andrew B. (chief mate of Pilgrim, 1836), 10:161 Amazeen, Edward C. (of Melrose, 1915), 10:161 Ambassador Hotel, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Ambassadors and consuls, 10:178; 23:83, 89

– Adams, see Adams, Charles Francis [1st]; Adams, John; Adams, John Quincy

– Dana, see Dana, Chief Justice Francis

– to England, see Britain

– to France, see France

– Franklin, see Franklin, Benjamin

– to Holland, see Adams, John

– Lowell, see Lowell, James Russell

– to Russia, see Russia

– to Spain, see Spain

– Storer, R. B. and W. B., see Russia

– Stoughton, E. W., see Russia

– See also Diplomacy Ambrose, Alice (persecuted Quaker, 1664), 24:76 Amee, Albert F. (bookseller; d. 1940), 42:119 Amee, John (bookseller; brother of Albert), 42:119 Amee, Mrs. John, 14:139 Amee Brothers (bookstore), 15:33; 30:22; 41:169; 42:119. See also Booksellers “American” as term for settlers, 43:116 American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Boston), 1:75; 4:88; 20:61; 24:25; 25:106; 38:76, 84; 40:100

– Proceedings of, 34:8 American Antiquarian Society (Worcester), 5:8, 17, 78n5; 9:8; 25:52n49; 26:82n42; 33:15n21; 37:75n; 40:16n15; 44:73n17

– “Cambridge Platform” at, 38:94, 100, 102, 105, 109

– “Craigie Papers” at, 27:48-86nn-17-96 passim, 88, 90, 91

– diaries in possession of, 11:70-83 passim

– Proceedings of, 16:74, 92, 93; 33:64n27 American Appliance Company (electronics), 34:120-21 American Architect, see Periodicals (general) American Association for the Advancement of Science, 23:88; 43:62 American Association of Theological Schools and Colleges in the United States and Canada, 36:70 American Biltrite Rubber Company (Chelsea), 40:42 American Board of Missions, 28:53 American Chemical Society, 40:100 American Federation of Labor, 33:128. See also Labor American Fire Society, 36:79. See also Cambridge Fire Department American Folklore Society, 25:89 American Geographical Society, 40:104, 105, 106 American Historical Review, see Periodicals (general) American House (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses American Institute of Architects, 43:153, 164 American Institute of Graphic Arts, 42:38 American Journal of Archaeology, see Periodicals (general) American Law Institute, 41:124 American Law Review, see Periodicals (general) American League of Universal Brotherhood, 34:27 American Library Association, 21:73, 74 American Medical Association, 41:63 American Medical Botany (Bigelow), 34:83; 43:138) 44:77 American Ornithological Union, 35:14, 15 American Peace Society (1826), 28:22 American Philological Association, 44:140 American Philosophical Society (Philadelphia), 43:132; 44:125, 127 American Quarterly Review, see Periodicals (general) American Railway Times, see Periodicals (general) American Research and Development Corporation (Amrad), 34:120, 123 American Research Center (Cairo), 44:33 American Revolution, see Revolutionary War American School of Classical Studies (Athens), 44:34 American School of Oriental Research, 35:75 American Student Union (Radcliffe), see Radcliffe College American Telegraph Company, 42:115. See also Communication(s) American Telephone and Telegraph Company, 34:112, 114, 117; 35:84. See also Communication(s) American Unitarian Association, see Unitarian Church Ames, Alice, see Crothers, Mrs. Bronson Ames, Carolyn (CHS curator, 1970s), 44:71n11

– “Radcliffe’s First Century” (1979 paper), 44: 139-56 Ames, Mr. and Mrs. Charles (of Minnesota, c. 1885), 33:114 Ames, Fanny, see Randall, Mrs. Mallinson Ames, Fisher (1758-1808; lawyer, statesman), 4:15, 16; 11:40n2; 39:61 Ames, Prof. James Barr (1846-1910), 10:176; 18:45; 20:34; 23:88; 34:8; 41:130

– obituary, 5:105; 28:107-8 Ames, Mrs. James Barr (Sarah Russell), 5:105; 18:45

– “A History of the Cambridge Branch of the Massachusetts Indian Association from 1886 to 1923” (1924 paper), 17:84-91 Ames, James Barr [2d]: “The Founding of Mount Auburn Hospital” (1961 paper), 39:39-49 Ames, John S. (architect, 1909), 39:128; 43:51 Ames, Mrs. John W. (Sarah Thayer; teacher, 1912), 32:45, 46 Ames, Nathaniel (1741-1822): diary of, while Harvard student (1758-61), 11:74 Ames, Oakes I., 40:34

– “Mount Auburn’s Sixscore Years” (1952 paper), 34:77-95 Ames, Gov. Oliver (1831-1895), 35:87 Ames, Richard (Harvard 1907), 5:105 Ames, Robert Russell (Harvard 1907), 5:105; 44:106 Ames, Ruth, see Angier, Mrs. Edmund Ames, Seth (Cambridge Book Club, 1851), 28:115 Ames, Rev. William (of Rotterdam; d. 1633), 8:31; 10:95; 14:85, 90; 22:84 Ames, Mrs. William (Joanna Fletcher), 14:90-91 Ames, Winthrop (1870-1937; theatrical producer), 27:38; 38:57 Ames, Mrs. (at Dickens Reading, 1867), 28:91 Ames Building (Boston), 3:10 Ames Street, 14:63; 40:28 Amesbury, Massachusetts, 7:83; 21:38, 44 Amherst College, 20:70; 23:80; 33:21; 34:37; 35:96

– and Calvinism, 4:22; 32:33 Amherst Street, 14:63 Amiel, Mr. and Mrs. J., and “Miss Chrissy” (Vassall family friends, 1766), 10:31 Amory, Charles (friend of Longfellow, mid-1800s), 25:109 Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Copley: Lake View Ave. house of (1948) , 32:98 Amory, Harcourt (Harvard benefactor, early 20th c.), 27:37 Amory, James Sullivan (Episcopal Seminary trustee, late 1800s), 36:10 Amory, Jonathan (of Boston, mid-1800s), 41:56 Amory, Thomas Coffin (Harvard 1830; author), 14:59n1; 16:21; 26:53n50, 61 Amory Street, 35:95 Amos [first name] (foreman on Storer farm c. 1830), 3:106 Amos, Mr. (believer in millennium, 1839), 25:41 Anabaptists, see Religion (dissenting/nonconformist) Anawon (Indian chief in King Philip’s War), 30:50. See also War(s) Anburey, Thomas (British soldier in Cambridge), 10:52n2; 13:32, 33, 37, 42, 56, 59n1, 68

– diary of (1776-81), 11:75 Anchor (Blue Anchor) Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Anderson, Larz (bridge donor, 1920s), 39:133 Anderson, Leroy (1908-1975; composer), 35:107 Andover, Massachusetts, 11:78; 16:59; 26:105; 27:88; 35:30

– settlement of, 21:32, 43 Andover Academy, see Phillips Academy, Andover Andover Creed, 36:58, 60, 66, 69 Andover Hall, 18:31; 24:88; 36:73; 41:29 Andover Theological Seminary, 16:106; 33:12; 36:60-62; 41:19

– founded (1808), 4:15; 36:58-59; 44:75

– graduates and professors of, 20:65, 71; 30:73; 32:33; 36:66

– Harvard Divinity School affiliation with, 36:69-73; 41:29

– library at (Andover-Harvard Theological Library), 36:69. 73

– See also School(s) Andover-Newton Theological Seminary (Newton), 33:151 André, Maj. John (1751-1780), 19:57 Andrew, see also Andrews Andrew, Gov. John Albion (1818-1867), 3:48-49; 21:61, 67; 39:10, 11; 40:100

– and Home Guard, 2:39, 40, 41; 6:14; 38:48 Andrew, John F. (Democratic party leader, 1880s), 20:45 Andrew Square, 39:102 Andrews, see also Andrew Andrews, (Elizabeth) Ann, see Willard, Mrs. [Prof.] Sidney Andrews, Charles McL. (author, 1930s), 26:50n8, 61; 40:81 Andrews, Dwight H. (realtor, 1960s), 39:72, 75; 42:33, 44 Andrews, [Elizabeth] Ann, see Willard, Mrs. [Prof.] Sidney Andrews, John (landowner, 1770s), 37:19

– diary quoted (1774), 5:64, 65-66 Andrews, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102, 103; 14:93; 22:76 (Map 1) Andrews, William T. (lawyer, mid-1800s), 38:45n42 Andrews, Mr. (of Newburyport, 1807), 9:25 Andrews, Mrs. (Newburyport, 1810), 9:32 Andrews, Dr. (dentist, 1870s), 30:19 Andros, Sir [Gov.] Edmund (1637-1714), 21:28 Anesthetic, see Medicine, practice of Angell, James Burrill (1829-1916; educator, diplomat), 41:167 Angier, Edmund (c. 1612-1692; merchant), 8:31-32; 14:97; 22:76 (Map 1); 37:31 Angier, Mrs. Edmund (Ruth Ames, first wife; d. 1656), 8:31; 22:84 Angier, Rev. Samuel (1654-1719), 3:112; 22:84; 24:51; 40:73n23 Angier, Mrs. Samuel (Hannah Oakes), 22:84 Angier (Harvard student, 1760; social position of ) , 10:25-26n5 Angier (Harvard 1829; sings at Class Day), 12:13 Angier family, 10:115 Angler’s Corner, 13:55, 80 Anglican Church, see Church of England Anglin, Margaret (actress, 1920s), 40:112 Animal Rescue League, 33:51. See also Animals; Charity Animals

– bear

– – – appearance of, in Cambridge (1754), 14:57; 16:48; 37:32

– – – pet, at dinner party (c. 1850), 22:47; 43:61

– bridge and ferry tolls charged for, 14:52; 33:144

– “cattle” as wealth, 37:29; 44:58-61 (see also cow[s]; hogs; oxen; sheep, below; Horses [as transportation])

– cats, 18:32; 32:102; 41:164

– – – Boat Club, 39:139

– – – as Cambridge “characters,” 42:119-20

– – – hole in door for, 23:79

– cockfighting, see Sports and games

– cow(s), 24:65; 32:61; 34:60; 35:113

– – – bequeathed to church, 14:54; 15:26

– – – “boarded,” 11:20

– – – bull broken to saddle, 33:140

– – – cattle market, 13:100; 20:91, 131-34 passim; 28:43; 30:21-22; 36:110, 117; 37:35, 36; 39:113; 40:86; 43:26; 44:59-61

– – – historical significance of, 44:56

– – – law concerning, 39:114

– – – number of (1635-36), 44:57-61

– – – pastures/grazing for, 14:44, 45; 21:29, 36, 71, 111; 22:62-66 passim, 71, 76; 30:14; 31:53; 32:99; 33:50; 35:29; 37:31; 38:117; 39:114; 40:81; 41:7, 8; 42:17, 80; 43:68, 69, 74; 44:56-61, 187

– – – as payment for Harvard tuition, 21:78; 37:13

– – – prices of, 44:42, 59-61

– – – “town,” 18:16

– – – “want of accommodation” for, 21:28; 40:81; 44:56-61

– – – water for, 41:7

– – – (see also oxen, below)

– dog(s)

– – – “brown-stone,” on Mount Auburn St., 31:35

– – – and dogfight, William James and, 42:17

– – – Fire Dept. Dalmatian, 44:10-11

– – – “Gillie,” of Robert Frost, 40:85-90 passim

– – – Helen Keller’s, 32:98

– – – licenses for, 37:96

– – – as pets, 3:104; 18:34, 38-39; 21:60; 22:51; 23:37; 24:96-97; 34:15; 36:67; 40:85-90 passim; 42:115; 44:10

– – – restraint of, 5:36; 14:48

– – – “Rex,” Fogg Museum watchdog, 27:26

– – – teamsters’, 35:80

– donkey and donkey cart, 34:69; 41:168

– ferry accommodations for, 7:54, 55

– foxes, 24:65; 41:160

– goats, 24:65

– hens, see poultry, below

– hogs, 10:22; 24:64, 65

– – – and hog reeves (wardens), 14:47; 26:73

– – – pig-raising on Coolidge farm, 32:99

– – – “ringing the swine,” 1:67

– – – running loose, penalty for, 14:47, 70

– horses, see Horses (cavalry); Horses (as transportation)

– kindness to, 4:33

– orang-outang “Joe,” William James and, 33:28

– oxen, 1:21; 10:22

– – – replaced by “ice railroad,” 28:32

– – – (see also cow[s], above)

– pets

– – – acquired by “Convention Troops,” 10:61-62

– – – at Harvard/Radcliffe, 41:143, 153

– – – party for (1890s), 42:128

– – – wild animals as, 22:47; 41:160; 43:61

– – – (see also cats; dog[s], above)

– poultry, 16:50, 55; 22:54; 24:65; 28:12; 31:49

– – – raised by Prof. Sophocles, 3:27; 12:35; 26:17; 42:121

– pound for, see Town Pound for, below

– prices of, 10:22; 24:65; 44:42, 59-61

– rabbit house on Brattle farm (1792), 28:12

– rare (giraffe, 1839), 4:33

– sheep, 5:22; 17:62; 20:91

– – – care of, as Harvard payment, 38:19

– Shetland pony (Dana, ridden into house), 26:104; 33:13-14

– snakes (Agassiz and). 32:29; 35:51-52

– Town Pound for (site of), 8:34; 22:77; 23:19; 33:41

– veterinarian for, 16:58-59

– wild, 24:65

– – – fences against, 31:54; 41:26

– – – as pets, see pets, above

– – – (see also wolves, below)

– wolves, 37:32; 44:45, 60

– – – on Beacon Hill (Boston), 27:30

– – – on Cambridge Common, 35:29

– – – on Observatory Hill, 20:94

– – – in Plymouth Colony, 5:33; 33:141

– – – in Watertown, 32:126

– See also Birds; Business and industry (slaughter houses) Ann Street (Boston), 41:57 Annals of America, see Holmes, Rev. Abiel Annapolis Convention (1786), 33:72 Anne (1665-1714; queen of England), 6:10 Anne (ship), 30:49 Anniversaries, centennials, etc., see Celebrations Annual Register (1778), 13:55n3. See also Periodicals (general) Anthology Club, see Club(s) Anthony [first name] (Vassall family slave), see Vassall family Anthony, Almeda, see Snyder, Mrs. Almeda Anthony Anthony, Susan B. (1820-1906; feminist), 7:20 Antigua, West Indies

– histories of, 10:15nn1, 2, 20n2, 40n4, 50nn1, 4

– sugar plantations at, see Business and industry Antinomianism, see Religion (dissenting/nonconformist) Anti-Slavery Society, 20:68, 70. See also Slavery Anti-Tuberculosis Society/Association, see Disease Antrim Street, 41:158 Anzonella, Mabel, see Bell, Mrs. Stoughton Apartment houses, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Apel, see also Appel Apel, Willi (Harvard lecturer, c. 1950), 41:101 Apollo (ship), 11:15 Apothecaries, see Medicine, practice of Apothecary General, see Craigie, Dr. Andrew Appalachian Mountain Club, see Club(s) Appel, see also Apel Appel, R. G. (Harvard 1902; choirmaster), 32:88 Appian Way, 10:24n2; 14:63; 22:108; 23:19; 30:21; 32:26; 44:139, 140, 145

– Hilliard St. formerly known as, 29:71 (see also Hilliard Street)

– houses on

– – – Dana (No. 15), 26:120

– – – Founders’ (Radcliffe; No. 6), 34:70; 44: 141

– – – Holmes (John, elder, 1650s), 37:65

– – – Holmes (John, younger; torn down, 1871), 25:118; 31:8; 36:81; 38:49n49

– – – James (William; No. 11), 33:28-29

– – – moved from (to Coolidge Hill), 32:100

– – – Nichols (corner of Brattle), see Nichols houses (Edgar)

– – – Preble, later Greenough (No. 22; torn down, 1960s), 25:125; 33:41, 42, 43; 38:52; 39:76 Apple Island Fishing Club, 36:104. See also Club(s) Apples, Baldwin, see Agriculture and horticulture Appleton, Charles John (“mariner,” son of Consul; b. 1795), 17:58; 30:22 Appleton, Frances, see Longfellow, Mrs. Henry Wadsworth (second wife) Appleton, Capt. John, 3:16 Appleton, Mrs. John (Priscilla Glover, 1634-1697) 3:12, 16 Appleton, Hon. John (son of Capt. John; m. 1680) 3:16 Appleton, Mrs. John (Elizabeth Rogers), 3:16 Appleton, John (1758-1829; Consul to France), 9:19, 33; 17:57, 58; 37:22, 23

– street named for, 14:63; 25:120 (see also Appleton Street) Appleton, Mrs. John (Frenchwoman, first wife), 17:58 Appleton, Mrs. John (Sarah Fayerweather, second wife; m. 1807), 9:19, 22, 28, 65; 17:57, 58; 37:22, 23 Appleton, John James (son of Consul; b. 1782), 17:58; 37:22 Appleton, Margaret, see Holyoke, Mrs. Edward (second wife) Appleton, Margaret Gibbs, see Appleton, Mrs. Nathaniel Appleton, Mary (Mrs. McIntosh), 11:28; 23:50; 25:30 Appleton, Nathan (1779-1861; manufacturer, banker), 21:105; 22:100; 23:49-52 passim; 29:50n68; 37:18 Appleton, Mrs. Nathan, 23:50, 52 Appleton, Rev. Nathaniel (1693-1784), 22:76, 87; 31:64; 32:29; 43:118, 119

– bequest to charity, 18:16, 17

– biography of, 24:6

– and “Convention Troops,” 13:40, 43, 44n3, 47

– descendants of, 3:16; 19:88 at

– First Church, 3:16, 18, 19; 5:57; 9:10; 10:42; 16:72; 17:58, 96; 29:69-70; 43:124; 44:70

– ordained (1717), 3:111-13; 43:117

– and Whitefield controversy, 24:52

– in “Old Parsonage,” 6:23 (see also Boylston Hall; Parsonage[s])

– portrait of, 10:86 Appleton, Mrs. Nathaniel (Margaret Gibbs), 22:87-88

– portrait of, 10:86 Appleton, Dr. Nathaniel Walker (1755-1795), 27:47

– letters of (1773-84), 2:132 Appleton, Samuel (1766-1853; merchant, philanthropist), 34:79 Appleton, Samuel (1930s), 35:23 Appleton, Sarah F. , see Appleton, Mrs. [Consul] John (second wife) Appleton, Thomas Gold (1812-1884; poet, artist), 27:73n77; 28:97, 98; 33:24

– as a boy, 23:50, 51

– -Longfellow letters, 25:36n27; 28:83

– and Norse memorial, 40:102, 105 Appleton, William S. (founds antiquarian society, before 1911), 6:16; 22:13n1 Appleton Academy (New Ipswich, N. H.), 23:49 Appleton Chapel (Harvard), 11:55; 18:33, 34, 41, 44; 20:53; 21:122; 27:13; 33:26, 131, 151; 35:46; 36:67, 70; 44:23, 26

– architecture of, 27:17; 42:116

– Choir of, 27:33; 30:89; 41:97, 137

– dedication of (1858), 33:23

– organ and organists at, 30:89, 90-91; 32:82-83, 91; 41:27 (see also Music) Appleton family, 14:80; 25:28; 33:16 Appleton Hall (Harvard Yard), 22:102 Appleton house sites

– Boston, 25:29

– Cambridge, see Appleton, Rev. Nathaniel Appleton property, 22:65, 75 Appleton Street, 10:183; 27:98; 33:99; 43:11-12

– naming of, 14:63; 32:39

– residents on, 15:10; 16:10; 21:63; 22:15; 24:15; 28:7, 107; 34:75; 43:24 Apprenticeship, 14:125; 18:23; 19:43; 25:75; 27:47-48; 34:98; 36:56-57; 44:70, 76

– indentured servants, 18:13

– See also Education; Labor; Servants/”hired help” Apthorp, Charles (merchant of Boston, c. 1700; father of Rev. East), 26:51 Apthorp, Rev. East (1733-1816), 10:28n2; 19:49; 22:77; 23:18, 20; 26:51; 43:119

– house built by (1760), 13:30; 17:54 (see also Apthorp-Borland house [“Bishop’s Palace”])

– leaves Cambridge (1764), 22:71; 26:59

– – – impostor as successor to, 10:32n1

– portrait of, 26:52n37 Apthorp, Mrs. East (Elizabeth Hutchinson), 26:51 Apthorp, James (and establishment of Christ Church, 1759), 23:18; 43:118-19 Apthorp, John (Christ Church member, 1765), 10:40n2 Apthorp, John T. (landowner. Fresh Pond, c. 1800), 3:100, 101 Apthorp, Robert (Follen St. resident before 1850), 20:97 Apthorp, William F. (1848-1913; music critic), 32:88 Apthorp family, 13:84 Apthorp-Borland house (“Bishop’s Palace,” built 1760), 15:41; 17:54-55, 56; 25:121; 26:51

– architecture of, 6:25; 22:31-32; 26:59

– Burgoyne lodged in, 1:57; 13:30-31, 49, 70, 79; 22:31

– as Master’s residence, Adams House, Harvard, 22:32, 100; 26:59; 30:27

– as Putnam’s headquarters, 5:25n1; 13:70

– site of, 1:19, 56; 17:55; 26:59; 30:27 Arabic (ship), 24:94 Arbella (ship), 13:82; 30:34, 38, 39; 33:142, 147; 37:24 Archaeological Club, 23:43. See also Club(s) Archaeological Institute of America, 44:33 Archaeology, 44:34

– Cambridge, 43:143, 146 (see also Leif Ericsson)

– European, 33:87-89 Archaeology magazine, 44:33. See also Periodicals (general) Architects, 8:52; 23:38; 25:121; 27:14, 25; 29:19n21; 32:102; 33:43, 56, 57; 34:11, 74-76, 91, 108; 35:73; 39:121, 138; 43:13, 18, 26-30 passim, 47-52, 91, 103, 155; 44:31, 145, 150, 153, 168, 185n21, 187

– MIT, 42:54-55, 62-63

– women, 33:47, 34:74-76; 41:161; 43:21, 153-72

– See also Bulfinch, Charles; Coolidge, Charles Allerton; Greenough, Henry; Gropius, Walter; Harrison, Peter; Howe, Miss Lois Lilley; Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth; Peabody, Robert Swain; Richardson, Henry Hobson; Van Brunt, Henry; Wright, Frank Lloyd Architecture

– Architectural History of Cambridge, Survey of, 42:33-37 passim, 43, 93; 43:86n2, 88, 90n3, 125, 142, 149; 44:135

– Ash St., 31:33-36

– Boston, 41:60

– Boston Society of Architects and, 43:164

– Brattle St. as example of, 43:37 (see also Brattle Street [Cambridge])

– brick used in, see Brick and brickmaking

– and “building list” (of L. L. Howe), 43:166-71

– church, 18:30; 41:25; 43:115 (see also Appleton Chapel [Harvard]; Christ

– Church [Episcopal])

– of Court Houses, 39:61-62, 65, 66

– of Craigie (Longfellow) House, see Craigie-Vassall-Longfellow House

– education in (c. 1890), 43:156-57

– of Elmwood, see Elmwood (Cambridge)

– of Fay House (Radcliffe), see Fay House

– of Fogg Museum, see Fogg Art Museum

– French influence on, 43:157

– of “Garden House,” 33:56; 38:82

– Guide to: Ten Walking Tours (Rettig), 42:37-38; 43:11

– of Harvard buildings

– – – 17th c., 14:34; 32:108-9

– – – 18th c., 13:45; 29:20, 23

– – – 19th C., 4:30; 14:9-10; 20:57; 23:45; 25:116, 121; 26:41-42, 46; 27:17, 31-32; 28:110; 33:8, 16-35 passim; 35:113, 120; 41:118 (illus. #2 following), 125-29; 42:75; 43:16, 48

– – – 20th c., 35:113, 120-21; 42:75

– – – (see also Appleton Chapel [Harvard]; Dane Hall; Fogg Art Museum; Hunt Hall; Memorial Hall)

– Harvard School of, see Harvard School(s)

– on Harvard Square, see Harvard Square

– historic preservation of, see Historic preservation

– of Hooper-Lee-Nichols house, see Hooper-Lee-Nichols house

– Lake View Ave., 44:159, 163-68

– landscape, see Agriculture and horticulture

– of “Larches” (Gray house), see “Larches, The”/”Larchwood”

– lectures on, 35:118

– of Loyalist houses, 10:12-14; 16:18-24 passim; 26:49, 52-60; 33:62; 37:67 (see also individual houses)

– medieval, studies of, 33:85-90

– meetinghouse, see church, above

– MIT and MIT School of, see Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

– at Mount Auburn Cemetery, 44:184-87

– “new town” (Mariemont, Ohio), 43:162-63

– of old gymnasium, 30:12

– at Radcliffe, see Fay House

– railroad station, 38:33

– résumé of (1973 paper), 43:33-52

– schoolhouse, 13:90-97 passim

– schools of, see Harvard School(s); Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

– of stables (private), 43:10, 159, 166

– of street railway “head house,” 39:102n73

– survey of, see Architectural History of Cambridge, Survey of, above

– of University press (old, Brattle Square), 26:40; 30:19-20 (see also Harvard University Press)

– variety of, 26:38; 31:33; 39:108; 43:44

– of Vassall houses, see Vassall houses and land; Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House; Waterhouse house

– walking tours showing, see Guide to, above

– West Indian, 33:61

– wood used in, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.

– 17th c., 6:19-25 passim; 14:34; 32:108-9

– 18th c., 6:25; 13:45; 19:47; 20:111, 124; 25:88-90; 27:87, 29:20, 23

– 19th c., 6:25; 18:34-40 passim, 43; 20:57, 60, 119; 22:53; 23:24, 92; 30:20; 41:20 (see also of Harvard buildings, above)

– 20th c., 20:124; 35:113, 120-21; 42:75

– See also Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Architecture, styles of

– Bauhaus, 42:59

– “Bracketed,” 43:44, 46; 44.164-67 passim

– Bulfinch, 44:142 (see also Bulfinch, Charles)

– “Cape Cod, 31:35

– “carpenter’s,” 26:43, 46; 39.118; 43:40-41, 42, 51

– changes in (1880s), 44:166

– classical, 43:48

– “colonial,” 6.19-20, 25; 10:13; 18:29; 21:50-57, 108, 112-18; 24:19; 26.37, 39, 43; 30:76; 31:33; 33:40, 92; 35:25; 43:37, 158; 44:168

– – – Colonial Revival, 31:35; 43:17, 48, 49-59, 159-61 passim, 166

– – – Holmes’s description of, 33:62

– “cottage mansion,” 18.43; 33:21

– “Early American,” 31:35

– “Eastlake,” 43.47; 44:167

– Egyptian Revival (at Mount Auburn Cemetery), 34:83, 90; 44.184-85, 192 (and illus. #2 following)

– “Empire,” 32.101

– “English,” 43.11, 44, 160; 44:135

– “Federal,” 23.26; 25:129; 26:39, 40 (illus. #11 following), 43; 33:49; 42:46; 43:43-44

– “French,” see mansard-roof, below

– functional, 31:35

– gambrel-roof, 6:25; 20:111; 26:40 (illus. #12 following); 28:11; 43:49, 51; 44:168

– – – of Holmes birthplace, 4.39; 6:25; 29.19; 33:40; 41:120

– – – Holmes quoted on, 26:43

– – – “that saw the row…on the 19th of April,” 10:71n1; 20:127

– – – Vassall (Henry) house, 10:13; 21:108

– – – Webber house, 8:33; 41:118 (illus. facing), 119

– garrison, 6:16, 19

– Georgian, 26:42, 44; 33:92; 39:108; 41:10; 43:31 (illus. #13, #14 following), 46, 48

– – – difficulties with, 42:75; 43:51

– – – Georgian Revival, 43:49-50, 160

– – – Neo-Georgian, 44:145

– – – Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House, 26:52-53; 43:31 (illus. #2 following)

– Gothic Revival, 26:38, 40 (illus. #9-11 following), 96; 34:30, 39:108; 43:10; 44:165, 185

– – – “cottages,” 26:42, 43; 39:118

– – – introduction of, 26:41-42, 45, 46; 27:31; 28:63; 33:17

– Greek Revival, 18:36n2; 26:37, 40 (illus. #l-4 following), 44; 29:36-37; 30:21; 38:77; 39:118; 43:44, 45, 164; 44:163

– – – Dana-Palmer house, 33:11, 16, 20, 30

– – – Ionic columns used in, 30:20; 31:58; 43:26; 44:146

– – – Law School buildings, 41:124, 128

– – – popularity of (1840s), 20:119; 26:38-41, 43; 31:34; 44:185

– hip-roof, 44:135

– International, 43:37, 51 (see also “modern,” below)

– Italianate, 18:33; 26:37, 40 (illus. #7, #8 following), 41, 43, 43:44, 45; 44:165

– mansard-roof, 18:36n2; 19:21; 26:40 (illus. #13, #14 following); 30:20; 33:49; 42:39, 46; 43:11; 44:139, 143, 152 (illus. #1, #5 following), 163-68 passim (and illus. #3-#5 following)

– – – popularity of (1860s), 26:38, 43-45; 31:34, 57; 35:113; 43:45-46

– “modern,” 43:11, 30, 33 (illus. #16 facing), 37, 51-52

– Neo-classic, 26.40 (illus. #5, #6 following)

– Neo-Georgian, see Georgian, above

– Norman Gothic, 44:185 (see also Gothic Revival, above)

– Palladian, 44:168

– Queen Anne, 26:38, 40 (illus. #15 following), 45, 47, 48; 39:108; 43:46-51 passim; 44:166, 167

– Regency, 44:135

– Renaissance, 43:45

– Romanesque, 26:40 (illus. #16 following); 39:120-21; 41:117, 126, 127, 128

– Romantic, 26:42-43

– “salt-box,” 37:67

– Scandinavian, 42:59

– “Shingle,” 11:23; 43:47, 159; 44:167

– “Stick,” 43:14, 31 (illus. #8 following), 47; 44:165

– Swiss, 26:47

– “telescope” house, 26:44; 31:33

– Tudor/Tudor Gothic 26:40 (illus. #10 following), 42: 39:108 (see also Gothic Revival, above)

– Venetian Gothic, 26:45 (see also Gothic Revival , above)

– “Victorian,” 26:37-38; 28:31, 63; 30:21; 35:25; 43:37, 47; 44:159, 163, 166, 189

– See also Architecture; Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Arensberg, Walter L. (Pittsburgh art collector, c, 1915), 41:23 Arianism, see Religion (dissenting/nonconformist) Aristocracy, see Social class Arkwright Insurance Company (Boston), 2:28 Arlington, Massachusetts, 30:20; 32:44; 44:159

– boundaries of, 8:20; 21:34, 35; 39:109

– brickyard in, 42:74

– and bridges, bridge expense, 5:39; 7:55

– burying ground (Pleasant St.) in, 8:22, 24

– Cambridge YWCA in, 36:48

– consolidation with Cambridge proposed (1916), 42:91

– court jurisdiction over, 16:22

– early roads to, 14:35, 50; 28:30; 33:38

– History of (Cutter), 5:42

– included in “Newtown[e],” 9:71, 75; 14:35, 48; 17:93; 21:34; 22:98; 31:61; 39:109; 42:79; 44:57

– incorporated (1807) as “West Cambridge,” see West Cambridge

– migration to (c. 1900), 35:87

– newspaper (Middlesex Townsman) in (1882), 36:114

– opposes enclosure of Cambridge Common (c. 1830), 33:38, 39

– settlement of, 22:66

– street railway to, 20:54; 39:84, 89n32, 94, 99, 101nn71, 73, 104, 105; 42:90

– as village (c. 1845), 22:28

– See also Menotomy; West Cambridge Arlington Heights, 39:99, 105; 44:11 Arlington Historical Society, 11:82 Arlington Street (Boston), 24:64; 44:11

– Arlington St. Church, 34:125; 43:21 Arlington Street (Cambridge), 14:63; 20:126; 36:101; 38:119-20 Armaments, see Arsenal; Cannon; Revolutionary War (ammunition/powder shortage during ) Armenian Church, 42:135 Armory, see Coats of arms Armory buildings, see Arsenal Armory Hall (1870s), 30:20 Armstrong, Gen. Samuel Chapman (1839-1893), 17:87 Army, 34:111n

– age of recruits in, see Militia

– barracks for (Revolutionary War), 5:64-67; 14:43; 16:37, 55, 80; 20:99; 22:67; 37:60

– – – in Harvard buildings, 3:54; 13:37; 23:49; 33:148; 40:115; 42:82; 43:71; 44:67

– (see also Cambridge Common; Christ Church [Episcopal]; “Convention Troops”)

– and courts-martial, courts of enquiry (1770s), 11:64, 67, 69; 13:34; 30:68; 37:58

– and the draft

– – – draft riots (1860s), 2:39; 6:14; 33:48-49

– – – hired substitutes in, 25:137; 39:13

– – – protested (watchmen, 1630s), 44:44

– ROTC, 34:11; 40:115; 44:153

– Student Army Training Corps (MIT, 1918), 42:56

– Union, food for, 40:100

– Washington takes command of (1775), 18:47-75 passim; 37:53-61 (see also Washington, George)

– See also Arsenal; Cannon; Food; Militia; Military headquarters; War(s) Arnold, Benedict (1741-1801; patriot, traitor), 5:15, 31; 11:76, 77, 79; 21:100; 30:59-60; 33:68 Arnold, “Chappie” (orchestra leader, 1947), 39:140 Arnold, Miss Ellen (on “Junior Committee,” 1905), 44:109, 116, 118 Arnold, Mrs. James: Dana letter to (1842), 29:45n48 Arnold, John (of Hooker’s Company, 1636) 10:102; 14:91; 22:76 (Map 1), 78 Arnold, John Himes (Law School Librarian, 1872-1913), 41:129 Arnold, Miss Margaret (on “Junior Committee,” 1905), 44:106, 109, 113, 114 Arnold, Prof, and Mrs. William R. (Francis Ave. residents, 1915-1960s), 41:28 Arnold, Mr. (at “Junior Committee” party, 1906), 44:116 Arnold Arboretum, 43:14, 72, 79 Arrow Street, 14:34; 15:19; 18:27, 40n2; 22:60, 62, 64

– Phip[p]s-Winthrop house (later site of St. Paul’s Church) on, see Phip[p]s-Winthrop house Arsenal

– Boston, 6:13

– Cambridge, 10:52n2; 16:125; 33:39

– – – and armory buildings, 6:15; 37:91

– – – Harvard battalion formed to guard (1861), 6:14; 17:67; 18:42; 20:100-101, 132; 33:48; 39:13

– – – history of, 6:5-15; 20:99-101; 33:48-49

– – – removed to Springfield, 20:101

– – – site of, 25:119; 31:55, 56; 33:50; 39:13

– – – as theatre, see Theatre

– – – Washington Home Guard and “Reserve Guard” at (1860s), 2:39-40; 6:14-15; 30:80 (see also Militia [volunteers, Civil War] )

– Watertown, 21:21; 37:48; 39:24 Arsenal Square, 20:93; 30:80; 31:56

– naming/origin of, 6:11; 25:115, 119; 33:47-49 Art Club, see Club(s) (at Harvard) Arts, the, 18:33; 21:50

– art prices, 29:56

– art schools, see School(s)

– Concord Art Association, 43:161, 167

– European influence on, 29:34, 37-38, 42-43, 48-51

– Harvard Art Department, beginning of, 27:11-27 (see also Fogg Art Museum)

– lessons in “sketching” (c. 1880), 30:15; 32:45

– medieval, studies of, 33:86-91

– Puritan view of, 30:29; 43:43

– religion and, 30:29

– Romanticism in, 26:42-43, 96-97. 110, 121; 29:34, 48-60 passim, 67; 33:11, 12

– writings on, 35:63, 72

– see also Architecture; Architecture, styles of; Houses, meetinghouses, etc.; Museum(s); Music; Paintings; Photography; Sculpture; Silhouettes; Theatre Arthur, Chester A. (1830-1886; U.S. president 1881-84), 20:38, 47 Articles of Confederation, 33:71, 72 Artificial Pond (Concord Avenue), 38:114. See also Ponds and lakes Asa Gray Garden, see Gray, Prof. Asa Ash Street, 21:5, 59; 24:13; 39:129, 136

– architecture on, 31:33-36

– as “boundary,” 21:96, 109; 28:12

– -Brattle St. intersection, 1:59; 6:34; 16:33; 24:99; 26:50; 31:24, 39; 33:96; 37:13

– Casino on, 31:31-33; 39:126-28

– gasworks on, 25:131; 31:29; 39:126; 42:8

– as “highway” to wharf/landing, 10:10n3, 11n1: 14:33, 63; 22:76-77; 31:25

– laid out, 14:33; 31:22

– -Mason St. intersection, 43:37

– naming of, 31:27 (see also as Windmill Lane, below)

– palisade willows on, 10:20; 31:29-30, 54; 39:126 (see also Fortifications)

– Vassall/Batchelder garden on, see Agriculture and horticulture (private gardens )

– as Windmill Lane, 1:60; 10:11; 21:78, 79, 83; 31:22-27, 38; 37:10, 11, 13; 39:126 Ash Street Place, 31:34 Ashburner, Misses Anne and Grace (c. 1890), 23:77; 25:19; 34:65; 41:34 Ashburnham, Massachusetts, 21:104 Ashfield, Massachusetts: Academy dinners in, 14:27 Ashley, Professor (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Ashmont (suburb): trolley line to, 39:102, 106. See also Street railway(s) Ashmun, John F. (of Cambridge Book Club, mid-1800s), 25:110 Ashmun, Prof. John Hooker (c. 1798-c. 1831), 11:31; 28:112; 34:88; 41:122 Ashmun, Lucy (sister of John H.), 11:31 Ashton, J. N. (Harvard 1893; music critic), 32:88 Ashworth (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:49, 50 Aspinwall, Augustus (Brookline estate of, c. 1830), 34:78 Aspinwall, William (“Recorder,” 1647), 26:68 Aspinwall, Deacon (of First Church, 1630), 10:89 Associated Charities, see Charity Associated Harvard Alumni, see Harvard Alumni Association Association of Ministers in and about Cambridge, 16:97-101 passim; 24:52. See also Religion Associations, see Society(ies) (organizations ) Astor, John Jacob (1763-1848; fur trader): and Astoria Colony, 2:36; 28:39, 40, 44; 38:80 (see also Trade and commerce ) Astronomy, 25:76-83, 119; 33:16-19; 35:83; 36:56; 38:69; 43:19, 44:65

– Clark’s Telescope, 41:158, 166

– comets discovered and studied (1811-58), 4:88; 25:76, 80, 84; 33:18; 40:12

– – – Halley’s (1835), 33:15, 18

– “orrery” (at Harvard), 29:21

– See also Eclipse, total; Harvard Observatory Atatürk, Mustapha Kemal, 44:31 Athenaeum(s) (Boston, Cambridge, Hartford), see Museum(s) Athenaeum Press, 44:81, 82, 83. See also Printers Atherton, Col. Abel Willard (1812), 7:77-78 Atherton, Mrs. Abel Willard (Margaret Weeks Duncan), 7:77-78 Atherton, Dr. Israel (of Lancaster, late 1700s), 7:78 Atherton, James (of Dorchester; d. 1710), 7:78 Atherton, Margaret, see Atherton, Mrs. Abel Willard Atherton, Sarah, see Nichols, Mrs. George Henry Athletics, see Sports and games Atkins, Helen Louise, see Edmands, Mrs. John Rayner Atkins, Sally, see Read, Mrs. William [1st] Atkinson, Brooks (b. 1894; drama critic), 41:108; 42:113 Atkinson, Edward (1827-1905; Boston industrialist ), 40 : 145, 156 Atkinson, Elizabeth, see Dunster, Mrs. [Rev.] Henry (second wife) Atkinson, Emily (“Bee” member, 1860s), 17:72; 32:36 Atkinson, John B. (“Jack”; city manager, 1942-52), 35:24-25; 41:11; 44:93, 94, 97 Atkinson, Mr. (Humane Society agent, c. 1860), 6:31 Atlantic Club, see Club(s) Atlantic Monthly, 31:13; 36:15; 41:62; 44:118

– contributors to, 10:146; 20:70; 32:115; 33:80; 38:52; 39:88n30; 43:30, 56n2

– editors of, 41:31

– – – Aldrich, 19:28, 29

– – – Fields, 33:81; 37:89

– – – Lowell, 4:57, 14:8, 23; 33:80, 83

– – – Page, 19:29

– – – Perry, 2:59; 43:20

– – – Scudder, 19:29

– – – Sedgwick, 41:34; 42:16

– Dr. Holmes and, 4:50, 57, 41:62

– sale of (1870s), 19:22

– See also Periodicals Atlantic Monthly Company, 19:22 Atlases (Cambridge), see Maps and plans Attleboro, Massachusetts: slave/Negro population in (1754, 1765), 10:63n1 Attucks, Crispus (d. in Boston Massacre, 1770), 30:54; 40:124 Atwood, Frederic H. (Francis Ave. resident, 1952-59), 41:30 Atwood, Peggy (friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1798), 11:37, 44 Atwood, Thais, see Carter, Thais Atwood Atwood, Zenas C. (oyster seller, 1816), 8:35 Aub, Mrs. Joseph C. (president of Window Shop, mid-20th c.), 43:105 Auburn Lake (Meadow Pond), 34:84; 44:192 (and illus. #3 following). See also Mount Auburn Cemetery; Ponds and lakes Auburn schools (Alphabet School; “Female High School”), see School(s) Auburn Street, 14:51, 67

– Allston house and studio on, 1:65, 11:32n, 25:119; 26:118; 29:36n6; 35:82 (see also Allston, Washington)

– Inman house moved to corner of, see Inman house

– known as Brookline St., 14:64 (see also Brookline Street) Auction prices, see Prices Audubon, John James (1785-1851, naturalist), 35:12, 14

– Birds of America, 24:86, 87, 28:117; 38:83 Auk magazine, see Periodicals (general) Austen, see Austin Austin, Benjamin (1752-1820; Council member, 1770s), 13:20, 39n3, 40, 41, 43. See also Austin, Jonathan Loring Austin, Charles (shot by Selfridge, d. 1806), 9:11-12 Austin, Rev. Daniel (1840s), 20:97; 22:22; 28:115 Austin, Edward (b. 1802 or 1803; Harvard benefactor), 41:126 Austin, George Lowell (author, 1883), 25:26-27n12 Austin, James T. (1784-1870; Gerry biographer), 33:70-74nn44-57 passim, 90; 34:79 Austin, Mrs. James T. (daughter of Elbridge Gerry), 33:90 Austin, Jonas (bap. 1598; landowner, 1630s), 14:100; 22:76 (Map 1), 78 Austin, Jonathan Loring (1748-1826; landowner), 7:59, 61; 14:43, 51, 64- –

– given as “Benjamin,” 16:38 Austin, Loring (purchases Orne house, 1826), 13:86; 25:129; 32:101. See also Hayes house (“Havenhurst”) Austin/Austen, Martha [Mary], see Austin, Mrs. Thomas Austin, Rev. Richard Thomas (formerly Rev. Reuben S[e]iders; m. 1837), 6:21; 38:117, 41:17 Austin, Mrs. Richard Thomas (Sarah Austin), 6:21; 38:117, 118 Austin, Samuel (1800s; Austin Hall built in honor of), 41:126 Austin, Sarah, see Austin, Mrs. Richard Thomas Austin, Susan (sculptress, mid-1800s), 38:83 Austin, Thomas (of Boston, early 1800s), 6:21; 41:17 Austin, Mrs. Thomas (Martha [Mary] Frost; d. 1838), 6:21; 9:65; 17:48; 23:78, 80; 41:17 Austin, W. (woodcarver, c. 1760), 23:21 Austin, Miss, school of (1839), see School(s) Austin, Mr., school of (1840s), see School(s) Austin Hall (Harvard), 28:115; 33:40; 38:49; 41:26, 126, 129, 130

– architecture of, 25:116, 121; 41:117, 118 (illus. #3, #4 following), 127-28, 131

– site of, 15:38; 25:131; 30:76; 37:51; 42:88 Austin Hotel, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Austin houses, see Cooper-Frost-Austin house; Hayes house (“Havenhurst”) Austin Street, 1:56; 14:51; 16:87; 20:64; 22:68; 34:30; 35:83; 36:45, 116; 39:113

– barracks on (Revolutionary War), 16:37; 22:67 (see also Army)

– laid out, 14:43, 64; 16:38

– school on, (1820s), 35:82 (see also School[s]) Austin Street Unitarian Church, 13:110; 39:21. See also Unitarian Church Austin’s field, 38:117, 118 Australian ballot, see Election(s), political Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, The (Holmes), 4:55, 63-66; 39:130-31 Automobiles, 42:26; 43:23, 27

– and automobile accident (1915), 11:87; 33:55

– effect of, 42:15

– – – on Harvard, 41:110

– – – on historic preservation of houses, 6:16; 39:76

– – – on industry, 39:27-28

– – – on location of professors’ homes, 41:19

– – – on public transit, 39:102n73, 103

– – – traffic problems and pollution, 39:28, 35; 43:35, 80

– gasoline and diesel buses, 39:104, 105; 42:89 (see also Street railway[s])

– highways for, see Streets and highways

– horses replaced by (c. 1915), 32:100

– “livery cabs,” 42:130

– manufacture of (in Cambridge), 15:36

– MIT automobile lab, 42:58

– as novelty (and trouble with), 44:106, 109

– numbers of (1890s), 42:126-27; 43:12

– parking spaces for, 34:120; 35:31, 32; 36:99; 37:43, 92; 38:119; 39:76, 141; 40:28; 42:65; 43:80

– – – hotel parking garage, 37:39

– Radcliffe rules concerning, 41:146, 147

– rubberized tops for, 40:36

– sale of, 30:16

– speed of (1911). 24:91

– – – and speed limit (1909), 42:89

– trucks

– – – on Brattle St., 31:26

– – – vs. railroads, 40:34; 42:89

– See also Travel/transportation Avon, Massachusetts, 21:37, 38 Avon Hill, 38:112, 113; 41:137; 42:37; 44:9 Avon Hill Street, 14:64; 38:111-16 passim, 122; 44:12 Avon Home for Destitute Children, see Charity Avon Place, 38:112, 113, 117, 121, 124 Avon Place Home (Avon Home), see Charity Avon Street (Boston), 32:98 Avon Street (Cambridge), 14:67; 38:112-13, 114; 41:132, 137. See also Shepard Street Aydelotte, Professor (at Swarthmore, 1935), 23:79 Ayer, Clarence Walter (1862-1913; librarian), 3:93; 5:107; 6:33

– obituary, 8:49
Ayer, Mrs. Clarence Walter (Grace Stanwood Blackwell), 8:49
Ayer, Lt.-Comm. Nathaniel F. (1919), 14:116
Ayer, Walter (of Haverhill, c. 1850), 8:49
Ayer, Mrs. Walter (Abbie West Stevens), 8:49
Ayers, see Eayres
Aylward, James (East Cambridge resident, late 1800s), 36:104
Ayres, see Eayres

B

Babb, Prof, [at Boston University] and Mrs. Hugh Webster (Kirkland St. residents, 1930), 41:34
Baccilupi (runs fruit stand on Harvard Square, mid-1800s), 30:18
Bach Society Orchestra, 41:103.- – See also Music
Bache, Alexander D. (1806-1867; physicist), 23:32
Bache, Theodore (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:45
Bacheler, see also Bachelor; Batchelder
Bacheler, W. (“phonographic” report by, 1862), 39:81n11, 86n24, 89n32
Bachelor, see also Bacheler; Batchelder
Bachelor, Rev. George (mid-1800s), 23:80
Bachelor, Mrs. George (Priscilla Stearns), 23:80
Back Bay (Boston), 7:63; 41:56
– filling of, 39:30, 31, 32; 42:48, 49
– as port, 39:110
– street railway to, 39:87, 92, 96 (see also Street railway[s]) “Back Lane,” 14:35; 22:62 Bacon, Delia (1811-1859; author, lecturer), 23:56 Bacon, Edwin Munroe (1844-1916; author), 21:36; 39:25n6; 43:149 Bacon, George (of Stockbridge, 1794), 10:61n1 Bacon, Michael (landowner, 1682), 9:75 Bacon, Robert (1860-1919; diplomat), 33:123 Bacon house (Billerica; standing “on Parker farm” in 1914), 9:75 Bacon & Brown (iron and steel firm), 10:173.- – See also Business and industry Badger, Bernard (of Philadelphia, mid-1700s), 19:78 Badger, Mrs. Bernard, see Riché, Susannah Badger, Mary, see Inman, Mrs. George Bagley, Mrs. Harry Lee (of Boston, 1940s), 28: 104n Bailey, see also Bayley Bailey, David Washburn (publisher, 1920s), 35:115; 37:109-13 passim Bailey, Hollis Russell (lawyer; d. 1934),- – 20:75, 77-78; 22:25
– papers by:
– – – “The Beginning of the First Church in Cambridge” (1915), 10:83-113; 43:114n, 124
– – – “The Beginning of the First Parish in Cambridge” (1924), 17:92-97
– – – “Gleanings from the Records of the First Church of Cambridge” (1908), 3:109-13
– reports on marking of historic sites, 1:55-67; 3:50-56 Bailey, Rev. Jacob (1731-1808):- – diary of, while Harvard student (1755), 11:73 Bail[e]y, Rev. John (1693), 24:50 Bailey, Julia Reynard Pickard, see Bailey, Mrs. Ralph E. Bailey, Dr. M. H. (1920s), 20:62 Bailey, Rev. Ralph E. (called to First [Congregational] Church, 1928), 31:65 Bailey, Mrs. Ralph E. (Julia Reynard Pickard):- – “The Distaff Side of the Ministerial Succession in the First Parish Church in Cambridge” (1933 paper), 22:80-96 Bailey, Solon I. (1854-1931; author), 33:16n24 Bailey, Mr. (friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1826), 28:23 Bailey, Mrs. (Female Humane Society secretary, 1914), 9:70 Bainbridge, Guy (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 10:103; 14:98 Bainbridge, Comm. William (1774-1833), 25:100 Baird, Spencer F. (1823-1887; zoologist), 35:12 Baird-Atomic, Inc., 41:44 Baker, Adelaide (daughter of Minerva Parker; of Westport, Ct.), 43:172 Baker, “Alice,” see Baker, Miss Charlotte Alice Baker, Miss Charlotte Alice (1833-1909; schoolmistress), 33:39
– obituary, 10:171 Baker, Dean Christina H. (of Radcliffe, 1920s), 16:13; 43:81 Baker, Eliphalet (in Dedham church case, 1820), 43:120 Baker, George Fisher (1840-1931; philanthropist), 34:11 Baker, Prof. George Pierce (1866-1935), 8:54; 27:34
– and 47 Workshop, 33:158; 38:58; 40:110-22; 43:20; 44:148, 152 (illus. #9 following ) Baker, Mrs. George Pierce (Christina Hopkinson), 33:44; 43:20 Baker, Dean [of Business School] and Mrs. George Pierce, Jr. (Farrar St. residents, c. 1930), 25:18; 32:102; 41:37; 42:16 Baker, John C. (president of Avon Home, 1939-45), 38:129 Baker, John Hopkinson (b. 1894; ornithologist), 35:15 Baker, Matthew Bridge (of Charlestown, c. 1800), 10:171 Baker, Mrs. Matthew Bridge (Catherine Catlin), 10:171 Baker, Thomas (Roxbury settler, 1640), 10: 171 Baker, Walter (Dorchester house of, built mid-1700s), 33:65 Baker, William (trial of, 1657), 24:75 Baker, Mrs., boardinghouse of, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Baker, Professor (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Baker Library, see Library(ies) Bakeries, see Retail and food stores Balch, Frank (Boston lawyer, 1860s), 3:22 Balch & Tucker (provision store), 8:39.- – See also Retail and food stores Baldwin, Dudley (of Connecticut [?], c. 1790), 27:73 Baldwin, Emma, see Livingston, Mrs. Oscar Frederick (first wife) Baldwin, Col. Jeduthan (1732-1788):- – diary of (1775-79), 11:75 Baldwin, Judge J. F. (before 1853), 14:64 Baldwin, John (newspaper editor, late 1800s), 36:109 Baldwin, Loammi (1745-1807; engineer), 16:88; 33:10n12
– and Middlesex Canal, 40:52, 53, 54; 42:120
– orderly book kept by (1776), 11:79
– and plans for Stoughton Hall, 7:64, 65 Baldwin, Mrs. Loammi (Nancy Williams), 1:49 Baldwin, Maria (Agassiz school principal, 1914), 41:24; 44:13 Baldwin, Ruth, see Barlow, Mrs. Joel Baldwin, Samuel (British historian, 1770), 39:145n3 Baldwin, Simeon (Yale tutor, 1784):- – diary quoted, 11:68-69 Baldwin, William B. (in Chapel choir, 1880s), 27:33 Baldwin, Mr. (professorial candidate, 1807), 9:17, 20, 23; 21:103 Baldwin, Rev. (of Cambridgeport, 1819), 16:65 Baldwin apples, see Agriculture and horticulture Baldwin Prize (Harvard), 44:89 Baldwin Street, 14:64; 34:69; 39:106 Balfour, Mary, see Brunton, Mrs. Mary Balfour Ball, Amy Cooke, see Gilman, Mrs. Arthur (first wife) Ball, John (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:47 Ball, Samuel and Experience (of Lee, c. 1840), 5:110 Ball, Sidney (Dramatic Club, 1940s), 38:57, 63 Ball, Thomas (1819-1911; sculptor), 33:155; 34:91 Ball’s Hill (Concord), 24:90 Ball’s store (North Ave., 1840s), 20:129 Ballantine, Stuart (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Ballantine, Professor (of music, c. 1900), 32:88; 41:99 Ballard, Fred (playwright, 1912), 40:111, 112 Balloon ascension (1784), see Aircraft Ballots, see Voting Ballou, Ellen B. (biographer, 1970s), 44:69n8, 81 Ballou, Rev. Hosea (1771-1852), 34:88 Ballou’s Pictorial magazine, see Periodicals (general) Baltimore, Lord (Charles Calvert; 1637-1715), 34:113 Baltimore, Maryland
– gas lighting in, 42:8
– yellow fever epidemic in, 44:174 Baltimore, U.S.S. (ship), 41:169 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, see Railroad(s) Bancroft, Prof. George (1800-1891; historian), 2:119; 7:32; 28:75; 34:38; 40:95; 44:191
– cited, 4:22n1; 5:87n2 Bancroft, Hubert H. (1832-1918; historian), 28:45, 52, 54 Bancroft, Mary (author, mid-1900s), 36:102 Bancroft, Roger (of Shepard congregation; d. 1653), 14:97; 21:82-83; 22:20 Bancroft, Mrs. Roger (Elizabeth; later Mrs. Martin Saunders, Mrs. John Bridge, Mrs. Edward Taylor), 21:82, 83 Bancroft, Mayor (Gen.) William A. (mayor 1893-96), 25:116; 39:99 Bangor, Maine, 44:33 Bangs, Edward (brother of Outram), 35:16 Bangs, Jacob N. (printer, 1840s), 20:85 Bangs, Outram (1863-1932; ornithologist), 35:15-16 Bangs, Miss, boardinghouse of, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Banister, see also Bannister Banister, Mr. (Vassall family friend, 1770s), 10:39 “Bank Lane,” 13:82n1 Banks, Sir Joseph (1743-1820; English naturalist), 38:77 Banks, Gen. [Gov.] Nathaniel Prentiss (1816-1894), 7:6; 14:126; 17:65, 66; 23:86; 39:16; 43:64 Banks, Sarah, see Foster, Mrs. Thomas (James?) (second wife) “Banks Brigade,” see “Bee” Banks Street, 14:64 Banks and trust companies
– Bank of the United States, 27:53
– “Cambridge Market Bank,” 20:131-32
– Cambridge Savings Bank, 10:174, 185; 15:36; 16:130; 33:50; 38:29
– – – Corporation, 7:85
– – – site, 30:18, 23; 32:84
– Cambridge Trust, 7:105; 10:186; 15:22; 39:12; 41:22; 43:26, 105
– – – history of (1968 paper), 41:40-54
– – – site, 30:24; 41:106
– Cambridgeport Savings Bank, 15:37; 35:87
– Central Trust, 15:36; 24:11
– Charles River National Bank, 6:28, 30; 10:174; 15:36; 33:119; 34:98; 41:143
– – – site, 2:38; 8:33; 20:131; 30:18
– Charles River Trust, 15:36; 41:46, 48
– Charlestown Savings Bank, 33:149
– Coolidge Bank, 43:44
– East Cambridge Savings Bank, 15:37; 36:96, 101, 105; 41:46
– Federal National Bank (fails, 1933), 37:38
– Federal Reserve Act and, 12:41
– First National Bank (Boston), 33:149; 41:47
– Harvard Bank, 25:138
– Harvard Trust, 39:40, 45; 40:147, 148; 41:46, 51, 119
– – – historical publication of (1936), 43:125
– Lechmere Bank, 39:69
– Merchants Bank (Boston), 41:66
– New England Bank, 41:65
– North Cambridge Savings Bank, 20:132
– Old Colony Trust, 41:47
– See also Money Bannister, see also Banister Bannister property, 22:66 Bant, Mary, see Bronsdon, Mrs. Benjamin Baptism and baptism controversy, see Religion Baptist Church, 9:76; 13:98; 33:151; 36:65, 68, 71
– Central Square (Cambridgeport), see First Baptist Church
– North Cambridge, 20:135
– Old Cambridge, 6:30; 10:173; 15:34; 18:29; 38:30n12
– – – moved (1867), 18:30; 21:61; 25:120
– organized (in Cambridge, 1817), 29:68
– See also Religion Barbados, 17:56; 24:70n6, 74n14
– Vassall family property in, 10:32n
– See also West Indies Barber, see also Barbour Barber, Annie, see Clarke, Annie Barber Barber, Edwin A. (1851-1916; archaeologist), 19:42 Barbour, see also Barber Barbour, Edmund D. (Boston merchant before 1902), 15:47 Barbour, Thomas (Harvard 1896)), 27:37; 35:14; 38:79 Barbour, W. S. (surveyor, 1860s):- – street railway map by, 39:96 (illus. facing) Bard, Dean [Dr.] Samuel (1742-1821; of New York), 43:137 Bare Cove, see Hingham, Massachusetts Barges, see Travel/transportation Barker, Ebenezer (engineer, c. 1840), 41:159 Barker, Edward (Buckingham St. resident, c. 1900), 41:169 Barker, Jeanette Palache (architect), 41:161
– “A School for All Seasons” (1972 paper), 42:123-35 Barker, John (ice plant employee, c. 1800), 2:37 Barker, John Herbert (1910):- – as descendant of early settlers, 5:54 Barlow[e], Elizabeth, see Dana, Mrs. Robert Barlow, Gen. Francis C. (Harvard 1855), 6:11 Barlow, Joel (1754-1812; statesman), 27:54-55, 72, 75, 78, 83; 29:27 Barlow, Mrs. Joel (Ruth Baldwin):- – and Craigie letters, 27:72, 73, 75, 78, 83 Barlow, Samuel L. M. (1826-1889; book collector), 38:108 Barnard, see also Bernard Barnard, Benjamin, Jr. (m. 1726), 8:21 Barnard, Mrs. Benjamin, Jr. (Mary Wellington), 8:21 Barnard, Rev. Charles Francis (1808-1884), 23:57 Barnard, Eliza (friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1798), 11:37 Barnard, George Middleton (late 1800s), 19:46n1 Barnard, Mrs. George Middleton (Susan Livingston Tilden), 19:46n1, 47n Barnard, John (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:78 Barnard, John (of London, 1772; Ruggles creditor), 37:23 Barnard, Joseph Tilden (late 1800s), 19:46n1 Barnard, Mrs. Joseph Tilden (Mary Winchester Cunningham), 19:46n1 Barnard, Mary Winchester (daughter of following), see Curtis, Mrs. Francis Gardner Barnard, Mary Winchester Cunningham, see Barnard, Mrs. Joseph Tilden Barnes, Albert M. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:41 Barnes, Phineas (O. W. Holmes classmate), 41:120, 122 Barnes, Mr. (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:59, 62 Barney, Dr. J. Dellinger (1940s), 31:52 Barney, Mrs. Margaret W. Higginson (1911), 6:78 Barns, farm buildings, carriage houses, stables, see Agriculture and horticulture; Animals; Horses (as transportation); Houses, meetinghouses, etc.; Street railway(s) Barnstable, Massachusetts, 32:108; 41:64; 43:168
– Genealogical Notes of families of, 44:70n9
– Hilliard’s pastorate in, 22:88
– ornamented floors in houses in, 21:55 Barnstable County, 23:27 Barnum, P. T. (1810-1891; showman), 14:137, 138; 23:89 Barnum’s tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Baron, see Bar[r]on Barracks
– for British troops, see Britain; “Convention Troops”
– for colonial/U.S. forces, see Army
– for “Hessians,” see “Convention Troops”
– Navy (World War I), see Navy, U.S. Barrett, Hannah (landowner, 1818-34), 20:134 Barrett, Mrs. Jo[seph?] (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1806), 9:15 Barrett, Thomas (appraiser, 1778), 10:85 Barrett, William (tailor, 1656), 8:31 Barrett, Dr. W. M. (1870s), 20:103 Barrett, Mr. (accommodations for British officers in house of, 1770s), 13:50 Barrett, Mr. (property of, owned [1807] by Benjamin Joy), 9:23 Barrett, Mr. (at “Junior Committee” party, 1906), 44:116 Barrett family, 10:115 Barrington, Sir Thomas and Lady: Watertown agent’s letter to (1630), 24:64-65; 26:6 Bar[r]on, Jonathan (of Chelmsford, c. 1700), 13:83 Bar[r]on, Lucy, see Vassall, Lucy Bar[r)on Barren, W. A. (Harvard tutor, 1793-1800), 11:35n2 Barron, Walter (with William Emersons, 1950s), 37:127 Barry, Mayor J. Edward (elected 1910), 6:57; 8:10; 42:52 Barry, John Stetson (historian, 1856), 43:124 Barry, Philip (1896-1949; playwright), 40:117, 119 Barry, Mrs. (buys Kirkland St. house, 1935), 23:79 Barry’s Corner:- – horse cars to, 39:92, 95 Barter system, see Trade and commerce Bartlett, Harriet (schoolgirl, early 20th c.), 42:134 Bartlett, Henry (Highland St. resident, early 20th c.), 24:16; 43:16 Bartlett, Mrs. Henry, 43:16 Bartlett, J. Gardner:- – “The English Ancestral Homes of the Founders of Cambridge” (1919 paper), 14:79-103 Bartlett, John (1820-1905; editor), 8:39; 10:192; 21:62; 44:113
– …Concordance…of Shakespeare, 1:74, 86
– Familiar Quotations, 1:70, 71-75, 86; 11:30n1; 15:31
– house of (165 Brattle St.), 1:86; 21:60; 25:115, 118; 41:165
– “Reminiscences of” (Willard, Higginson, Emery addresses, 1906), 1:67-87
– and University Book Store, see University Book Store Bartlett, Mrs. John (Hannah Willard), 1:67, 68, 74, 86; 9:68; 21:60; 35:18; 41:165
– as four-year-old child, 11:30
– illness and death of, 1:76-77, 80; 44:113 Bartlett, Mary and Nancy (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bartlett, Register [Samuel?] (friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1801), 11:52 Bartlett, Sarah L. (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bartlett, Gen. William Francis (Civil War), 39:14 Bartlett, Mr. (rents Old Parsonage from Judge Wendell, 1808), 9:28, 31, 32n1 Bartlett, Mr. (ice cream store of, 1870s), 30:24.- – See also Retail and food stores (confectioneries) Bartlett, Professor (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Bartlett:- – Account of Charlestown, 17:53 “Bartlett Club,” see Club(s) Bartlett family, 14:80 Bartlett house, see Bartlett, John Bartlett Street (Boston), 30:38 Bartlett’s (apothecary shop, late 1800s), 25:116, 121; 41:105 Bartol, Rev. Cyrus Augustus (1813-1900), 30:89 Barton, Dr. Benjamin Smith (Philadelphia botanist, c. 1800), 43:132, 135, 137, 138 Barton, Clara (1821-1912; organizer of Red Cross), 14:123, 138 Barton’s Point (Boston), 14:48; 16:46 Bartram, see also Bertram Bartram, John (1699-1777; botanist), 43:128, 132, 135, 138 Bartram, William (1739-1823; naturalist), 43:128, 135 Basket Club, see Women’s clubs/organizations Bass, Bishop Edward (1726-1803), 9:32n1; 10:46 Bass River, see Beverly, Massachusetts Bassett, Asa (late 1700s), 8:23 Bassett, Mrs. Asa (1745-1804; Margaret Wellington [Page]), 8:23 Bassett, John (drum major, 1775), 18:61 Bassett, Parker (freed slave), 18:37 Bastille, Mrs. John (Esther Jackson), 43:11 Batchelder, see also Bacheler; Bachelor Batchelder, Charles Foster (b. 1877; ornithologist), 1:49; 2:20; 28:105, 108; 30:11; 41:32 Batchelder, Mrs. Charles Foster, 28:105, 108 Batchelder, Eugene (Harvard 1845; brother of Isabella), 21:105, 106 Batchelder, Mrs. Eugene (Caroline A. Deshon), 21: 106 Batchelder, Francis Lowell (1825-1858; lawyer), 21:105, 106, 107, 110; 23:55, 57, 58; 25:129 Batchelder, Mrs. Francis Lowell (Susan Cabot Foster), 21:106; 23:57; 25:129 Batchelder, “Frank,” see Batchelder, Francis Lowell; Batchelder, Samuel Francis Batchelder, Isabella, see James, Mrs. Thomas Potts Batchelder, John M. (surveyor; 1863-1904), 14:73 Batchelder, John Montgomery (1811-1892), 21:105, 116 Batchelder, Jonathan (Minute Man, 1775), 23:49 Batchelder, Miss Mary Emory (CHS member, 1937), 24:17; 33:158 Batchelder, Maude, see Vosburgh, Mrs. Charles Peter Batchelder, Samuel (Minute Man; d. 1814), 23:49 Batchelder, Mrs. Samuel (Elizabeth Woodbury), 23:49 Batchelder, Samuel, Jr. (1784-1879), 21:104-15 passim; 22:24; 23:49-54 passim
– buys Vassall (Henry) property, 16:33; 21:104; 23:49, 56; 31:26, 27-29, 38; 37:18 (see also Vassall houses and land [Henry Vassall])
– and Harvard Branch Railroad, 38:26, 27, 30, 40
– poem by, quoted, 10:77 Batchelder, Mrs. Samuel, Jr. (Mary Montgomery), 21:79, 105, 106, 107, 114, 116; 23:49-52 passim, 61; 31:27 Batchelder, Samuel 3d, 6:28; 15:38; 16:119; 18:31; 20:94; 21:14, 105, 106, 107
– lays out Hawthorn and Acacia Sts., 31:30-31 Batchelder, Mrs. Samuel [3d] (Marianne Giles Washburn), 18:37; 21:106 Batchelder, Samuel Francis (“Frank”; d. 1927), 33:158
– death of, 15:2
– – – resolution on, 20:10-11
– papers and histories by:
– – – “Adventures of John Nutting, Cambridge Loyalist” (1910), 5:55-98
– – – Bits of Cambridge History, see History, Cambridge
– – – “Burgoyne and His Officers in Cambridge, 1777-1778” (1918), 13:17-80; 22:29n1
– – – “Col. Henry Vassall” (1915), 10:5-85; 21:98; 31:26
– – – “editor’s note” (1925), 18:27-28; 33:9n10
– – – Notes on Col. Henry Vassall, 26:50-56nn6-86 passim, 59nn129, 135, 61; 31:25nn6, 7
– – – “The Washington Elm Tradition” (1925), 18:46-75; 33:38; 43:72n6 Batchelder, Mrs. Samuel Francis (Hilliard St. house of, built 1910), 43:166 Batchelder, William (b. c. 1820), 21:105; 23:54, 55, 58 Batchelder, Mrs. William, 23:58 Batchelder family, 10:10n2; 23:56; 33:158; 34:62 Batchelder garden, see Agriculture and horticulture (private gardens) Batchelder house, see Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall) Bates, Betsey (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bates, E. C. (tavernkeeper , c. 1850), 20:133 Bates, Jacob Hill (b. 1788), 20:60; 23:23; 26:106n78
– house built by (“Bates-Dana” house), see Dana houses (#11) Bates, John S. (merchant, c. 1850), 8:37 Bates, Joseph (housewright/wheelwright, 1796), 6:12; 20:99; 33:48 Bates, Joshua (1788-1864; financier), 33:154 Bates, Mary, see Meriam, Mrs. Horatio Cook Bates, Pearses (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bates, Mrs. William (Female Humane Society officer, 1864), 9:66 Bates, Mr. (superintendent of schools, c. 1910), 44:14 Bates house (Brattle St.; moved to Hawthorn St., 1929), 30:15, 19, 20 Bates-Dana house (Brattle St.; torn down, 1927), see Dana houses Bates Street, 38:113, 115, 123 Bates & Thaxter (shipping firm, c. 1850),10:184 Bath Street, 14:33; 31:22, 27, 29; 42:8, 9.- – See also Ash Street Bathing
– and bathtubs/bathrooms, see Domestic and family life
– in early hotels (c. 1850), 37:37
– shower bath “for ladies” (1934, Boat Club), 39:137
– and swimming, see Sports and games
– See also Health; Water supply Batterymarch Street (Boston), 19:37 Baxter, Prof, and Mrs. Gregory P. (Francis Ave. residents, c. 1920), 41:29 Bay Colony, see Massachusetts Bay Company and Colony Bay Psalm Book, 3:17; 27:30; 32:69-70, 84-85, 86; 36:54; 38:92, 93; 44:64.- – See also Printers; Publishers Bay State Brick Company, 42:72, 73-74.- – See also Brick and brickmaking Bay State Glass Company, 36:102.- – See also Business and industry Bay State Historical League, see Historical Society(ies) Bay View (Boston), 39:99 Bayard, Thomas F. (1828-1898; statesman), 5:7; 14:27 Bayley, see also Bailey Bayley, Frank W. (authority on Copley, 1915), 9:61; 10:8n1, 15n4; 26:52n37, 61 Bayliss, E., see Ricketson, Mrs. O. G. Beach, see also Beech Beach, Rev. David Nelson (late 1800s), 20:75; 35:85; 40:145 Beach, S. C. (hymn writer, 1866), 36:64 Beach Street (Boston), 41:59 Beacon Hill (Boston), 26:52; 39:30, 31, 133
– Blackstone settles on (“Sentry Hill”), 33:139 (see also Blackstone [Blaxton], Rev. William)
– as center of Boston society (c. 1850), 41:56
– geology of, 17:30
– State House on, 41:58 (see also State House [Boston])
– three peaks of, 33:143 (see also “Trimount,” “Trimountain[e]”) Beacon Oil Company (est. c. 1860), 7:105.- – See also Business and industry Beacon Street (Boston), 17:33; 25:136; 27:30; 33:140; 39:30
– fire on (1824), 23:51 (see also Fire[s] [1800s])
– mansions on, 25:29; 41:56, 57
– mayor’s residence on, 4:91
– schools on (1840s, 1880s), 21:105; 23:58; 34:7 Beacon Street (Cambridge/Somerville), 14:64; 20:129; 22:64; 39:92; 40:27; 41:16n1, 19-26 passim, 34; 42:15
– toll house on corner of, 14:50
– See also Bigelow Street; Hampshire Street; Middlesex Turnpike Beal, see also Beale; Beals Beal, Dr. (of McLean Hospital, mid-1800s), 16:121 Beal[s?], Misses (in Old Ladies Home, 1905), 44:110 Beal family, 9:30 Beale, see also Beal; Beals Beale, Miss Elizabeth Chadwick (d. 1950), 6:44, 46 Beale, Prof. Joseph Henry (1861-1943), 18:18n; 22:13n1; 24:71n7; 27:98; 35:23; 39:128
– as descendant of early settlers, 5:53
– minute on death of, 29:7-8
– obituary of Prescott Evarts by (1931), 21:76-77
– papers by, 29:8
– – – “The History of Local Government in Cambridge” (1932), 22:17-28
– – – “The Origin of the New England Town” (1938), 25:61-64 Beale, Rhoda (of- – Hingham, 1835), 33:46 Beale, Thomas (of Shepard congregation; d. 1661), 10:103; 14:101; 22:20, 64, 76 (Map 1) Beals, see also Beal; Beale Beals, Rev. Charles E. (early 20th c.), 20:76 Beaman, William (of Saybrook, Ct., c. 1640), 21:81 Beaman, Mrs. William (Lydia Danforth), 21:81 Bean, James W. (newspaperman; d. 1934), 20:86; 36:114, 117 Bear, see Animals Beard, Amy (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:43 Beard, Rev. Reuben A. (c. 1900 ), 20:76, 80 Beard family (1906), 44:115 Beaver, see also Bever Beaver (ship), 19:50 Beck, “Carl,” see Beck, Prof. Charles Beck, Prof. Charles (1798-1866; classicist), 1:13, 70; 9:66, 67; 15:37, 38; 25:110; 28:112
– and Cambridge volunteers (Civil War), 2:39, 40, 41; 30:80
– given as “Carl,” 37:77
– house of, 18:28, 40-41 Beck, Clara A. (author, 1936), 27:82n86 Beck Hall, 18:27, 40; 22:66; 26:47; 30:23, 80 “Beck’s Park,” 18:40n2 Becker’s greenhouse (1920s), 18:34.- – See also Agriculture and horticulture Bedford, F. (bookbinder), 38:105, 106 Bedford, Massachusetts, 14:50; 30:7; 39:103
– as part of Cambridge (before 1655), 9:75; 14:35; 17:93; 21:47; 22:98; 31:61; 39:109; 42:79
– as part of Concord (1638), 21:38 Bedford, New Hampshire, 40:49 Bedford Street (Boston), 43:121 Bedlam, Capt. Stephen (1776), 11:81 “Bee” (women’s sewing club, formed 1861), 11:56; 12:69; 17:44; 18:40; 22:92; 33:52, 126
– and “Banks Brigade,” 9:67; 17:65-66, 69, 70, 80; 32:35; 39:16
– “Story of” (1924 paper), 17:63-86; 32:35
– See also Women’s clubs/organizations Beech, see also Beach Beech, John (bridge incorporator, 1807), 16:88 Beech Road (Brookline), 43:160 Beech Street, 14:36, 37, 64; 20:125-31 passim, 134; 37:32 Beech Street Bungalow, 44:87 Beecher, Harriet, see Stowe, Harriet Beecher Beecher, Rev. Henry Ward (1813-1887), 7:19; 33:113 Beecher, Rev. Lyman (1775-1863; of Boston), 20:63, 65; 43:119 Beer, see Wine and spirits Belcher, Andrew (tavernkeeper, d. 1673), 8:33; 11:13n2; 14:102-3; 21:81-82, 83, 84; 37:13, 31; 43:116 Belcher, Mrs. Andrew (Elizabeth Danforth, 1619-1680), 21:80-82, 83, 91 Belcher, Capt. Andrew, Jr. (1647-1717), 21:81-89 passim, 105; 37:31; 43:118 Belcher, Mrs. Andrew, Jr. (Sarah Gilbert, first wife), 21:86, 87 Belcher, Mrs. Andrew, Jr. (Hannah, second wife), 21:87 Belcher, Andrew [3d] (b. 1672), 21:86 Belcher, Andrew (1707-1771; son of Gov. Jonathan), 21:90, 91 Belcher, Mrs. Andrew (Elizabeth Teele), 21:93 Belcher, Andrew (grandson of Gov. Jonathan, m. c. 1790), 21:102 Belcher, Mrs. Andrew (Mary Ann Geyer), 11:13n2; 21:102 Belcher, Deborah (b. 1689), 21:87 Belcher, Elizabeth (1640-1709), see Blowers, Mrs. Pyam Belcher, Elizabeth (1678-1735; niece of above), see Oliver, Mrs. Daniel Belcher, Elizabeth Danforth, see Belcher, Mrs. Andrew [1st] Belcher, Elizabeth Teele, see Belcher, Mrs. Andrew [4th] Belcher, Jemima, see Sill, Mrs. Joseph Belcher, Gov. (Sir) Jonathan (1682-1757), 10:58, 73n1; 11:13n2, 83; 21:87-94 passim, 102; 31:41; 37:13 Belcher, Mrs. Jonathan (Mary Partridge, first wife), 21:88-89, 91, 93 Belcher, Mrs. Jonathan (Mary Louisa Emilia Teele, second wife), 21:93 Belcher, Jonathan, Jr. (1710-1776), 21:90, 91, 92-93 Belcher, Mrs. Jonathan, Jr. (Abigail Allen), 21:93 Belcher, J. P. (ice cream store, 1907), 41:143.- – See also Retail and food stores (confectioneries) Belcher, Martha, see Remington, Mrs. Jonathan Belcher, Mary, see Vaughan, Mrs. George Belcher, Robert (of Wiltshire, grandfather of first Andrew), 21:81 Belcher, Sarah, see Lyde, Mrs. Byfield Belcher, Thomas (of London; father of first Andrew), 21:81 Belcher, Thomas (b. 1713; son of Gov. Jonathan), 21:90 Belcher, William (b. 1712), 21:90 Belcher, Mrs. (two of same name, dine at “Mr. Smith’s Farm,” Watertown, 1766), 10:31 Belcher, Mr. (of Boston, 1780s), 19:64 Belcher, Mr. and Mrs., confectioner shop of (1870s), 30:23 Belcher family, 21:110 Belknap, Andrew (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:22 Belknap, Rev. Jeremy (1744-1798; historian), 10:64n4. 69-70n5, 74n4; 38:78; 44:124
– diary of (1775) , 11:75 Bell, Alexander Graham (1847-1922; inventor), 14:129; 29:10n; 34:67, 115; 35:84; 42:10, 11; 43:45 Bell, Mrs. Alexander Graham (Mabel Hubbard), 29:10n; 34:67; 42:11 Bell, Gov. (of New Hampshire) John (late 1700s), 6:76 Bell, Margaret (Margaret Fuller biographer), 35:82 Bell, Stoughton, 22:25; 39:125, 127-29 passim, 135; 41:48; 44:88
– “Bits of Russian Court Life in the Seventies” (1937 paper), 24:99-134
– Brattle St. property of, 16:114; 18:8; 25:109, 118; 26:40 (see also Worcester, Joseph Emerson) Bell, Mrs. Stoughton (Mabel Anzonella), 25:118; 31:160 Bell, Mr. and Miss (friends of T. Fuller, Jr., 1800), 11:45 Bell (watercolorist, 1805), 41:128 Bell (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:44 Bell Telephone Company, 34:114-15.- – See also Communication(s) Bell(s), 31:13
– church, 11:28, 43n1; 16:46, 47, 86; 21:107; 31:13; 33:24; 42:63; 43:113, 118, 44:11, 48
– college, 11:43n1, 61; 29:19-20, 27; 44:23
– fire alarm, 30:16; 44:11 (see also Fire[s])
– school, 30:78 Belle Farm (Rome, N.Y.), 27:75-80 Belletti (concert artist, Bellevue Avenue, 36:116, 118; 38:114 Bellingham, Gov. Richard (c. 1592-1672), 14:54n1; 15:26; 24:76 Bellingham, Mrs. Richard (Penelope Pelham), 14:54n1 Bellingham, Massachusetts, 21:37, 38 “Bellisarius” article (von Steuben), 40:18-20 Bellows, Rev. Henry Whitney (1814-1882), 22:100; 34:22, 24 Bellows, Robert P. (mid-20th c.), 27:98; 35:39 Belluschi, Dean Pietro (at MIT), 44:103 Belmont, Massachusetts, 44:159
– brickyard in, 42:74
– and Cambridge water supply, 10:187; 41:10; 42:85; 43:8
– court jurisdiction over, 16:22
– creation of, 21:34
– migration to, 35:87
– as part of Cambridge, 8:22, 24; 24:51; 39:109; 42:79, 82; 44:57
– – – argument against incorporation, 10:165
– – – consolidation with Cambridge proposed (1916), 42:91
– trolley and subway to, 39:98, 101n71, 103, 105 Belmont Hill, 41:161 Belmont Springs Company, 41:48 Belmont Street, 3:56; 13:65n5; 24:50; 39:98, 105 “Belshazzar’s Feast,” see Allston, Washington (paintings and caricatures by) Belvedere (near Lowell, Mass.), 23:51 Belvidere, Vermont, 27:65 Bemis, Dr. Alonzo A. (c. 1910), 14:128, 129 Bemis, Althea (schoolgirl):- – “Longfellow’s Narrative Poems” (1912 prize essay), 7:91-92 Bemis, Capt. Edward (1745), 14:124 Bemis, George (1816-1878; lawyer), 41:60, 69, 83-84, 86 Bemis, Harry (businessman, 1900), 42:73 Bemis, Mrs. (daughter of Jonas Wyeth 3d) 21:64, 71 Bemis family, 14:138 Benét, Stephen Vincent (1898-1943; poet), 37:88 Benjamin, John (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 10:103; 14:33, 91; 22:76 (Map 1); 31:22
– descendants of, 5:54 Bennett, Dr. David (of Rowley, c. 1650), 16:70 Bennett, Edward L. (bank secretary, 1933), 41:52 Bennett, J. Clark (businessman, 1960s), 40:34; 41:44 Bennett, Josiah Q. (Boston businessman, 1898), 40:29, 34; 41:44 Bennett, “Poco” (Harvard Square personality), 42:119.- – See also Cambridge “characters” Bennett, Samuel (carpenter, 1630s), 21:42 Bennett, Spencer, see Phip[p]s, Lt.-Gov. Spencer Bennett house (Linnaean St.), 44:10 Bennett Street yards, see Street railway(s) Ben[n]ington (ship), 3:66 Benshimol, Max (schoolmaster. 1890s), 35:105 Benson, Albert Emerson (historian, 1929), 44:178n11 Benson, Frank (of Salem; art student, 1880s), 34:73 Benson, Rita (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:43 Bent, Newell (voter, 1822), 14:64 Bent Street, 14:64 Bent’s Wharf (East Cambridge), 44:164 Bentinck-Smith, William (editor), 42:113 Bentley, Rev. William (1759-1819; of Salem), 16:104
– diary quoted, 11:69; 16:106-8, 109; 28:12 Benton (historian, c.1915), 10:63n1, 69-70n5 Bequests, see Wills and testaments Berenson, Rachel, see Perry, Mrs. Ralph Barton Bergen, Mrs. (Raymond St. resident before 1901; “stone lady”), 44:9 Bergman, Charles C. (Harvard 1954), 41:110 Berkeley, Bishop George (1685-1753), 4:23; 14:64; 21:58; 26:118; 28:111 Berkeley, Gov. (Sir) William (1606-1677), 7:97; 32:78 Berkeley Book Club, see Club(s) Berkeley Hotel (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Berkeley Place, 17:43; 21:70; 31:57; 33:99; 36:8 Berkeley Street (Boston), 33:143; 34:71 Berkeley Street (Cambridge), 1:65, 67; 5:108; 11:9; 20:99; 22:56; 37:9, 16; 44:145
– architecture on, 26:41; 43:171
– – – “A History of” (1931 paper), 21:58-71; 25:107, 109; 31:55, 58; 43:7n1
– naming of, 14:64; 26:118
– reminiscences of, 21:13
– springtime flooding of, 25:109; 31:56 Berkeley Street Schools, see School(s) Berkeley Street School Association, 32:30-32 Berkhof, Louis (theologian, 1932), 40:64n8 Berkshire Street, 14:62; 22:68 Bernard, see also Barnard Bernard, Gov. (Sir) Francis (1712-1779), 10:70n5; 11:61; 23:20, 22; 30:53; 37:12, 46; 40:125n7 Bernard, Lady Francis, 23:22 Bertram, see also Bartram Bertram, G. E. M. (electronics manufacturer, 1930), 34:122 Bertram Hall (Radcliffe), 44:145 Bertram Williams Square, 21:61 Bérubé, Miss (with Miss Markham’s school, 1890s), 41:162-63; 43:134
– quoted, 42:130-31 Besbeech, Thomas (settler, d. 1674), 14:101 Bessan, Madame (teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1870s), 32:37 Besse, J. (Quaker historian, 1753), 24:76nl9, 80n32 Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, see Moravian(s) Bethune family, 11:24n6 Betteley, Charlotte, see Leverett, Mrs. Daniel Better Business Bureau (Boston), 40:149 Betts, Elijah:- – Lake View Ave. house of (before 1877), 44:164, 165 Betts, John (landowner; d. 1663), 22:64, 76 (Map 1) Betts propery (1697), 22:64 Bever, Mrs. Michael (president of Window Shop, mid-20th c.), 43:105 Beverly, Massachusetts, 21:40; 22:49; 25:68
– as landing-place of Arbella, 30:34
– Sunday School (of Joanna Prince, 1810) in, 27:82n87 “Bevers,” 38:11.- – See also Food (at Harvard) Bibby, Gouvernour (early 1800s), 19:46n1 Bibby, John Cornelius (early 1800s), 19:46n1 Bibby, Mrs. John Cornelius (Emma Maria Stevens Livingston), 19:46n1 Bible, the, 1:79, 81; 2:28, 31; 3:21; 44:78
– and Bible boxes, 21:51
– and Bible classes, 20:77; 34:41; 36:41, 44; 41:44, 142; 44:110
– English, 40:61
– Geneva, 40:61n2, 63n7
– Indian, 3:17; 6:23; 26:12; 32:27, 70; 44:66
– “infallibility” of, 33:112
– King James, 30:31; 33:136; 42:133
– leaf torn from (by Mather, 1682), 11:62
– and “Lydia’s conversion,” 40:60, 64-74 passim, 79
– Puritans and, 1:35; 17:11; 32:53-54, 69, 72-73; 40:59-60, 66; 43:111 (see also Bay Psalm Book)
– reading of, in schools and at Harvard, see Religion
– Revised Version (1885), 34:41
– science and, 39:119 (see also Evolution)
– “Scottish Psalter,” 37:111
– textual analysis/criticism of, 39:119; 43:122
– Wycliffe, 32:53; 33:136 Bicentennial, see Celebrations (anniversaries of Revolution) Bicycling, see Sports and games Biddle, Clinton P. (president of Avon Home, 1930-39), 38:129 Bierer, John M. (executive, 1950s), 40:37, 40, 41, 42 Bierwirth, Prof. Heinrich Conrad (c. 1900), 35:121 Big Tree Swimming Pool (Holyoke St.), 1:57; 15:20.- – See also Sports and games Bigelow, see also Biglow Bigelow, Benjamin (landowner, 1818, 1830s), 14:64; 16:38 Bigelow, Deborah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:66 Bigelow, Francis Hill (c. 1910), 34:63
– as descendant of early settlers, 5:54 Bigelow, George Tyler (of Watertown, 1829), 12:15, 18 Bigelow, Dr. Jacob (1787-1879; physician, botanist), 4:51; 10:159; 11:21; 17:62; 38:83; 43:135-37, 138-39; 44:77
– and Mount Auburn Cemetery, 34:77-84 passim, 89; 44:172, 174n6, 176-92 passim Bigelow, John (1817-1911; diplomat, author), 2:49 Bigelow, John Ripley (landowner, early 1800s), 23:24 Bigelow, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. III (Elmwood Ave. residents, 1970s), 42:44 Bigelow, Marshall T. (of University Press, 1843; m. 1847), 15:19, 20; 44:76n21, 80n31 Bigelow, Mary Louisa, see Gale, Mrs. Wakefield Bigelow, Rebecca (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bigelow, Timothy (Congressional candidate, 1798), 11:38, 40 Bigelow (Harvard 1801; Commencement speaker), 11:42, 52 Bigelow, Mr. (father of founder of Bigelow Brothers & Kennard; party at home of, 1816), 11:17 Bigelow, Mr. (on women’s education committee, 1870s), 36:32 Bigelow, Mrs. (of Plant Club, 1889), 35:18 Bigelow Brothers S Kennard, 11:17n2; 44:119 Bigelow Chapel, 34:85.- – See also Mount Auburn Cemetery Bigelow estate (1835), 22:66 Bigelow family, 14:80 Bigelow Street, 1:56; 14:64.- – See also Beacon Street (Cambridge/Somerville) Biggs, E. Power (organist), 43:16 Biglow, see also Bigelow Biglow, Abraham (warden of Christ Church, 1814-28), 9:10, 16, 32; 16:89; 23:24; 33:14 Biglow, Mrs. Abraham, 9:9, 10, 16, 20, 32, 33 Biglow, Amelia, Anna Maria, Hephzibah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Biglow, Horatio (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1810), 9:33 Biglow, Lucy (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Biglow Papers, see Lowell, James Russell (writings of ) Bill [first name] (handyman, c. 1910), 31:46-47 Bill, see also Bills Bill, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander H.:- – Highland St. house of, 20:21; 35:20; 43:16 Bill, Frank C. (Prospect Church benefactor, c. 1910), 20:78 Bill of Rights, 10:69n5; 32:105
– of Massachusetts Constitution, 6:53-54, 71 Billerica, Massachusetts, 14:50, 85; 21:104; 39:103; 43:115
– boundaries of, 9:75; 42:79
– “Cambridge Grants and Families in, 1641 to 1655” (1914 paper), 9:71-78
– canal through, 40:43, 46, 48, 53, 54, 58 (see also Canal[s])
– included in Cambridge, 9:72; 17:93; 21:47;22:98; 25:63; 31:61; 39:109; 42:79
– incorporated (1655), 9:76; 14:35, 36; 39:109; 42:79
– as Shawsheen/Shawshin[e] plantation, 9:71-72, 76; 14:36; 21:46; 26:73; 42:79, 116; 43:115, 116 Billings, Dr. John S. (1838-1913), 16:117 Billings, Moses (purchases window glass, 1798), 19:34 Billings, Richard (of Billings Bros., Boston tailors), 10:36-37 Billings, Warren T. (publisher, c. 1900), 20:86 Billings, William (1746-1800; choirmaster), 32:86 Billings family (1806), 9:11 Billings & Stover’s (apothecaries), 20:55; 30:24; 41:52 Bills, see also Bill Bills, Mark (coach line of, c. 1840), 8:37 Bingham, Hiram (1875-1956; archaeologist, statesman), 43:17, 30 Bingham, William J. (athletic director, c. 1910), 34:8; 41:53 Bingham, Lieutenant (at Bunker Hill), 5:28 Binney, Dr. Amos (1803-1847), 25:136 Binney, Amos (glass manufacturer, c. 1820), 9:8; 14:64; 16:94; 19:35; 36:96 Binney, Mrs. Amos, see Russell, Judith Binney fields, 39:115 Binney Street, 14:64; 22:68; 39:121 Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University (Sibley), see Harvard College/University Bird, Horace (music teacher, mid-1800s), 30:76 Bird, Joseph (music teacher, mid-1800s), 13:104; 30:76-77 Bird family, 30:76 Birds, 1:13; 22:109-10; 23:93; 31:50-51; 38:113-20 passim; 39:128, 134; 41:167
– aviary for, 16:50, 54, 61, 62
– and Baldwin apples, 40:52
– Brewster’s study of, 24:86-98; 41:163
– Cambridge ornithology, early history of (1953 paper), 35:11-16
– children’s interest in, 44:10
– English sparrow introduced, 33:94
– Mount Auburn as sanctuary for, 34:86, 87
– orioles, 20:101; 23:93; 25:35; 31:39; 38:120
– parrot, 18:30; 23:37
– passenger pigeons, 24:96
– pigeons, 22:72
– poultry, see Animals
– writings on, 35:12-15
– – – Birds of America, see Audubon, John James
– – – Birds of the Cambridge Region (Brewster), 24:88, 96; 35:15; 41:163
– – – Birds of Concord (Griscom), 35:14
– – – Manual of Ornithology (Nuttall), 24:86; 35:12
– See also Animals; Nuttall Ornithological Club Birket, James (Vassall family friend, 1750), 10:29n1, 32-33; 26:51n25, 52n39, 60; 33:58n3 Birkhoff, Prof. Garrett (Fayerweather St. resident, 1970s), 43:30 Birkhoff, Mrs. Garrett (Ruth), 43:30 Birkhoff house (built 1940), 43:10, 30 Birmingham (England) riots (1791), see Britain Birtwell, Miss Mary (of Welfare Union; d. 1919), 18:21 Bisco, B[e?]ulah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bishop, Anna (1814-1884; singer), 4:88 Bishop, George (of England, 1666), 24:69, 70n5, 73n10, 74, 75n18, 76, 77, 78n29 “Bishop’s Palace,” see Apthorp-Borland house Bissel, Israel (messenger, 1775), 5:24 Bittleston, Elizabeth (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1) Bittlestone, Thomas (in Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Bittlestone, William (in Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Bixler, J. Seely (president of Colby College, 1950), 33:150 Black, Margaret Charlton (schoolgirl):- – “Descriptions of Nature in Longfellow’s Poems” (1915 prize essay), 10:116-22 Black, Professor (Follen St. resident, late 1800s), 20:99 “Black Birds Swamp,” 22:63, 72-73 “Black Death,” see Disease “Black Friday”
– 1775, 30:67
– 1854, 10:150
– 1929, 37:38 Black Horse Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses “Black Island” (near Fresh Pond), 3:105 Blacks, see Negroes Blackall, Clarence Howard (CHS member, 1927), 17:7; 20:56 Blackall, Marian, see Miller, Mrs. Marian Blackall Blackburn, Archdeacon Francis (London, 1780), 9:40 Blackburn, Joseph (portrait painter, c. 1760), 21:119 Blacksmith(s), 8:34, 36; 14:55; 15:33; 20:134; 23:78; 30:16; 33:140
– college, 8:31
– “learned” (Elihu Burritt), 34:27
– “Village,” 37:13 (see also Pratt, Dexter)
– – – Longfellow’s poem on, 3:44; 12:48-49; 14:42; 15:33; 25:41-42; 28:62, 84; 43:104
– – – Longfellow’s sketch of, 30:40 (illus. facing)
– – – and “spreading chestnut tree,” 1:59; 2:55; 3:44; 12:48-49; 14:42, 18:7, 55; 22:106; 28:41, 62, 63; 34:35; 43:104 “Blacksmith’s House,” 43:97, 104 Blackstone [Blaxton], Rev. William (1595- 1675; first settler in Boston), 4:65; 22:59; 27:30; 31:53; 33:95, 139-43 passim; 39:24, 25 Blackstone, Sir William (1723-1780; English jurist), 7:42 Blackstone Canal (Providence-Worcester), 40:51-52.- – See also Canal(s) Blackstone Square (Boston), 41:167 Blackstone Street, 1:56; 19:16, 21, 27-28 Blackwell, Grace Stanwood, see Ayer, Mrs. Clarence W. Blackwell, John T. (CHS member, 1980s), 43: 154n5 Blackwood’s Magazine, 26:97.- – See also Periodicals (general) Blaine, James G. (1830-1893; statesman), 12:23; 20:44-45, 46, 51; 37:94 Blair, Rev. Hugh (1718-1800; Scottish rhetorician), 44:73, 74n18 Blair, Rev. James (1655-1743; of Virginia), 36:57 Blake, Arthur W. (cousin of Davis family, mid-1800s), 23:35 Blake, Mrs. Arthur W. (Louisa Greenough), 18:35; 23:35 Blake, George (businessman c. 1800), 11:40n2; 16:94 Blake, J. Henry (artist, c. 1800), 10:160 Blake, John B. (author, 1950s), 43:130n5; 44:74n18 Blake, Lyman R. (1835-1883; inventor), 36:82; 40:23 Blake, Robert Pierpont (classicist, 1960s), 44:35 Blake, William (1757-1827; English poet and artist):- – works collected, 44:30, 32 Blake, Professor (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Blake, Mrs. (sister of Dr. George Parkman, 1850s), 41:60 Blake Bros. & Co. (Boston banking house, 1870s), 23:36 Blake-Shaw mansion (Boston, 1850), 41:60 Blake’s Stable, 30:15.- – See also Horses (as transportation) Blakeslee, Capt. Victor F. (d. c. 1946), 35:102 Blakeslee Street, 43:9, 12 Blatchford, Miss Mary (Brattle St. resident, 1890s), 34:75; 35:17; 41:165 Blatchford family, 25:130 Blaxton, see Blackstone Bleachery, the, see Somerville, Massachusetts Blessington, Lady Marguerite (1789-1849; British socialite), 28:73, 81 Blidenburg family (Long Island, N.Y.), 10:27 Bliss, George (1816-1896; merchant), 14:135 Bliss, Richard (pupil of Agassiz), 2:74 Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woods (Fogg Museum benefactors, c. 1940), 27:26, 27; 44:31 Bliss (Harvard student, 1773), 11:63 Bliss family, 14:80 Blitzer, Mr. and Mrs. Max (Scott St. residents, 1960s), 41:38 Block, Mrs. Marguerite Beck (author, 1932), 27:60n43 Block Island (Fresh Pond), 20:129.- – See also Fresh Pond Blodgett, Susan (landowner, 1630s), 22:76 (Map 1) Blodgett, Thomas (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:97
– descendants of, 5:54 Blodgett (bakery and dwelling of, destroyed during Siege of Boston), 13:33n4 Blodgett, Mr. (Acacia St. resident, 1930s), 21:112 Blood’s Hotel, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Bloomberg, Dr. and Mrs. Wilfred (Farrar St. residents, 1930s), 41:37 Bloomfield, see Blumfield Blossom Street (Boston), 41:66, 79 Blowers, Elizabeth (Mrs. Thomas Symmes), 21:87 Blowers, Elizabeth Belcher, see Blowers, Mrs. Pyam Blowers, John (1680-1707), 21:87 Blowers, Capt. Pyam (d. 1709), 21:83 Blowers, Mrs. Pyam (Elizabeth Belcher), 21:81, 83, 86, 87, 102 Blowers, Rev. Thomas (1677-1729), 9:6; 21:87, 88 Blowers family, 21:90 Blue Anchor Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses “Blue books,” student, see Harvard student(s) Blue Hill, 21:41; 43: 145
– Harvard Observatory and, 18:42n1; 33:17 Blume, Prof, and Mrs. Bernhard (Holden St. residents, 1950s), 41:38 Blumfield, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:103; 14:89 Blumgart, Dr. and Mrs. Herrman L. (Irving St. residents, 1930), 41:36 Blunt, Rt. Rev. Hugh F. (c. 1920), 36:104 Blynn, Police Officer (1890s), 41:169; 43:17.- – See also Cambridge “characters” Boardinghouses, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Boardley, T. A. P. (editor, c. 1900), 20:89 Bo[a]rdman, Aaron (1649-1703; college smith, steward), 8:31; 37:8n2 Bo[a]rdman, Andrew (1646-1687; college steward), 8:31; 38:7n2 Bo[a]rdman, Andrew (1670/71-1747; college steward), 8:31, 33, 34; 16:33, 72; 22:70; 38:17, 19; 39:60 Bo[a]rdman, Andrew (1701-1769; college steward), 16:72; 22:70 Bo[a]rdman, Mrs. Andrew (Sarah Phip[p]s), 15:41; 16:18, 32, 33, 72; 22:70 Bo[a]rdman, Andrew (1745-1817; landowner), 7:59; 14:55, 64, 68; 16:33, 41-46 passim, 65, 84, 86, 89; 22:68 Bo[a]rdman, Mrs. Andrew (Abigail Richardson, second wife), 16:41, 44-45, 89
– offers room and board for teacher, 13:90 Bo[a]rdman, Caroline (Poole; adopted daughter of Andrew [4th]), 16:44-45, 65 Boardman, “Cato” (slave), 10:69.- – See also Slavery Bo[a]rdman, Mrs. Mary (c. 1700), 22:74 Boardman, Prudence (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Bo[a]rdman, William (in Glover party; d. 1685), 3:12; 8:31; 14:101 Bo[a]rdman, William (landowner, 1761), 5:57 Boardman, Mr. (accommodations for British officer in house of, 1777), 13:50 Boardman, Mrs. (buys house from Beals, 1809), 9:30 Bo[a]rdman family, 10:115; 22:27; 38:7 Bo[a]rdman farm, see Phip[p]s (later Bo[a]rdman) farm Bo[a]rdman house site, 1:64; 15:41 Boardman Street, 14:64; 16:86 Boat Club, see Club(s) Boating, boathouses, boat races, see Sports and games Bôcher, Prof. Maxime (1867-1918; mathematician), 27:37; 36:27 Boer War, see War(s) Bognor, Prof. Walter F. (architect, 1940), 43:30 Boit, Robert A. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:42 Bok, Derek C. (b. 1930; Harvard president1971– – ), 44:152 (illus. #15 following) Boland, Frank K. (hotel owner, 1930s), 37:39-40 Boles, see also Bolles Boles, Mrs. Mary Fabens (Radcliffe 1903), 36:28 Bollan, William (British official, 1772), 39:145n2 Bolles, see also Boles Bolles, Elizabeth (member of “Junior Committee,” 1905):- – letters to, 44:105-20 passim Bolles, Frank (1856-1894; Harvard Secretary), 21:60 Bolles, Mrs. Frank (Elizabeth Swan), 21:60, 61 Bolles, Mr. (of Freeman & Bolles printers, c. 1850), 19:16 Bolster, Charles Stephen:- – “Cambridge Court Houses” (1962 paper), 39:55-70 Bolster, Mrs. Charles Stephen (Elizabeth Winthrop), 38:62
– “Behind the Scenes at 47 Workshop” (1966 paper), 40:110-22 Bolton, Mrs. Anna (daughter of [younger] Elizabeth Bowers [Quaker]), 24:80 Bolton, Charles Knowles, 31:53
– papers by:
– – – “The Aims of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities” (abstract of 1911 address), 6:16-17
– – – “Genealogy and Local History” (1913), 8:12-14 Bonaparte, see also Napoleon Bonaparte Bonaparte, Charles Lucien (1803-1857; prince of Canino), 2:85, 88; 43:57 Bonaparte, Jérôme (1784-1860; French prince), 33:75 Bonaparte, Mme. Jérôme (Elizabeth Patterson), 33:75 Boncoeur, see also Bunker Boncoeur (Huguenot settler, 1630s), 33:148n6 Bond, Rev. Claude (of Nantucket, 1940s), 27:58n38 Bond, Elizabeth L., 35:18, 19
– “The Observatory of Harvard College and Its Early Founders” (1938 paper), 25:75-85; 33:16n26, 55 Bond, George (at Cemetery meeting, 1825), 34:77, 79; 44:176 Bond, Prof. George Phillips (1825-1865; astronomer), 14:64; 25:80, 81-85, 121; 32:29; 33:18 Bond, Mrs. George Phillips (Harriet Harris), 25:83 Bond, Dr. Henry (Watertown historian), 7:63; 8:14n1, 16, 21; 21:11, 38; 37:24, 27 Bond, Jonas (on Watertown committee, 1753), 24:62 Bond, Phineas (British consul at Philadelphia, 1780s), 40:9-10 Bond, Richard (b. c. 1820; son of William C.), 25:80 Bond, Sarah, see Wellington, Mrs. Palgrave Bond, Thomas (of London, 1815), 25:77 Bond, Col. [William? (1734-1776)], 30:62; 37:48 Bond, William (Boston clockmaker, c. 1800), 25:75, 76, 77, 78 Bond, Mrs. William (Hannah Cranch), 25:75, 77, 78, 79 Bond, Prof. William Cranch (1789-1859; astronomer), 15:37, 18:42n1; 25:75-81, 82-85 passim; 26:102n71; 33:16, 18, 36, 55 Bond, Mrs. William Cranch (Selina Cranch, first wife), 25:77, 78-79, 81 Bond, Mrs. William Cranch (Mary Cranch, second wife), 25:79 Bond, William Cranch [Jr.] (d. 1841), 25:79, 82; 33:18 Bond, William H. (Houghton Library curator, 1963):- – “Private Letters to a Public Monument” (1963 paper), 37:173 Bond (Harvard 1801; friend of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:44, 48 Bond Street, 14:64; 22:78; 32:29; 33:55; 37: 16 Bonnier, Mrs. Tora Nordstrom (Swedish author, c. 1950), 33:78n69 “Booby-hut,” see Horses (as transportation) Boody, Dean Bertha M. (of Radcliffe, 1914), 41:144 Book Clubs, see Club(s) Book collection(s), 38:100
– Brinley, sale of (1879), 38:87
– See also Library(ies) Book of Common Prayer, see Religion “Book of Possessions” of Harvard (1635), 22:63 “Book of Sports” (England, 1618), 3:9-10; 38:91 Books
– and bookplates, 10:84 (and illus. following); 24:84; 38:82
– British prisoners’ demand for (1777-78), 13:66
– for children, see Children
– manufacture and sale of, see Booksellers; Business and industry; Printers; Publishers
– and reading at early age, see Age
– and “reading parties,” 11:21
– See also Library(ies); Prices; Schoolbooks Booksellers
– 1600s, 2:14; 44:66
– late 1700s, 9:41
– 1800s, 8:39; 15:33; 30:22; 37:80; 38:104; 42:119; 44:77, 79, 84 (see also Old Corner Book Store [Boston]; University Book Store)
– 1900s, 9:37; 38:104; 41:169
– See also Communication(s); Printers; Publishers Boone, Daniel (1734-1820; pioneer):- – William James compared to, 31:16-17 Booth, Edwin (1833-1893; actor), 18:44; 34:91 Boott, Frances, see Wells, Mrs. William Boott, Dr. Francis (Harvard 1810; physician, botanist), 38:78, 86; 43:137, 139 Boott, Francis (Harvard 1831; benefactor; d. 1904), 32:91; 35:112 Boott, Harriet, see Loring, Mrs. Edward Greely Boott, Kirk (1790-1837; merchant), 22:93; 23:53, 83; 25:91 Boott, Mrs. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:22 Boott house, 23:83 Boradel, see also Borodell Boradel, Margaret (third wife of Thomas Shepard; later, wife of Jonathan Mitchell), see Mitchell, Mrs. Jonathan Borden, Joseph (of Fall River, 1714), 30:50 Bordman, see Bo[a]rdrnan Borgeson, Earl (Law School Librarian, 1960s), 41:131 Boring, Prof. Edwin G. (20th c.), 42:122 Borland, James P. (on Coolidge Hill, 1940s), 32:103
– trustees of ( 1941), 41:30 Borland, Mrs. James P., 32:103 Borland, John (Loyalist, 1770s), 10:40n2, 44n1; 13:70, 79; 15:41; 17:54, 56; 19:63n; 26:59
– property confiscated, 13:22, 30, 44 Borland, Mrs. John, see Vassall, Anna Borland, John Lindell (son of above), 19:63n1, 67, 68 Borland, Mrs. John Lindell, 19:68 Borland family, 10:53, 63 Borland house, see Apthorp-Borland house (“Bishop’s Palace”) Borodell, see also Boradel Borodell, Ann, see Denison, Ann Borodell Bossenger, Sarah, see Foster, Mrs. Thomas Boston, England, 14:81; 22:69; 30:32, 35; 32:62, 110; 44:50 Boston, Massachusetts
– Athenaeum in, see Museum(s)
– boundaries of, 21:24, 26-36 passim, 41-47 passim
– Brighton included in, see Brighton, Massachusetts
– British troops in (1770s), see Britain
– burying grounds in, 44:173-75 (see also Burying ground[s]; Mount Auburn Cemetery)
– and Cambridge Synod, 32:105, 110
– as “capital”/shire town, 17:46; 21:22, 23; 30:35; 32:58, 59; 33:145; 39:25, 26, 58; 43:113
– – – court held in, 39:59
– charitable organizations of (1803 and earlier), 6:28
– City Council of, 39:122; 41:56
– city government plans and charter of, 22:22-23; 41:64
– clubs in, see Club(s)
– commuting to (from Cambridge), see Travel/transportation
– Customs House in, 20:38
– defense of
– – – in Civil War, 40:100
– – – fortifications (1630s), 32:71; 44:43, 45
– – – against Indians, 39:28
– – – in Revolutionary War, see Siege of Boston
– – – and vulnerability (in 1630s), 21:23; 30:35; 31:23; 32:58; 33:145; 39:25; 42:78; 43:112; 44:43
– Dickens visits, 28:57-64, 65; 29:44-45
– directories of, see Directories (city)
– Fair in (1839), 4:34
– as “finest city in the world,” 4:65
– Fire Department, 25:46; 27:46; 36:78
– fires in, see Fire(s)
– First Church, 7:98; 10:88-89, 90, 97-99 passim; 25:104; 30:37; 32:62, 107, 109, 110; 33:37; 35:29; 40:80, 81, 82; 43:124; 44:48, 50, 51
– – – Antinomian/Anne Hutchinson controversy and, 32:73-75; 42:104, 105; 43:113, 114
– – – creed/covenant of, 1:36; 10:88; 32:107
– – – moves from Charlestown (1630), 10:89; 30:34; 33:143; 44:47
– first inhabitants of, see Blackstone [Blaxton], Rev. William
– first mayor of, see Phillips, John
– fortification of, see defense of, above
– founding/settlement of, 14:32, 81; 22:17, 18, 59, 60; 25:63; 30:35; 32:58, 85; 33:139-40, 143; 38:89, 91; 39:24, 25
– gas lighting in, 42:8
– growth of, 39:111 (see also Population)
– historic preservation of buildings in, 20:102; 25:67, 68
– – – Commission on, 39:28n14; 42:33
– histories of, 10:48n1; 30:32; 32:90; 39:29
– – – math theses and, 42:118
– incorporation of, as city (1822), 44:173
– King’s Chapel in, see King’s Chapel
– land values in, 44:173
– mill dam created, 16:114
– MIT (“Boston Tech”) in, see Massachusetts Institute of Technology
– museums of, see Museum(s)
– music societies of, see Music
– naming of, 30:34-35; 32:60; 33:139, 143
– newspapers and magazines published in, see Periodicals (Boston)
– North End of, 35:39; 39:111, 117; 41:57
– ornamented furniture from, 21:50 (illus. following), 51-52, 54
– “panhandle” of, 21:41
– Park Commission/Department of, 39:24n3, 31-32; 41:57 (see also Metropolitan Park System/Commission)
– police in
– – – chief resigns in slavery protest (1854), 37:86
– – – number of (1849-50), 41:60
– population of, see Population
– as port, 44:171
– – – tea imported/smuggled into, 39:150-56 passim, 162 (see also Boston Tea Party)
– printers in, 44:66
– Quakers in, 25:68-80 passim
– railroads of, see Railroad(s)
– red-light district in, 41:57
– as rival of Worcester, 37:85
– routes and transportation to, 1:21; 4:36; 7:63; 14:55; 16:37; 25:131; 30:25-26, 74; 34:75-76; 38:25-26; 39:79, 109; 43:73; 44:11
– – – distance of, 14:35, 37, 39; 17:54; 25:120; 35:30; 38:25; 39:26, 28, 108, 109-10; 42:81; 43:35, 73
– – – importance of, 25:134; 39:110, 117
– (see also Bowdoin Square [Boston]; Bridge[s]; Ferry[ies]; Milestone[s]; Omnibuses; Railroad[s]; Street railway[s]; Streets and highways)
– schools in, 32:69 (see also School[s])
– as seat of American agitation (1770s), 39:162
– Second Church of, 11:40n3, 45n2
– Selectmen of, 5:22, 65
– Siege of, see Siege of Boston
– society in (Beacon Hill as center of, 1850), 41:56
– South End of, 16:85
– – – South End House, 44:110
– State House in, see State House
– tea imported/smuggled into, see as port, above
– theatre in, 40:122 (see also Theatre)
– town meetings of, see Town meeting(s)
– Town Records of (1693), 21:42
– transcendentalism in, 37:77, 80, 89 (see also Transcendentalism)
– Transit Commission of, 39:101
– transportation to, see routes and transportation to, above
– -Troy canal planned, 40:49-50
– view of
– – – from Mount Auburn, 44:178
– – – from West Boston Bridge, 16:84 (illus. facing)
– water supply for, see Water supply
– West End of, 39:117, 122; 41:66, 79, 80 (see also “West Church”)
– See also Back Bay; Beacon Hill (Boston); Boston Common; East Boston, Massachusetts; Shawmut/Shawmut peninsula; South Boston, Massachusetts; “Tri-mount,” “Trimountain[e]” “Boston” (parlor game), 44:116.- – See also Sports and games Boston & Albany, Boston & Lowell, Boston & Maine, Boston & Providence, Boston & Worcester railroads, see Railroad(s) Boston Authors Club, see Club(s) Boston Band, see Music Boston Basin, 44:159.- – See also Geology Boston Bookbinding Company (Cambridge, 1920), 15:19 Boston Central Labor Union, 33:128.- – See also Labor Boston College, 44:34 Boston Common, 25:30, 31; 31:53; 34:71; 41:58-59; 43:162
– barracks on (1774), 5:64-67
– bequest for preservation of, 41:57, 70
– brickyards on, 42:70
– meetinghouse on, 24:64 (see also Meetinghouse sites)
– and Public Garden. 9:8; 34:20, 67; 39:30; 41:57, 63
– sold to Puritans, 33:140; 39:25 “Boston Commons,” 21:36.- – See also Brookline, Massachusetts “Boston Confession” (1630s), 43:114 Boston Conservatory of Music, see Music (schools of) Boston Edison Company, 42:12 Boston Elevated Railway Company, see Street railway(s) Boston Harbor, 3:68; 32:58, 62; 43:60
– Dickens arrives in, 28:57, 59 (illus. facing)
– fortification of (1630s), 32:65, 71-72 (see also Fortifications)
– geological formation of, 2:75
– settlement around, 21:32; 22:17
– tidal scour in, 2:75-76; 39:31
– See also Castle William/Castle Island; Deer Island; Long Island Head Boston Independent Corps of Cadets (1867), 34:89 Boston Jewish Committee for Refugees, 43:99.- – See also Population (foreign-born) Boston Marine Society, 9:47; 27:44, 45, 46, 86n96 Boston Massacre, 9:42; 26:82, 121; 30:54
– litigation concerning, 40:124-28, 135 Boston Medical Library, see Library(ies) Boston Miscellany, see Periodicals (Boston) Boston Navy Yard, see Navy Yard Boston Neck, 5:65; 39:24-30 passim, 109; 43:73 “Boston Parambulators,” see Surveyors Boston Porcelain & Glass Company (pottery, East Cambridge), 16:55, 92, 94; 19:34-35; 36:95, 96.- – See also New England Glass Company Boston Post Road, 25:123 Boston Public Garden, see Boston Common Boston Public Library, see Library(ies) “Boston Saints” (1760s), 9:41 Boston Society of Natural History, see Society (ies) (organizations) Boston Symphony Orchestra, 21:67; 27:13; 32:93, 94; 35:39; 41:97, 100, 168; 43:28
– established (1881), 41:89, 93; 42:9
– Harvard-Radcliffe chorus with, 44:149
– See also Music Boston Tea Party (1773), 20:117; 28:60; 30:55-56; 33:69
– “and the American Revolution” (1963 paper), 39:144-64
– Centennial celebration of (1873), 30:20
– “Indians” in, 13:86; 20:112-13, 118; 39:157
– weather during, 42:120
– See also Tea “Boston Tech,” see Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Boston Town House:- – early routes to, 14:35, 37, 38 Boston University, 35:106; 41:34
– building project, 39:36
– School of Theology, 36:71
– women students at, 36:25; 44:140 Boston University Bridge, see Bridge(s) (Brookline St. [now Boston University]) Boston Window Glass Company (1822), 19:34 Boston Woven Hose and Rubber Company, 23:39; 36:82
– paper on (1964), 40:23-42 Boston & Roxbury Mill Corporation, 39:30 Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, see Sandwich glass Boston & Western Land Company, 23:81 Bosville, Elizabeth, see Pelham, Mrs. Herbert (second wife) Bosville, Col. Godfrey (c. 1600), 14:54n1; 15:25 Bosworth, Jonathan (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1), 78 Bosworth, W. Welles (MIT 1889; architect), 42:54-55, 59 Botanic Garden, 18:54n1; 28:38; 34:70, 84; 35:20, 22; 38:116; 41:161, 165
– children visit, 44:10
– created, 4:14; 29:19; 33:56; 38:75-86 passim; 43:131, 134, 139
– housing project replaces, 33:55; 35:28; 38:119
– and naming of Garden and Linnaean Sts., 14:45, 65; 25:119; 32:25; 38:111
– site of, 2:16; 4:89; 14:45; 17:48; 20:93; 21:104; 25:119; 33:57, 96; 38:111; 44:10
– See also Medicine, practice of (medical botany and) Botanist, The, see Waterhouse, Dr. Benjamin Botany
– Harvard botanical studies, 38:77-86; 43:26
– herbaria, 21:107; 25:124; 43:137; 44:22
– – – Farlow Herbarium, 44:21
– – – Gray Herbarium, 33:55-56, 125; 38:83
– medical, see Medicine, practice
– of wildflowers, 1:13; 34:65; 41:161
– – – Brattle St. to Fresh Pond, 24:88; 32:44; 41: 167
– – – in Cambridge Heights, 38:113, 118, 120
– – – in Harvard Yard, 25:110
– – – New England Wild Flower Preservation Society, 35:22
– – – in private gardens, 31:40, 43, 48-52 passim
– – – in Radcliffe Quadrangle, 44:10
– – – in swamps, 18:34; 31:53, 55, 56
– See also Agriculture and horticulture; Botanic Garden “Bottle House” neighborhood, 36:102 Boudinot, Elias (1740-1821; statesman), 27:83 Boundaries, town, see Cambridge, Massachusetts; other town or city listings Bourne, Meletiah (Plymouth merchant, 1760s), 39:146 Boutell (schoolmaster; friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1801), 11:53 Bouton, John Bell (1830-1902; editor, author), 6:76 Bouton, Mrs. John Bell (Eliza Jane Nesmith): obituary ( 1911), 6:76 Boutroux, Émile (French philosopher, c. 1910), 33:28n42 Bouvé, Thomas T. (historian. 1880), 43:139n24 Bouviers, Professor (Paris naturalist, 1907), 2:81 Bow Street (Cambridge), 1:56; 8:38; 15:41; 18:27; 25:118; 29:68; 33:28
– boardinghouse on, 23:47
– Dana house on, 26:69 (see also Dana houses)
– Danforth home on, 21:79, 81; 41:32
– land ownership on, 22:60, 62, 64; 26:49, 68
– naming of, 15:19 Bow Street (Charlestown), 33:154 Bowditch, Charles P. (1842-1921; archaeologist), 20:35 Bowditch, Dr. Henry Ingersoll (1808-1892), 4:84, 90, 91; 16:118; 25:83 Bowditch, Mrs. Henry Ingersoll, 4:90 Bowditch, Nathaniel (1773-1838; astronomer, mathematician), 15:50; 34:88; 38:79; 44:79 Bowditch, Nathaniel Ingersoll (1805-1861), 4:91; 41:60 Bowditch, Mrs. Richard (Fayerweather St. resident, mid-1900s), 43:11 Bowditch, Mrs. Sylvia Scudder, 41:164, 169 Bowditch, Miss, see Dixwell, Mrs. Epes Sargent Bowdoin, Gov. James (1726-1790), 9:42; 15:28, 29; 38:74; 40:9, 10 Bowdoin College, 9:8, 22; 30:72, 73; 38:71; 43:121
– Longfellow as professor at, 25:107-8; 33:12
– “passengers from Brunswick” (1806), 9:11 Bowdoin Prize (Harvard), 32:115 Bowdoin Square (Boston), 3:100; 11:40n3; 22:93; 41:59
– transportation to and from, 20:54; 22:68, 106; 25:131, 133-34; 28:62; 32:32; 34:69, 71; 38:48; 39:82-100 passim; 42:8, 11, 88, 89 Bowdoin Street (Boston), 34:69 Bowdoin Street (Cambridge), 32:29; 38:112 Bowen, Catherine Drinker (b. 1897; historian), 33:69n42, 70n43 Bowen, Prof. Francis (1811-1890; philosopher), 3:31; 12:38; 13:110; 20:98; 21:59; 25:119; 26:21; 28:115, 116; 30:85; 33:27, 153n7; 36:27
– as editor and writer, 16:70, 71; 21:106; 23:59; 33:63n25
– Felton letter to (1839), 26:103n71; 33:16n25
– house and orchard of, 20:97, 99 Bowen, George (Follen St. resident, mid-1800s), 20:98-99 Bowen, Miss Maria (CHS member, d. 1937), 9:66, 68; 23:75; 41:165
– papers by:
– – – “Notes on Sparks Street” (1932), 22:46-48
– – – “Reminiscences of Follen Street” (1928), 20:91-101; 31:55
– will of, 24:18-19, 20-23; 29:8 Bowen, Nathan (1752-1837):- – orderly book kept by ( 1775), 11:79 Bowen, Misses (sisters of Prof. Francis), 21:59 Bowen, Misses (daughters of Prof. Francis), 30:85 Bowen house (Follen St.), 24:18-19, 20-23; 26:40 Bowers, Barbara (persecuted Quaker, 1670s), 24:80 Bowers, Bathsheba (1671-1718; Quaker recluse), 24:80n33, 81 Bowers, Benanuel (persecuted Quaker, 1670s), 24:70, 78-81 Bowers, Mrs. Benanuel (Elizabeth Dunster), 24:78, 80, 81 Bowers, Elizabeth (daughter of above), see Curtis, Mrs. Wenlock Bowers, Elizabeth Dunster, see Bowers, Mrs. Benanuel Bowers, Henry S. (Harvard benefactor, 1920s), 27:26 Bowers’ tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Bowes, Mrs. Nicholas (Martha Remington), 21:87 Bowker, R. R. (1848-1933; editor, publisher), 21:74 Bowman, Nathaniel (landowner, 1650):- – descendants of, 5:53 Bowman, Samuel (fish weir let to, 1717), 5:38 Bowman, Bishop (1850s), 23:60 Boxford, Massachusetts, 11:39; 21:41
– slave/Negro population in (1754, 1765), 10:63n1 Boy Scouts, 27:100, 101; 38:126; 43:143.- – See also Club(s) Boys’ Club, see Cambridge Social Union Boyd, William (Harvard 1796), 41:119
– drawing by, 41:118 (illus. #1 following); 42:118 Boyd family, 10:189 Boyden, Helen, see Lamb, Mrs. Robert Boyden, Margaret, see Magoun, Mrs. Francis Peabody Boyden, Mr. and Mrs. Roland (Harrington descendants, 1950s), 34:35 Boyden, Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. (Irving St. residents, 1925-40), 41:34 Boylston Hall (Harvard), 18:43; 20:53; 30:27
– as site of early houses, 1:63; 5:108; 8:34-35; 10:99; 11:32n (see also Parsonage[s]; Sewall, Prof. Stephen; Wigglesworth house) Boylston Prize, 4:48 Boylston Professorship, 4:15; 25:104; 28:112; 44:146 Boylston Street (Boston), 9:8; 34:71, 72, 76, 118; 39:96, 98, 102; 41:56; 42:58; 44:11 Boylston Street (Cambridge), 2:96; 14:44; 22:63; 32:108; 44:25
– “Farwell’s Corner” on, 8:37, 39
– former names of, 8:30, 32; 14:34, 64; 15:31; 20:91; 30:21; 42:116
– Hicks house moved to corner of, 20:123; 27:99; 41:20
– history of, 14:37-39
– shops/offices on or near
– – – 1800s, 8:34-39 passim; 20:55; 30:21, 22
– – – 1900s, 41:143-44
– sites identified on, 1:58; 3:51; 6:24, 25; 8:30; 17:58; 22:61, 70
– street railway on, 39:92
– taverns on (1600s), 8:32, 34; 21:81; 37:30, 31 (see also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses) Boylston Street Bridge (“Great Bridge”), see Bridge(s) Boynton, Josiah (landowner, 1840s), 20:133 Bracket, see also Brackett Bracket, Governor (late 1800s[?]), 35:87 Brackett, see also Bracket; Brockett Brackett, Edward A. (1818-1908; sculptor), 34:88, 91 Brackett, James (supplies building stone, 1761), 23:19 Brackett, Rachel, see Crosbie, Mrs. Simon Brackett, Walter M. (painter), 10:159 Brackett & Company (furniture), 38:29.- – See also Retail and food stores; Whitney & Brackett Bradbury, Thomas (of Maine, 1634), 10:172 Bradbury, William Frothingham (1829-1914; schoolmaster), 10:187; 13:108; 26:33; 30:84-85; 35:88, 96, 97-99, 100, 104
– obituary, 10:172-73 Bradbury, Mrs. William Frothingham (Margaret Jones), 10:173 Bradbury, William S. (of Westminster, c. 1800), 10:172 Bradbury, Mrs. William S. (Elizabeth Emerson), 10:172 Bradford, Alden (1765-1843; historian), 43:124 Bradford, Capt. Gamaliel (c. 1820), 11:17n5, 24 Bradford, George (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:24 Bradford, G. G. :- – house of (built 1912), 43:167 Bradford, Capt. [later Mayor] Isaac (late 1800s), 2:39; 6:10, 14, 35-36; 33:48 Bradford, Lodowick H. (lithographer, c. 1850), 39:64 (illus. facing) Bradford, Gov. Robert F. (1960s), 41:42-43 Bradford, Gov. William (1589/90-1657), 14:18; 25:62, 72; 32:110, 111 Bradford, Miss (daughter of Gamaliel, 1816), 11:17 Bradford, Mrs. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:21, 22 Bradford, Dr. (1822), 11:24 Bradford House (Browne & Nichols School), 33:47 Bradish, Ebenezer (1716-1785; tavernkeeper, college glazier), 8:33, 34; 10:40, 85; 17:47; 37:23, 31 Bradish, Ebenezer, Jr. (1746-1818; lawyer), 10:46 Bradish, John (1678-1741; college glazier), 6:24 Bradish, Robert (in Shepard congregation; d. 1659), 8:34; 14:97; 22:76 (Map 1) Bradish, Mrs. Robert (Vashti; vendor of bread and beer; d. 1672), 8:34; 37:31 Bradish, Vashti, see Bradish, Mrs. Robert Bradish, Mr. (troops quartered in house of, 1777), 13:44 Bradish family, 10:56, 115 Bradish’s Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses (Blue Anchor Tavern) Bradlee, H. Gardner (heads trust company, 1960s), 41:54 Bradley, Miss Lucy M. (Francis Ave. resident, 1902-38; d. 1938), 41:29 Bradley, Richard (London agriculturist, 1727), 26:55n79, 60 Bradshaw, Humphrey (settler; d. 1682), 14:102 Bradshaw, Larry and Helen (operate snack bar, 1950s), 41:110 Bradstreet, Ann[e] Dudley, see Bradstreet, Mrs. Simon Bradstreet, Lucy, see Remington, Mrs. Jonathan, Jr. Bradstreet, Gov. Simon Symon, 8:30; 21:83, 84; 30:34, 38; 32:58, 110, 113; 44:43, 45
– English background of, 14:83
– and First Church in Cambridge, 10:88-91 passim, 100, 101
– property owned by, 8:33; 22:71, 76 (and Map 1), 77
– site of house, 1:58; 22:61; 30:35 Bradstreet, Mrs. Simon (Annie) Dudley, c. 1612-1672), 21:84; 22:91; 30:31, 34
– as poetess, 10:116; 14:83-84; 26:96; 30:30, 39, 45-47
– site of house, 1:58; 8:30; 25:116, 121 Bradstreet, Rev. Simon (of Charlestown, c. 1720), 36:54 Bradstreet family, 8:33 Brady, Nicholas (English poet, 1690s), 32:85 Bragg, Julia (niece of Mrs. Asa Gray), 17:65 Braintree, England, 10:90-91; 32:61; 44:41, 49, 55, 58, 59 Braintree, Massachusetts, 10:25; 14:89; 21:29, 83; 23:80; 32:61, 69, 75; 33:70; 37:62
– settlement of, 10:184; 14:103; 21:44 Braintree Company, see Hooker, Rev. Thomas Braintree Street, 8:30-31; 14:34, 66; 26:59.- – See also Harvard Street Bramhall, Thomas L. (schoolmaster, 1910-50s), 35:103 Brand, Thomas, see Hollis, Thomas Brand Brandegee, Mrs. E. D. (Harvard benefactor, early 20th c.), 27:37 Brandeis, Miss Elizabeth (Boat Club, 1915), 39:134 Brandeis, Justice Louis D. (1856-1941), 34:115; 40:35; 43:10 Brandeis, Dunbar & Nutter (law firm), 43:10 Brandon, Edward John (city clerk; d. 1921), 8:10; 9:50 Brandstrom, Elsa, see Ulich, Mrs. Robert Brannan, Prof. Joseph Doddridge (d. 1930), 21:63 Brannan, Mrs. Joseph Doddridge, 9:62; 21:63 “Brattle, Dick” (slave), 10:66.- – See also Slavery Brattle, Katherine, see Wendell, Madam John Mico Brattle, Thomas (1658-1713; Harvard Treasurer), 22:65; 37:11; 38:7, 15 Brattle, Maj. Thomas (c. 1740-1801), 10:25n5; 14:58, 59n1; 37:11, 12
– estate subdivided, 9:30; 14:61; 31:26; 37:13; 43:44
– gardens of (1792), 28:12; 31:27; 37:13 Brattle, Rev. William (1662-1716/17), 3:18; 6:23; 14:41; 22:86-87; 31:63-64; 37:11; 43:124
– death of, 3:112; 22:87
– diary of, 11:81
– as Harvard Fellow, 22:65; 38:11
– ordained, 3:113; 31:63; 43:116 Brattle, Mrs. [Rev.] William (Elizabeth Hay-man, first wife), 22:86 Brattle, Mrs. [Rev.] William (Elizabeth Gerrish Green, second wife), 22:86-87 Brattle, Col. (later Maj.-Gen.) William (c. 1702-1776; Loyalist), 10:41n1, 44, 65-67 passim; 26:55; 32:25; 43:71
– children of (Mme. Wendell; Thomas), 4:35; 14:61, 68; 31:27; 37:12
– garden of, 26:56; 31:26; 37:11, 18
– at Harvard (social standing of), 33:63
– house built by, see Brattle house (built 1727; 42 Brattle St.)
– as justice of the peace (1730s), 17:95
– land owned by, 10:11n1; 31:25; 37:11-12
– portrait of, 26:52n37
– as regimental commander, 5:56; 10:18, 30n Brattle family, 10:115; 11:83; 14:61, 64; 22:27; 37:10, 13 Brattle Hall (built 1891; 40 Brattle St.), 3:51; 14:41; 28:11; 37:10
– as ballroom/theatre, 30:20; 38:55-56, 62, 63; 44:105, 111, 145 (see also Dancing; Theatre) Brattle house (built 1727; 42 Brattle St.), 1:59; 3:52; 6:25; 14:41; 18:19; 22:100; 25:121; 26:51; 31:25; 37:11, 26, 67
– architecture of, 31:33
– CHS meets in
– – – 1905 (first meeting), 3:5; 11:53
– – – 1942, 28:11
– T. Fuller lives in, 11:33; 28:11
– model of, 26:49, 56 Brattle House/Inn, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Brattle Square (Boston), 20:95
– Brattle Square Church, 10:76 Brattle Square (Cambridge), 8:32, 33; 14:34; 37:10; 41:52
– architecture on, 26:40, 47; 30:19 (and illus. facing); 43:37
– businesses on
– – – c. 1700, 37:32
– – – 1800s, 8:39; 15:20, 21, 33, 35; 20:87; 36:81; 37:37
– canal to, see Canal(s)
– connecting streets laid out, 14:58, 59, 64, 66, 74; 22:60
– early settlements near or on, 22:59, 60, 61, 65, 76, 77, 97
– police and fire station on, 16:119-20; 17:21; 25:46; 26:47; 30:16; 39:69 Brattle Street (Boston), 4:29; 19:48
– Brattle St. Unitarian Church, 9:37; 33:151
– omnibus line to, 8:37; 14:55 Brattle Street (Cambridge), 22:59; 41:130, 156-67 passim; 43:9, 26; 44:59, 139, 159, 167, 168
– architecture on, 26:39, 40 (and illus. #2, 6, 10, 13-16 following), 42, 44; 28:30; 30:19 (and illus. facing), 76; 31:34; 43:31 (illus. #1-3, 5, 8-16 following), 167, 171; 44:163, 165
– – – résumé of (1973 paper), 43:33-52
– (see also Brattle Street houses)
– -Ash St. intersection, see Ash Street
– burial place near, 6:34
– as Charlestown-Watertown road/King’s Highway, see Charlestown-Watertown road
– “coasting” on, 43:12 (see also Sports and games)
– as “country,” 41:167
– – – painting of, 31:56
– Court House (of 1757) on corner of, 39:62 (see also Court House[s] [Cambridge])
– -Craigie St. junction, 16:32; 22:46, 47, 51, 52, 55; 24:85, 88; 26:57; 32:27; 37:10, 16, 67; 40:126; 43:37 (see also “Wash Tub Square”)
– Episcopal School property on, 36:8 (see also Brattle Street houses)
– first telephone exchange on, 42:10
– future of, 2:113
– gas pipes laid on, 21:109; 31:37
– gravel bank on, 16:114
– greenhouse on, 34:86
– in or as Historic District, 39:74; 42:34, 37, 41, 46; 43:33, 36-38
– history of, Mrs. Gozzaldi’s views on, 35:111; 39:78
– laid out, extended, 14:41, 64, 74; 24:63; 44:160
– – – connecting streets laid out, 14:33, 59; 44:161, 162
– life on
– – – mid-1800s, 15:35, 45; 18:41; 20:55, 56, 94; 25:19; 26:14, 26; 30:15, 18-21 passim, 26; 32:28, 98; 33:29
– – – 1905, 1:16
– – – 1911, 41:143
– Longfellow and, 2:44; 3:47, 48
– Loyalists on, 26:49, 50; 44:161 (see also Loyalists; Tory Row; Vassall houses and land)
– moving of buildings to and from, 8:36; 14:104, 105; 30:15; 31:33-34; 33:44; 41:165; 42:43, 45; 43:44 (see also Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house)
– plan of
– – – 1630s, 22:77-78
– – – 1760, 14:71
– and politics, 20:46
– public houses on, 8:33; 37:32 (see also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boarding-houses )
– public school on (1890s), 42:126
– “saved,” 20:91; 43:37-38
– settlement on (1630s), 24:49
– sites identified on, 1:59, 60, 65; 3:51, 52; 9:30n3; 23:19; 24:84, 95; 25:118
– spring at foot of, 7:52; 21:113 (see also Water supply)
– street railway (horse cars) on, 14:42; 20:54; 21:58; 22:106; 25:132; 30:26; 32:44; 35:17, 18; 39:82-87 passim; 42:89, 126; 43:37; 44:161, 162, 165
– – – courtesy on, 17:67; 20:55; 34:76
– – – electric cars opposed, 20:55; 30:21; 39:96-97; 42:11; 43:38; 44:168
– – – removed, 5:109
– tides reaching, 39:24
– topography of, 44:160
– trees on, 33:96, 98-99
– Vassall property on, 21:96; 29:68
– broken up, 37:18-19
– – – (see also Vassall houses and land)
– “village smithy” on, see Blacksmith(s)
– widening of, see Streets and highways
– Window Shop on, 43:103, 104-5, 107
– See also Brattle Street houses Brattle Street houses, 44:140, 147
– No. 40, see Brattle Hall
– No. 42, see Brattle house
– No. 55, see Read house
– No. 60, see Milliard, Deacon William
– No. 63, see Nichols house
– No. 64, 21:9; 24:7
– No. 76, 31:33-34 (see also Greenleaf, Mrs. James [Mary Longfellow])
– No. 90, see Stoughton house
– No. 94, see Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall)
– No. 96, see James, Thomas Potts
– No. 99, see Episcopal Theological School
– No. 101, see Episcopal Theological School; Hastings house(s) (Oliver Hastings)
– No. 105, see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House
– No. 108 (Mrs. R . deW. Sampson), 13:5; 22:10; 32:117
– No. 112, built 1846 (no name given), 43:44
– No. 113, see Dana houses (#15)
– No. 114, E. R. James (built 1903), 22:8; 23:10; 43:51
– No. 115, see Thorp[e], Mrs. Joseph Gilbert (Annie Allegra Longfellow)
– No. 121, see Worcester, Joseph Emerson
– No. 133, Falxa (built 1971). 43:33 (illus. #16 facing), 52
– No. 140, built 1930 (no name given), 43:51
– No. 144, E. B. Hill (built 1915), 43:51 (illus. #13 following), 50
– No. 145, see Brewster, John; Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house
– No. 146, see Hubbard house
– No. 149, see Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house
– No. 151, Endicott, 41:136
– No. 152, see Dana houses (#14)
– No. 153, see Lee, Thomas (3d)
– No. 155, Devens, 41:157
– No. 156 (rear), Scudder, 24:84; 41:165
– No. 159, see Hooper-Lee-Nichols house
– No. 160, built 1884 (no name given), 43:47-48
– No. 164, Scudder (built 1868, “stick-style”), 25:8; 43:31 (illus. #8 following), 46
– No. 165, see Bartlett, John
– No. 167, see Van Brunt, Henry
– No. 168, see Thorp, Joseph D.
– No. 170, D. Wells house moved to, 42:43
– No. 175, see Ruggles-Fayerweather house
– No. 183, Kidder, 43:49
– See also Dana houses (#11); “Larches, The”/ “Larchwood” (William and John C. Gray estate) Brattleboro, Vermont, 22:93; 25:90; 33:113-14 Braun, Cecile, see Agassiz, Mrs. [Jean] Louis (first wife) Brayton, Judge Charles (c. 1815), 7:38 Brazier’s Block, 38:30 Bread, sale of, see Food Breaker, W. D. (book collector, 1922), 38:108 Breck, Samuel (letter to, 1786), 40:16n15 Breckenridge, John C. (1821-1875; statesman), 39:11 Breed’s Hill, 16:37; 33:141, 148; 37:51.- – See also Bunker Hill, Battle of Bremer, Frederica (1801-1865; writer), 15:44; 23:60; 33:78-79 Brenton, Mr. (collector of Port of Boston, c. 1690), 16:31 Brewer, David (butcher, 1870s), 20:56; 30:19 Brewer, John (1642):- – descendants of, 5:54 Brewer, Thomas H. (grocer, 1870s), 8:39; 20:56, 135; 30:19 Brewer, Dr. Thomas M. (1814-1880; ornithologist), 39:12-13, 16 Brewster, Carrie (“Bee” member, late 1800s), 17:80 Brewster, John (father of ornithologist William), 22:50; 24:85, 87; 30:80
– house built by (145 Brattle St., 1887), 24:85, 95; 43:33 (illus. #15 facing), 51
– owns, moves Lechmere house, see Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house
– street named for, see Brewster Street Brewster, Mrs. John (Rebecca Parker Noyes), 24:85; 30:86 Brewster, Margaret (persecuted Quaker, 1677), 24:80 Brewster. Mrs. Mary Young, 43:29 Brewster, Elder William (1567-1644), 1:68; 10:87; 24:84; 32:106, 111 Brewster, William (1851-1919; ornithologist), 1:59; 3:99; 30:85, 86-87; 34:12, 14-16; 41:163; 42:135
– museum built for, 22:50-51; 24:84, 95; 41:165
– paper on (1937), 24:83-98 Brewster, Mrs. William (Catherine Kettell), 24:90; 42:135 Brewster estate (Brattle and Sparks Sts.), 22:47-51; 24:85, 88, 95 Brewster houses, see Brewster, John Brewster Museum, see Brewster, William Brewster Place, 22:51 Brewster Street, 21:63; 22:50-51, 78; 41:136, 159; 43:170, 171
– as “Brewster Village,” Robert Frost and, 40:84-92 passim
– naming of, 14:64; 33:151
– trees on, 33:96 (illus. facing), 99 Brick and brickmaking
– brick or brick-ended buildings, 8:33, 36, 38; 20:53; 24:85; 30:16; 31:27; 33:49; 37:91; 39:66, 106, 111; 41:25; 42:16, 70-76; 43:11, 16, 28, 30, 50, 51, 160-64 passim
– – – Harvard and Radcliffe, 29:19, 20; 33:7-8; 44:145
– brick blocks, 22:48-52 passim; 26:47
– brick floors, 21:113; 37:73
– brick gashouse, 31:29; 39:126
– brick ovens, 23:79; 25:89; 37:72
– brick paths/sidewalks, 24:89; 33:97; 35:24, 26. 28; 42:14
– brick walls, see Fences and walls
– brickmaking industry, 8:22; 22:76, 78; 24:61, 89; 40:45, 46; 42:70-74
– brickyard (Walden St.), 44:10
– brickyard plans, 42:68-69 (illus.), 73
– clay for, see Geology
– cost of, 42:72
– “Romance of” (1971 paper), 42:67-76
– See also Houses, meetinghouses, etc. “Brick Meeting House”
– Boston, see “New Brick Meeting House”
– Cambridge, see Cambridgeport Church/Parish Brick Wharf, 31:27, 54; 37:10
– “highway” to, 10:10n3, 11n1; 26:55; 31:24,27 (see also Ash Street) Brick Wharf Lane, 31:27 Brickyard, see Brick and brickmaking Brickyard Swamp, 24:89.- – See also Swamp(s) Bridenbaugh, Carl (author, 1949), 33:64n28 Bridge, Anna, see Wellington, Mrs. Oliver Bridge, Anne Palfrey, see Piper, Mrs. William Taggard Bridge, Col. [Ebenezer? b. 1742], 13:23; 16:80; 37:57 Bridge, Deacon John (of Shepard congregation; d. c. 1665), 1:35, 61, 62; 10:98. 101, 103; 14:97; 15:25; 22:76 (Map 1), 78
– descendants of, 5:53; 10:171
– house of, 21:82, 84
– statue of, on Common, 1:37; 33:39, 147n5; 40:134; 43:78, 81 Bridge, Mrs. John, see Bancroft, Mrs. Roger Bridge, John (of Lexington, 1770), 40:134 Bridge, Jonathan (committee member, 1654), 14:36 Bridge, Joseph, Jr. (of Lexington, 1770s), 40:134 Bridge, Matthew (d. 1700), 21:81, 82, 83 Bridge, Mrs. Matthew (Anna Danforth), 21:80, 83, 102 Bridge, Samuel (d. 1672; gravestone of), 17:34 Bridge, Samuel James (city and Harvard benefactor, 1684), 1:62; 33:146, 147n5 Bridge, Thomas (d. 1673; gravestone of), 17:34, 35 Bridge, William D. (genealogist, 1924), 40:134n30 Bridge family, 22:27; 40:135 Bridge(s), 20:56; 21:31; 25:104; 39:121; 44:61
– Alewife, 5:42
– Anderson, 14:36, 39n1; 17:54; 22:106; 25:117; 39:24, 26, 80n4, 133; 42:81; 43:62, 73 (see also “Great Bridge” [Boylston St.], below)
– Boston University, see Brookline St., below
– Boylston St., see “Great Bridge,” below
– Brookline St. (now Boston University), 7:62; 8:38; 14:51; 15:32; 33:21; 39:32, 36, 80n4, 122, 133; 43:142
– – – “Cottage Farm,” 35:83; 39:27, 90; 41:158, 166; 42:48, 51; 43:144, 145
– – – street railway proposed for, 39:88, 91-92
– “Cambridge” (Revolutionary times), 13:22, 80; 19:51
– “Cambridge” (West Boston Bridge replaced by, 1900), 7:60; 14:52; 39:100
– – – known (since 1920s) as Longfellow or Subway Bridge, 14:116; 17:12; 18:77, 78; 20:8; 38:24; 39:26, 27, 32, 128; 42:48. 83; 43:35; 44:82
– – – (see also West Boston, below)
– Cambridge Bridge Commission (1898) and, 7:60, 63; 39:82n14, 100
– Canal, see Craigie, below
– celebrations at opening of, 7:57, 59; 15:32; 16:49; 27:62; 33:144; 39:26; 41:159-60
– “Charles River” (built 1785/6), 7:56-57; 33:144; 39:26; 41:159-60
– – – teapot engraved with picture of, 41:159
– Charlestown, 7:57; 14:56; 16:39
– cost of, 7:55-63 passim; 14:51; 16:40, 49, 53
– Cottage Farm, see Brookline St., above
– Craigie (Canal, built 1809), 7:60-62; 9:23; 14:48, 56-59 passim, 64; 16:46, 47, 88, 90, 91; 22:71; 29:71; 36:94, 105; 37:33; 38:24; 39:19, 27, 32, 34, 64, 80, 111, 112, 123; 42:83, 87; 43:73
– – – connected to Prison Point, 16:59
– – – cost of, 16:49
– – – and Craigie Bridge Corporation/Canal St. Bridge Company, 20:129; 36:94; 39:27, 64
– – – as free bridge (1858), 7:58-59; 14:56; 15:32; 39:82n14, 117, 41:8
– – – opening of, 16:49; 27:62; 39:64
– – – petitions for, 9:22; 14:74-75; 16:90
– – – revenue from, 7:61; 10:58n2; 15:32; 16:49, 84
– – – as “rival” of West Boston Bridge, see West Boston, below
– – – roads to, 16:49, 55-56; 23:26; 26:38; 37:18; 39:64, 113; 43:74
– – – speculation connected with, see Craigie, Dr. Andrew
– – – street railway over, 39:82n14, 84, 87
– over “Craigie Brook,” 31:59-60
– drawbridges, 34:69; 39:27, 133; 40:28
– East Cambridge viaduct, 39:102, 106
– effects of, 7:62-63; 8:32; 35:80
– – – interfere with river traffic, 39:27
– – – interfere with street railway, 34:69
– – – population increase, 14:48
– – – replace ferries, 7:53-57; 14:38-39; 21:80; 33:144; 39:26; 41:159; 42:88; 43:73 (see also West Boston, below)
– Eliot, 22:119; 29:8; 39:25, 34, 35; 42:87
– ferries replaced by, see effects of, above
– first across Charles, see “Great Bridge” (Boylston St.), below
– first horse bridge in the country (1648), 7:54
– footbridge crossing Menotomy River (1862), 5:40
– “free,” 7:57-62 passim; 8:38; 14:51, 56; 15:32; 37:33; 39:82n14, 117; 41:8 (see also revenue from, below)
– Galen St., 7:54
– Gore St., 14:41n1
– “Great Bridge” (Boylston St., built 1662, rebuilt 1690), 7:54-56; 8:30, 32; 14:36, 38, 39n1; 17:54; 21:84; 25:70, 115, 117, 120; 33:144; 37:12, 29; 39:26; 40:81; 42:88; 43:35, 73
– “Great Bridge” (or “Mill Bridge”), Water-town, 7:54 (see also “Watertown,” below)
– and Hancock Free Bridge Corporation, 7:58, 61, 62; 14:51, 56; 33:144; 39:80
– Harvard, 7:62-63; 14:37, 66; 22:58, 71; 39:30, 98, 102, 104; 122-23; 41:137, 166; 42:48, 50, 87, 89
– to Harvard Square, 7:61; 14:53, 57; 22:67-68; 35:80
– “Historical Account of Some” (1912 paper), 7:51-63
– Howe Truss Bridge (1838 or 1839), 14:124-25
– ice beneath (and skating), 39:133
– Larz Anderson, see Anderson, above
– “Little,” 7:58
– Longfellow, see “Cambridge” [2d], above
– maintenance and repair of, 7:54-62 passim; 21:84; 22:21; 24:62
– Medford, 5:35; 13:22, 80
– Menotomy (“Notomie”), 5:38, 40, 41
– Mill (Watertown), 7:54
– over “Mills’s Ware” (Spy Pond outlet), 5:38-39
– Mount Auburn, 30:76; 33:142n3; 39:105n81
– New South Boston, 38:42
– petitions and plans for, 7:54-63; 9:22, 23, 28, 33; 14:49-59 passim, 74-75; 16:39-40, 90-91; 22:68, 71, 75
– pile-drivers used in construction of, 7:56, 58, 62; 22:68; 25:70
– Porter Square, 39:105n81
– Prison Point, 7:61; 16:58; 33:144; 39:112
– proposed
– – – 1924, 17:10
– – – 1937, 24:65-66
– railroad, 14:124, 125; 20:129-31; 39:30; 41:159
– – – “went out” (1856), 42:88
– repair of, see maintenance and repair of, above
– revenue from, 7:58, 61; 10:58n2; 14:52; 15:32; 16:49, 83-84; 39:117; 41:8 (see also “free,” above)
– River St., 7:61; 14:51; 16:53; 39:80n4; 42:83
– roads to, 42:83 (see also Craigie, above; West Boston, below)
– Soldiers’ Field, 1:58
– stone, over creek crossing Watertown road, 37:16
– street railway over, 39:82, 84, 87, 92, 100, 102
– “Subway,” 42:83 (see also “Cambridge” [2d], above)
– and Toll Bridge Company, 33:144
– toll gatherer for, 8:38; 14:52
– toll schedule for, 14:52 (see also Expenses [fares])
– tolls from, see revenue from, above
– Warren (built 1838), 7:57; 33:144; 39:37; 41:159
– “Watertown,” 10:29n2; 13:80; 26:69n11 (see also “Great Bridge” [or “Mill Bridge”], above)
– Weir (Medford), 5:35
– West Boston (built 1793), 1:19; 7:61, 62; 15:32; 16:53, 78; 20:128; 26:38; 30:26; 35:86; 39:30, 80, 116-23 passim; 42:10, 48, 87, 88
– – – accident on, 44:131
– – – “Cambridge Bridge” replaces (1900), see “Cambridge” [2d], above
– – – causeway to, 14:50, 66, 72; 35:80; 39:110, 115
– – – construction of, 7:57-60; 14:52-53, 54; 16:39-40, 83-85; 33:144; 35:80; 39:108; 42:83; 43:73, 144
– – – Craigie Bridge as “rival” of, 14:56; 16:88; 29:72; 31:25; 37:18
– – – effect of, 14:48; 25:120; 35:81; 37:33; 38:24; 39:26, 108, 110, 113; 43:35
– – – as “free” bridge (1858), 15:32; 39:82n14, 117; 41:8
– – – houses near- – (in 1793), 7:59; 25:115, 118; 39:110
– – – as “Longfellow Bridge,” see “Cambridge” [2d], above
– – – portrayed, 16:84 (illus. following)
– – – street railway over, 39:82, 87, 92; 44:139
– – – view of Boston from, 16:84 (illus. facing)
– – – and West Boston Bridge Corporation, 7:61, 63; 14:51; 16:83; 20:129
– Western Avenue, 7:61-62; 22:73; 39:80n4; 42:83
– See also Travel/transportation Bridge Street, 14:57, 64, 68, 74; 16:49; 36:97, 102
– laid out (c. 1809), 7:61; 14:56, 57-58; 42:83
– street railway on, 39:84, 100, 102 Bridges, Davenport & (Watertown, c. 1860), 16:38 Bridget (servant in Nichols household, c. 1900), 7:87.- – See also Servants/”hired help” Bridgewater, Massachusetts, 3:117 Bridgman, Thomas (author, 1853), 27:45n8 Bridleway (path to river, c. 1720), 16:38 Brigade Band (Boston), 40:47.- – See also Music Brigden, Zachariah (silversmith, 1786), 41:159 Briggs, Abram (Batchelders’ hired man, 1820s), 23:52 Briggs, C. E. and G. E. (choir members, 1880s), 27:33 Briggs, Gov. George N. (1796-1861), 37:81, 41:8, 86, 87 Briggs, Rev. George W. (of First Parish, 1887), 34:31; 41:33 Briggs, Dean LeBaron Russell (1855-1934), 22:47, 23:43, 25:117, 27:34; 33:50; 34:52, 37:108, 109, 111, 44:144
– quoted, 35:98-99; 44:140
– as Radcliffe president, 35:106; 44:142, 146, 149, 152 (illus. 13 following), 156
– student feeling toward, 18:42, 34:46-47; 35:115-16 Briggs, Mrs. LeBaron Russell (Mary Frances DeQuedville), 33:50; 44:142, 146, 152 (illus. #6 following) Briggs, Miss Lucia (president of Milwaukee-Downer College), 35:106 Briggs, Richard (glass seller, early 1900s), 19:37-38 Briggs, Walter B. (1872-1943; Harvard Librarian), 22:65; 25:113; 27:33; 30:11; 34:40
– minute on death of, 30:5-6
– obituary of William Coolidge Lane by (1931), 21:72-73
– “Sundry Observations upon Four Decades of Harvard College Library” (1942 paper), 27:29-41 Brigham, Anna Maria (Peck), see Paige, Mrs. Lucius R. (fourth wife) Brigham, Charles (architect, 1870s), 43:13 Brigham, Clarence (of American Antiquarian Society, 1940s), 27:86n96; 44:67n3 Brigham, Mrs. David Trowbridge (Anna Maria Peck), see Paige, Mrs. Lucius R. (fourth wife) Brigham, Henry R. (Boat Club, 1915), 27:98; 39:134 Brigham, Mrs. Henry R., 27:98 Brigham, Marian (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Brigham, Nathaniel (Harvard 1880; choir member), 32:88 Brigham, Thomas (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Brigham, William (of Grafton, 1829), 12:16, 19 Bright, E. H. (Boat Club, 1915). 39:134 Bright, Henry (of England, 1867), 28:90 Bright, Rev. (Salem minister, 1630s), 10:87 Bright family, 21:104; 23:57 Brighton, Massachusetts, 13:81; 37:92
– bridges to, 7:61-62; 33:144; 37:12; 39:80n4, 133
– – – shares bridge costs, 7:56 (see also Bridge[s])
– cattle and sheep market at, 13:100; 17:62; 20:131; 30:21; 36:117; 37:35; 40:86; 43:26; 44:25
– Dana family in, 26:99
– early roads to, 14:50, 51
– “Father of,” 26:77
– Fire Department of, 25:46
– included in Boston, 21:29, 35; 39:87
– included in “Newtown[e],” 9:71, 75; 14:35, 48; 17:93; 21:47; 22:98; 25:63; 31:61; 39:109, 110; 42:79, 82; 44:57
– incorporated (1807), 14:36; 17:96; 29:68; 39:109
– as “Little Cambridge” or “Third Parish,” 13:111; 14:35, 38; 15:37? 16:44; 26:69-78 passim, 120
– – – Congregational Church in, 11:40; 16:44, 97; 17:96; 39:109; 43:119
– – – ferry to, 7:53; 8:31
– railroad through, 39:115
– street railway in and to, 39:84, 87, 92; 43:145
– view of, from Vassall house, 21:116
– as village (1845), 22:26 Brighton Avenue (Boston), 39:90 “Brighton bull” (fire alarm), 30:21.- – See also Cambridge Fire Department “Brighton Corner,” 7:53 Brighton Street, 13:90; 16:64; 37:30, 32; 39:87
– named/name changed, 14:51, 64, 67; 15:31; 20:55. 91-92; 30:21
– See also Boylston Street; River Street Brimmer, Andrew (Boston lawyer, 1770s), 19:50, 77 Brimmer, George Watson (purchases Mount Auburn, c. 1830; d. 1838), 34:78, 79; 44:178, 179, 184, 188n28 Brimmer, Herman (Boston lawyer, 1770s), 16:80; 19:50, 77 Brimmer, Martin (of Fogg Museum, 1895), 35:62 Brimmer School (Boston), 32:48.- – See also School(s) “Brimstone Corner” (Boston), 41:58 Brinckerhoff, Dr. and Mrs. (Berkeley St. residents, mid-1800s), 21:60 Brine, George R. (publisher, 1907), 20:89 Brine, James W. (bank official, 1890), 41:41, 52 Brink, Roscoe (playwright, 1920s), 40:119 Brinley, George (of Connecticut; book collector, before 1879), 38:87, 104, 105 Brinley, Thomas (Vassall family friend, 1766), 10:19 Brinley, Colonel (landowner, 1754), 24:63n1 Brisbane, Albert (1809-1890; social reformer), 34:25-26 Briscoe, Nathaniel (Harvard usher c. 1640; beaten), 3:14 Bristol Academy (Taunton), 25:68 Bristol County, 21:22n1 Bristol Street, 14:62 Britain
– ambassadors/consuls to, 12:68; 14:27; 15:44; 16:15; 20:37-38; 23:65-66; 26:82, 93n61, 115; 33:83; 35:112
– American political system as viewed by, 44:171-72
– ancestral homes of Cambridge founders in, 30:29
– – – papers on (1912, 1919), 7:71-77; 14:79-103 (see also Essex County [England]; Kent County [England]; Suffolk County [England])
– and Battle of Waterloo, 25:77
– and “British English” (1850s), 32:14
– in Canada (1786), 40:11, 17
– and Chesapeake affair (1808), 33:74
– death penalty in, 32:50
– and English customs in colonies, 25:63-64
– and English law (affecting colonies), see Law
– furniture styles in (1780s), 21:52
– gas industry and street lights in, 42:8
– gravestones imported from, 17:29-41 passim
– immigrant workers from, see Population (foreign-born)
– impressment of American seamen by (1769), 40:124
– Indemnity Act (1767-72) of, 39:147, 151
– industrial supremacy of (c. 1755), 9:38n3
– land claims by, 21:19; 33:134
– land grants by, see Land grants
– libraries and museums of, see Library(ies); Museum(s)
– Longfellow visits, 28:69-76, 97-103
– Massachusetts charter granted by, see Massachusetts Bay Company
– and Colony Privy Council of (1633), 44:55
– Protestantism and Reformation in, see Protestantism
– Puritanism in, see Puritans and Puritanism
– reaction in, to Two Years Before the Mast, 26:111-12
– refugee children from (1940s), 38:127-28
– and Revolutionary War alliances, 3:72-73
– – – blockade, 3:75-76; 4:23
– – – Episcopal Church, 29:68-69
– – – evacuate “Castle,” 6:7
– – – “inhumanities”/”atrocities,” 5:84n5; 39:7
– – – Loyalists, see Loyalists
– – – Peace Commission (1778), 3:58
– – – Penobscot Expedition, see Maine, State of
– – – popular views, 3:69-71
– – – reconciliation sought, 3:58-59; 26:83-84, 121; 30:59, 66, 70; 33:69-70
– – – refusal to recognize USA, 13:73n1
– (see also troops of, in Boston, below; “Convention Troops”)
– and right of search, 3:76-77; 28:22
– riots in (“Gordon,” 1780; Birmingham, 1791), 5:87n6; 25:90-91
– Russia as ally of (1780), 3:72-73, 76
– and Shays’s Rebellion, 40:8-11, 13
– Spain and, see Spain
– taxation by, see Taxation/taxes (protests against)
– trade with, see Trade and commerce
– treaties with, see Treaty(ies)
– and Trent affair, 3:77 (see also Civil War, U.S.)
– troops of, in Boston (1770s), 4:35; 33:45, 66-67; 39:155; 44:67
– – – barracks for, 5:64-67
– – – hostility toward, 39:162
– – – land at Lechmere Point, see Lechmere Point
– (see also Siege of Boston)
– troops of, quartered in Cambridge, see “Convention Troops”
– victory of, at Montreal (1760), 37:71
– visit to (1851-52) described, 24:45-48; 32:7-24
– Washington, D.C., entered by (War of 1812), 3:106; 23:58 (see also War of 1812)
– See also Church of England; Ireland; Scotland; individual sovereigns Britannia, S.S. (ship), 28:57, 59 (illus. facing British War Relief (1940s), 39:137 Briton, James (songwriter, 1842), 28:65 Broad Canal, see Canal(s) Broad Canal Street, 25:139 Broad Street (Boston), 27:45 “Broad Walk” (Vassall/Batchelder garden), see Agriculture and horticulture (private gardens) “Broad Way” (causeway), 39:110.- – See also Broadway (Cambridge); Broadway (Somerville); Streets and highways Broadside,- – The (Boston, 1870s), see Periodicals (Boston) Broadstreete, Mr. (Charlestown settler, 1629), 8:17 Broadway (Cambridge), 14:43, 44, 52, 65, 67; 16:64, 90; 30:74, 75; 33:29; 35:113; 39:20; 41:11, 13; 43:80; 44:90
– architecture on, 26:38, 40 (illus. following), 44; 39:111
– City Hall Annex on, 42:33
– as country road/turnpike, 2:30; 14:57; 18:35; 23:26; 35:81; 43:73
– Fogg Museum on, see Fogg Art Museum
– houses moved across, 23:44; 44:21
– laid out, 7:59; 14:64; 42:83
– naming of, 14:50, 64; 42:116
– – – renaming proposed (1928), 20:14
– Public Library on, 26:98n66; 34:67 (see also Cambridge Public Library)
– schools on, 13:95, 99; 30:84; 32:89; 34:67; 35:94, 96, 97, 100; 41:24; 42:84 (see also School[s])
– sites identified on, 5:110; 8:38; 11:32n; 16:86; 22:98; 23:24, 25; 26:102; 27:12; 30:73; 35:35; 43:141, 142
– street railway on, 23:44; 30:26; 34:69, 71; 39:80n6, 87, 92, 99, 103; 42:89; 43:38; 44:21 (see also Street railway[s])
– swamp and pond near, 18:34, 36n2 Broadway (Somerville), 5:39, 40, 41, 42 Broch, Mrs. Alice Perutz (of Window Shop, 1940s), 43:100, 102, 104 Brock, Leslie N. (store, 1913), 8:31 Brock (of Leavitt & Brock), 41:105 Brock Brothers store, 1:64; 8:31, 37; 41:41 Brock & Eaton’s store, 1:64 Brockett, see also Brackett Brockett, Dr. Linus P. (1820-1893; physician, author), 39:49 Broderick, Edward (janitor at Fogg, c. 1900), 27:22 Bromfield House (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Bromfield Street (Boston), 19:20; 41:59 Bromley Atlas, see Maps and plans Bronsdon, Benjamin (of Boston, c. 1700), 21:90 Bronsdon, Mrs. Benjamin (Mary Bant), 21:90 Bronsdon, Mercy (Mrs. John Friz[z]ell, Jr.; later Mrs. Joseph Wise, Jr.; later Mrs. William Stoddart), 10:9-10; 21:90-91, 94; 22:99; 37:14 Bronson, Louise, see Crothers, Mrs. Samuel McChord Bronson, Miss (1913), 23:92 Brook, see also Brooks Brook, Aaron (marsh of, c. 1700), 22:73 Brook[e], Lord (Robert Greville) (c. 1608-1643), 44:54 Brook Farm (1841-47), 2:100; Il:21n4; 21:68; 23:63; 32:90; 34:25, 26, 35; 35:83 Brook Street, 26:99n67.- – See also Lawrence Street Brookfield, Massachusetts, 11:73; 30:61 “Brooklin Fort,” 43:142.- – See also Fortifications Brookline, Massachusetts, 10:171, 185; 26:22; 33:21; 34:7, 78; 36:114; 41:127; 44:176
– architecture in, 43:160, 167-71 passim
– causeway and bridges to, 39:26, 30, 80n4; 43:73
– Cottage Farm area of, 15:32; 18:78; 26:42; 39:92, 99, 103
– Devotion house in, 6:16; 25:66
– Hooker offered land grant including, 44:57
– included in Boston, 21:47 included in “Newtown[e],” 9:71, 75, 76; 14:37, 38; 44:57
– known as “Muddy River” or “Boston Commons,” 9:71; 14:37, 38; 21:29, 31, 36; 25:120; 39:109
– land speculation in, 39:121; 42:50
– math theses relating to history of, 42:118
– street railway to (Cottage Farm), 39:92, 95, 99, 103
– Washington visits fort at, 18:64, 65 Brookline Street, 22:74; 25:119; 36:110; 39:91; 41:166
– Auburn St. known as, 14:64
– Inman house moved to corner of, see Inman house
– laid out, 14:51, 64; 43:145 Brookline Street Bridge, see Bridge(s) Brooklyn (N.Y.) City Railroad, 39:79, 82, 83.- – See also Street railway(s) Brooks, see also Brook Brooks, Arthur (Sparks St. resident; d. 1880s[?]), 22:51 Brooks, Mrs. Arthur (later Mrs. Maximilian Kellner), 21:62 Brooks, Arthur H. (Ash St. resident, 1930), 21:5; 39:128, 129 Brooks, Arthur H., Jr. (architect, 1960s), 39:75; 42:33 Brooks, Mrs. B. F. (educational pioneer, 1870s), 36:28, 31 Brooks, Caleb (surveyor, 1760), 16:33 Brooks, Edwin Chapin (superintendent of water works, c. 1900), 3:114 Brooks, Mrs. Edwin Chapin (Ella Florence Kimball), 3:114 Brooks, Elisha (lost at sea, 1798), 11:37, 38 Brooks, Enoch (of Princeton, c. 1800), 11:37n3 Brooks, George (“dangerous illness” of, 1826), 11:28 Brooks, James (of Berkeley St., mid-1800s), 21:59 Brooks, Rev. John Graham (1846-1938; sociologist), 21:59; 22:51; 31:11-12, 35; 40:144, 145; 41:18, 30 Brooks, Mrs. John Graham (Helen Lawrence), 21:59; 22:51; 31:11-12; 41:18, 30 Brooks, Laurence (on “Junior Committee,” 1905), 44:109 Brooks, Lawrence G. (politician, 1910), 6:68 Brooks, Lizzie Edna (1873-1907; librarian): obituary, 3:114 Brooks, Luther (fire chief, 1832), 36:80, 90 Brooks, Margaret, see Robinson, Mrs. Fred N. Brooks, Martha (Berkeley St. resident, mid-1800s), 21:59 Brooks, Peter Chardon (1767-1849; merchant), 11:23n2; 25:89; 38:82; 41:21, 23, 32, 60 Brooks, Bishop Phillips (1835-1893), 1:70; 7:19; 16:112; 17:43; 33:113, 131; 34:91; 36:13, 21
– as Harvard preacher, 34:41, 44; 36:67; 42:119
– papers of, 33:124-25; 42:122
– Phillips Brooks House, 22:64 Brooks, Thomas (1600s):- – descendants of, 3:114 Brooks, Thomas (landowner, 1770s), 13:24n1 Brooks, Van Wyck (1886-1963; historian), 29:48; 37:112, 117, 121
– The Flowering of New England, 26:114n90; 27:30, 67n61; 29:48n59; 34:104; 35:47n1, 123
– New England: Indian Summer, 29:11 Brooks, William K. (1848-1908; zoologist), 2:82 Brooks, Gov. (1818), 6:13; 20:100; 33:48 Brooks, Mrs. (mother of James), 21:59 Brooks:- – History of Medford, 10:16n2, 48n3 Brooks estate (Massachusetts Ave.), 38:119 Brooks lot (Highland St., 1873), 43:18 Brooks, see Rivers and brooks Brother Jo[h]nathan’s Youngest, see Periodicals (Cambridge) Brown, see also Browne Brown, Albert (Berkeley St. resident, 1860s), 21:61, 67 Brown, Mrs. Albert (Mattie Griffith), 21:61 Brown, Andrew (British official, 1768), 39:147n7 Brown, Ann(e), see Oliver, Mrs. Robert Brown, Asa (landowner, c. 1811), 16:93 Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. (Irving St. residents, 1960s), 41:35 Brown, Dean Bernice Veazey, see Cronkhite, Dean Bernice Brown Brown, Rev. Charles R. (of Charlestown; later Dean of Yale Theological School), 33:151 Brown, Charlotte Hawkins (educator, 1950s), 35:106 Brown, Eliza Coe, see Moore, Mrs. Edward Caldwell Brown, Miss Elizabeth G. (1915), 10:173 Brown, Dr. Francis H. (c. 1860), 7:81 Brown, Frank C. (architectural historian, 1907), 43:160n17, 171 Brown, George Edwin (lives in Riedesel house,1940s), 26:50 Brown, Mrs. George Edwin (Mildred Hunter), 26:50, 57nn99, 103; 33:165 Brown, Helen Tyler (editor, 1920s), 33:58n4, 60n12, 72n49 Brown, James (of Antigua, c. 1700), 17:55; 35:59, 65; 37:24
– given as “John,” 10:14n2 Brown, Mrs. James (Elizabeth Eliot), see Royall, Mrs. Isaac [Sr.] Brown, James (1800-1855; publisher), 19:16; 38:83, 84; 39:117; 44:69, 77n24 Brown, John (before 1656):- – descendants of, 5:53 Brown, John (of Antigua), see Brown, James (of Antigua, c. 1700) Brown, John (on Watertown committee, 1753), 24:62 Brown, John (1800-1859; of Harper’s Ferry), 2:51; 7:14-15, 16; 10:145-46, 165; 14:28; 37:88-89 Brown, John (of Washington Ave., 1880s), 38:118 Brown, John Carter (1797-1874; book collector), 38:104-9 passim.- – See also Library(ies) Brown, John Greenwood (1846-1908; businessman):- – obituary, 10:173 Brown, John Mason (1900-1969; drama critic), 40:117, 120, 121 Brown, John Nicholas (Harvard benefactor, 1930s), 27:26 Brown, John Perkins:- – “Christ Church, Cambridge” (1934 paper), 23:17-23 Brown, Kenneth W. (Boat Club, 1963), 39:142 Brown, Martha (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Brown, “Osawatomie,” see Brown, John (1800-1859; of Harper’s Ferry) Brown, Otis S. (of East Cambridge, mid-1800s), 36:95 Brown, Richard (member of Phillips’ congregation, 1630s), 16:112-13; 17:49 Brown, Lt. Richard (British soldier shot in Cambridge, 1778), 13:67-68, 69n2 Brown, Rollo (biographer, late 1800s), 34:47; 37:112 Brown, Samuel (of Abington; owner of 1775-76 orderly book), 11:81 Brown, Samuel (of Boston, 1824), 10:75n4 Brown, Seth (and hay for “colony service,” 1775), 10:47n4 Brown, Deacon William (provisioner, 1818), 1:22; 8:37 Brown (committee member, 1777), 13:51 Brown, Major (residence of, opposite meetinghouse, c. 1800), 42:118 Brown, Durrell & Company (Boston dry goods firm), 41:44 Brown, Shattuck & Company (printers), 44:84. See also Printers Brown of Harvard (play, c. 1900), 33:129; 38:57 Brown Street, 22:59; 31:60; 36:8 Brown University (Rhode Island College), 4:6, 34; 21:102; 33:120; 35:97; 38:71; 43:129
– John Carter Brown Library, 5:8; 38:100-109 passim Brown-Sequard, Dr. Charles Eduard (d. 1894), 23:86-87 Brown-Sequard, Mrs. (Miss Webster, first wife; Miss Carlisle, second wife; Mrs. Doherty, third wife), 23:86 Brown-Wales Company, 10:173 Brown’s Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Browne, see also Brown Brown[e], Abraham (Watertown house of), 20:102; 25:67 Browne, Alexander Porter (patent attorney, c. 1900), 34:115 Browne, Amy, see Townsend, Mrs. Amy Browne Browne, Rev. Arthur (1770s), 10:68n1 Browne, Mrs. Arthur, 10:18n2, 30n1 Browne, George H. (late 1800s; of Browne & Nichols School), 22:107, 108-10; 30:13; 32:48; 44:20, 111 Browne, Mrs. George H. (Emily Webster), 30:13; 32:48 Browne, Richard (operates ferry, 1633), 7:53 Browne, Elder Richard (of Watertown, 1636), 44:47 Browne and Nichols Preparatory School, 43:79
– boathouse of, 39:138
– founders of, 23:82; 32:48; 44:20
– Hall at, 44: 106, 113
– history of (1933 paper, read at 50th anniversary), 22:105-12; 31:61n
– property owned/houses built by, 20:95; 32:99; 33:44, 47; 42:126; 44:145, 150
– students at, 5:47; 23:45 Browning, John S. (editor, 1880s), 20:88 Browning, Robert (1812-1889; British poet):- – Longfellow meets, 28:102 Browning and Drake circuitry, 34:122.- – See also Business and industry (electronics ) Bruce, Abel W. (city treasurer, 1846), 22:24 Bruce, H. Addington (Boat Club, 1914), 39:134 Bruen family, 14:80 Brunswick, Duke of, and Brunswick Battalion (1770s), 13:17n2, 18.- – See also “Convention Troops” Brunswick Hotel (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Brunton, Mrs. Mary Balfour (1778-1818; novelist), 27:44n3 “Brush Hill,” 16:80; 19:48.- – See also Milton, Massachusetts Bryan, William Jennings (1860-1925; political leader), 40:159 Bryant, John Jr. (art collector, 1830s), 29:50n66 Bryant, Rene Kuhn (historian, 1939), 41:156n1 Bryant, William Cullen (1794-1878; poet), 19:23; 25:106, 123; 26:96, 97; 29:14n2; 33:11, 12; 40:95
– house of (Cummington), 25:67-68 Bryant, Mrs. William Cullen, 25:123 Bryant, Dr. (father of William Cullen; d. 1820), 25:123 Bryant Street, 23:77; 34:64, 65; 41:18, 19, 31
– residents of (1911-69), 41:36 Bryce, Lord James (1838-1922; British diplomat), 7:10; 10:162; 33:121; 34:9 Bryn Mawr College, 44:142, 154 Buchanan, James (1791-1868; U.S. president, 1856-60), 23:86 Buchheim, Gunther (writer, 1974), 43:138n19 Buck, Paul Herman (Harvard provost, 1940s), 33:33, 35; 34:10 Buck, Roger (and fish weir, 1640s), 5:38 Buck, William (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 “Buck’s Progress,” see Allston, Washington (paintings and caricatures by) Bucket brigade, see Fire(s) Buckingham, Joseph T. (1779-1861; editor, publisher), 18:27, 37 (and n1); 44:69n8, 76n21, 174n6
– houses built by, 18:36 (and n2) Buckingham, Miss Mary H. (granddaughter of Joseph T., living in 1925), 18:36n2 Buckingham, Mr. (neighbor of Mrs. Samuel Howe, 1840), 24:39, 40, 41, 43 Buckingham Place, 18:31; 41:162; 42:125, 126; 43:168 Buckingham School, see School(s) Buckingham Street, 22:55; 31:44; 32:25; 33:97; 37:18-19; 41:169
– architecture on, 18:36n2; 26:47; 43:51, 171
– Col. Higginson’s residence on, 1:65; 39:91; 41:167
– marsh or spring near, 16:114; 20:94; 31:49, 53
– Miss Markham’s and Misses Smiths’ schools on, see School(s) Buckley, Daniel (newspaper publisher, d. 1901), 20:42, 88 Buckman, Mr. (at “Junior Committee” party, 1906), 44:116 Buckminster, Anna (grandmother of Timothy Fuller; mid-1700s), 11:37n1 Buckminster, Col. Joseph (early Framingham settler, c. 1650), 11:37n1 Buckminster, Rev. Joseph Stevens (1784-1812), 3:63; 9:37; 11:39, 44, 45; 16:25; 34:88 Buckminster, Maj. Lawson (of Framingham, 1798), 11:37 Buckminster, Nancy (friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1800), 11:45 Buehler, Mrs. (researched 1969 paper), 41:159 Buffalo Bill, see Cody, William F. Buffam, F. H. (newspaperman, 1880s), 20:86; 26:114 Bufford, John H. (lithographer, c. 1850): tavern portrayed by, 39:112 (illus. facing) Building and construction
– bridge and street, see Bridge(s); Streets and highways
– house, 10:188; 11:23 (see also Expenses) Building stone, see Geology Bulfinch, Charles (1763-1844; architect), 30:15; 39:30; 42:116
– buildings by, 3:106; 25:121; 27:68n63; 32:81; 33:147; 35:73; 41:60
– – – style of, 44:142
– at Fresh Pond, 3:100, 106-7 Bulfinch, Mrs. Charles, 3:106-7 Bulfinch, Ellen Susan (granddaughter of Charles; d. 1921), 30:15; 32:41; 41:165-66
– “The Tudor House at Fresh Pond” (1908 paper), 3:100-109 Bulfinch, Mrs. Stephen G. (daughter-in-law of Charles), 30:15 Bulfinch, Madam Susan (1811), 3:100-101, 109 Bulfinch family, 13:84 Bulfinch Place (Boston), 34:69 Bulk[e]ley, Rev. Peter (1582/3-1658/9), 24:76; 44:51 Bulk[e]ley family, 14:80 Bull, Ole (1810-1880; violinist), 15:44; 40:104; 41:43 Bull, Mrs. Ole, 35:18, 20 Bullard, Rev. Amos (of Barre, 1840s), 6:76 Bullard, Mrs. Amos (Mary Ann Durant), 6:76 Bullard, Anne, see Dana, Mrs. Richard Bullard, Rev. Asa (1860s), 2:40; 20:75 Bullard, Francis (Harvard 1886; art collector), 27:11, 20; 35:64, 68 Bullard, Mary, see Day, Mrs. Francis H. Bullard, Stephen Hopkins (Quincy St. resident, mid-1800s), 23:34 Bullard, Mrs. Stephen Hopkins (Elizabeth Lyman Eliot), 23:34 Bullard, William A. (Hospital trustee, 1870s), 35:86; 39:45 Bullard, William S. (merchant, c. 1850), 10:182 Bullitt, Misses Carrie and Susan (of “Havenhurst,” late 1800s), 32:102 Bullitt family (from Baltimore, late 1800s), 32:102 Bullock, Dr. C. (dentist, 1860s), 39:43 Bullock, Gov. [of Georgia] (Rufus Brown, 1884-1907[?]), 21:67 Bump, Mr. and Mrs. W. Nelson (in Hayes-Baker house, 1940s), 32:103 Bumpkin Island, 42:116 Bumstead, Anne, see Cogswell, Mrs. George P. Bumstead, Ethel Quincy (of Berkeley St. School Association, c. 1910), 21:69; 32:31 Bumstead, Mrs. Freeman J. (sister of J. Gardner White, late 1800s), 21:69 Bumstead, Miss Josephine Freeman (Berkeley St. resident; d. 1950), 21:13, 69; 32:42 Bumstead, Josiah (Boston wallpaper manufacturer, 1800), 39:50 “Bunch of Grapes” Tavern (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Bunker, see also Boncoeur Bunker, Ingalls (of New Hampshire, 1840s), 20:134 Bunker, John (1662-1712; saddler), 8:33; 39:60 Bunker, J. W. M. (MIT, 1940s), 42:62 Bunker Hill, 28:61; 43:145
– fortification of, see Fortifications (Revolutionary War)
– name of, 33:148n6
– Webster speech at (1825), 20:24
– See also Bunker Hill, Battle of Bunker Hill, Battle of, 10:54; 16:37, 41; 18:52, 57, 59, 66, 71-72; 25:103; 27:43; 30:56; 32:27; 35:30; 37:51, 55, 60; 39:29; 41:160; 42:82; 43:72, 85
– British soldiers at, 16:79, 95; 19:51
– Cambridge men at, 1:27; 4:41; 8:14; 10:74; 13:84; 16:79, 80-81; 19:51; 23:76; 26:76; 33:148-49
– and care of wounded, 6:23; 15:42; 17:58, 100; 22:100; 27:48; 37:52
– Dana (Lt. James) at (1910 paper on), 5:21-32
– diary accounts of, 11:76, 77, 78; 19:51
– reproduction of battle scene, 33:149 Bunker Hill Day (June 17), see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Bunker Hill Monument, 18:28; 28:61
– cornerstone laid (1825), 44:172
– design and building of, 23:82; 33:149
– height of, 19:37; 36:97 Bunker Hill Monument Association, 44:177 Bunting, Bainbridge (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:33, 36, 37, 42
– “Brattle Street:- – A Résumé of American Residential Architecture, 1673-1973” (1973 paper), 43:33-52 Bunting, Mary Ingraham (Radcliffe president, 1960-72), 44:152 (and illus. #11 following), 153, 156 Buonaparte, see Bonaparte Burbank, Mr. (Boston lawyer, 1860s), 30:87 Burbeck, Edward (woodcarver, c. 1700), 23:21 Burchard, John (historian, 1948), 42:59, 62n12 Burchhardt, Mr. (artist for Prof. Agassiz, 1860s), 35:51 Burdett, George (Harvard 1881; choirmaster), 32:88 Burdette, Miss (music teacher, mid-1800s), 30:88 Burgess, see also Burgis Burgess, Gelett (1866-1951; humorist): quoted, 34:53 Burgess, W. Randolph (with Treasury Dept., 1950s), 35:107 Burgis, see also Burgess Burgis, William (artist, engraver, working c. 1718-31), 7:69 Burgoyne, Gen. John (1722-1792; “Gentleman Johnny”), 3:74; 5:70, 71; 10:68; 19:55; 37:15, 31, 67
– and Convention Troops as prisoners of war, see “Convention Troops”
– papers on, 44:193
– – – “and His Officers in Cambridge” (1918), 13:17-80
– – – life of (1932), 22:29-45
– sword of (owned by Connecticut resident, 1918), 13:29n3 Burke, Edmund (1729-1797; English statesman), 22:34-35; 33:70; 39:158; 43:86, 88 Burke, Edmund (of New Hampshire, 1860s), 20:61 Burke, Frances Matson, see Dana, Mrs. George Hazen Burke: General Armory, 28:13 Burleigh house, 26:40 (illus. #10 following) Burleigh Street, 18:19; 44:111 Burlingame, Anson (1820-1870; diplomat), 34:91; 39:8 Burlington, Massachusetts:- – boundaries of, 21:34, 41, 48; 33:153.- – See also Woburn (Charlestown Village) Burnet, see also Burnett Burnet, Gov. William (1688-1729), 21:89; 36:54 Burnett, see also Burnet Burnett, Mrs. E.: house of (addition to, 1895), 43:167 Burnett, Edmund C. (editor, 1936), 40:11n8 Burnett, Mrs. Mabel, see Lowell, Mabel Burney, Fanny (1752-1840; author), 22:35 Burney, James (brother of Fanny), 22:35 Burnham, Ethel, see Worcester, Mrs. William L. Burnham, Roger Noble (sculptor, late 1800s), 33:57 Burnham, Maj. Thomas (1750-1833): orderly book kept by (1776), 11:79 Burnham Hall (Episcopal Seminary), 36:8 Burns, Anthony (1834-1862; fugitive slave), 1:48; 6:78; 10:130, 138, 140, 150, 161, 165; 23:84-85; 26:113; 37:85-87. See also Slavery Burnside, Gen. Ambrose E. (1824-1881), 36:114 Burr, Aaron (1756-1836; lawyer and politician), 4:32 Burr, Allston (Harvard benefactor, 1943), 33:147 Burr, Andrew (Princeton University president, 1757), 21:94 Burr, Benjamin (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:103 Burr, Mrs. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:25 Burrage, Miss A. A.:- – Brookline house of (built 1905), 43:160 (and illus. #4 following), 161, 166, 167, 171 Burrage, Joseph, Jr. (selectman, 1840s), 22:24 Burritt, Elihu (1810-1879; “learned blacksmith”), 34:27 Burroughs, Alan (Harvard 1920; of Fogg Museum), 27:26; 35:72 Burroughs, Rev. Henry, Jr. (mid-1800s), 19:47n Burroughs, Mrs. Henry, Jr. (Sarah Tilden), 19:47n Burroughs, John (1837-1921; naturalist, author), 19:23 Burying ground(s)
– Arlington(Pleasant St.), 8:22, 24
– Cambridge Cemetery and Cemetery Commission, 8:20; 10:188; 13:86; 23:32, 35, 36; 24:8, 63; 32:96,97; 36:114; 37:106; 39:21; 42:112
– Cambridgeport, 16:53
– Charlestown(Phipps St.), 33:146
– outside “Common Pales,” 6:34; 31:24
– Copps Hill, see Copps Hill (Boston)
– and disease, 44:173-74
– Granary (Boston), 17:29, 30, 31; 19:78
– on Harvard St., 30:78
– Kings Chapel (Boston), 17:33, 34, 36, 38; 27:45, 51
– old Garden St. (“God’s Acre”), 3:16, 63; 6:34; 13:60; 14:71n2; 15:26; 21:82, 85, 87, 90, 93; 33:40-41; 43:69
– – – Committee members (1930’s), 22:13n1; 35:23
– – – enclosure of, see Fences and walls
– – – Epitaphs from (Harris, ed.), 22:13n1; 26:78n37, 93n63
– – – gravestones in, see Tomb(s) and tombstone(s)
– – – Harvard presidents interred in, 3:18; 17:101; 23:97; 25:106; 33:40; 35:24; 41:160
– – – in Historic District, 39:73; 42:42
– – – history of (Farnum, 1937), 22:13n1; 35:24
– – – in Longfellow’s poems, 3:45
– – – milestone at corner of, see Milestone(s)
– – – plan of, 19:81; 22:13n1; 35:24
– – – preservation of, discussed, 16:133, 135; 17:101; 18:75, 79; 23:74, 99; 24:7-8; 35:23-25; 39:73
– – – Revolutionary War casualties buried in, 1:64; 25:118; 33:41; 39:7 (see also Revolutionary hospital, below)
– – – schoolhouse in, 13:98
– – – “Sentinel and- – Nun” at, 5:30; 29:64
– – – tombs in, see Tomb(s) and tombstone(s)
– – – WPA project concerning records of, 24:8, 10; 29:84; 33:158 (see also Christ Church)
– Paris (Père Lachaise), 34:77; 44:175, 176, 182, 183, 186
– Revolutionary hospital, 1:60; 16:8, 128; 17:100 (see also old. Garden St., above)
– Roxbury, 21:27; 30:42
– Salem (laid out, c. 1830), 14:72
– Washington St. (Boston), 30:42
– See also Death; Tomb(s) and tombstone(s) Bus, see Automobiles; Omnibuses Busby, Abraham (c. 1686/87), 7:76 Busby’s Lane, 24:63.- – See also Fresh Pond Lane Busch, see also Bush Busch-Reisinger Museum, see Museum(s) Bush, see also Busch Bush, Reynold (with Hooker, 1636), 14:87 Bush, Vannevar (1890-1974; inventor), 34:120, 123; 35:112 Bushnell, Rev. Horace (1802-1876), 14:31 Business Administration, Harvard School of, see Harvard School(s) Business and industry, 25:115, 117
– abattoirs, see slaughter houses, below
– advertisements for, see Advertisements
– aircraft, 42:57-58
– apothecary, see Medicine, practice of
– armament, 30:65
– automobile, see Automobiles
– bakery, see Retail and food stores
– barber shop, 1:13; 8:34
– “beautician,” 41:144
– bicycle tire, 40:24-27, 30, 35 (see also Sports and games)
– blacksmith, see Blacksmith(s)
– book manufacturing, 15:19; 19:16-31; 20:36; 25:117; 32:92; 38:105; 44:66 (see also Booksellers; Printers; Publishers)
– box-making, 39:115; 40:29
– brewery/distillery, 8:33, 34; 21:91; 37:19 (see also Wine and spirits)
– brick-making, see Brick and brick-making
– building and construction
– – – bridge and street, see Bridge(s); Streets and highways
– – – house, 10:188; 11:23 (see also Expenses)
– building stone, see Geology
– and Business Men’s Association, Harvard Square, 20:16; 37:92-93, 96, 100; 42:90-91
– candle-making, see Lights and lighting
– carpentry, 5:61-62; 41:17
– carriage (“chaise”) building, 5:61-62; 15:33; 16:42; 20:46; 27:51; 36:81; 39:111, 115; 40:36; 43:73
– cement, 40:48
– chair factories, see “fancy chair” factories, below
– chimney sweep, 41:169
– chocolate mill, 39:29
– clock- and watch-making and repair, 8:31; 18:23-24; 25:79; 30:17
– clothing, 39:120 (see also hat manufactory; textile mills, below; Clothing)
– coach painting, 38:9
– coal, see wood and coal dealers, below
– and commuters to Boston, 44:164, 165
– confectionery, see Retail and food stores
– cooperage (barrels), 26:77; 36:96
– cracker factory, 43:11
– development and decline of
– – – Cambridge (industry leaves), 19:44; 34:120-24 passim; 42:64
– – – Cambridgeport, 1:19; 8:37; 15:31-39 passim; 26:41-44, 85; 29:71; 31:29; 35:80-88; 37:33; 39:63, 115; 42:83, 88; 43:144, 145 (see also Cambridgeport [as port of entry]; Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses)
– – – East Cambridge, 7:60; 14:74; 15:37, 38; 16:65, 88-94 passim; 19:32, 34, 43; 25:139; 31:55; 32:92; 34:99; 35:93, 94-98; 39:64, 110-12, 115-16; 40:143; 42:83; 43:73
– distillery, see brewery/distillery, above
– early directories of, 15:30-40 (see also Directories [city])
– effect of, see industrialization, below
– electronics, 34:111-24; 35:22
– express/freight, see shipping, below
– and factory whistle, 40:34
– “fancy chair” factories, 21:53-54
– fishing, see Fishing (as industry)
– foundries, see iron and steel, below
– fur trade, see Trade and commerce
– furniture-making, 22:47; 36:93, 97, 98; 39:111, 115, 120; 43:73
– glass and pottery manufacture, 15:36; 16:55, 65, 92, 94; 17:51; 19:32-45; 22:71; 34:99; 36:93-103 passim; 39:112; 42:83
– glazier, 10:40; 38:15 (see also Glass)
– glue factory, 43:104
– grain, 20:15; 37:92
– gristmills, 3:104; 14:124; 22:66, 76; 39:29
– harness-makers/saddlers, see Horses (as transportation)
– hat manufactory, 16:42 (see also palm leaf importation and processing, below)
– hose, woven, see Boston Woven Hose and Rubber Company
– ice-cutting, see Ice and ice-houses
– industrial parks, 39:27-28, 36
– industrialization
– – – effect of, 22:101; 39:108, 112, 115, 120, 124; 40:143
– – – English industrial supremacy (c. 1755), 9:38n3
– – – industrial revolution, 31:29; 36:42; 39:120; 41:55
– interior decorators, 21:70; 44:38
– iron and steel, 6:7, 8; 10:173; 35:86; 40:28, 46; 41:41
– jelly-making, 33:54
– lamp and lantern manufacture, 19:34, 38, 43, 44; 33:150 (see also glass and pottery manufacture, above)
– laundry, Chinese, 44:12
– leaves Cambridge, see development and decline of, above
– livery stable, see Horses (as transportation)
– locksmith, 8:31
– lumber, 5:59; 23:22; 38:30; 39:29, 110; 40:29, 47, 49, 50, 57; 41:44
– machine shop, 6:14; 20:100; 40:56
– machinery (heavy), 39:120
– marble works, see stonecutters, below
– masons, see stone masons, below
– meat-packing, 36:97; 39:115, 120
– moving, 23:52; 40:118
– musical instruments (organs and pianos), 8:28-29; 20:36, 75; 32:92-93; 39:120
– oil, 7:105
– palm leaf importation and processing, 10:185; 14:129, 130
– paper makers, 15:21
– picture-framing, 30:22
– potash manufacture, 9:38, 39n1, 41
– pottery, see glass and pottery manufacture, above
– printing and publishing, see Printers; Publishers
– real estate, 10:177, 12:65; 16:85; 20:15; 21:82; 32:66; 37:16, 17, 21, 24, 92; 39:84n19, 118; 44:161, 162
– – – and land speculation, see Land
– Revere Copper Company, 34:68, 69
– rope-making and ropewalks, 20:91; 22:75; 31:25; 39:30
– rubber products, 40:24-27, 30, 33, 35-41
– saddlers, see Horses (as transportation)
– sarsaparilla root processing, 9:40-41
– seamstresses, see Clothing (tailors and seamstresses)
– shipbuilding, 35:84, 112; 37:107-8; 38:76; 39:111, 139; 40:49
– shipping, 5:59n10; 7:52, 54; 10:184-85; 21:112; 32:58; 39:111; 40:33, 45, 49, 56-57; 42:70; 44:79
– – – on Connecticut River, 17:37; 40:50, 51
– – – docks and wharves for, 7:59, 65; 15:33; 16:42; 20:119; 21:89; 22:106; 26:92; 31:23; 35:81; 39:27, 29, 110, 111, 116; 40:27, 29; 42:8, 12, 88; 44:44, 164
– – – express/freight, 5:61; 8:37; 22:106; 30:25, 26-27, 36; 34:88; 39:115; 43:73
– – – on “Menotomy River,” 5:43
– – – restrictions on, see Trade and commerce
– – – teamsters and, see Horses (as transportation)
– (see also Canal[s]; Coal; Railroad[s]; Travel/transportation)
– shoemaking, 20:92; 24:72-73, 77; 40:36, 42
– silk culture, 9:39
– silversmiths, 19:40; 41:159 (see also Revere, Paul)
– slate quarries, 17:32, 34-37 (see also stonecutters, below)
– slaughter houses, 14:63n1; 17:62; 20:131; 21:109; 26:69n11; 30:21; 36:117; 43:26; 44:25, 61 (see also Animals)
– smithy, see Blacksmith(s)
– soap-making, 16:64; 20:36; 25:117; 39:111, 112, 115, 120; 40:24; 42:64; 43:73, 146; 44:61
– sporting goods, 10:187
– stone masons, 9:6; 42:29
– stonecutters, 17:31-37 passim; 31:35; 32:97; 35:18, 24
– stoves and tin ware, 15:35; 38:41n37
– and street criers, 42:28
– sugar plantations (West Indies), 33:62; 37:23
– – – Oliver family, 10:60; 21:119; 33:58-68 passim; 37:24
– – – Vassall and Royall family, 10:15-28 passim, 31n2, 38, 49-50; 21:96, 98-99; 22:99; 33:63; 37:15 (see also Slavery)
– sugar refining, 36:93, 96, 97
– tailors and seamstresses, see Clothing
– tanning, 5:57; 40:49; 44:61
– telegraph and telephone, see Communication(s)
– textile mills, 10:23; 21:105; 23:49, 50, 52; 26:113; 40:49
– – – England, 19:74
– watch-making, see clock- and watch-making and repair, above
– whaling, 27:57 (see also Lights and lighting)
– wheelwright, 14:70
– wood and coal dealers, 7:105; 15:33; 20:56; 21:112 (see also Heating)
– world wars and, see World War I; World War II
– woven hose, see Boston Woven Hose and Rubber Company
– See also Advertisements; Economic conditions; Inventions; Labor; Money; Mortgages and debts; Printers; Profession(s); Publishers; Railroad(s); Retail and food stores; Street rail-way(s); Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses; Trade and commerce; Wages and salaries
Busnack, Solomon (Civil War veteran), 39:12
Bussey, George D. (teacher, 1890s), 35:113
Bussey Institute, 4:82; 18:47; 36:30-31
Bussey Professorship, 29:70
Bust, Nathaniel, see Rust, Nathaniel
Butler, Albert S. (clerk of court, 1860s), 17:22
Butler, Gov. [Gen.] Benjamin F. (1818-1893), 10:141, 156, 157; 20:26-27, 30, 35, 40-45 passim; 26:114; 34:20; 39:11
Butler, Fanny Kemble (1809-1893; actress), 4:88, 89
Butler, Harrietta, see Howe, Mrs. James Murray
Butler, Bishop Joseph (1692-1752; of England), 10:64
Butler, Mr. and Mrs. Paul (Francis Ave. residents, 1922-25), 41:29
Butler, Richard (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91
Butler, Sigourney (politician, 1880s), 20:45
Butler, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102, 103; 14:91; 22:77
Butler, Mr. (in Edmund Quincy house, 1922), 16:21
Butler’s Hill, 43:141.- – See also Dana Hill
“Butlers” at Harvard, see Harvard College/University
Butterfield, Lyman (historian, 1960s), 44:124, 126, 136
Buttery, the, see Harvard College/University
Buttrick, Ephraim (alderman, 1846), 22:24
Buttrick, Mollie, see Goodwin, Mrs. Frank
Buttrick, Rev. (University Preacher, 1950s), 41:33
Byerly, Prof. William E., 28:118; 44:143
Byerly Hall (Radcliffe), 44:150, 151
Byles, Rev. Mather (1706/7-1788; Boston Loyalist), 30:49
Byrne, James (Harvard 1877; benefactor), 27:36-37
Byzantine Institute, 27:27; 44:31

C

Cabeen, David C. (editor, 1940s), 37:113
Cable, George Washington (1844-1925; author), 2:42
Cable cars, see Street railway(s)
Cabot, Andrew (Salem or Beverly merchant, 1779)
– buys Loyalist property, 16:76, 78, 89, 90-91; 33:68; 37:25 Cabot, Mrs. Anna (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:27, 28 Cabot, Dr. Arthur T. (1852-1912), 27:20 Cabot, Eliza Lee, see Follen, Mrs. Charles Cabot, Elizabeth, see Kirkland, Mrs. John Thornton Cabot, George (1752-1823; merchant and politician), 16:25 Cabot, Godfrey L. (of Boston, early 20th c.), 43:19 Cabot, Miss Helen (of Boston; b. 1855; educational pioneer), 36:35 Cabot, Prof. J. Elliot (1870), 36:27 Cabot, John (1461-1498; explorer), 21:19; 33:134; 40:101, 102 Cabot, John (landowner, c. 1800), 16:89 Cabot, Dr. Richard C. (1868-1939), 27:33 Cabot, Dr. S. (of Boston, 1860s), 7:81; 39:43 Cabot, Sebastian (1482[?]-1557; explorer), 33:134; 40:101 Cabot, Sewall (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Cabot, Walter M. (Harvard 1894; curator at Fine Arts Museum), 27:20, 21, 23; 35:68 Cabot, Mr. (friend of F. Dana, 1780), 3:66 Cabot, Miss, see Lee, Mrs. Joseph (sister of George Cabot) Cabot, Cabot & Forbes Company, 42:64 Cabot & Chandler (architects), 34:75; 43:155 Cabot family, 20:95 Cabot house (Beverly), 25:68 Cadbury, Prof. Henry J. (Ph.D. 1914; theologian), 36:66
– “Early Quakers at Cambridge” (1937 paper), 24:67-82 Cadwalader, Isaac Guest (mid-1800s), 19:46n1 Cadwalader, Mrs. Isaac Guest (Althea Linzee Livingston), 19:46n1 Cain/Caine, see Cane Cairns, Claude (electronics manufacturer, 1920s), 34:121 Calder, John Vassall (of Jamaica, c. 1915), 10:48n2 Calderon de la Barca, Sr. and Sra., 23:58-59. See also Inglis, Misses Fanny and Lydia Calderwood, Mrs. (Farrar St. resident, 1960s), 41:37 Caldwell, George C. (Harvard 1855; chemist), 4:82 Caldwell, Mrs. Jane R. (daughter of Elias Howe), 14:126, 138 Caldwell, Sarah (orchestra conductor), 41:103-4 Caledonian Mines Company, 25:139 Calef, John (Loyalist, 1770s), 5:74, 79n2, 84n5 Calhoun, John C. (1782-1850; statesman), 10:147, 151; 25:40 Calhoun Club, see Club(s) Calkins, Rev. Raymond (1930s), 21:65; 23:12; 31:56, 64; 43:122. 124, 125 Callahan, Lucretia Catherine Timmins, see Hill, Mrs. Thomas Quincy Callahan, William G. (hotel owner, 1848), 37:34 Callahan Playground, 43:87 Callendar (Boston tailor, 1800), 11:44 Calthrop, Rev. Samuel Robert (of Bridgeport, Ct., 1850s), 10:191 Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, 5:109; 11:87; 26:23; 33:50; 35:38; 41:46 Calvin, John (1509-1564), 1:36; 4:29; 22:99; 32:84; 40:59, 78
– and Calvinism, 1:36-37; 11:62; 37:48
– – – at Amherst, 4:22; 32:33
– – – at Harvard, 33:56, 58
– – – A. Holmes and, 4:29; 11:30; 29:70
– – – Puritans and, 22:99; 32:106; 36:55; 40:77, 82; 43:112
– See also Religion Cam, Prof. Helen Maud (historian), 44:152 Cambridge, England, 3:11; 13:84; 14:83; 21:20; 30:33, 42; 32:106; 40:69
– Cambridge University, 13:82; 21:91; 34:10, 16; 36:32; 44:78
– – – Dunster and J. Harvard at, 3:15; 32:62, 66, 67, 111, 112; 33:144, 145; 43:114
– – – Emmanuel College, 10:92, 96; 13:82; 14:84, 91; 15:24; 32:61-62, 66; 33:136, 139, 144, 145; 36:55; 40:72; 42:78, 97-99
– – – founders/early settlers educated at, 1:38; 3:7, 14; 7:17, 74; 10:92, 96; 14:84, 91, 99-103 passim; 15:24; 30:42; 31:63; 32:61, 110; 33:139; 40:72; 42:78, 97-99
– – – Harvard compared to, 1:40; 32:112
– – – influence of, 2:55; 10:92; 15:24; 30:32; 33:136; 36:54-55; 42:98
– – – Longfellow Centenary greeting from (1907), 2:49
– See also Cambridge, Massachusetts (naming of) Cambridge, Massachusetts
– agencies, boards, councils, and departments of, see Cambridge agencies, boards, councils, and departments
– agriculture in, see Agriculture and horticulture
– “Alice’s Adventures in” (Evarts), 42:82
– annexation of, to Boston, 16:85
– bill defeated, 10:187
– (see also boundaries of, below)
– anniversaries of founding of:
– – – 250th (1880), 20:36
– – – 275th (1905), 1:25-53; 32:116
– – – 300th (1930), 27:98-101
– – – 340th (1970), 42:77
– anniversaries of incorporation of:
– – – 1896, 12:67; 37:100; 39:108, 114, 123; 40:23, 26, 42; 41:9; 42:74, 88
– – – 1946, 32:120; 33:39
– – – 1971, 42:77-94
– (see also organization and charter of, below; History, Cambridge [Cambridge of 1896, The])
– Annual Documents of, 37:96, 97, 103, 104; 43:149
– annual report (1946), 42:93
– area of, see boundaries of, below
– arsenal in, see Arsenal
– Atlas published by (1873), see Maps and plans
– “Battle of” (sham fight, muster day 1772), 10:18n2
– boundaries of, 14:35-36; 17:46, 93; 22:98; 39:98; 43:116
– – – and annexations to, 8:20; 20:128; 24:62-63; 43:81
– – – Billerica grants and, 9:71-76 (and maps); 14:35
– – – Brighton and W. Cambridge separated from (1807), 17:96; 29:68
– – – Charlestown (Somerville) line, 14:34, 71n3; 39:109
– – – fixed, defined (1632, 1641), 16:75; 21:24-25, 30-31, 34, 47; 25:63; 38:111; 39:109; 42:78-79
– – – maximum size (c. 1650), 9:72
– – – Watertown line, 13:81; 14:68; 34:78; 44:178 (see also Sparks Street)
– (see also Fences and walls; Maps and plans; entries for surrounding towns)
– British/”Hessian” troops quartered in, see “Convention Troops”
– building in:
– – – 1600s, 7:52; 8:30; 9:71
– – – 1760s and 1770s, 5:57, 58
– – – 1839 and 1849, 4:32, 89
– “Buildings and Parts of…in Longfellow’s Poems” (1908 prize essay), 3:43-47
– as capital of Bay Colony, see Massachusetts Bay Company and Colony
– “catechism” on, 19:10-14
– Centennial and Bicentennial celebrations in, see Celebrations
– as “center of the world,” 44:11-12
– charter of, see organization and charter of, below
– chosen as college site, see Harvard College/University
– churches in, see First Church and Parish; Meetinghouse sites; individual church listings
– as city, incorporation of, see organization and charter of, below
– City Building(s) of, 18:19; 30:16, 20
– City Council of, see Cambridge agencies, boards, councils, and departments
– city expenses of (1846-95), 42:88
– City Guard in, 37:91
– City Home, City Mission of, see Charity
– city seal of, 27:31; 33: 152
– in Civil War, see Civil War, U.S.
– confiscation of property in, see Loyalists
– consolidation with surrounding cities proposed (1916), 42:91
– Constitutional Convention held in (1779), see Massachusetts Constitutional Convention(s)
– Court held in (1700s), 10:33n2; 40:132, 133 (see also Court House[s] [Cambridge])
– “declaration of independence” of, 13:84
– descriptions of:
– – – 1804, 42:7
– – – 1870s, 43:154
– – – 1886, 22:106-7
– diaries depicting life in, see Diaries and journals
– directories of, see Directories (city)
– effect of Harvard upon, see Harvard College/University
– election(s) in, see Election(s), political
– electronics industry in, 34:111-24 (see also Business and industry)
– English ancestral homes of founders of, see Britain
– factionalism in, see as “three towns,” below
– fencing of, see Fences and walls
– first house built in, 3:52; 14:40, 41; 22:69 (see also Graves, Thomas)
– first mayor of, see Green, Rev. James D.
– first newspaper in, see Essex Gazette and New England Chronicle
– first parish of, see First Church and Parish
– first tavern in, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses
– First Three Centuries (annual report, 1946), 42:93
– flora of, see Agriculture and horticulture; Botany; Trees
– founding of, see Dudley, Gov. Thomas; Newtown[e]
– “French neutrals” in, 10:25n1 (see also Acadian exiles)
– government of:
– – – “catechism” on, 19:13
– – – as city, see organization and charter of, below
– – – as town, see Selectmen; Town meeting(s)
– growth of, see Population
– and Harvard, see Harvard College/University
– healthfulness of, see Health
– and historic preservation (funding for), 42:32 (see also Historic preservation)
– historic survey areas of, 42:36, 93 (see also Cambridge Historical Commission)
– history of, see History, Cambridge
– homesteads (1635 and 1642), 22:76 (Map 1)
– inaccessibility of approach to (as advantage), 31:23; 32:58; 33:145; 37:29; 39:25; 42:78 (see also Boston, Massachusetts [defense of]; Fortifications)
– incorporated, see organization and charter of, below
– industry in (and loss of), see Business and industry
– land grants in, see Land grants
– Laws, Special, Enacted…for, 1781-1890, 43:74n10
– legislature meets in, see Massachusetts General Court/Legislature
– liquor sales in, see Wine and spirits
– Longfellow’s poems concerning, 12:46-50
– Loyalists in, see Loyalists
– maps of, see Maps and plans
– mayors of, see Allen, Frank Augustus; Bancroft, Gen. William A.; Barry, J. Edward; Bradford, Capt. Isaac; Champlin, E. R.; Corcoran, John; Crane, Edward A.; Daly, Augustine J.; Fox, James A.; Good, Mayor; Green, Rev. James D.; Hall, Mayor; Harding, Hamlin R.; McNamee, Mayor; Quinn, Mayor; Raymond, Zebina L.; Russell, Richard M.; Russell, Gov. William Eustis; Sortwell, Alvin Foye; Stevens, George; Thurston, Mayor; Wardwell, Mayor
– “Merchants of…in the Early Days” (1912 paper), 8:30-40 (see also Retail and food stores)
– model of (as of 1775), 42:32
– naming of (1638/9, change from “Newtown[e]”), 1:34, 40; 3:53; 21:38, 79; 22:97; 26:63; 30:41; 31:63; 32:107; 33:145; 36:53; 39:26, 126; 43:114; 44:47, 61
– old houses of, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– organization and charter of, 6:53-72; 15:37; 22:19, 21-28; 31:37, 56; 37:100
– – – incorporated (1846), 14:37, 65, 75; 20:86; 25:130, 139; 27:31; 30:72; 31:55; 32:7; 33:152; 35:95; 36:101, 107; 37:33; 38:24; 39:40, 114, 115; 41:8; 42:7, 84-85
– – – Plan B form of government, 42:90; 44:90
– – – Plan E form of government, 41:11; 42:77, 90, 91; 44:87-103
– (see also Election[s], [political]; Wards [town districts])
– population of, see Population; Population statistics
– as port of entry, see Cambridgeport
– printing press in, 3:16-17; 38:89 (see also Printers)
– “Proprietors’ Registere Booke” of, see town/”Proprietors'” records of, below
– Registry of Deeds built, 34:99n2
– religious controversy in, see Religion
– reminiscences of:
– – – 1827 (Higginson, read 1906), 2:20-32
– – – 1840s (Norton, read 1905), 1:11-23
– – – 1870s (Howe, read 1952), 34:59-76
– – – 1890s (Crothers, read 1945), 31:7-21; 44:108n2
– “revolutionaries” in, 42:78
– in Revolutionary War, see Revolutionary War
– routes and transportation to Boston from, see Boston, Massachusetts
– school districts of, 35:94 (see also School[s])
– settlement of (as “Newtown[e]”), see Newtown[e]
– sewer system, 22:21, 22, 28
– as shire town, 17:46; 24:61; 39:58; 42:80 (see also Court House[s] [Cambridge])
– sinking funds, 37:94, 100
– size of, see boundaries of, above; Population; Population statistics
– streets of, see Streets and highways
– as summer resort for Boston residents, 26:51 (see also Fresh Pond)
– taxes in, see Taxation/taxes
– Thayer poem about (1905), 1:43-47
– as “three towns,” 2:21; 39:112, 116; 42:84; 43:74 (see also Cambridgeport; East Cambridge; “Old Cambridge”)
– topography of, see Maps and plans
– town/”Proprietors'” records of (Register Book), 3:11, 12; 5:17n1; 10:17n3, 73-74 (notes), 104; 16:75; 21:82, 84; 22:61n2; 26:72n17, 73n24; 30:36; 31:22; 43:69n1
– – – begin, 10:91; 22:18
– – – land holdings traced from, 22:58-79; 28:29-30
– – – quoted, 5:38; 13:23; 14:36, 37; 17:47; 22:77
– trade and “want of trade” in, see Trade and commerce
– traffic pattern of, 39:117
– trees of and tree-felling in, see Trees
– urban renewal/city planning in, see Cambridge agencies, boards, councils, and departments (Planning Board/Department)
– Vital Records of (1915), 26:83n43
– vital statistics of, “Some Vital Errors in” (1921 paper), 15:46-51 (see also Population; Population statistics)
– walking tours of, see Walking tours
– wards of, see Wards (town districts)
– “warning out” of public charges from, see Welfare, public
– water supply of, see Water supply
– Watertown area later a part of, see Watertown, Massachusetts
– whipping post in, 24:70, 71n7, 75 (see also Corporal punishment)
– zoning restrictions, in, see Law(s)
– See also Cambridgeport; East Cambridge; History, Cambridge; Newtown[e]; North Cambridge; “Old Cambridge”; West Cambridge Cambridge agencies, boards, councils, and departments
– Board of Aldermen, 20:41, 43. 48, 50, 87; 21:106-7; 22:23-25 passim, 28; 35:87; 37:100; 39:9, 81n10
– Board of Health, 16:114
– Board of Trade, 41:46
– City Council, 37:97, 99; 39:73, 74, 75, 81n9; 42:31, 52, 90-91; 43:75; 44:87 (see also Common Council, below)
– and City Manager, 42:37, 42, 77, 90; 44:87, 91-103 passim
– Mayor Crane quoted on, 44:87-100
– Civil Defense, 36:88, 91-92
– Common Council, 22:24; 37:38
– – – abolished (1916), 22:26
– – – members of, 1:32; 5:107-8; 7:85; 10:186, 187, 188; 12:23; 20:36, 43, 48; 22:28; 25:138; 33:41; 35:87; 39:40; 41:44, 46; 43:26
– – – school supervision by, 20:42
– Conservation Commission, 42:87; 43:30
– Environmental Planning Council (proposed, 1974), 43:93
– Housing Authority, 44:99
– Planning Board/Department, 36:105; 39:72, 75, 137; 42:32, 33, 42, 91; 43:95
– – – and urban renewal/city planning, 42:64, 87 (see also Metropolitan District Commission [MDC])
– Printing Department, 42:37
– Public Welfare Department, 38:122, 127
– Public Works Department, 42:32
– Recreation Department, see Sports and games
– Redevelopment Authority, 42:32, 42; 44:99
– See also Cambridge Fire Department; Cambridge Police Department “Cambridge Agreement” (1629), 30:33 Cambridge Almanac and Business Directory, 15:31. See also Directories (city) Cambridge and Brookline Bridge Corporation, 14:51. See also Bridge(s) Cambridge and Concord Turnpike Corporation, 14:49. See also Concord Turnpike; Streets and highways Cambridge[port] Aqueduct Company, see Water supply Cambridge Baking Company, 15:33. See also Retail and food stores Cambridge Bicentennial Corporation, 44:193. See also Celebrations Cambridge Boat Club, see Club(s) Cambridge Book, The, 1966, 42:90, 93; 43:149 Cambridge Book Club, see Club(s) Cambridge Bridge, Cambridge Bridge Commission, see Bridge(s) Cambridge Broadway Railroad Company, see Street railway(s) (horse cars) Cambridge Camera and Marine, 41:131 Cambridge Cemetery and Cemetery Commission, see Burying ground(s) Cambridge Center for Adult Education, see Education Cambridge “characters,” 1:22; 13:124; 20:57-58; 22:104; 23:79; 28:21; 30:13-26 passim; 32:28; 34:53; 42:118-22; 43:10, 31; 44:25, 26
– eccentricities of, 18:32; 23:55; 26:14-19 passim; 27:64; 28:107; 31:9-12; 32:25, 26, 27; 33:18, 26, 56, 60n12; 38:82; 42:121-22; 43:18-19, 165
– Holmes, Lowell quoted on, see Holmes, John; Lowell, James Russell
– and nicknames of College celebrities, 23:54; 25:115, 119; 44:71
– See also Blynn, Police Officer; Holmes, John; John “the orange man”; Reamie/ Reemy, Marcus Cambridge Chronicle, see Periodicals (Cambridge) Cambridge City Home, City Mission, see Charity Cambridge Civic Association (CCA), 44:100-103 Cambridge clubs and associations, see Club(s); Society(ies) (organizations) Cambridge Coach Company (livery stable), 15:33. See also Horses (as transportation) Cambridge Collection, see Cambridge Public Library Cambridge Common, 4:26, 34; 14:49; 22:97, 107; 24:63; 29:15; 36:94
– barracks on:
– – – 1770s, 11:76, 13:18n2; 33:38, 48; 35:30; 43:71, 72
– – – 1917-18, 14:116; 17:82-83; 43:72
– – – 1940s, 43:72
– baseball field on, 33:39 (see also Sports and games)
– as boundary, 5:40; 28:30; 44:139
– cannons on, 1:61; 6:5-15; 13:20; 20:101; 29:84; 33:39; 35:30; 43:78, 80; 44:18
– “catechism” concerning, 19:13
– clearing of, see trees felled on, below
– “Convention Troops” and, 13:22, 26, 80
– as “Cow Common” or “Ox Pasture,” 2:15; 14:45; 15:24; 17:46; 18:46; 22:79; 25:120; 33:8, 37, 45; 35:29, 92; 36:76; 38:111; 43:68, 69-70, 74
– damage to, in Revolution, 10:51; 20:92
– divided into lots (1724), 14:45, 46; 33:45
– “Election Oak” on, see Election(s), political (1600s)
– enclosure/fortification of, see Fences and walls; Fortifications
– executions on, see Execution(s)
– flagpole on, 43:80
– Harvard Commencements held on, 20:127; 33:38; 35:30 (see also Harvard College/University)
– Harvard facing on, 7:64; 18:56; 35:33; 41:128-29
– “highway” across, 21:10; 25:118; 33:38; 37:10; 43:78 (see also Charlestown-Watertown road)
– as Historic District, 39:73, 76; 42:34, 35, 42
– “Historical Development of” (1974 paper), 43:67-82, 151
– improvements of:
– – – c. 1830, 29:71; 33:38; 43:74
– – – c. 1920, 43:72
– – – c. 1975, 43:80-81
– as “Little Common(s),” 30:14; 33:39; 43:75 (see also “Deltas”)
– as meeting place or military ground, see as “Town Common,” below
– monuments and statues on, 1:61-62; 23:71; 30:14; 33:38, 39, 40, 147n5; 36:103; 40:135; 43:76-78, 80 (see also Soldiers’ Monument[s])
– patriot activity on, see as “Town Common,” below
– planting on, 33:38; 35:29-33; 43:80 (see also Trees)
– as public park, 43:69, 71-77 passim, 78-81
– railroad near, 38:26, 27, 34
– reduction of size of, 14:46 (see also sales of land from, below)
– roads to (1805-10), 14:49; 16:91; 37:18; 39:64; 43:75 (see also “highway” across, above)
– sales of land from:
– – – 1648, 2:14-15; 35:92
– – – c. 1760 (to Christ Church), 22:77; 23:19
– – – 1961 (opposed), 39:169
– surveys of, 14:77; 42:118
– as “Town Common,” 43:68, 70-71
– – – meeting place for discussion, 14:45; 33:66; 35:29; 43:68, 70, 71
– – – military training ground, 5:6; 16:80; 33:37, 38; 35:30, 33; 39:113; 43:68, 71, 72, 77, 141 (see also Militia)
– – – patriot activity on, 5:63; 33:38
– trees felled on, 6:19; 17:55; 30:36; 33:37
– War Memorial on, 16:124-25
– Washington Elm on, see Washington Elm
– water main on, 41:13
– Whitefield preaches on, see Whitefield, Rev. George; Whitefield Elm Cambridge Community Center (1953 paper on), 35:28-29. See also Margaret Fuller House Cambridge Community Services, see Charity Cambridge Country Week, see Charity Cambridge Crossing: street railway from, 39:80n6 Cambridge Dining Club, see Club(s) Cambridge Dispensary, see Charity Cambridge-Dorchester tunnel, see Tunnel(s) Cambridge Dramatic Club, see Theatre (dramatic clubs) Cambridge Electric Light Company, 22:76; 36:96; 39:33; 42:9, 10, 11-12
– 1920s plant of, 19:16; 39:133; 40:34
– See also Electricity Cambridge Esplanade (1897-98), 32:39n28. See also Charles River Embankment Cambridge Family Society, see Charity Cambridge Farms, see Lexington, Massachusetts Cambridge Field (Donnelly Field), 42:87 Cambridge Fifty Years a City (Davis, ed.), see History, Cambridge Cambridge Fire Department, 33:39; 36:96
– appropriations for (1845 and 1932), 22:21
– authorized, 22:21; 36:80; 41:8
– company formed (1803), 16:42; 36:79-80
– at Craigie fire (1840), 25:45-46
– fire alarms, fire engines, see Fire(s)
– fire stations, 16:119-20; 30:12, 16, 20; 43:80; 44:10-11, 167
– Harvard and, 34:63; 35:60; 36:83-84; 42:110
– – – college engine-house, 8:36
– newspaper discussions of, 20:85; 36:117
– volunteer, 10:159; 22:28; 39:9; 41:8; 42:84, 85
– See also Fire(s) “Cambridge Flag” (1775), see Flag, U.S. Cambridge Garage (1940s), 30:21 Cambridge Garden Club, see Club(s) Cambridge Gas Light Company, 15:39; 25:130, 131; 31:29, 31; 37:13; 39:81, 126; 41:32; 42:8-9; 43:154. See also Lights and lighting Cambridge Heights: “Evolution of” (1960 paper), 38:111-20; 43:7n1 Cambridge Heritage Trust, 42:44; 43:89 Cambridge High School, see School(s) Cambridge Historical Commission, 41:128n7, 131; 43:33, 88, 143, 146, 161-66 passim
– Advisory Committees, 42:34
– First, report on (1962, rev. 1964), 39:71-77; 42:31-32, 35
– “Progress and Prospects” (1970 paper), 42:31-47
– Report(s), 42:36-37; 43:125, 142, 149
– “Slide-Show” developed by, 43:147
– Survey of Architectural History in Cambridge, 44:135 Cambridge Historical Society
– collections of, in Public Library, 3:96
– – – removed to Widener Library (1916), 9:61; 11:7; 15:58
– founding and first meetings of (1905), 1:5, 26, 30, 33; 3:5; 10:184; 11:53; 21:72; 32:116
– fund-raising by, in World War II, 29:11
– gavel of, 17:9
– gifts to and acquisitions by, 2:111; 3:94-95, 116-20; 5:32, 47, 48-50, 99-104; 6:47, 73-75; 8:41-48; 9:79-82; 11:8; 12:9, 58-62; 13:116-18; 14:116, 117-20, 139; 15:5, 8, 10, 15; 16:11; 17:9; 19:83; 20:15, 18; 25:18; 29:10; 30:7
– – – bequests, 20:16; 23:15; 24:17-23 passim; 25:143; 26:9; 29:8; 32:116; 37:65, 96, 115-17, 126-30; 38:134, 135, 137; 44:29n1
– – – endowment sought (1918), 13:120-21
– – – models of Revolutionary houses, 44:193
– and historic preservation, 7:77; 20:123; 42:42-43; 43:88-96 passim
– – – protests removal of Dana-Palmer house, 32:119; 33:34 (see also Dana houses [#10])
– (see also Historic preservation)
– Hooper-Lee-Nichols house as headquarters of, see Hooper-Lee-Nichols house
– list of officers (1950-55), 35:7-9
– Longfellow medal awarded by, 3:40-41
– membership fluctuation, 12:52-54; 16:134
– Proceedings:
– – – indexing of, 12:57: 42:136
– – – Tables of Contents of, 42:136-59; 43:173-95
– Seal of (1908 paper on), 3:5-19
– Wright Collection material on, 37:104 Cambridge Home for Aged People, see Elderly, care of Cambridge Horse Railway, see Street railway(s) Cambridge Horticultural Society, see Agriculture and horticulture Cambridge Hospital, see Cambridge (Mount Auburn) Hospital Cambridge Humane Society, see Charity “Cambridge Idea,” 20:34, 132. See also Politics Cambridge Improvement Company (1874), 39:121 Cambridge in the Centennial (City Council), see History, Cambridge “Cambridge Market Bank,” see Banks and trust companies Cambridge Medical Improvement Society, see Medicine, practice of Cambridge Motor Mart (1940s), 30:16 Cambridge (Mount Auburn) Hospital, 6:32; 38:124, 126; 40:100
– beginning of, 7:81, 84; 16:115-17; 17:71; 20:105, 106; 33:54; 35:84-87; 39:39-49
– bequests to, see Wills and testaments
– drawing and photograph of (1890, 1906), 39:32-33
– individuals and organizations aiding, 5:108; 6:52; 9:69; 10:169, 174, 181, 193; 12:67; 15:35; 17:71; 21:60; 24:11; 31:8; 35:21, 86-87; 37:95; 39:39-49; 41:46, 52, 161, 164
– sites of, 3:55; 14:59n1; 16:115; 17:71; 18:20; 24:65; 32:97, 98; 35:86; 39:42, 43, 45-46, 49
– trustee reports of, 37:97, 103
– Visiting Committee/Staff of, 39:47, 48, 49
– Woolson Building for Children at, 24:11
– See also Hospitals; Medicine, practice of Cambridge Neighborhood House, see Charity Cambridge News, see Periodicals (Cambridge) Cambridge Nursery School, see School(s) Cambridge Nursing Home, 43:89 Cambridge of 1776, The (Gilman, ed.), see History, Cambridge Cambridge of 1896, The (Stevens et al.), see History, Cambridge Cambridge Park Commission, 39:32n28, 34, 128; 42:85-86; 43:78, 79, 81. See also Metropolitan Park System/Commission “Cambridge Petition” (1664), 26:74 Cambridge Photographic Club, see Club(s) Cambridge Plant Club, see Club(s) Cambridge “Platform,” see Congregational Church/Congregationalism Cambridge Police Department, 22:28, 53; 41:109; 42:130
– appropriations for (1932), 22:21
– and children and their games, 22:52; 41:169; 43:17
– locations of, 18:19; 30:20; 39:69
– organized (c. 1850), 41:8
– station built (Brattle Square), 16:119-20; 17:21; 26:47; 30:16 Cambridge Poor Farm and poorhouse, see Charity Cambridge Press, The (Winship), 44:64 Cambridge Public Latin School, see School(s) Cambridge Public Library, 39:57
– benefactors of, 37:96; 42:85
– building of, 34:101, 103, 108
– Cambridge Collection at, 26:56n96, 60
– CHS use of, 2:10, 106-13 passim; 3:40, 95, 96-97; 9:61
– – – collections removed from (1916), 9:61; 11:7; 15:58
– and Cambridge history, 1:33
– as “Dana Library,” 26:98
– History of (1855-1908), 43:150
– librarian of, 8:49
– scrapbook at, 10:72n3
– site of, 18:34; 34:67
– trustees of, 10:186; 41:46
– Wyman papers at, 35:87
– See also Library(ies) “Cambridge Pudding Stick,” 23:55. See also Hilliard, Harriet[t] Cambridge Railroad Company, see Street railway(s) Cambridge Safety Vaults Company, 41:40-43, 44. See also Banks and trust companies Cambridge Savings Bank, see Banks and trust companies Cambridge School(s)
– for Girls (Gilman School), see School(s)
– of Art, 30:16 (see also Arts, the; School[s])
– of Nursing, 12:67 (see also Medicine, practice of)
– and School Committee, see School(s) Cambridge Skating Rink, 41:146, 147. See also Sports and games Cambridge Social Dramatic Club, see Theatre (dramatic clubs) Cambridge Social Union, 6:29; 10:184; 18:19; 27:99; 37:97; 38:62
– Boys’ Club of, 11:86; 21:66
– buildings of, see Brattle Hall; Brattle house
– See also Charity; Club(s) Cambridge Stage Company, 39:80. See also Omnibuses Cambridge Street (Boston), 3:10; 20:102; 30:89, 90; 41:59, 79, 80
– omnibus and horse cars on, 25:132, 133; 38:48; 39:82, 83 Cambridge Street (Brighton), 14:38 Cambridge Street (Cambridge), 16:115, 116; 23:46, 83; 26:98n66; 32:29; 34:99n2; 36:80, 94, 95, 99, 103, 104; 39:20; 43:80
– architecture on, 26:41; 42:39
– as “boundary” of Foxcroft farm, 23:24; 41:19
– building moved to (1809), 16:48, 92, 93
– Craigie’s Bridge and, 10:58n2; 14:59; 16:89; 23:26; 39:113; 42:83; 43:74
– street railway on, 34:69; 39:84, 87, 96, 102, 104, 106; 42:89; 43:38; 44:21 Cambridge Street (Watertown), 14:32-33 Cambridge Synods (1646, 1648), see Religion Cambridge Taxpayers’ Association, 37:94, 103; 42:52; 44:88. See also Taxation/taxes Cambridge Tercentary Committee, see Historic preservation (of houses and locations) Cambridge Thirty Years Ago (Lowell), see History, Cambridge Cambridge Town Pound, see Animals Cambridge Tribune, see Periodicals (Cambridge) Cambridge Tribune Press, 15:11n1. See also Publishers Cambridge Trust Company, see Banks and trust companies Cambridge Union of Social Workers, 18:22 Cambridge Unitarian Club, 10:185. See also Club(s); Unitarian Church Cambridge University, see Cambridge, England Cambridge University Press, 44:78 “Cambridge Village,” see Newton, Massachusetts; “Old Cambridge” Cambridge Water Works, see Water supply Cambridge Welfare Union, see Charity Cambridge Wharf Company, 25:139; 39:116, 121. See also Business and industry (shipping) Cambridgeport, 11:33; 43:11
– Allston in, 26:99, 118
– – – paper on (1943), 29:34-67
– architecture of, 26:38-39; 29:36, 44, 62
– boundaries of, 16:46, 86; 35:79; 37:33
– causeway to, 20:91; 35:80; 39:115 (see also Streets and highways)
– churches in, 8:37; 10:170; 20:63-65, 69; 42:111
– countryside described, 26:94; 29:35; 35:82; 37:33
– Dana family in, 11:32n; 16:95; 26:91, 92, 99, 101-3, 118, 120
– early farms and houses of, 10:9n2; 16:83; 35:80 (see also Inman house; Phip[p]s [later Bo(a)rdman] farm; Soden farm)
– first schools in, see School(s)
– as historic survey area, 42:36-37, 46, 93
– histories of, see History, Cambridge
– hospital started in, 16:115; 35:85-86 (see also Cambridge [Mount Auburn] Hospital)
– industrial development and decline of, see as port of entry, below; Business and industry; Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses
– land holdings in:
– – – 1700s, 22:68, 72, 74, 75; 26:120; 33:9
– – – 1800s, 16:44
– land prices in (1817), 6:12
– maps of, see Maps and plans
– militia formed (1860s), 2:39-40
– physicians of, 20:63, 106-8 (see also Medicine, practice of)
– population of:
– – – 1800-1810, 39:110-11
– – – 1870s (native vs. foreign-born), 39:118-19
– as port of entry, 14:60; 16:43, 55; 26:92; 35:80, 84, 88; 37:33; 40:143; 42:83
– – – docks and canals planned, 7:59; 35:81; 39:27, 110-11; 40:27
– – – “the Port,” 9:18; 39:114, 115; 41:7; 42:83
– – – “Port Chucks,” 26:118; 39:114
– post office in, 15:37
– as separate village, see “Old Cambridge”
– stage or street railway to, 20:54; 25:133; 39:82-87 passim, 89n2
– – – fare for, 14:55; 15:32; 25:132; 39:86
– town house built in (1830s), 39:113; 42:83 (see also Town House[s])
– water supply for, 25:131 (see also Water supply) Cambridgeport Church/Parish (formed 1807), 16:46, 48, 85, 86, 94; 34:29-30; 42:83
– “Brick Meeting House” of, 11:42; 16:46, 47, 86, 87; 35:82
– map of Parish ( 1824), see Maps and plans
– and Meeting-House Corporation, 16:44, 46, 47, 86
– See also First Baptist Church (Central Square, Cambridgeport) Cambridgeport Savings Bank, see Banks and trust companies Cameron, Russell (merchant, c. 1900), 15:35 Cameron, Simon (1799-1889; politician), 39:15 Cameron Street, 14:63; 39:15 Camp, Prof. Thomas R. (of MIT, 1942), 41:12 Camp Day, Camp Cameron (North Cambridge, Civil War), 7:80; 14:63; 39:15 Camp Devens (Ayer, Mass.): theatre performances at, 38:61; 40:119 Camp Street, 14:63 Campbell, [British] Capt. Alexander (1781), 5:85n2 Campbell, [British] Lt.-Col. Archibald (c. 1776), 5:69n2. 85n2, 86n4; 6:11 Campbell, Thomas (Scottish merchant; d. before 1760), 19:48 Campbell, Mrs. Thomas, see Inman, Mrs. Ralph (second wife) Campbell, Thomas (1777-1844; British poet), 28:73 Campbell, Walter E. (architect, 1960s), 39:72 Campbell (poet, 1770s), 26:83 Campbell & Sullivan (Church St. shop, 1940s), 30:19 Canada, 21:19
– American migration to, encouraged (1780s), 40:10
– British hold on, 40:11
– Canadians in Cambridge, 39:118 (see also Population)
– fears of French or British invasion from, 6:6; 40:17
– “reduction” of (1758), 5:56
– Revolutionary War and, 5:80n2; 22:39; 30:66
– See also Nova Scotia; Quebec Canaday Hall (Harvard), 44:26 Canal(s), 7:52; 14:53; 16:42, 60; 27:75n81; 28:11, 12; 30:36; 39:26, 111, 114
– Blackstone, 40:51-52
– to Brattle Square, 21:79; 39:26
– Broad, 14:58; 39:27, 115, 116, 121; 40:26-29; 42:12, 42, 83
– Cape Cod, 40:49, 52
– Cross, 40:28
– Erie, 40:44
– excavations for, 23:53; 40:44
– Lechmere, 39:27
– in Maine, 40:50
– Middlesex and Middlesex Canal Corporation, 7:60, 65; 11:49; 14:56; 16:88; 22:71; 24:35; 39:27, 29-30; 42:120
– – – paper on (1965), 40:43-58
– plans for, 7:59; 35:81; 39:110; 40:49-50,51-52; 44:44
– Roxbury, 21:26, 32
– Santee (South Carolina), 40:44
– South, 40:28
– See also Rivers and brooks Canal boats, see Travel/transportation Canal Bridge, Canal Street Bridge Company, see Bridge(s) (Craigie) Canal Street, 14:51, 59, 64, 65; 16:45. See also Brookline Street; Harvard Street Candles and candlemaking, see Lights and lighting Candy stores, see Retail and food stores (confectioneries) Cane, Christopher (of Shepard congregation; d. 1653), 6:23; 10:103; 14:98; 22:76 (Map 1) Cane, Ruth, see Johnson, Mrs. Marmaduke Cane, [British] Major (Boston, 1770s), 30:63, 65n Caner, Rev. Henry (1770s), 5:75; 19:48 Canfield, Grace (Radcliffe 1883; Bryn Mawr headmistress), 44:142 Canfield family, 21:61 Canino, Prince of, see Bonaparte, Charles Lucien Cannon, Carl L. (writer, 1941), 38:102, 109 Cannon, James, see Kiernan (or Cannon), James Cannon, Marion, see Schlesinger, Mrs. Arthur M., Jr. Cannon
– at arsenal, 20:99
– on Cambridge Common, see Cambridge Common
– at Fort Washington (ornamental), 43:145
– pointed at crowd:
– – – in draft riots (1860s), 2:40
– – – in fugitive slave case (1854), 37:86
– in Revolutionary War, see Revolutionary War Cano, Reverend (of Cambridgeport, 1819), 16:65 Cantabrigia Club, see Club(s) Canton, Massachusetts, 21:37, 38; 34:68 Cantor, William (Francis Ave. resident, 1940s), 41:28 Cape Ann (Massachusetts), 21:41, 47; 27:43, 46; 30:34
– naming of, 33:135; 39:24
– See also Gloucester, Massachusetts Cape Cod (Massachusetts), 40:95
– architectural style named for, 31:35
– early settlement of, 25:62; 33:138
– histories of, 5:17
– naming of, 33:135
– ornamented floors in houses on, 21:55 Cape Cod Canal, see Canal(s) Cape Elizabeth (Maine), 33:135 Cape Fear (North Carolina), 19:48, 50, 52; 33:137 Capen, Joseph (Harvard student, c. 1680), 11:62 Capital punishment, see Corporal punishment “Capitalists,” 41:44-45. See also Economic conditions Captain’s Island, 14:44; 22:73; 25:115; 29:35; 30:74
– fortification of, 42:82; 43:142
– as hospital site (proposed), 16:115; 35:86; 39:45
– park use of, 39:36
– powder magazine on, 14:45, 66, 72; 25:119
– site identified, 1:56; 22:58; 25:117
– “Way to,” 14:45 Car-barns, see Street railway(s) Carew, Eliza Jane, see Rolfe, Mrs. William James Carew, Harold D. (editor, 1915), 20:90 Carey, see also Cary Carey, Alida, see Gulick, Mrs. Millard Carey, Arthur Astor (1857-1923; Fayerweather St. resident), 42:89; 43:27
– houses and land of, 43:15, 17, 19, 27, 28, 167 Carey, Mrs. Arthur Astor (Agnes Whiteside, of London), 43:27 Carey, Arthur Graham (Harvard 1914; architect), 43:16, 17, 27 Carey, Miss Emma (Brattle St. resident, c. 1880), 21:109-10 Carey, Frances (schoolgirl, early 20th c.), 42:134; 43:27 Carey, Henry Reginald (“Rex”; Harvard 1913), 43:16, 27 Carey, Mr. (reader at Christ Church, 1807), 9:23; 21:103 Carleton, see also Carlton Carleton, Gen. [Sir] Guy (1724-1808), 5:89, 92, 93nn1, 4; 22:31, 32 Carleton, Osgood (surveyor, c. 1790), 14:71-72 Carleton, Mrs. Sally (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:60 Carleton, William (Carleton College benefactor, 1871), 33:150 Carleton College (Minnesota), 33:150 Carlisle, see also Carlyle Carlisle, Mrs. Louise Emerson (1960s), 38:78 Carlisle, Miss (second wife of Dr. Brown-Sequard), 23:86 Carlisle, Massachusetts, 14:35; 21:38; 39:109 Carlton, see also Carleton Carlton, Samuel A. (businessman, 1883), 42:73 Carlyle, see also Carlisle Carlyle, Thomas (1795-1881; British author), 28:83; 33:69n41; 37:79 Carmalt, Dr. (student of Dr. Jeffries Wyman), 4:84 Carnegie, Andrew (1835-1919; philanthropist), 42:50, 52; 44:147 Carnegie Corporation, 27:26 Carpenter, Mrs. Deborah Lee (daughter of Thomas Lee [3d]), 16:19, 24, 32; 37:22, 68, 69 Carpenter, John Alden (1876-1951; composer), 32:88; 41:99 Carpenters, “college,” see Harvard College/ University Carr, Lucian (at Museum, 1880s), 26:14; 41:165 Carr family (Winchester, Mass.), 34:35 Carret, see also Carrott Carret, Miss Anna (schoolmistress, 1890s), 42:130 Carret, Miss Frances Weld (1940s), 30:11, 16, 21 Carret, Philip (Longfellow medal runner-up, 1913), 8:9 Carret house (later [Radcliffe] Founders’ House), 34:70; 44:141 Carriages, carriage houses, see Business and industry; Horses (as transportation); Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Carrington, Edward (statesman, 1786), 40:11n8 Carrott, see also Carret Carrott, Richard G. (writer, 1970s), 44:185n21 Carruth, Charles: house of (built 1892), 43:18, 167 “Cars” and car-barns, see Street railway(s) Carstensen, Hans L. (president of Avon Home, 1945-57), 38:129 Cartée, Cornelius Sowle, school of (Charles-town), 10:171. See also School(s) Carter, Alice, see Vaughan, Mrs. Charles E. (second wife) Carter, James Coolidge (1827-1905; lawyer), 26:29; 41:125 Carter, John (author, 1770s), 5:23 Carter, J. W. (“Young Republican,” 1878), 20:35 Carter, Robert (1819-1879; author), 25:130, 135
– portrait of, 12:9 Carter, Mrs. Susan Nichols (head of Cooper Union, late 1800s), 34:71 Carter, Sybil (worker with Indians, c. 1900), 17:86 Carter, Thais Atwood (Francis Ave. resident, 1952-59), 41:30 Carter, Mrs. Vincent, see Gookin, Hannah Carter, William (of Yorkshire; at Botanic Garden, c. 1810-40), 38:77, 85 Carter, Reverend (1642), 30:44 Carter, Mrs. (daughter of General Schuyler, 1777), 13:66 Cartwright, George (king’s commissioner, 1665), 24:70n6 Carty, Gen. John J. (1861-1932; telephone engineer), 35:84 Carver Street (Boston), 6:13; 20:100 Cary, see also Carey Cary, Alphaeus (sculptor, mid-1800s), 25:56n58 Cary, Mrs. Edward M. (Fogg benefactor, 1913), 27:23; 35:69 Cary, Elizabeth Cabot, see Agassiz, Mrs. (Jean) Louis (second wife) Cary, Miss Margaret Graves (c. 1800), 27:60-61, 79 Cary, Miss Sallie (mid-1800s; sister of Mrs. Agassiz), 18:41; 35:54 Cary, Mrs. (c. 1850; mother-in-law of Cornelius Conway Felton and Louis Agassiz), 18:42-43; 43:60-61 Case, Prof. Adelaide (at Episcopal Seminary; d. 1948), 36:19 Casino, see Club(s) Cass, Lewis (1782-1866; statesman), 34:38; 37:82 Castle, Margaret, see Tozzer, Mrs. Alfred M. “Castle, The,” see Fort Independence “Castle Corner,” 44:142. See also Fay House Castle Island, see Castle William/Castle Island (Boston Harbor) Castle Square Theatre, see Theatre Castle William/Castle Island (Boston Harbor), 9:10; 10:33; 21:97; 32:71; 39:156, 162; 44:45, 46 Caswell (at Belcher funeral, 1717), 21:90 Catalogues, Harvard, see Harvard College/University Catesby, Mark (1679-1749; naturalist), 43:138 Catherine II (the Great) (1729-1796; empress of Russia), 3:59-60, 72-73, 76; 26:8889, 93, 115 Catholic Church, see Church of England; Roman Catholic Church; Syrian Orthodox Catholic Church Catlin, Catherine, see Baker, Mrs. Matthew Bridge Catlin, John (of Deerfield, c. 1671), 10:171 Cato (name of two slaves, 1770s), 10:69, 74n4. See also Slavery Cattle, see Animals Caucus Club (of Boston, mid-1700s), 30:51. See also Club(s) Causeway Street (Boston), 34:70; 38:26; 39:29, 87; 41:79 Causeways, see Streets and highways “Caution money” at Harvard, 38:16-17. See also Expenses (Harvard) Cavanagh, Mrs. Thomas J. (1930s), 35:23 Cavarly, Captain (of S.S. Colima, 1895), 41:157 Cecelia (St. Cecelia) Society (Boston), see Music (societies) Cedar Avenue (Mount Auburn Cemetery), 25:55 Cedar Street, 3:52; 20:125, 128, 132, 133. See also West Cedar Street (Boston) “Cedarcrest” (Runkle farm, Trapelo Road), 44:109 Celebrations
– Agassiz Centennial, see Agassiz, [Jean] Louis
– at Agassiz Museum opening (1860), 43:64
– anniversaries of founding of Cambridge (“Newtown[e]”) and of incorporation of city, see Cambridge, Massachusetts
– anniversaries of founding of First Church, see First Church and Parish
– anniversaries of Revolution (Semicentennial, Centennial, Sesquicentennial, Bicentennial), 6:6, 35; 18:28, 48; 20:114; 30:20, 100; 33:95; 42:82; 43:72, 77-78, 87, 95-96; 44:61-62, 172
– – – Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, 18:38; 21:107; 40:100
– – – plans for (Bicentennial), 42:47, 82; 43:80-81, 86-96, 146, 149
– – – report on Bicentennial pageant ( 1976 presentation), 44:193
– anniversary of founding of Prospect Church (50th, 1877), 20:72-73
– of Belcher’s appointment as governor, 21:89
– of bridge openings, see Bridge(s)
– at John Bridge statue (1882), 43:78
– at Bunker Hill Monument cornerstone laying (1825), 44:172
– of Burgoyne’s surrender (1777), 13:20
– “Cambridge Platform” Tercentenary, 32:104-14; 43:123, 125 (see also Congregational Church/Congregationalism)
– Cambridgeport Church (dedication, installations), 16:46, 48, 56, 86
– Christ Church Centennial, 10:77
– Civil War Centennial (1961), 40:100n9
– of Civil War victories and end, see Civil War, U.S.
– Columbian (quadricentennial and Chicago Exposition, 1893), 8:52; 23:42, 34:76; 40:105; 43:158
– Commencement, see Harvard College/University
– Deeds and Probate building dedication (1900), 39:66
– of election victory (1800), 11:43n1
– “Evangeline” Centennial (1947), 33:161
– Harvard anniversaries, see Harvard College/University
– at Harvard Medical School opening (new, 1846), 41:71-72
– Holmes Centenary, see Holmes, Dr. Oliver Wendell
– Hooker Tercentenary (1933), 23:96
– “illuminations” at, see Lights and lighting
– of king’s birthday, by “Convention Troops” (1778), 13:61
– of landing of forefathers:
– – – bicentennial (Plymouth, 1820), 44:172
– – – Portsmouth, N.H. (1823), 11:25
– Longfellow Centennial, see Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
– at Mount Auburn Cemetery dedication (1831), see Mount Auburn Cemetery
– parades, 11:43; 14:45
– – – 50th anniversary of city incorporation (1896), 40:26 (see also Cambridge, Massachusetts)
– Parkman Centennial, 32:116
– peace:
– – – 1783 (end of Revolutionary War), 19:68; 23:91
– – – 1815 (end of War of 1812), 16:57-58
– – – 1865 (end of Civil War), see Civil War, U.S.
– Washington commemorated, see Washington, George
– wedding, see Domestic and family life
– See also Holidays, fairs, and festivals; Parties and entertainment Cemeteries, see Burying ground(s); Mount Auburn Cemetery Census, see Population; Population statistics Centennials, see Celebrations Center, see also Centre Center for the Study of World Religions, 41:31 Centinel, Columbian, see Periodicals (Boston) Central Massachusetts Railroad, see Railroad(s) Central Square, 13:24; 26:94n63, 98n66; 36:43, 45; 37:37; 38:124, 125; 39:8, 117; 43:45; 44:90
– as “Haymarket,” 29:36; 35:81
– Post Office, 17:10; 28:112n
– street railway to, 14:56; 39:87, 92, 96, 98, 101, 103, 104 Central Square Baptist Church, see First Baptist Church Central Trust, see Banks and trust companies Centre, see also Center Centre Street, 13:122; 30:88; 44:90 Centre Yard, 22:77 Century Magazine, see Periodicals (general) Chadbourne, Sarah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Chaddock, Delphia, see Cook, Mrs. Ebenezer Washington Chadwick, Frank (living in Paris, 1880s), 23:36 Chadwick, Rev. John W. (1840-1904), 36:64 Chadwick, Dr. (medical librarian, late 1800s), 4:50 Chafee, see also Chaffee Chafee, Prof. Zechariah (Irving St. resident, 1917-35), 41:34
– “trial” of (1921), 34:13 Chafee, Mrs. Zechariah, 41:34 Chafee, Mr. (landowner, 1930s), 24:64 Chaffee, see also Chafee Chaffee, Prof. E. Leon (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Chaffee family, 36:95 Chalkley, Robert (constable of Charlestown, 1664), 24:72n8 Chamber of Commerce, 36:118; 40:23, 42; 41:46. See also Business and industry; Trade and commerce Chamberlain, see also Chamberlaine; Chamberlin Chamberlain, Anita (daughter of Gen. Samuel E.), 16:125 Chamberlain, Herbert (schoolboy, late 1800s), 20:98 Chamberlain, H. M. (church member, 1839), 20:69 Chamberlain, Joseph W.
– notes of, on historic books and resource materials, 43:147-51
– papers by:
– – – “The First Church in Cambridge, Congregational: Some Events in Its Life” (1974), 43:111-26, 151
– – – “Gentleman Johnny Burgoyne” (1978), 44:193 Chamberlain, Samuel (photographer, 1940s), 29:15; 41:131 Chamberlain, Gen. Samuel E. (arsenal superintendent, late 1800s), 3:97; 16:125; 20:100; 39:12-13 Chamberlain, V. R. (hospital worker, 1886), 39:47 Chamberlain, William Everett (architect, 1880s), 39:47 Chamberlaine, see also Chamberlain; Chamberlin Chamberlaine, William (of Billerica, 1654), 9:76 Chamberlin, see also Chamberlain; Chamberlaine Chamberlin, Mr. and Mrs. William Henry (Francis Ave. residents, 1950s), 41:31 Chamberlin & Austin (architects, 1889), 38:123 Chambers, John (on march to Quebec, 1775), 11:78 Chambers Street (Boston), 25:134; 39:82 Champlain, Samuel de (1567-1635; explorer), 39:23-24 Champlin, Mayor E. R. (c. 190D), 40:145 Champney, Daniel (1645-1691; landowner), 2:16; 9:75, 76, 78 Champney, Mrs. Daniel (Hepzibah Corlet [Minott], second wife), 2:16 Champney, Daniel (landowner, 1739), 14:71 Champney, Edward (committee member, 1654), 14:36 Champney, Hepzibah, see Wyeth, Mrs. Jonathan Champney, Hepzibah Corlet, see Champney, Mrs. Daniel [1st] Champney, John (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98
– descendants of, 5:54 Champney, Elder Richard (landowner; d. 1669), 9:75, 76, 77; 10:101; 14:98; 22:76 (Map 1); 26:69
– descendants of, 19:88 Champne[y], Samuel (1636-1695; landowner), 9:75, 76, 78; 14:71 Champney family, 10:115 Chandler, see also Chanler Chandler, Charles F. (1836-1925; of New York; industrial chemist), 4:82 Chandler, Francis H. (architect, 1880s), 34:75 Chandler, Joseph Everett (architect, c. 1915), 37:72-73; 44:38 Chandler, Samuel, Jr. (1753-1786): diary of, while Harvard student (1773), 11:63-64, 74 Chanler, see also Chandler Chanler, Mrs. Winthrop (writer, 1870s), 23:39n1 Channing, Anne, see Allston, Mrs. Washington (first wife) Channing, Prof. Edward (1856-1931; historian), 5:21; 27:34; 34:50; 40:145; 41:159, 166, 167 Channing, Mrs. Edward, 41:159, 166, 167 Channing, Prof. Edward Tyrrell, 1:70; 7:32; 11:27; 25:110, 121; 37:77
– house of, 18:27, 40 Channing, Mrs. Edward Tyrrel[l], 18:40; 28:112 Channing, Elizabeth, see Fuller, Mrs. Elizabeth Channing Channing, “Ellery,” see Channing, William Ellery (“Ellery”); Channing, Rev. William Henry Channing, Francis Dana (Harvard 1794; attorney), 11:45, 53 Channing, Lucy (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:24 Channing, Lucy Ellery, see Channing, Mrs. William Channing, Mary Elizabeth, see Higginson, Mrs. Thomas Wentworth (first wife) Channing, Susan (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:21; 25:110 Channing, Dr. Walter (1786-1876), 4:89; 6:77; 7:7[?]; 37:80 Channing, William (father of Rev. William E.), 4:26 Channing, Mrs. William (Lucy Ellery), 21:85 Channing, Rev. William Ellery (1780-1842), 9:35; 11:46n; 22:90; 28:60; 29:22, 34, 40, 78; 33:153; 44:127
– as critic, 2:24, 32; 4:26, 47
– monument to, 25:56n58; 29:55; 34:91 Channing, Mrs. William Ellery, 29:61 Channing, William Ellery (“Ellery”; 1818-1901; poet), 7:27, 32 Channing, William Ellery (Harvard 1829), 12:15, 18 Channing, Rev. William Henry (1810-1884), 26:100; 37:80, 81
– given as “Ellery,” 41:58
– Memoir of, 26:101n70 Channing family, 2:28; 3:63 Channing Place, 1:59 Channing Street, 16:128; 17:100; 24:63, 64; 25:118; 33:99; 43:168 Chapel(s): of First Church (Congregational), 43:121, 122. See also Appleton Chapel (Harvard); Harvard College/ University; Holden Chapel (Harvard); King’s Chapel (Boston); Mount Auburn Cemetery; St. John’s Memorial Chapel (Episcopal); University Hall chapel Chapel Street, 14:63; 38:120. See also Arlington Street (Cambridge) Chaperones, see Society (people) Chapin, Mrs. E. Barton (great-granddaughter of Lemuel Shaw), 15:52; 25:53n50; 27:88 Chapin, Edward (Boston salesman, 1870s): Lake View Ave. house of, 44:167 Chapin, Fanny Hudson, see Hooper, Mrs. Edward William Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. (“Susie” Revere of Canton, mid-1800s), 34:69 Chapin, Noah, Jr. (Connecticut ensign, 1776): diary of, 18:64, 65 Chaplin, Clement (of Hooker Company, 1636), 7:53; 10:102, 103; 14:92, 95 Chaplin, Hannah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Chaplin, Dr. James P. (c. 1820), 16:65, 66; 20:63-64 Chaplin, W. J. (Shop Club member, c. 1900), 23:43 Chapman, Miss Annie B.
– in Dramatic Club (1905), 44:105, 111, 114
– house of (built 1923), 43:160 (illus. #7 following), 162, 167 Chapman, E. A. & F. L. (carriage builders, 1829-1900), 15:33 Chapman, Edmund A. (carriage builder, mid-1800s), 15:33
– house of, 43:31 (illus. #4 following), 44 Chapman, Miss Emily (c. 1910), 31:48 Chapman, Frank [Francis) L. (carriage builder, C. 1870), 15:33; 16:119; 36:81, 91 Chapman, Frank M. (ornithologist, late 1800s), 24:93; 35:15 Chapman, Deacon John L. (early 1900s), 20:78 Chapman, Mayor (of Boston] Jonathan (1842), 28:75 Chapman, Miss Margaret: in Dramatic Club (1905), 44:105, 111-12 Chapman, Mr. (superintendent of music, Cambridge schools, 1907), 2:53; 44:15-16 Chapman, Mr. (Harvard trustee, 1915), 41:23 Chapman, Misses: New Hampshire house of (built c. 1900), 43:160, 167 Chardon Street (Boston), 39:87, 89 Charity
– agencies combating disease, see Disease
– aid to Indians, 17:84-91 (see also Massachusetts Indian Association)
– almhouse(s), 22:28; 37:98; 39:42, 113; 42:85 (see also Cambridge Poor Farm/ poorhouse, below)
– Animal Rescue League, 33:41
– Associated Charities, 6:32, 52; 8:54; 9:70; 10:169, 170, 186; 11:86; 18:19, 21; 33:44; 38:123
– Avon Home for Destitute Children, 7:84; 10:169, 186; 17:82; 18:20-24 passim; 21:67; 30:17; 37:97; 38:111, 113, 121-29; 41:48, 168; 44:112, 121
– – – as child-placing agency only, 38:124-28
– the “Bee” and, 17:81-82 (see also “Bee”)
– bequests to, see Wills and testaments
– Boston organizations for (1803 or earlier), 6:28
– Cambridge City Home, 20:108; 21:76
– Cambridge City Mission, 10:170
– Cambridge Community Federation/Services, 38:126, 128
– Cambridge Country Week, 38:125
– Cambridge Dispensary, 18:19
– Cambridge Family Society, 38:123 (see also Associated Charities, above)
– Cambridge Humane Society, 6:27-32; 15:39; 18:18; 22:48; 25:138; 37:105; 38:123
– Cambridge (Moore Street) Neighborhood House, 12:69; 18:20-21; 35:21
– Cambridge Poor Farm/poorhouse, 5:40; 19:15, 16, 17, 21; 22:75
– Cambridge Welfare Union, 18:19, 21 (see also Associated Charities, above)
– Catholic, 18:17n2, 19, 20n1; 37;34
– Charitable Society, 10:23, 24
– child care (assumed by town), 18:17n2, 22 (see also Avon Home for Destitute Children, above; orphanages, below)
– clothing provided through, 6:51; 9:67-68; 22:95
– Community Chest, 36:19
– – – discouragement of, 18:23
– costs (to town) of poor relief, 18:15, 16-17; 22:21; 38:122; 44:59
– East Cambridge Female Charitable Society, 18:19; 38:123
– East End Christian Union, 3:115; 18:19-20; 35:21; 36:105; 44:111
– fairs and festivities aiding, 16:116; 35:21, 86; 37:40; 38:122; 39:44; 41:161, 164, 168; 44:112
– Family Welfare Society, 36:19
– Female Humane Society, 6:31, 32, 51; 9:62-70; 11:53, 56; 18:18, 23; 25:107; 29:72
– First Church and (before 1783), 10:114
– “Historical Sketch of…in Cambridge” (1925 paper), 18:11-26
– Howard Benevolent Society, 15:39; 18:18; 38:123
– for indigent scholars, 42:105-6
– – – and scholarships, see Education
– Ladies’ Charitable Society, 34:32-33
– Ladies’ Humane Society, see Female Humane Society, above
– Ladies’ Samaritan Society, 18:19; 38:123
– Male Humane Society, 9:62, 70; 18:18
– Margaret Fuller House, 18:21
– Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association, 25:103
– Moore Street Neighborhood House, 12:69; 18:20-21; 35:21
– for Negroes, 10:190
– New England Home for Little Wanderers, 42:134
– North Cambridge Relief Association, 18:21
– orphanages, 37:34; 42:134 (see also Avon Home for Destitute Children, above)
– Paine Fund, 6:32; 9:66; 18:18, 22-23; 22:48; 29:72; 41:165
– and “paupers” among population (1856), 23:93 (see also “warning out” of public charges, below)
– private, 6:50; 17:44, 81; 21:90; 27:64-65
– Red Cross, 14:123; 25:137; 30:15; 38:51; 41:48, 157
– – – in World Wars I and II, 17:82; 35:22, 102; 40:119; 44:148
– Sanders Fund, 9:70; 18:22
– Sibley Fund, 24:26
– Sunday School social service, 44:112
– Thanksgiving Day, 18:16, 17
– United Community Services/United Fund, 36:44; 38:126, 129
– U.S. Sanitary Commission, see Civil War, U.S.
– Valentine Fund, 20:78
– Visiting Nurse Association, 18:22; 21:68
– Walker Benevolent Society, 15:39; 18:18, 21
– War Relief, Special Aid to, 17:82
– “warning out” of public charges, 18:13-15; 20:115
– Window Shop, 43:97-110
– Woman’s Guild (Congregational Church), 10:76, 80
– See also Cambridge Social Union; Elderly, care of; Medicine, practice of; Welfare, public Charles I (1600-1649; king of England), 3:10; 7:37; 21:80; 26:63; 32:55-56, 62; 33:136; 39:25; 43:84
– and Bay Company charter, 13:81; 30:33; 32:56-57, 58, 71; 33:141; 43:111; 44:46
– Charles River named for, 25:120; 33:135; 39:24
– executed, 30:31; 32:65 Charles II (1630-1685; king of England), 7:101, 102; 33:63n25, 136
– “Cambridge Petition” to, 26:74
– houses built in or before time of, 16:21; 37:20
– licenses land purchases, 24:69, 70, 71-72
– and Stuart Restoration, 16:71; 26:73; 32:74 Charles Beck Post (GAR), 18:41. See also GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) Charles River, 22:71; 43:145
– as boundary, 8:20; 13:83; 16:46, 76; 17:93, 96; 20:110, 117; 21:20, 31, 34, 36, 49; 24:53-63 passim; 32:96; 33:141; 34:99; 35:79; 37:9; 39:109, 122; 43:111
– bridges over, see Bridge(s)
– canals connecting with, 16:42; 40:46 (see also Canal[s])
– dam proposed, 2:75 (see also Charles River Dam)
– as defense, 39:28
– dredging of (1880s), 39:122
– explorations of, 16:111; 21:21, 22; 39:24, 25
– ferries over, see Ferry(ies)
– fish weir on (Watertown, 1630s), 5:35; 39:126
– as “highway,” 39:25-27
– historic map of, 39:17 (illus. facing)
– in Longfellow’s poems, 3:45; 12:47; 25:48
– lumber floated down, 23:22
– naming of, 25:116, 120; 33:135; 39:24
– “new island” proposed for, 42:50
– palisade on, see Fortifications
– and plan of Cambridge, 20:56
– pollution of, 39:33-34, 122-23; 42:85; 43:93
– schooners/shipping on, 21:112; 22:106; 26:55; 32:58; 39:122; 40:27, 29; 42:8, 12 (see also Business and industry)
– sculling on, see Sports and games
– settlement on or near, 4:65; 21:32; 22:58, 59, 62; 26:63; 30:33, 34, 35; 31:37; 33:142; 39:25-26
– – – “Norse,” see Leif Ericsson
– (see also Newtown(e) [later Cambridge])
– as tide water, 2:75-76; 14:40, 54; 16:40; 20:56; 21:116; 22:98; 25:19; 31:54; 32:58; 36:94; 37:29; 39:24-37 passim, 100, 116, 122-23, 124, 128; 44:60-61
– – – flooding by, 7:56; 13:81; 16:41, 46-47, 61-62; 26:69; 35:82; 39:24, 36-37, 110
– – – rowing against, 39:127
– – – and tidal power, 22:76; 39:29, 30
– view of (from Lake View Ave.), 44:163, 166, 167-68 Charles River Basin, 35:87; 39:123, 124; 42:58
– paper on (1961), 39:23-38
– seen as potential seaport, 26:91 Charles River Basin Commission, 42:88 Charles River Bridge, see Bridge(s) Charles River Dam, 39:37, 127; 42:83, 87, 91; 43:73
– Craigie proposes (1806), 16:90, 91
– feasibility of, studied (c. 1907), 2:75; 33:160; 39:31
– replaces Craigie Bridge (1910), 7:61; 14:56; 22:98; 35:87; 36:105; 39:35, 100, 123, 124; 42:49, 88
– See also Dams and dikes Charles River Embankment, 22:58, 98; 25:104; 39:37, 123
– “Charlesbank,” 39:32, 35 Charles River Embankment Company (1881), 39:122, 123; 42:48
– development plans of, 39:112 (illus. facing) Charles River National Bank, see Banks and trust companies Charles River Roadway/Parkway, see Streets and highways (parkways) Charles River Street Railway Company, see Street railway(s) (horse cars) Charles River Trust, see Banks and trust companies Charles Street (Boston), 3:11; 23:51; 30:90; 34:71; 39:30, 87, 92; 41:56 Charles Street (Cambridge), 14:58, 67, 68; 25: 139 “Charlesbank,” see Charles River Embankment Charlesgate, 39:35; 40:102 Charleston, South Carolina, 3:74n1, 75-76
– tea delivered to (1773), 39:154, 157 Charlestown, Massachusetts, 14:99; 17:46; 37:86; 39:58
– boundaries of, 9:71; 14:71n3; 16:46; 21:24-35 passim, 41, 42, 46, 49, 80; 22:62; 33:142, 153, 155; 39:109; 43:112
– bridges to, 7:56-57; 39:112 (see also Bridge[s])
– British forces in, 13:24n1; 14:37; 33:66; 41:160 (see also Bunker Hill, Battle of)
– burning of, see in Revolutionary War, below
– Catholic Church in, 36:99
– and colleges, 33:150-54
– “Convention Troops” quartered in, 13:18, 80; 22:31
– court held in, 39:59
– early records of (1664), 8:17-18
– early road to, see Charlestown-Watertown road
– ferry to Boston from (1631), 7:53, 54; 14:33; 39:26; 43:73 (see also Ferry[ies])
– Fire Department, 25:46
– first church at, 10:99; 21:22; 43:124; 44:47, 48
– – – and Church Covenant, 10:88-89; 33:143, 147
– and First Parish of Cambridge, 14:78; 24:59-60
– fortification of:
– – – 1630s (and vulnerability), 31:23; 32:71; 44:43
– – – 1770s, 43:142
– (see also Fortifications)
– “Historical Associations” of (1950 paper), 33:134-55
– histories of (Wyman; Frothingham; Bartlett), 8:14n1, 16; 10:58n3; 17:52, 53; 24:79n31
– horse cars to, 30:81 (see also Street railway[s])
– ice exported from, 4:25; 37:34
– John Harvard Mall (City Square) in, 33:147
– laid out (1629), 16:75; 22:59; 33:142
– Marines from (1850s), 23:85
– Medford as part of, 21:34, 35; 33:59 (see also Medford, Massachusetts)
– Middlesex Canal to, 40:46, 47, 49, 53 (see also Canal[s])
– naming of, 33:139, 142
– newspapers of, 20:85 (see also Periodicals [Cambridge])
– as oldest local settlement, 33:142
– persecution of Quakers in, 24:71, 72n8, 75, 79n31
– as port, 7:65; 39: 110
– portion of, now Somerville, see Somerville, Massachusetts
– portions of, annexed to Cambridge, 20:128; 24:58, 60; 41:22
– powder house in, see Powder House
– regiment formed in (1630s), 15:26
– in Revolutionary War, 33:148
– – – burning of, 10:54; 19:51; 33:149; 41:160
– – – Washington visits, 18:64, 65
– schools in, 10:171; 32:69 (see also School[s])
– settlement of (c. 1630), 1:14; 6:33; 8:16-17, 10:88; 14:32; 21:22, 24; 22:17, 58-59, 69; 26:63; 30:34; 32:58, 59; 33:134, 138-40 passim; 38:92
– “Shady Hill” within limits of, 41:20, 22n5 (see also Norton Estate)
– site chosen, 22:59; 33:142
– State’s Prison at, see Jail(s)
– water supply of, 21:22; 22:59; 30:34; 33:139, 143; 44:43
– See also Bunker Hill, Battle of; Winter Hill Charlestown Branch Railroad, see Railroad(s) Charlestown Bridge, see Bridge(s) “Charlestown Lane,” 13:24n1 Charlestown Navy Yard, see Navy Yard Charlestown Neck, 13:21, 22, 24, 25, 80; 16:37; 17:53; 20:126, 129; 21:22; 39:29, 30. See also “Neck, the” Charlestown Village, see Woburn, Massachusetts Charlestown-Watertown road, 1:14; 9:5; 10:10n3, 11, 24n3; 17:56; 20:57; 21:10, 78; 23:76; 25:115, 118; 29:19; 30:14, 76; 31:22, 25; 32:7; 34:83-84; 37:10-26 passim, 65; 41:16, 20; 43:69, 75, 78
– as first highway, 14:32-35, 40 (and map following), 41, 75; 18:56; 31:37, 54
– as Indian path, 39:26
– as “King’s Highway,” 20:93; 22:97; 24:62; 33:38; 37:29; 41:16n2; 44:160
– and parole limits (“Convention Troops”), 13:22, 25, 50, 55
– See also Brattle Street; Elmwood Avenue; Kirkland Street; Mason Street; Mount Auburn Street; Tory Row Charlton, 33:142. See also Charlestown, Massachusetts Charter
– Bay Colony, see Massachusetts Bay Company and Colony
– Boston (as city, 1822), 41:64
– Cambridge, see Cambridge, Massachusetts (organization and charter of)
– Cambridge water companies (1837 and 1852), 25:131; 41:8
– Harvard, see Harvard College/University
– Magna C[h]arta, 17:20; 30:40; 32:52, 64; 44:46
– – – “of musical education,” 32:81
– Pilgrim, denial of, 33:138
– Radcliffe ( 1894), 44:144 Charter Oak, 23:90. See also Connecticut, Colony/State of Chase, Algernon Sydney (mid-1800s), 19:46n1 Chase, Mrs. Algernon Sydney (Mary Augusta Tilden), 19:46n1 Chase, Mrs. Carroll Luther (Louise Fletcher; 1940s), 37:74 Chase, David B. (author, 1973), 44:178n11 Chase, Frank E. (Harvard benefactor, early 20th c.), 27:38 Chase, Prof. George H. (Bryant St. resident, 1935-55), 27:15n, 17, 20; 35:66-67; 41:36 Chase, Mrs. George H. (Freda Mark), 41:36 Chase, Dr. Hiram L. (1870s), 20:103 Chase, J. G. (mapmaker, 1865), 14:77 Chase, Philip Putnam: “Some Cambridge Reformers of the 80s” (1927 paper), 20:24-52 Chase, Salmon Po (1808-1873; statesman), 34: 19 Chase, S. M. (painter, 1911), 10:160 Chase, Thomas (1827-1892; Haverford College president), 35:95 Chase, Col. (quartermaster, 1770s), 13:25, 36, 50 Chastellux, Francois, marquis de (1734-1788), 13:44n1 Chatham Street, 36:114 Chaunc[e]y, Rev. Charles (1592-1672; Harvard president 1654-72), 3:17; 29:69; 31:63; 32:110; 38:7, 17; 42:110
– diary of, 11:59, 69
– “heresy” of, 14:103
– quoted on Quakers, 24:76-77
– street named for, 14:62, 64; 25:120; 32:27 (see also Chauncy Street) Chauncy, Israel (Harvard 1724), 21:90 Chauncy, Nathaniel (Harvard Fellow, 1660s), 24:76 Chauncy, Rev. (“meetinghouse is building,” 1809), 9:31 Chaunc[e]y family, 14:80 Chauncy Hall School, see School(s) Chauncy Place, 9:37 Chauncy Street, 22:78; 26:14; 33:49, 50
– arsenal on, see Arsenal (Cambridge)
– laid out (1857), 14:46, 64
– naming of, 14:62, 64; 32:27
– pond at corner of, 20:94; 31:55
– residents on, 15:13; 17:7; 20:95; 30:13 Chebacco Marshes, see Marsh(es) Checkley, Rev. John (1680-1754), 10:32, 33 Cheeshahteaumuck, Caleb (Harvard 1665), 35:93. See also Indians (education of) Cheever, see also Chiever Cheever, Abijah (bridge incorporator, 1807), 16:88 Cheever, Daniel (settler, 1640s), 14:101 Cheever, Dr. David Williams
– address of, on Dr. Holmes (1909), 4:46-52, 53, 54
– Dedham house of, 43:167 Cheever, Ezekiel (1614/15-1708; educator), 2:13, 17; 35:92 Cheever, Thomas (Harvard student, c. 1680), 11:62 Cheever: Poets of America (1847), 26:97; 33:12 Chelmsford, England, 44:49, 50, 58 Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 14:35, 50, 87; 16:121; 40:44, 46
– glass manufacture in, 19:34, 43 (see also Business and industry) Chelsea, Massachusetts (Winnesemet), 3:11; 17:32; 21:22, 24, 29, 30, 34, 41; 42:74 Chelsea (later Revere) Beach, see Revere Beach Cheney, Benjamin (meetinghouse petitioner, 1748), 24:58 Cheney, “Birdy” (schoolgirl, 1850s), 35:40 Cheney, John (meetinghouse petitioner, 1748), 24:58 Cheney, Mrs. Seth W. (Ednah Dow Littlehale; 1824-1904; reformer), 7:20 Cheney, Thomas (before 1656): descendants of, 5:53 Cherokee Inn, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Cherry Street, 1:65; 11:33; 16:50; 18:21; 28:11; 35:82 Chesapeake (ship), 33:74 Chesholm, “John,” see Chesholm[e], Thomas Chesholm[e], Thomas (tailor, tavern keeper, 1630s), 14:98; 21:82; 22:76 (Map 1); 37:30; 43:116
– given as “John” (d. 1671), 8:32
– as Harvard steward, 38:7, 15
– See also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses (first tavern) Chesley, Mrs. Annie L. (Paine Fund administrator, early 20th c.), 9:66; 18:23; 22:48; 31:65 Chester, John (of England, 1610), 14:91 Chester, Mrs. John (Dorothy Hooker), 10:102; 14:91 Chester, Capt. John (1775), 5:27, 28 Chester, Leonard (b. 1610; moves to Connecticut), 14:91 Chester family, 14:80 Chestnut Street (Boston), 2:24; 29:47, 63; 37:72 Chestnut Street (Cambridge), 22:63 Chestnut Tree, Spreading, site of, see Blacksmith(s) (“Village”) Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, see Railroad(s) Chicago Exposition (1893), see Celebrations (Columbian) Chicago fire, see Fire(s) Chicago Historical Society, 11:77 Chickering (piano) Company, 21:114; 27:68; 41:93-94 Chiera, Prof. Edward (1885-1933; orientalist), 27:26 Chiever, see also Cheever Chiever, Rev. Thomas, Jr. (of Maiden, mid-1600s), 7:76 Child, Benjamin (of Roxbury, 1630s), 10:184 Child, Elizabeth (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Child, Prof. Francis James (1825-1896; “Stubby”; philologist), 1:15, 70; 2:62; 6:28; 21:85; 23:77; 31:14; 32:12; 35:36, 117; 36:27
– house and garden of, 23:93; 26:20; 34:64, 65; 41:33-34; 42:16, 17
– as instructor (opinions of), 3:32; 20:58; 26:19-21; 33:23; 34:45-46, 52
– nickname of, 25:119
– objects to fire station plans, 16:119-20 Child, Mrs. Francis James (Elizabeth Sedgwick), 21:85; 31:14; 41:33; 42:16 Child, Harriet, see Perrin, Mrs. Augustus Child, Helen (schoolgirl, 1890s), 31:11; 34:64 Child, Henrietta (schoolgirl, 1890s), 34:64 Child, Julia, see Child, Mrs. Paul Child, L. M. (attorney, 1882), 39:89 Child, Louise (schoolgirl, 1856), 35:53 Child, Lucy (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Child, Paul (Irving St. resident, 1960s), 41:35 Child, Mrs. Paul (Julia), 41:35; 42:26-27 Child, Susan (schoolgirl, 1890s), 34:64 Child’s restaurant, 41:146. See also Restaurants Children
– addiction of, to tobacco and liquor (1860s), 13:98
– age of:
– – – and reading, 1:79; 2:25, 29
– – – in schools (mid-1800s), 13:99
– Avon Home for, see Charity
– Boat Club activities for, 39:132, 141, 142
– books for, 9:49; 17:87; 19:18-19, 24; 22:49, 56
– carrying fire forbidden, 36:75
– and child labor, 14:125
– and child-placing agency, 38:124-28
– and Chinese laundryman, 44:12
– clothing for, see Clothing
– delinquent, 13:101; 38:127, 128
– – – courts for, 17:24
– and descriptions of childhood:
– – – 1790, c. 1803, 3:102-6; 28:18-19
– – – 1823-33, 2:21-32 passim; 26:102-5 passim
– – – 1869, 1870s, 30:12-27 passim; 33:104-5; 34:61-67 passim
– – – 1890s, 41:158-70
– – – early 1900s, 42:14-28
– English refugee (1940s), 38:127-28
– and fences, see Fences and walls
– games and play of, see Sports and games
– household duties of, 28:18-19
– manners of, 22:93; 30:75; 32:28; 35:54 (see also Manners)
– medical (hospital) care for, 24:11
– medication for, 30:82
– newspapers published for and by, see Periodicals (general)
– orphanages for, see Charity
– parents’ support of, 18:13 (see also Apprenticeship)
– parties for, see Parties and entertainment
– pets of, see Animals
– playgrounds for, see Sports and games
– punishment of, 13:108; 32:25; 33:55 (see also Corporal punishment)
– reading at early age, see age of, above
– running beside carriage, 24:28
– schoolchildren’s jingles (about teachers), 44:14
– songbook for, 32:81 (see also Music)
– summer camps for, 18:22; 34:104; 36:47; 38:125
– theatricals by, 26:119-20; 41:162
– town care of, 18:17n2, 22
– toys and dolls for, 8:38; 18:31; 30:27; 41:169
– truancy of (and reasons for), 13:100-101
– upbringing of, 3:38; 22:93
– See also Domestic and family life; School(s) Children’s Book (late 1800s), 19:18 Children’s Museum, 35:22. See also Museum(s) Chilmark, Massachusetts, 11:33; 28:11, 16 Chilton, Mary, see Winslow, Mrs. John Chimney(s)
– and chimney sweeps, see Business and industry
– glass company (taken down, 1921), 16:94; 36:97
– house, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– slaughter house, 26:69n11 China
– Communist triumph in (1940s), 40:7
– emperor of (c. 1900), 33:53
– Imperial Maritime Customs of (before 1913), 33:52
– tea imported from (1700s), 39:145, 149 China and Japan Trading Company, 35:58. See also Trade and commerce Chinese laundryman, children’s annoyance of, 44:12 Chisholme, see Chesholm[e] Choate, Charles F. (friend of Bartlett and Lowell, mid-1800s), 1:83; 33:97; 34:75 Choate, Mrs. Charles F. (librarian of Book Club): house of, 28:106; 33:97 (see also Lee, Thomas [3d]) Choate, George (of Salem, c. 1800), 12:65 Choate, Mrs. George (Margaret Manning Hodges), 12:65 Choate, Joseph Hodges (1832-1917; lawyer, diplomat), 1:70; 14:27; 26:29; 28:116
– “Dana As a Lawyer and a Citizen” (1915 paper), 10:142-58
– obituary, 12:65-66 Choate, Mrs. Joseph Hodges (Caroline Dutcher Sterling), 12:66 Choate, Rufus (1799-1859; lawyer, statesman), 7:32; 23:84; 34:91; 41:59
– Dana’s eulogy of, 10:131, 142
– in Elias Howe case, 14:135, 139
– as orator, 3:23; 10:151, 152, 153 Choate, Samuel (barn frame built for, 1771), 5:62 Choate house, see Choate, Mrs. Charles F. Choquet (French teacher, mid-1800s), 18:33 Christ Church (Episcopal, built 1760/1), 33:41; 35:30; 37:93, 95; 39:117; 43:73
– architecture and architect of, 23:17n1, 18-22; 25:116, 121; 33:64; 35:25
– archives of, 21:119
– bells of, 21:107; 31:13; 33:24
– Biography of (Day), 35:25; 42:8
– burying gound near, see Burying ground(s) (old, Garden St.)
– Centennial of, 10:77
– communion plate belonging to, 41:42
– Continental troops quartered in, 1:62; 5:26, 27; 16:34; 35:25
– damage to (1778) and closure of, 10:53, 74n2; 13:68-69; 20:92; 22:101; 29:68-69
– – – repaired and reopened (1826), 11:28n2; 22:101; 23:22 (illus. facing)
– establishment of (1759), 10:43; 16:19, 32, 37, 79; 19:49; 21:99; 22:101; 23:17-21; 26:51; 33:64; 37:67; 42:81; 43:118-19
– as Historic Landmark, 39:73; 42:41; 43:35
– history of (1934 paper), 23:17-23
– land acquired by, 22:77; 23:19
– lay readers at, 9:8, 23n3, 36n2
– “library” of, 10:84 (caption facing)
– Library Association of, 23:74
– lighting of, 23:22-23; 42:8-9
– Loyalists attending, see members of, below
– members of, 12:68; 20:61; 21:102, 106; 23:39, 41, 73; 33:65
– – – from First Church, 5:58n5, 63; 9:32n1; 10:170; 16:79; 43:118-19 (see also establishment of, above)
– – – Loyalists as, 5:58n5, 63; 10:17, 40n2; 16:19, 32. 37. 79; 17:55, 57; 19:49; 23:17-18, 21; 30:58, 62; 33:64; 35:25; 37:17, 25; 43:118
– – – slaves as, 10:63, 74, 76-77
– organist, organ loft at, 21:67; 23:19; 35:27 (see also Music)
– parish incorporated (1815), 18:17n2
– parish work of, 11:86; 16:19
– patriots buried at, 20:114
– “perspective view” of (1790s), 42:118
– pew ownership and rent at, 10:42-43; 27:65
– plan of, 23:21-22
– planting around, 35:25-28, 31
– poor fund of, 18:17n2
– reading desk from (discarded), 21:112
– records of, 5:59n9, 63n2; 10:25n1, 35n3, 40n2, 44, 62n2, 74n3; 21:15
– rectors of, 5:59; 10:18n2, 30n1, 32n1; 13:110; 17:54; 20:99; 21:62, 76-77; 26:51; 35:23, 27; 37:98-99; 41:142; 43:119
– rectory of, 20:99; 30:19; 33:41, 42, 47; 35:26; 43:40 (see also Saunders, William)
– slaves attending, see members of, above
– Vassall tomb at, see Tomb(s) and tombstone(s)
– view(s) of:
– – – from Memorial Hall tower (1875), 44:139, 152 (illus. #1 following)
– – – sold as postcards (1930), 27:100
– wardens of, 9:10; 10:43n4; 16:32, 33, 35; 21:119; 23:22, 56; 27:60; 37:17
– Women’s Club of, 33:158
– See also Church of England; Episcopal Church Christian, Miss [?] (at Vassall dinner party, 1765), 10:39 Christian Association (Radcliffe), see Women’s clubs/organizations Christian Brethren, see Young Men’s Christian Association Christian Examiner, Christian Register, see Periodicals (Church) Christian Science Church: foundations of building, 31:55 Christian Science Monitor, see Periodicals (Boston) Christian Union, see Periodicals (Church) Christison, Wenlock (persecuted Quaker, 1664), 24:76 Christmas, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Church, Col. Benjamin (1639-1718), 30:50 Church, Deacon Benjamin [Sr.] (Harvard 1727), 30:49, 70 Church, Mrs. (Deacon) Benjamin (Hannah Dyer, second wife), 30:49 Church, Dr. Benjamin [Jr.] (1734-1778[?]; traitor), 10:73n1; 16:127; 21:100-101, 116-17; 27:49; 31:40; 37:52
– paper on (1944), 30:48-71 Church, Mrs. Benjamin [Jr.] (Hannah Hill [of England]), 30:50, 69 Church, Benjamin (b. c. 1758; son of Dr. Benjamin), 30:50 Church, Charles (Loyalist, 1770s), 30:70 Church, E. D. (book collector), 38:105-6 Church, Capt. Edward (c. 1670), 30:50 Church, Richard (of Plymouth, England, c. 1620), 30:49-50 Church, Mrs. Richard (Elizabeth Warren), 30:49-50 Church, the, see Religion Church and Parish, First, see First Church and Parish Church bells, see Bell(s) Church Covenants
– Boston, 1:36; 10:88; 32:107
– Plymouth, 32:107
– Salem, 10:87; 32:107
– Watertown, 13:82; 32:60
– See also individual town listings Church farm (“Shawshine,” sold 1669), 9:72, 75; 43:115, 116. See also Billerica, Massachusetts Church Green (Boston), 43:121 Church Library Society, 11:86 Church of Christ, see First Church and Parish, Congregational (Shepard Memorial Church) Church of England, 10:42; 36:66, 70; 40:72; 42:81, 99
– Articles (39) of, 36:10; 40:62
– colonial episcopate considered (1770s), 39:159-60
– establishment of (16th c.), 33:136
– patriot feeling toward, 14:41
– punishment for non-attendance at, 32:111
– Puritan loyalty to/separation from, 30:34; 33:137; 42:78, 99-100; 43:114; 44:43, 49, 50-51
– Puritans as liberal party of, 32:50, 55
– renunciation of (by Shepard), 31:62; 42: 100
– in Scotland (1630s), 32:65; 42:100
– Society of the Anglican Church for the Propagation of the Gospel, 6:23; 9:41; 10:40n2, 43, 46; 23:17; 25:51; 33:64; 38:106
– in Virginia and the South, 7:97; 32:111; 36:57
– See also Christ Church; Episcopal Church; Religion Church of the Sacred Heart (Roman Catholic), 18:20; 36:99, 104 Church of the Savior (Methodist), 43:121 Church of the Unity, 7:79 Church organs and organists, see Music Church Periodical Club, see Club(s) “Church Row,” see Tory Row Church Street, 14:64; 15:33; 17:21; 20:96; 30; 13-19 passim; 38:128; 39:69; 41:108, 146; 44:115
– Bates-Dana house on corner of, see Dana houses (#11)
– Fire Department located on, 36:80, 81, 84
– Unitarian Church on corner of, see Meetinghouse sites
– Window Shop on, 43:98, 100 Churchill, Frederick L. (baker, c. 1913), 8:38 Churchill, Sir Winston (1874-1965), 33:33; 40:86 Cider, see Wine and spirits Cincinnati School of Social Work, 36:19 Citizens’ Trade Association, see Trade and commerce Citizenship of former slaves, 10:62 City Hall (Boston), 41:59 City Hall (Cambridge)
– Agassiz lectures at, 35:95
– building of present (1889), 19:47; 34:101, 103, 108; 39:121; 42:85; 43:45
– inscription over door of, 34:109
– site of old (Main and Pleasant Sts.), 13:105; 22:24; 30:80; 39:117; 40:144
– site of present, 1:56; 6:24; 14:43; 16:79; 17:54; 19:47; 22:67; 25:118; 35:81, 84
– See also Politics City Hall Annex, 42:33 City (North) Point (South Boston), 39:93n48 City Point Works (South Boston machine shop, c. 1860), 11:87 City Square (Charlestown), 22:59 Civil liberties (1630s), 44:52 Civil Service
– Examiners and examinations, 12:23; 40:144
– reform and associations for reform, 10:192; 11:56; 20:16, 27, 34-46 passim; 37:93 (see also Politics) Civil War, England (1642-46), 32:65 Civil War, U.S. (1861-65), 3:48; 10:134, 143; 16:124; 23:60; 28:10; 30:87; 34:113; 36:114; 40:99; 42:118
– age of soldiers in, 23:39; 39:12
– beginning of, 37:89; 39:10
– and Cambridge arsenal, see Arsenal (Cambridge)
– Cambridge residents serving in, 1:27, 85; 3:115; 7:105; 8:14-15, 29; 10:174, 176, 184-90 passim; 11:87; 12:42, 44; 14:138; 15:39-40; 17:64; 20:61; 22:92; 23:29-30, 32, 67; 30:79; 33:51; 35:88; 43:13
– – – camps for, 14:63; 39:15
– – – casualties among, 4:61; 17:43; 18:38, 41; 23:39; 28:24, 28; 32:35; 33:77-35:45, 101, 113; 36:103; 39:12-22 passim
– – – Col. Higginson, see Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentworth
– – – monuments to, 1:61; 16:125; 33:38-39; 34:89; 39:13; 43:77, 153; 44:190 (see also Soldiers’ Monument[s])
– – – numbers of (statistics), 39:119
– – – paid substitutes for, 25:137; 39:13
– – – physicians, 7:80-81; 20:103, 106-9 passim
– – – Richardson and “38th Massachusetts,” 9:7-22
– – – women (as nurses), 7:81; 16:115; 17:71; 33:53; 35:85
– “catechism” on Cambridge in, 19:12
– celebration of victories in and end of, 10:134; 17:70; 30:78; 32:35; 39:19-20
– Centennial (1961), 40:100n9
– defense of Boston in, 40:100
– economic effects of, 17:67; 20:53; 25:83, 89; 30:24; 39:86; 40:143; 41:127; 44:161
– editorials and writings on, 12:37-38; 14:23-24; 33:81
– ends era (in legal history), 7:36, 39
– England and, 7:29; 26:93n61; 33:84
– – – Trent affair, 3:77
– girls’ and women’s work for, 25:137; 32:34-35; 34:32-34; 39:40-42, 49 (see also Cambridge residents serving in, above; U.S. Sanitary Commission in, below; “Bee”)
– Harvard during, 20:107; 35:113; 39:13-14; 42:113; 43:153
– – – student battalion guards arsenal, see Arsenal (Cambridge)
– Home Guard and Massachusetts Volunteers in, see Militia (volunteers, Civil War)
– Elias Howe in, 14:136, 137-38
– Navy in, 23:29-31
– Negro troops in, see Negroes pass issued (to Rev. Harrington) during, 34:34
– patriotism in, 4:51; 10:133, 154-55; 18:54; 33:23; 41:134
– political effects of, 20:25, 29, 53
– relics of, 3:97; 16:125
– and street names, 14:63; 39:15
– temperance movement during, 33:101-2
– threat of, discounted, 39:8
– Trent affair in, see England and, above
– use of whiskey in, see Wine and spirits
– U.S. Sanitary Commission in, 10:190; 18:38; 21:107; 23:61; 25:137; 38:51
– See also Slavery Claflin, Walter A. (apothecary, c. 1900), 15:33 Claflin, Gov. William (1818-1905), 33:51; 39:39 Clap, see also Clapp Clap, Dr. Edmund W. (Harvard 1892), 34:40 Clapp, see also Clap “Clapp,” Dexter, see Pratt, Dexter Clapp, Dudley (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:61 Clapp, James F., Jr. (architect, 1960s), 39:75; 42:33 Clapp, J. Emory (electronics manufacturer, c. 1910), 34:117-18 Clapp, Otis (Boston publisher, 1859), 16:27 Clapp, Philip Greeley (Harvard 1909; composer), 32:88; 41:102 Clapp, Miss, school of (Boston, 1860s), 36:35. See also School(s) Clapp-Eastham Company, 34:118-19 Clarence, Mrs. (Garden St. resident, early 1800s), 20:94 Clarendon Street (Boston), 39:31 Clark, see also Clarke Clark, Alvan (1804-1887; painter, astronomer), 25:115, 119; 35:83
– property of, 1:56 Clark, Alvan Graham (1832-1897; astronomer), 35:83 Clark, Charles (landowner, before 1840), 14:65 “Clark, Don” (Allston’s landlord, c. 1800), 29:25 Clark, Elihu (soldier at Roxbury, 1775), 18:61n2, 64n3 Clark, Elizabeth (“Lizzy”; schoolgirl, 1850s), 35:41, 42 Clark, Mrs. Frank M. (owner [1943] of “Buck’s Progress” [by Allston]), 29:23n26 Clark, George H. (MIT 1903; engineer), 34:111, 112, 116, 118
– quoted, 34:117 Clark, George L. (author, 1914), 27:75n80 Clark, James (c. 1652-1714; landowner), 22:74 Clark, John (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 5:35-36; 10:102; 14:89; 22:63, 76 (Map 1) Clark[e], Elder Jonas (d. 1700): descendants of, 5:54; 22:119 Clark, Rev. Jonas (1730-1805; at Lexington), 16:98 Clark[e], Jonathan (importer, 1770s), 37:21 Clark, Lillian, see Richardson, Lillian Clark Clark, Nicholas (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:89 Clark[e], Richard (& Sons, importers, 1770s), 8:21; 10:19; 37:21; 39:150, 151 Clark[e], Mrs. Richard (Elizabeth Wellington, d. 1777), 8:21 Clark, William (1770-1838; explorer), 2:34; 28:33, 37, 39 Clark, Mrs. William Irving (of Worcester; sister of Frederick Haven Pratt), 27:88, 89 Clark house (Cambridgeport), 16:95 Clark Road, 2:30. See also Broadway Clark Street, 14:65; 35:83 Clark’s Telescope, see Astronomy Clarke, see also Clark Clarke, Annie Barber (first president of Radcliffe Alumnae Association), 44:142 Clarke, Dr. A. P. (1870s), 20:103, 107 Clarke, Harrietta Butler, see Howe, Mrs. James Murray Clarke, Rev. James Freeman (1810-1888), 7:19; 12:13, 18; 36:65; 37:80, 81 Clarke, Joan, see Stone, Mrs. Simon Clarke, Rev. John (1609-1676; founder of Newport, R.I.), 14:95 Clarke, John (friend of Dr. Daniel Stone, 1680s), 7:76 Clarke, Margaret, see Wyeth, Mrs. Nicholas (first wife) Clarke, Dr. Moses (1860s), 7:81 Clarke, S. (friend of T. Fuller, Jr., 1800), 11:50 Clarke, Samuel (builds house at Newton, c. 1807), 9:23 Clarke, Thomas (Roxbury politician, 1786), 40:9 Clarke, Dr. William (Boston, mid-1700s), 17:51 Clarke (Burgoyne’s commissary, 1778), 13:75n5 Clarke, Miss (“of Providence,” 1806), 9:15-16 Clarke, Mr. (Follen St. resident, early 1800s), 20:95 Clarke, Mrs. (daughter of Albert Greene), 20:95 Clarke, Mr. (correspondence clerk at Riverside Press, late 1800s), 19:20 Clarke House (on “road to Lexington,” 1775), 13:85 Clary (assistant to Professor Lovering), 3:33 Class, see Social class Class Day, see Harvard College/University “Class Tree”/”Class Day Tree,” see Trees (in Harvard Yard) Classicism in literature, 33:11 Clay, Henry (1777-1852; statesman), 10:147, 151; 23:84; 25:40; 26:76 Clay, Marilla, see Houghton, Mrs. William Clay and clay pits, see Geology Clayton, John (c. 1685-1773; botanist), 43:135, 138 Cleaveland, see also Cleveland Cleaveland, Prof. Parker (1780-1858; geologist), 38:71, 77 Cleaveland, Colonel (of Royal Artillery, 1778), 5:67 Cleaveland, Mr. (“kicked out of” Bowdoin Chapel, 1807), 9:22 Cleland, Samuel (witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:80 Clemens, Samuel Langhorne (Mark Twain; 1835-1910; humorist, novelist), 7:19; 23:45-46 Clement, Frank (businessman, 1880s), 23:40 Clement, George (in Medical School, 1879), 23:40 Clement, Hazen (Harvard 1883), 23:40 Clement, James H. (businessman, 1880s), 23:40 Clement, Mrs. James H. (Clara Erskine; writer on art), 23:40 Clement Circle, 22:48; 37:113 Clements, William L. (1861-1934; book collector), 30:68. See also Library(ies) Clergy
– domestic life of, 36:56
– University preachers, see Harvard College/University
– See also Harvard Divinity School; Religion Cleve, Capt. Heinrich Urban (of Brunswick Battalion, 1777-78): quoted, 13:18, 34n4, 56-66 passim, 72n2 Cleveland, see also Cleaveland Cleveland, Francis (theatrical producer, mid-20th c.), 38:57, 59 Cleveland, [Stephen] Grover (1837-1908; U.S. president 1884-88, 1892-96), 7:6; 12:23; 20:37, 45-47; 25:140; 27:32; 33:83
– ancestry of, 22:84
– and “Cleveland Democracy,” 20:26-27, 38, 46, 52 Cleveland, Mrs. (Stephen] Grover, 27:32 Cleveland, Henry R. (d. 1842), 25:44n38; 28:56
– “Five of Clubs” letters to, 28:77, 78, 79 Cleveland, Leslie L. (schoolmaster, 1910-41), 35:91, 99-103 passim
– “Cambridge History in the Cambridge Schools” (1926 remarks by), 19:9-10 Cleveland, Mrs. Sarah P. (1850s), 7:104 Cleveland, Mr. and Mrs. (Higginson family friends, 1827), 2:21 Clifford, Gov. John Henry (1809-1876), 6:50
– as attorney general in Webster case, 41:69-74 passim, 81, 86 Clifton, Chalmers (Harvard 1912; orchestra conductor), 32:88; 41:102 Clifton Street, 20:132 Climate, see Weather Clinton, Daniel (city councillor), 44:98 Clinton, Gen. [Sir] Henry (c. 1738-1795), 3:74, 75, 76; 5:30, 82n5; 19:52, 55, 57; 22:30; 39:29
– letters to, 5:79n3, 86n4; 13:57n3, 59, 75, 77-79
– and “New Ireland,” 5:75, 78, 81, 86 Clinton, Theophilus, see Lincoln, Earl of Clinton Place, 24:110 Clock, wound only twice a year, 33:46 Clock-making and repair, see Business and industry Close, Miss Caroline (teacher, 1890s), 35:105 Clothing
– “arctics,” see boots and shoes, below
– army, see of Continental army; of “Convention Troops,” below
– boots and shoes:
– – – “arctics” (for men and women), 26:14; 33:18; 35:17
– – – boy’s pumps (1750s), 10:26
– – – hides for, 44:60
– – – ladies’, 16:39; 35:17
– – – makers of, see Business and industry
– – – men’s boots (and boot jacks), 21:95; 34:60
– – – rubber boots, 11:28; 21:58; 22:53
– – – shops selling, 15:33; 23:80; 30:22
– caps and gowns (academic), 41:148
– children’s, 13:98; 18:31, 32; 23:50-51; 25:110; 28:19; 31:12; 32:25; 33:55; 42:26
– of Continental army, 11:64-65; 18:58; 20:92-93; 37:60 (see also Militia [“uniforms” of])
– of “Convention Troops,” 13:18, 61, 62-63
– cost of:
– – – 1700, 22:86
– – – 1750s, 10:23, 26
– – – 1800, 11:44
– – – 1870s, Paris, 24:102
– F. Dana’s, worn at Russian Court, 26:90
– funeral/mourning, 11:64; 18:40; 21:89-90; 27:64; 33:10
– hat manufactory, see Business and industry
– hats, see ladies’ hats; men’s, below
– “havelocks” (1861), 17:69
– hides for, 44:60
– hoop skirts, 22:55
– invention of sewing machine and, see Inventions
– inventory of (John Vassall, 1736), 21:95
– judges’ (pre-Revolutionary), 42:80
– ladies’:
– – – “Bloomers,” 32:12; 34:26
– – – changing fashions in, 30:12; 36:47; 41:150-52
– – – garters, 44:106-7, 108
– – – hoop skirts, 22:55
– – – law concerning, 30:23
– – – new, accustoming oneself to, 41:2
– – – shoes and boots, 16:39; 35:17
– – – 1707/8, 22:86
– – – 1750s-1760s, 10:23, 29n1; 15:42
– – – 1770s, 17:56-57; 22:88; 32:25
– – – 1807, 9:19
– – – 1825, 1827, 1837, 2:28; 11:27; 25:20, 27, 37
– – – 1850s, 32:11-15 passim, 21-22, 24; 18:31; 25:117; 28:117
– – – 1860s, 17:68, 72-77 passim; 21:61; 26:45; 32:25, 36
– – – 1870s, 24:100-101, 109-29 passim; 30:12, 22, 23
– – – 1880s, 22:55-56; 31:11; 32:26; 35:17; 38:117; 44:143
– – – 1890s, 31:32; 32:43, 46; 36:47; 41:21, 165
– – – 1905-06, 44:106-7 1912, 32:36
– – – 1920s, 40:114
– – – 1940s, 30:12; 41:150-51
– – – 1950s, 41:151
– ladies’ hats, 17:68; 18:31, 32; 22:55; 25:117; 28:19; 41:144, 151
– – – lace caps, 22:55-56; 44:110, 143
– – – and milliners, 8:37
– – – too large for court house door, 8:36
– – – turbans, 20:96; 25:20, 22, 27, 51; 27:61; 30:15
– of Loyalists, 15:42; 17:56-57
– manufacture of, see tailors and seamstresses, below; Business and industry
– men’s:
– – – “arctics,” 26:14; 33:18
– – – boots (and boot jacks), 21:95; 34:60
– – – of guests at Radcliffe, 41:154
– – – Harvard students’, 26:106; 29:14; 34:49-50, 56
– – – hats, 26:45; 32:26
– – – Henry James’s waistcoat, 42:29-30
– – – man arrested for not wearing coat in court, 32:28; 39:61
– – – when running, 31:9; 34:49-50
– – – sailor’s, 26:106
– – – white flannels introduced, 31:32
– – – 1750s-1760s, 10:8n1, 26, 29n1; 15:42; 32:25
– – – 1770s, 3:37; 33:70
– – – c. 1800, 3:37; 11:12n1, 44; 27:88; 29:14, 15, 22
– – – c. 1820, 13:93; 23:56
– – – c. 1830, 26:106; 29:36, 40; 40:48
– – – c. 1840, 15:45; 23:55, 62; 25:36; 28:72, 76, 78; 29:44, 57; 32:28
– – – late 1800s, 26:14, 45; 28:91; 30:18, 26; 31:32; 32:89; 42:29-30
– – – c. 1920, 37:109
– – – 1960s, 41:154
– militia “uniforms,” see Militia
– mourning, see funeral/mourning, above
– palm leaf hats, see Business and industry
– for poor, charitable provision of, see Charity
– Russian, described (1870s), 24:104-33 passim
– of schoolmaster (1820s), 13:93
– shoes, see boots and shoes, above
– shops selling, 8:37-38
– tailors and seamstresses, 8:31, 38; 10:36; 11:44; 14:130; 30:19; 37:91
– – – in 1771 lawsuit, 5:61
– Victorian standards of, 31:9
– weaving of cloth for, see Domestic and family life (spinning and weaving)
– women’s sewing clubs and, see “Bee”
– See also Hairdressing fashions; Jewelry Clough, Miss Anne J. (school principal, 1873), 36:32n15 Clough, Arthur Hugh (1819-1861; English poet), 25:125; 32:101 Cloyne School for boys (Newport, R.I.), 6:52. See also School(s) Club(s)
– Anthology, 44:173
– Appalachian Mountain, 10:191; 23:80; 33:52; 37:109
– – – founded, early work, 5:106
– Archaeological, 23:44
– Atlantic, 4:42-45
– “Bartlett,” 1:81, 82, 86
– Berkeley Book, 21:70; 28:108, 111
– boat, see Cambridge Boat; Union Boat, below
– book, see Berkeley Book, above; Cambridge Book; New Book, below
– Boston Authors, 23:45
– boys’, 11:86; 21:66
– Calhoun, 23:84
– Cambridge, 10:173, 177, 186, 187, 188; 12:23; 20:23; 34:111; 37:93, 105; 41:43; 42:52
– Cambridge Boat, 22:77, 106; 31:32, 55
– – – moving of clubhouse, 39:113 (illus. facing), 135, 137, 138-40
– – – paper on (1963), 39:125-43
– Cambridge Book (started 1831/2), 4:31, 89; 18:36, 37; 25:110
– – – Centenary of (1932 and 1942 papers on), 28:105-19
– – – disposition of books of, 28:10
– Cambridge Dining, 7:105
– Cambridge Dramatic/Social Dramatic, see Theatre
– Cambridge Garden, 35:23, 24, 26, 28 (see also Cambridge Plant and Garden, below)
– Cambridge Photographic, 8:51
– Cambridge Plant and Garden, 23:74; 31:27; 33:39, 50-51, 158; 42:44; 43:80, 81, 164, 165; 43:165
– – – paper on (1953), 35:17-33
– Cambridge Unitarian, 10:185
– Cantabrigia, 27:99
– Casino, 31:31-33; 39:126-28
– Caucus, 30:51
– Church Periodical, 13:125
– Colonial, 7:84; 17:80; 18:39; 41:50; 44:24
– – – members of, 5:105; 6:78; 7:87, 105; 8:51; 10:177, 182; 12:67; 18:38; 37:93
– Commonwealth (Boston [?]), 20:34-35
– Dante, 21:74; 27:69
– debating, 37:78, 91
– Dining, 7:105
– dramatic, see Theatre
– Economy, 37:105; 42:52
– Fellowship (Boston), 27:44
– fishing, 36:104
– “Five of,” 28:56, 57, 64, 66, 69, 76, 77-78; 33:20
– 47, 27:99; 40:112
– Girls’ Friendly, 23:74
– Harvard, 27:68
– – – Boston, 34:12, 13; 38:42n38
– – – New York, 34:18
– at Harvard, 33:45
– – – AD, 34:100
– – – Art, 34:100
– – – Coffee, 11:35, 36, 48
– – – Dramatic, 38:62
– – – Faculty, 24:83; 25:118; 27:12; 33:28, 36; 35:45; 37:108; 41:50; 44:24
– – – Glee, see Music (at Harvard)
– – – Hasty Pudding, 11:42, 46, 48, 49; 25:37n29; 29:27-30, 31; 34:100; 35:38
– – – Institute of 1770, 11:44n3; 18:24; 34:100
– – – Lincoln’s Inn, see Harvard Law School
– – – Porcellian founded, 25:103; 28:112
– – – Spee (1920), 15:20
– (see also Phi Beta Kappa Society)
– Long Room (1760s), 30:52
– Massachusetts Reform, 12:23; 20:40, 44; 37:93
– Mayflower (Boston), 17:80; 43:169
– music societies, see Music
– New Book, 28:108, 111
– Newetowne, 37:93, 105
– North End (Boston), see Caucus, above
– Nuttall, see Nuttall Ornithological Club
– Plant, see Cambridge Plant and Garden, above
– Plato (Roxbury), 34:20
– Proscenium (Roxbury), 34:20
– Putnam (East Cambridge), 36:103
– Rendez-Vous, 41:107, 112
– Rotary, 37:38
– Russian, 23:82
– Saturday (Boston, mid-1800s), 2:75, 76, 102, 105; 4:54, 61. 62, 68; 10:145; 14:21; 28:90; 35:51; 41:57; 43:63, 154
– – – Early Years of: (Perry), 25:135-36
– Saturday (Cambridge, late 1800s), 38:55-56 (see also Theatre)
– Saturday Morning, 41:89; 42:14
– Saturday Night, 38:56 (see also Theatre)
– Shop (1884-1926), 23:43; 43:20
– skating, 39:127
– Somerset (Boston), 41:56, 57
– Students for Democratic Action (SDA), 41:151
– Union, 41:50; 44:32
– Union Boat, 39:133
– Whist, 25:135
– – – picture of (presented to CHS), 12:9
– women’s, see Women’s clubs/organizations
– Young Men’s Democratic (1887), 20:47
– Zonta, 27:99
– See also Boy Scouts; Cambridge Social Union; Girl Scouts; Phi Beta Kappa Society; Society(ies) (organizations); Sports and games; Women’s clubs/organizations; Young Men’s Christian Association Clymer, W. B. S. (English instructor, 1889), 34:42 Coal
– annual cost of, at MIT (1930s), 42:57
– dealers in wood and, see Business and industry
– Gas and Electric Company use of, 31:29; 42:8, 12
– heating by, 16:50; 23:26; 25:134; 29:40; 37:37; 38:36
– – – and coal strike (1902), 33:131
– – – coal supplied to poor, 9:66, 67
– – – Harvard buildings, 22:102; 26:29; 34:39; 41:129
– shipped by river or canal, 32:58; 39:27; 40:28, 49, 51-52; 42:8, 12
– See also Heating Coasting (sliding), see Sports and games Coasting trade, 39:27. See also Business and industry (shipping) Coates, Thomas (city councillor, 1968), 44:100 Coats of arms
– Fuller family, 28:13
– Wendell family, 22:91
– See also Dana family; Vassall family Cobb, Cyrus and Darius (sculptors of War Memorial), 16:125; 25:121; 33:38-39; 43:77 Cobb, Mary (“Bee” member, 1860s), 17:74, 82 Cobb, Captain (1775), 18:68 Cobb, Mr. (Bowdoin 1806), 9:11, 13, 14 Cobbett, William (1763[?]-1835; historian), 39:158n30 Cobble Hill, 33: 148 Coburn, see also Colburn Coburn, Miss Lucy: Ipswich house of (built 1909), 43:167 Cochichowick, 21:32. See also Andover, Massachusetts Cochituate, Massachusetts (Cochitawit), 9:72; 21:47; 25:104 Cochran, Miss Isabella (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:22 Cock Horse Restaurant (Brattle St.), 41:146; 42:105. See also Restaurants Cockerel Church (Boston), see “New Brick Meeting House” Cockfighting, see Sports and games Codman, Charles R. (of Boston, 1872), 20:34 Codman, Capt. John (d. 1755), 17:50-51 Codman, Mr. (house of, 1777), 13:22, 24, 80 Cody, William F. (1846-1917; “Buffalo Bill”), 31:11 Coeducation, see Education Coercive Acts (England, 1774), 39:158, 163, 164. See also Law(s) (English) Coerne, see also Corne Coerne, Louis Adolphe (1870-1922; composer), 8:15; 41:102 Coes, Aury Gates (mid-1800s), 8:50 Coes, Mrs. Aury Gates (Lucy Gibson [Wyman]), 8:50 Coes, Dean Mary (1861-1913; of Radcliffe), 36:31n10; 40:111; 41:144; 44:143
– obituary, 8:50 Coffee Club, see Club(s) (at Harvard) Coffee House, 7:59; 30:55 Coffee House Association, 7:105 Coffin, Charles Carleton (1823-1896; author), 27:83n87 Coffin, Jethro (of Nantucket, mid-1600s), 27:46
– home of (“Horseshoe House”), 27:46 Coffin, Mrs. Jethro (Mary Gardner), 27:46 Coffin, John (1756-1838; Loyalist), 16:95 Coffin, Dr. John Gorham (tract by, 1823), 44:174, 177 Coffin, Nathaniel (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:59 Coffin, Peleg (c. 1800), 11:24n3 Coffin, Mrs. Peleg (Eunice), boardinghouse of, 11:24 Coffin, Priscilla (Mrs. John (?) Gardner), 27:46 Coffin, Tristram (of Nantucket, c. 1600), 27:46 Coffin, Mr. (Bowdoin 1806), 9:11, 13 Cogdell, John S. (1778-1847; artist): Allston letters to, 29:26n34, 35n4, 36n8, 48n57, 60, 62 Cogswell, Charles Northend (of Maine, c. 1800), 10:173 Cogswell, Mrs. Charles Northend (Margaret Elizabeth Russell), 10:173 Cogswell, Charles Northend (architect; d. 1941), 10:174; 26:56n94; 27:98, 99; 38:56, 58, 61, 63; 41:33 Cogswell, Edward R. (son of following), 10:174 Cogswell, Dr. Edward Russell (1841-1914), 20:103, 107; 41:33
– obituary, 10:173-74 Cogswell, Mrs. Edward Russell (Sarah Parks Proctor), 10:174; 41:33 Coyswell, Dr. George P. (c. 1915), 10:174; 21:69; 30:15
– house of. 31:56; 32:38; 33:47 Cogswell, Mrs. George P. (Anne Bumstead), 21:69; 33:47 Cogswell, Prof. Joseph Green (1786-1871; Harvard Librarian ), 2:119; 4:22n1 Cogswell, Margaret E. (d. 1949), 10:174 Cogswell (son of Dr. George P.; ambulance driver in World War I), 21:69 Cogswell Avenue, 20:135 Cohasset, Massachusetts, 37:62; 43:168
– portico of Lechmere house in, 26:57 Cohen, see also Conn Cohen, Stephen (Fayerweather St. resident, 1970s), 43:28 Cohen family (Boston, 1850). 41:60 Cohn, see also Cohen Cohn, Amy E. (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:33, 43; 43:70n2 Cohn, Dr. Edward J. (Francis Ave. resident, 1920s), 41:27 Coijchawick, 21:43. See also Andover, Massachusetts Coit, Miss Dorothy (schoolmistress, New York), 42:131 Coit, Captain (at Battle of Bunker Hill), 5:28 Coke, Daniel Parker (British M.P., 1780s), 33:66n33 Colburn, see also Coburn Colburn, F. A. (jewelry store, 1912), 8:36; 41:143 Colburn, Mrs. Sarah Foster Hovey (d. before 1921), 15:10 Colburn, Warren (1793-1833; teacher), 34:88 Colburn, Mrs. Warren, 9:66 Colburn, Mr. (of Boston; on Bridge Committee, 1640), 14:38 Colby (“Couldbyes”), Anthony (landowner; d. 1663), 14:33; 31:22 Colby, Gardner (1810-1879; merchant, benefactor of Colby College), 33:150 Colby, Mrs. Lewis (formerly Mrs. Samuel Allen), 16:38 Colby College (Maine), 33:150 Colchester, see Merrimac[k] plantation and Merrimac, Massachusetts “Cold Friday,” see Weather Colden, Jane (1724-1766; botanist), 43:135, 138 Cole, George (heads Harvard Coop, 1890s), 32:89; 41:53 Cole, John, 24:79n31 Cole, Mrs. John (Ursula; persecuted Quaker, 1663), 24:79n31 Cole, Mr. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:24 Cole family (1905), 44:114 Coleman, see also Colman Coleman, Ann (Quaker, 1660s), 24:70n6 Col[e]man, Joseph (shoemaker of Scituate, mid-1600s), 24:72, 77-78 Coleman, Sarah (Quaker, mid-1600s): persecution of, 24:71-73, 77 Coleman, Rev. (1807), 9:26 Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834; English poet), 10:162; 29:34, 39, 43-44; 33:11, 12, 14; 37:79 Colima, S.S. (sinks, 1895), 41:157 Colin, Mile, (teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1890s), 32:46 “College Book” (1700s), College Chapel, College Farm, see Harvard College/University “College Corn,” see Harvard College/University (funding of) College Hall, see Harvard Hall (Harvard) College Hill, 20:105; 34:123 College House (Harvard Square), 13:45; 18:24; 20:55, 93; 30:14, 16, 25, 80
– “Old College House” (1770s), 8:33, 36; 13:44-45, 50; 25:115, 118 “College House Nos. 1 and 2,” see Harvard Law School College of New Jersey, see Princeton University College of William and Mary (Virginia), see Colleges and universities College Press, 44:84. See also Harvard University Press College Pump, see Harvard College/University “College Row” (commercial building, mid-1800s), 8:36, 38-39. See also University Row College Street, 14:67; 18:27; 33:15. See also Quincy Street College Wharf, 1:58; 7:52. See also Business and industry (shipping) Colleges and universities
– Andover-Newton Theological Seminary, 33:151
– Berea College, 44:110
– Boston College, 44:34
– Colby College, 33:150
– College of William & Mary, 33:146; 36:57
– Colorado College, 36:29
– Haverford College, 35:95
– Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 43:139
– Massachusetts General Theological Seminary, 21:77
– Middlebury College, 28:29; 35:106
– New England Female Medical College Report, 43:134n14
– Oberlin College, 44:132
– University(ies):
– – – of Massachusetts, Herbarium, 43:137
– – – of Pennsylvania, 18:69n1; 43:135
– – – of Virginia, 44:69 (see also Library[ies])
– Willamette University, 28:51
– Williams College, 35:99
– See also Amherst College; Andover Theological Seminary; Boston University; Bowdoin College; Brown University (Rhode Island College); Columbia College/University; Cornell University; Education; Episcopal Theological School; Harvard College/University; Harvard School(s); Johns Hopkins University; Library(ies); Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Princeton University; Radcliffe College; School(s); Smith College; Tufts College; Vassar College; Wellesley College; Yale University Collegiate Instruction for Women, Society for, see Society(ies) (organizations) Collier, Adm. Sir George (1770s), 5:70-71, 81; 16:72 Collier’s Weekly, see Periodicals (General) Collins, Edward (Shepard executor, 1649), 42:108 Collins, Edward (of Billerica; d. 1689), 9:72, 75; 14:98; 22:76 (Map 1) Collins, Mary (worker with Indians, c. 1900), 17:86 Collins, Patrick A. (1844-1905; politician), 20:35, 37, 40, 45 Collins, Thomas H.: Princeton (Mass.) house of (built 1914), 43:167 Collins, Wilkie (1824-1889; British novelist), 28:93, 99 Colman, see also Coleman Colman, John (cousin of Andrew Belcher, 1717), 21:90 Colman (first name unknown; second wife of Enoch Wellington), 8:23 Colonial Club, see Club(s) Colonial Restaurant (1920s), 41:146. See also Restaurants Colonial Society of Massachusetts, see Historical Society(ies) Colorado College, 36:29 Colt, Peter (of Rome, N.Y.; c. 1800), 27:75-76 Colt, Sally (c. 1800), 27:74, 75
– letter to Andrew Craigie from, 27:79-80 Colt family (Hartford, Ct.), 27:75 Columbia (ship), 28:35 Columbia College/University, 4:82; 7:35; 38:69; 43:133-34, 140 Columbia River Fishing and Trading Company (1833), 28:48 Columbia Street, 14:53; 16:76; 22:67, 68; 39:20
– “Brick Meeting House” on, 16:86; 42:83
– Dana (Richard, Sr.) lives on corner of Broadway and, 11:32n; 26:102
– horse cars on, 39:91, 92 Columbiad, The (Barlow), 27:54 Columbian Centinel, see Periodicals (Boston) Columbian Exposition (Chicago, 1893), see Celebrations Columbus, Christopher (1451-1506; explorer), 40:94, 102, 105 Columbus (ship), 25:101 Columbus Avenue (Boston), 34:76 Colvin, Sir Sidney (1845-1927; at British Museum), 35:64 Comegys, Mrs., young ladies’ school of, 20:95. See also School(s) Comer, John (1704-1734): diary of, while Harvard student (1721-23), 11:72 Comets, see Astronomy Comey, Arthur C. (planning consultant, 1920), 32:102; 42:91 Comey, Mrs. Arthur C., 32:102 Comins, Lucy, see Paige, Mrs. Lucius R. (third wife) Commager, Henry Steele (b. 1902; historian), 33:69n41, 72n51 Commander Hotel, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Commercial Pioneer Association (c. 1900), 20:89 Commissioners of the United Colonies, 3:79 Committee(s), Revolutionary
– of Conference, 26:85-86
– of Correspondence, 3:77; 5:22, 24; 14:43; 30:48, 56; 33:69; 39:164
– on Depositions, 30:58 of
– Public Safety, 1:63; 3:19; 5:24, 43; 6:25; 13:85; 15:16; 17:58; 21:87, 101; 33:68, 70, 148; 37:45-48 passim
– – – Benjamin Church on, 21:100; 30:56, 57, 59-60, 68
– – – Journals, 10:47n4
– of Supplies, 13:85; 30:56, 58, 59; 33:70, 71; 37:48
– See also Revolutionary War Committee of Twelve, Junior, see First Church and Parish (Unitarian-Universalist) Common, the, see Boston Common; Cambridge Common Common Marsh, see Marsh(es) “Common Pales,” 6:34; 22:68, 69, 76-77; 31:24
– “Highway to,” 14:35, 65; 22:62
– See also Fortifications Common Street, 24:50, 51 “Commons” (food or eating place for students), see Food (at Harvard) “Commons, Boston,” see “Boston Commons” “Commonplace Book,” see Diaries and journals Commonwealth Avenue (Boston), 16:25; 39:90; 40:102; 41:56, 166; 42:51, 52 Commonwealth Club, see Club(s) Communication(s)
– and colonial unity, 39:164
– committees of correspondence and, see Committee(s), Revolutionary
– concerning “Convention Troops,” 13:19-20
– “express,” 13:25, 74n1; 16:57
– and the press:
– – – Dickens on, 28:70
– – – freedom of, see Freedom
– – – and “shirtsleeves diplomacy,” 13:74
– telegraph:
– – – boys’ games with, 43:29
– – – invention of, 14:129; 23:52; 29:55; 41:56, 60
– – – use of, 13:19; 34:72; 40:33; 42:115
– telephone, 41:143; 42:21; 43:29
– – – first installations of, 23:44; 41:10
– – – invention of, 14:129; 34:67, 68, 115, 123; 39:81n9; 42:10-11; 43:45
– – – and telephone calls to Radcliffe students, 41:144, 147
– – – Telephone Company office (1950s), 34:32
– television (WHDH-TV) and “Walking Tour of Cambridge” (1969-70), 42:43
– See also Advertisements; American Telephone and Telegraph Company; Business and industry (electronics); Periodicals; Printers; Publishers; Technology; Trade and commerce; Travel/transportation Communism: in China (1940s), 40:7 Community Chest, see Charity Commuting (from Cambridge to Boston), see Travel/transportation Compromise, see Missouri Compromise Compton, Karl Taylor (1887-1954; MIT president, 1930-48), 42:58, 59, 60, 63 Comstock, Ada Louise (b. 1876; Radcliffe president, 1923-43), 24:16; 41:149, 150; 44:149-50, 152 (illus. #10 following), 156 Comstock, Mrs. Seth (Elmwood tenant, 1921), 15:41 Conant, Edwin (of Sterling, 1829), 12:16 Conant, James Bryant (1893-1978; Harvard president 1933-53), 27:39n; 33:30; 34:10; 36:73; 44:90, 151, 155
– houses of, 28:105; 33:32-33, 36; 41:23
– on old burying ground committee, 22:13n1; 35:23 Conant, Mrs. James Bryant, 28:105 Conant, Prof. Kenneth J. (architectural historian, 1960s), 42:34 Conant, Mary, see Foster, Mrs. Andrew Conant, Gov. Roger (1592-1679), 27:46 Conant (settles on Governor’s Island c. 1620), 22:59 Conant & Stockwell’s provision store (1912), 8:36. See also Retail and food stores Concord, Massachusetts, 2:100; 4:56; 5:24; 26:26, 73; 34:120; 39:58, 99; 42:113, 115
– architecture in, 26:42; 43:161-62, 167, 170
– Art Association, 43:161, 167
– Birds of (Griscom), 35:14
– boundaries of, 9:72; 21:34, 38, 39n1; 22:20; 43:116
– Brewster at (and October Farm), 24:90-92, 97
– Courts at, 10:67; 15:28; 17:46; 39:60; 40:16, 132-33
– “Elmwood” (farm, 1892) in, 38:124
– founding and settlement of, 10:190; 14:100; 20:111, 126; 21:32, 38, 80
– Harvard’s move to, 22:102; 44:67
– historic houses in, 25:67
– provisions stored at (1775), 37:48
– Public Library of, 25:136
– Reformatory at, see Jail(s)
– residents of, 7:77; 9:71; 10:174, 189; 25:26; 27:11, 12, 13; 28:24-25
– slave/Negro population in (1754, 1765), 10:63n1
– transcendentalism at, 23:63; 37:77, 80, 89 (see also Transcendentalism)
– See also Concord River; Lexington and Concord, Battles of Concord, New Hampshire, 23:52; 40:26, 49, 56 Concord Avenue, 20:101; 21:68; 32:25, 38; 38:114; 40:87; 41:161; 42:93
– architecture on, 26:40; 44:103
– as boundary, 31:56; 37:16, 17
– brickyard on, 42:74
– brook running from/marsh near, 5:41; 16:114; 21:58; 24:89; 31:44, 53, 55
– buildings on, 28:106; 32:43; 33:46
– – – at corner of Waterhouse St., 5:111; 23:22
– – – Howells house (No. 37), 2:59; 21:63; 41: 165
– – – omnibus stable, 20:94 (see also Omnibuses)
– – – St. Peter’s Church and High School, 15:34; 38:119
– – – Saunders house, 10:188; 20:99
– – – Tobin school, 44:103
– – – Tudor house, 3:100-109
– elms on, 18:46; 35:113
– horse cars on, 35:17; 39:84, 97; 42:89
– laid out, 7:59; 14:49-50, 65
– See also Concord Turnpike Concord River, 23:51; 24:90, 91
– as boundary, 9:72, 76; 14:35; 21:38, 47, 49
– canal to and canal boats on, 40:46, 48, 53, 55 (see also Canal[s])
– as drinking water, 40:57 (see also Water supply) “Concord Road,” 5:39. See also Concord Avenue; Massachusetts Avenue Concord Street, 14:50, 57, 64; 16:43; 18:35. See also Broadway Concord Turnpike, 24:88; 26:38; 31:56; 32:25; 40:90
– Corporation, Cambridge and, 14:49
– crosses Common (later Garden St. crossing), 20:93; 33:46; 43:75
– – – controversy over, 39:113; 43:74
– See also Concord Avenue; Streets and highways Confiscation Acts, see Law(s) Congregational Church/Congregationalism, 3:109; 24:53; 36:64, 68
– as Bay Colony Church, 4:29; 43:112
– Cambridge Synod and, 32:104-14; 42:80
– Congregational Christian Church formed (1931), 43:122
– convention (1837), 4:29
– corporate powers of deacons of, 10:112
– divisions of, 2:29; 4:29; 20:63, 72-74; 36:58, 66, 69; 43:119-20 (see also First Church and Parish)
– First, see First Church and Parish, Congregational (Shepard Memorial Church)
– history of, 16:100; 43:112 (see also divisions of, above)
– Library of, 38:87, 100, 104-5
– in Milton, 25:103
– Norfolk St., see Prospect (Street) Congregational Church
– North Cambridge, 25:120
– organization of, 16:48, 98-99, 112; 23:71; 32:114; 43:84
– Park Street Church (Boston), 44:174
– Platform of Church Discipline (1649), 1:36; 10:107; 16:99; 38:87-88, 93-96, 97-98 (illus.), 99-100, 101 (illus.), 102, 103 (illus.), 104-9; 42:106; 43:115
– 300th anniversary (Synod and Platform), 32:104-14; 43:123, 125
– and Sabbath observance, 16:106 (see also Religion)
– secession from (by Episcopal congregation), see Episcopal Church
– Second, 20:65, 69; 43:117
– Winthrop, in Charlestown, 33:151
– See also Religion Congregational Society, 16:57; 22:64 Congregationalist, see Periodicals (Church) “Congress,” colonial (1640s), 30:40-41 Congress, Continental, 7:38; 40:19
– First (Philadelphia, 1774), 7:37; 13:85; 39:158, 164
– Second (Philadelphia, 1775-76), 6:10; 7:104; 13:85; 33:70-71; 37:25; 43:142
– – – and Benjamin Church affair, 30:48, 60-69 passim
– – – Francis Dana as delegate to, 3:58, 60; 10:143, 159; 25:119; 26:84-86, 121
– – – Letters of Members of, 26:86n45
– – – Washington appointed Commander-in-chief by, 18:59, 62; 37:53-59 passim Congress, Provincial (1775), 5:24; 13:85; 18:60, 73n1; 30:56, 58, 60; 33:70-71; 37:45-48 passim, 51, 52, 56, 57
– confiscation of property by, 15:42; 16:19; 21:100; 26:60; 37:12 (see also Loyalists)
– Journals, 10:47n6
– meets in Cambridge, 3:19; 24:52; 43:118
– meets in Watertown, 13:85; 15:43; 21:100; 24:52; 30:61, 66; 33:70 Congress, U.S., 32:60; 37:63; 44:127
– and Cambridge as port, 39:110; 40:27, 143
– and “Convention Troops,” 10:55; 13:42, 59, 60, 70-78, 80
– and currency, 13:64, 75, 76 (see also Money)
– Fifty-first (1891), 34:49
– refuses to pay balance of Gerry’s salary, 33:76
– suffragist committee and (1917), 44:147-48
– and telegraph, appropriation for development of, 29:55
– views of, on diplomacy, 26:89
– See also “Congress,” colonial (1640s); Congress, Continental; Congress, Provincial Congress (ship), 26:105 Congress Street (Boston), 30:74; 33:143 Conihasset, 21:43. See also Hingham, Massachusetts Conklin (historian, 1927), 39:58, 59, 60, 63 Conlan, Lt. Charles (schoolmaster, killed in World War II), 35:102 Conlon, John (politician, 1880s), 20:40 Connecticut, Colony/State of
– and Cambridge Synod, 32:109
– and confederation (1643/44), 32:108; 42:105
– first law school in country in (Litchfield), 25:122
– “Fundamental Orders” (constitution) of, 32:64; 43:113
– histories of, 27:75n80
– Hooker’s move to (1636), see Hooker, Rev. Thomas
– land grants in, 44:54-55
– -Massachusetts boundary disputes, 5:22; 21:44-45
– military imprisonment in (1770s), 30:56, 68, 69
– ornamented furniture and walls in, 21:50-51, 53-54 (and illus. )
– settlement of, 5:21, 22; 7:104; 32:108
– smuggling into, 39:147
– trade and commerce of, 44:61
– troops of, in Revolutionary War, see Revolutionary War
– Winthrop [the younger] as governor of, 7:73; 32:113; 44:56
– See also Connecticut River and Valley; Hartford, Connecticut; New Haven, Connecticut Connecticut River and Valley, 23:90; 24:36, 37
– and river traffic, 17:37; 40:50, 51
– settlements along (1630s), 10:100; 21:32, 44, 50; 23:90; 32:63-64, 66; 40:82; 44:56, 61
– See also Hartford, Connecticut Conscription (draft), see Army “Consecration Dell,” see Mount Auburn Cemetery Conservatism, see Politics “Conspiracy theory,” see History Conspirators Act (1779), 16:78. See also Law(s); Loyalists Constantius Fund (Harvard), 12:34. See also Sophocles, Prof. Evangelinus Apostolides Constellation, U.S.S. (frigate), 6:7 “Constellation Class” (1860s), 16:19 Constitution, U.S., 32:105
– Connecticut constitution and, 32:64
– delegation of powers by, 17:16, 17
– Eighteenth Amendment to, see Wine and spirits (and temperance movement)
– framing of (Constitutional Convention, Philadelphia, 1787), 3:60-61; 10:159; 15:43; 28:17; 33:72; 37:25; 43:87
– Massachusetts adopts (1788), 6:36; 7:37; 10:152, 159; 26:90, 121; 29:69
– – – and opposition to, 3:61; 15:43
– Nineteenth Amendment to, 44:148 (see also Women)
– and slavery, 28:22 Constitution, U.S.S. (“Old Ironsides”; frigate, launched 1797), 6:7; 29:26-27
– Holmes’s poem on, 33:34; 41:62, 120 Constitutions, state, see Connecticut, Colony/State of; Massachusetts Constitution Constitutional Conventions
– Massachusetts, see Massachusetts Constitutional Convention(s)
– U.S., see Constitution, U.S. Consumers’ League, 11:86 Contentment plantation, 21:32. See also Dedham, Massachusetts Continental Congress, see Congress, Continental Continental Hospital (1770s), 30:61. See also Hospitals; Medicine, practice of Continental Hotel, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Continental troops, see Militia “Convention Troops”
– barracks/accommodations for, 1:57; 10:51n2, 54-55, 73n1; 13:17-80; 21:94, 101, 118; 22:29, 31-32; 31:26; 32:27; 37:15
– diaries kept by members of, 11:75, 77; 16:126
– “Hessians” among, 13:17n2, 18, 19n1, 25, 31-32, 54n1, 58-67 passim
– list of, 13:16 (illus. facing); 23:15
– social life among, 13:32, 61, 66
– See also Riedesel, Mme. [Baroness] Fredericka von Converse, Edward (ferry keeper, 1630s), 9:71; 33:144 Converse, Frederick Shepherd (1871-1940; composer), 32:88; 41:99 Converse, P. L. (writer, c. 1830), 40:45 Converse family, 14:80 Cony, Sarah, see Williams, Mrs. Renel [Reuel?] Cony (silversmith), 19:40 Cook, see also Cooke Cook, Charles W. (landowner, 1890s), 38:113, 115 Cook, Charlotte Augusta Langdon, see Sibley, Mrs. John Langdon Cook, Ebenezer Washington (of New York, mid-1800s), 32:115 Cook, Mrs. Ebenezer Washington (Delphia Chad-dock), 32:115 Cook, Miss Eliza: Longfellow letter to (1852), 28:76 Cook, Frank Gaylord(1859-1948; lawyer), 2:45; 33:50, 53
– tribute to, 32:115-16 Cook, Mrs. Frank Gaylord (Alice Burr Sterling), 32:115 Cook, Dr. Frederick A. (1865-1940; physician and explorer), 33:121 Cook[e], George (landowner, 1630s), 14:33n1, 96; 15:25; 22:66, 76 (Map 1) Cook[e], Joseph (of Shepard congregation, 1630s; returns to England 1658), 5:36; 10:103; 15:25; 22:20, 61, 76 (Map 1)
– house of, see Cooke-Holyoke house
– operates ferry, 7:53; 14:33n1, 47, 96; 22:66 Cook, Joseph [Flavius Josephus] (1838-1901; lecturer), 3:28-29 Cook, John (merchant, c. 1800), 16:85, 86 Cook, John (“proprietor,” 1826), 17:48 Cook, Russell (“old resident,” 1910), 5:41 Cook, Susan (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Cook, William: house of (standing in 1940), 26:46 Cook, Zebedee (1786-1858; horticulturist), 34:79; 44:182 Cook, Widow (of “Menottemy,” 1775), 18:17n2 Cook, Professor (owned Ernest Longfellow house on Brattle St.), 21:68 Cook family, 10:115 Cooke, see also Cook Cooke, George Frederick (actor, d. 1811), 4:88 Cooke, Prof. Josiah Parsons (1827-1894; chemist), 3:33-34; 6:49; 26:21, 22; 34:44; 40:98
– character of, 6:51; 7:79
– house of (Quincy St.), 18:44 Cooke, Mrs. Josiah Parsons (Mary Huntington), 9:68-69; 18:18, 23, 44; 22:95
– life of (1911 paper on), 6:49-53 Cooke, Mary Huntington, see Cooke, Mrs. Josiah Parsons Cooke, Rev. Samuel (1709-1783): diary of (1739-83), 11:82 Cooke-Holyoke house (“Mansion”; built 1668, corner of Holyoke Pl. and Holyoke St.), 6:24; 9:32n1; 11:20n5, 30n1; 14:47 Cooking, see Food “Cooledge,” see Coolidge Cooley, Francis R. (of Hartford, Ct.; owner, 1918, of Burgoyne’s sword), 13:29n3 Coolidge, Prof. Albert Sprague (Harvard 1915), 41:34; 43:30 Coolidge, Mrs. Albert Sprague, 41:34 Coolidge, Prof. Archibald C. (1866-1928; Harvard Librarian ), 27:32, 36, 38 Coolidge, “Archie” (son of Julian L.), 43:18-19 Coolidge, Calvin (1872-1933; U.S. president 1923-28), 18:48; 33:119 Coolidge, Caroline Matilda, see Lane, Mrs. William Homer Coolidge, Charles Allerton (1858-1936; architect), 27:25; 33:33n47; 34:11, 15; 35:73, 74; 41:131 Coolidge, Mrs. Charles Allerton, 41:126, 131 Coolidge, Edward (c. 1900), 32:98 Coolidge, George (historian, 1887), 39:92n47 Coolidge, Rev. J. I. T. (Brewster Pl. resident, 1880s), 22:51; 40:145 Coolidge, Mrs. J. I. T., 22:51 Coolidge, John (Sr.) (selectman of Watertown; d. 1691), 13:84 Coolidge, John, Jr. (m. c. 1680), 8:20; 13:84; 32:98 Coolidge, Mrs. John, Jr. (Mary Wellington [Maddock], second wife), see Wellington, Mary Coolidge, John (director of Fogg Art Museum, 1950s), 35:64 Coolidge, John Templeman (m. 1831), 19:47n Coolidge, Mrs. John Templeman (Louisa Riche Tilman), 19:47n Coolidge, Joseph (son of Josiah; landowner, c. 1800), 32:97-98 Coolidge, Joseph, Jr. (Craigie Bridge incorporator, 1807), 16:39, 88 Coolidge, Mrs. Joseph (of Boston, 1811; daughter of Madam Susan Bulfinch), 3:100, 107 Coolidge, Joseph G. (in Home Guard, 1860s), 2:39 Coolidge, Joshua (landowner, c. 1812), 37:26; 44:160 Coolidge, Josiah (1787-1874; landowner), 14:65
– farm and farmhouse of, 13:84, 86; 32:96-101 passim; 37:26; 44:160-63 passim, 166, 168 (and illus. #1 following)
– – – plans of, 44:163, 168 (Maps 1 and 2 following) Coolidge, Prof. Julian Lowell (c. 1875-1954; mathematician), 43:18-19, 30
– “Lawrence Lowell, President” (1951 paper), 34:7-18
– as president of Prospect Union (c. 1915), 40:145, 146 Coolidge, Mrs. Julian Lowell (Theresa Reynolds; d. 1972), 43:15, 18 Coolidge, Nathaniel (of Watertown, 1770), 5:61 Coolidge, Rosamond, see Howe, Mrs. George Wright Coolidge, Sarah Templeman, see Howe, Mrs. [Uriah] Tracy Coolidge, Simon (landowner, 1754), 24:63n1 Coolidge, Stephen (landowner, c. 1750), 13:83; 26:50 Coolidge, Susan Bulfinch, see Lyman, Mrs. Joseph Coolidge, Miss (daughter of Rev. J. I. T.), see Deane, Mrs. Walter Coolidge (son of Prof. A. S.; architect, 1955), 43:30 Coolidge, Shepley, Bulfinch, and Abbott (architects), 35:73 Coolidge Avenue, 1:60; 13:84; 14:65; 24:64; 32:96-103 passim; 34:85; 42:112 Coolidge Bank, see Banks and trust companies Coolidge Corner (Brookline), 14:38n1 Coolidge family, 10:115; 22:75; 24:63; 32:96-103 passim; 43:18 Coolidge farm, see Coolidge, Josiah Coolidge Hill, 34:70; 35:17
– “History of” (1948 paper), 32:96-103; 43:7n1
– Shady Hill School moved to, 41:24; 42:16 Coolidge Hill Road, 25:18; 32:103; 35:18; 36:8
– architecture on, 43:160 (illus. #8 following), 163, 166 Coolidge’s tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Cooly (tavern keeper, c. 1852), 20:134. See also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Coombe, Bernard (in England, 1780s), 19:76 Coombe, Rev. (Loyalist in England, 1780s; father of Bernard), 19:64, 65, 76 Coombe, Mrs. (sister of Mrs. George Inman), 19:57, 76 “Coop,” Harvard, see Harvard Cooperative Society Cooper, George Duncan (mid-1800s), 19:46n1 Cooper, Mrs. George Duncan (Margaretta Susan Livingston), 19:46n1 Cooper, James Fenimore (1789-1851; novelist), 28:85; 40:95 Cooper, Deacon John (d. 1691), 6:19-20, 21; 7:76-77; 14:96-97; 22:20, 98
– descendants of, 5:54; 22:119 Cooper, Mrs. [Deacon) John (Anne Sparhawk), 6:20; 7:77 Cooper, John (1698-1724), 6:20 Cooper, Mrs. John (b. 1703; Lydia Prentice; later Mrs. Thomas Kidder), 6:20 Cooper, Lydia (widow of Simon; second wife of Deacon Gregory Stone; before 1636), 7:72-73, 76
– descendants of, 5:53, 54 Cooper, Lydia (daughter of above), 7:76 Cooper, Lydia Kidder, see Cooper, Mrs. Walter, Jr. Cooper, Lydia Prentice, see Cooper, Mrs. John [2d] Cooper, Mary, see Merriam, Mrs. John Cooper, Samuel (d. 1718), 6:20 Cooper, Mrs. Samuel (Hannah Hastings), 6:20 Cooper, Rev. Samuel (1725-1783; of Boston), 13:39n3, 44n3; 39:157n27 Cooper, Samuel (Boston office of, 1792),16:83 Cooper, Simon (of England, c. 1590), 7:73, 77 Cooper, Walter (1697-1751; builder), 6:20 Cooper, Mrs. Walter (Martha Goddard), 6:20 Cooper, Walter, Jr. (1729-1756), 6:20 Cooper, Mrs. Walter, Jr.(b.1726;Lydia Kidder, later Mrs. Jonathan Hill), 6:20 Cooper, Miss (at Buckingham School, 1932), 42: 130-31 Cooper family, 6:34; 10:115 Cooper-Frost-Austin house (built 1657), 14:45n1; 17:48; 25:121; 38:83, 116
– architecture of, 6:19-21; 43:39
– as Historic Landmark, 1:65; 6:17; 20:102, 127; 21:10; 27:98; 38:117; 42:41
– as “oldest” in Cambridge, 7:77; 14:97; 20:127; 22:98; 27:99; 38:111 (see also Houses, meetinghouses, etc. )
– view of (sold as postcard, 1930), 27:100 Cooper’s tavern (1777), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Cooper-Marshal, Frances, see Donovan, Mrs. James Cooperative, Harvard, see Harvard Cooperative Society “Cooperative Open Air School,” see School(s) (Shady Hill) Cope, Mrs. Oliver (Alice DeN.), 43:105
– “The Story of the Window Shop” (1974 paper), 43:97-110 Copeland, Prof. Charles Townsend (1860-1952; “Copey”), 2:42, 59, 107, 108; 27:34; 35:115, 122-24; 41:54; 42:10; 44:25 Copenhagen, Sarah (schoolgirl, 1860s), 32:36 Copithorne, Prof. Matthew R. (of MIT; Francis Ave. resident, 1926-57), 41:30 Copley, Elizabeth, see Greene, Mrs. Elizabeth Copley, John Singleton (c. 1738-1815; painter), 10:8-9n1; 19:68; 22:88; 27:14; 40,12; 41:56
– Dana portrait by, 10:159; 26:79, 80, 84, 91n57
– Loyalist portraits by, 9:61; 10:8n1, 15n4; 12:77; 17:56; 26:52 Copley Plaza Hotel (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Copley Society (Boston), 8:51 Copley Square (Boston), 26:46; 33:124; 35:62, 68; 42:49, 50 Copley Theatre (Boston), see Theatre Copper Works Point (Boston), 22:68 Copps Hill (Boston)
– British troops encamped on, 33:45
– burial ground, 10:40n4; 17:30; 28:61
– ferry and bridge to, 7:53, 54, 56; 39:109 Copyright law, see Law(s) Coquerel, A. L. C. (1795-1868; French theologian), 36:61 Corbet, see also Corbett Corbet (murder) case (1769), 40:124-25. See also Crime Corbett, see also Corbet Corbett, Anna (tavern keeper, 1849), 20:133 Corbett, Mrs. Helen (lodging house keeper, 1890), 23:79 Corbett, J. J. (politician, 1880s), 20:45 Corbett, John (athlete, 1890s), 23:79 Corcoran, Mayor John (1940s), 44:95 Corcoran, John H. (merchant), 35:88 Corey: History of Malden, 21:32, 35 Corey Hill (Brookline), 12:44; 40:25; 43:145 Corlet, Ammi Ruhamah (Harvard Fellow; d. 1679), 2:16 Corlet[t], Elijah (1610-1687/8; schoolmaster), 3:15; 35:91-93
– “Nehemiah Walter’s Elegy on” (1906 paper on), 2:13-20 Corlet[t], Mrs. Elijah (Barbary [or Barbara] Cutter), 2:16 Corlet, Hepzibah (Mrs. James Minott; later Mrs. Daniel Champney), 2:16 Corn, see Agriculture and horticulture Corne, see also Coerne Corne, Adolphus M. (New York businessman, 1840s), 8:50 Corne, Mrs. Adolphus M. (Elizabeth Sarah Dumbreck), 8:50 Corne, Fanny Elizabeth (CHS member; d. 1943), 35:18, 19
– “Mrs. Mary Isabella De Gozzaldi” (1935 paper), 23:72-75; 32:30 Corne, William Frederick (1843-1913; merchant, inventor, artist): obituary, 8:50-51 Cornell, Ezra (1807-1874; capitalist), 36:24 Cornell University, 2:79; 4:82; 35:98; 36:24, 25, 29 Corner, Andrew, 27:44n3. See also Craigie, Capt. Andrew (1703-1766) Cornhill Street (Boston), 10:188; 14:126; 19:15; 20:85, 112 Corning Glass Company (New York), 36:102 Cornish, Rev. Louis Craig (Harvard 1899), 43:29
– house of (built 1916), 43:160 (illus. #5 following), 161, 165, 167 Cornish, Mrs. Louis Craig (Frances), 43:29 Corporal punishment
– for crimes:
– – – in England, 32:50
– – – whipping, 10:67
– Dana’s view of, 26:103, 107
– at Harvard, 3:14; 32:67
– horsewhipping of editor, 20:86; 36:109
– of nonconformists, 32:111
– of persecuted Quakers, 24:70-82 passim; 32:112
– by Puritans, 32:49-50
– in schools, 3:38; 13:92, 93, 108-9; 16:119, 124; 25:92; 26:103; 30:78, 79-80; 34:37; 37:98
– of “witches,” 16:31; 32:76
– See also Execution(s); Witchcraft trials Corsy, Rev. and Mrs. R. S. (Irving St. residents, 1954-61), 41:34 Cost of living, see Expenses; Prices Cottage Farm, see Brookline, Massachusetts Cottage Farm Bridge, see Bridge(s) (Brookline Street) Cottage Street, 14:35 Cotter, Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. (Irving St. residents, 1920-59), 41:36 Cotting (contemporary of Dr. Holmes), 4:51 Cotton, Rev. John (1584-1652), 3:17; 10:98; 12:68; 16:113; 32:113; 38:94, 109; 42:102
– and Antinomian controversy, 32:73; 42:104 (see also Religion)
– of Boston, England, 14:81; 30:32; 32:110; 44:50
– and conversion issue, 40:72, 76-83
– Hooker and, 10:92, 95-101 passim; 31:61; 32:62, 63; 40:80-82; 43:113; 44:42, 51-52
– ordained in Boston (1633), 10:97; 32:73; 44:48, 50 Cotton, Mrs. John (later Mrs. Richard Mather), 32:113 Cotton, John (Harvard student, c. 1680), 11:62 Cotton, Rev. John (of Newton, 1717), 21:89 Cotton, Hon. Josiah (1680-1756): diary of, while Harvard student (c. 1700), 11:72 Cotton family, 14:80 Cotton Street, 30:74, 75. See also Hancock Street Cottrell, Adam S. (lumber merchant, mid-1800s), 38:28, 30 Coues, Elliott (1842-1899; ornithologist), 24:87; 35:13 “Couldbyes,” see Colby Coulson, Kr. (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:59 Council for New England, see Plymouth Company Counihan, Judge Edward A., Jr. (1950s), 32:120; 35:106 Counihan, Judge Edward F. (early 1900s), 17:23 Counties
– abolition of, 42:92
– establishment of, 21:22, 39:58; 42:80
– and shire towns, 17:46; 24:61; 39:58; 42:80
– – – Lancaster (Mass.) and, 1:29
– See also Court House(s) (Cambridge); Essex County (Massachusetts); Middlesex County; Norfolk County; Suffolk County (Massachusetts) “Country life” (1811) described, see Domestic and family life Country School, see School(s) Country Week fair, 44:112. See also Charity Countway Library, see Harvard Medical School County Road (to Watertown), 14:104, 105; 24:63. See also “Great Road” Court(s), the
– atheist witness in, 20:30
– and Cambridge as shire town, see Cambridge, Massachusetts
– in Concord, see Concord, Massachusetts
– contempt of (man in shirtsleeves), 32:28; 39:61
– general, see Massachusetts General Court/Legislature
– Indian, see Indians
– interpreters for, 17:25
– judicial:
– – – established (1635), 39:57
– – – “evils” of, 40:11
– jurisdiction of, over Massachusetts Bay Colony, 26:73
– and jury lists, 37:96
– Juvenile Court, 17:24
– Police Court, 17:21-22; 39:68-69
– and “Scotch verdict,” 41:64
– steam trains ruled against by, 39:93
– Third District Court (history of), 17:16-27; 39:68-69
– See also Crime; Law(s); Middlesex County Court; Witchcraft trials Court House (Boston), 41:59, 60
– slaves imprisoned in, 23:85; 37:84, 86 Court House(s) (Cambridge), 17:46; 22:71; 23:26
– church services held in, 8:36; 43:120, 124
– cost of building, 39:60, 64, 66, 69, 111
– dedication of new (Probate Court, 1900), 39:66
– first, 39:58-60
– – – burned (c. 1671), 24:82n35; 39:59
– General Court meets in, 42:82 (see also Massachusetts General Court/Legislature)
– history of (1962 paper), 39:55-70
– lectures given at, 11:31
– meetinghouse used as, 29:71- 39:57, 59
– preservation of old (1757) discussed (1922), 16:11, 133, 135
– records in, see Middlesex County
– removal of, to East Cambridge, see East Cambridge
– sites of old, 39:56-70
– – – Harvard Square or vicinity, 1:21, 64; 3:52; 8:33, 36; 13:22; 14:36, 39; 18:73; 20:117; 25:120; 29:69; 39:58, 60-62; 42:80, 83; 43:71, 85, 120
– taverns or barrooms used as, 17:20; 39:63, 69
– town meetings held in, 13:22; 39:113; 42:83
– See also Middlesex County Court of Assistants, 44:42, 45. See also Massachusetts General Court/Legislature Court Street (Boston), 3:10; 23:85; 25:91; 38:42; 41:59, 60, 79, 80; 42:10 Court Street (Cambridge), 14:68; 39:84, 86, 92; 42:9. See also Third Street Courts-martial, see Army Courtland family, 19:72 Cousen’s Coal Wharf, 39:27. See also Business and industry (shipping); Coal Cove farm, 16:33. See also Phip[p]s (later Bo[a]rdman) farm Covenant(s)
– church, see Religion
– “of grace,” 32:73 Coveney, John W. (politician, 1880s), 20:44, 45 Cow(s), see Animals “Cow Common,” see Cambridge Common “Cow Yard Lane,” 14:35; 22:61, 63-64, 65 Cowden, Colonel (1860s), 20:100 Cowen, Robert (machinist, 1870s, 1890s), 36:82, 83; 40:24, 30, 39 Cowles, J. (of Macon, Ga., 1847), 42:111-12 Cowley fathers (monastic group), 20:120 Cowperthwaite Street, 18:27 Cowpox (smallpox), see Disease Cox, Allen Howard (architect, c. 1900), 33:56, 57 Cox, Charles M. (of Melrose; newspaperman, 1930s), 36:117 Cox, George Howland (engineer, bank official, 1860s-1920s), 39:34; 41:22, 46 Cox, Henry S. (printer, publisher, 1840s), 20:84, 85 Cox, James (publisher, 1860s), 20:86 Cox, Leonard, Jr., and Company (publishers, 1840s), 20:85 Cox, Peter L. (printer, publisher, 1840s), 20:84, 85 Cox, Mr. and Mrs. Walter (1807), 9:24 Crackbone, Benjamin (1710-1767; tanner), 10:71n1; 24:58 Crackbone, Gilbert (landowner; d. 1672), 14:98; 22:76 (Map 1) Craddock, George (of Boston, 1756), 10:23, 25n4, 42 Craddock (or Cradock[e]), Gov. Mat[t]hew (1630s), 5:35; 21:20, 35; 30:33-34 Crad[d]ock (or Tufts) house and land (Medford), 6:17; 21:35; 42;70 “Cradle of Liberty,” see Faneuil Hall (Boston) Cradock[e], see Craddock Craft, Lt. Benjamin (1738-1823): diary of (1775), 11:75 Crafts, James M. (1839-1917; MIT president), 4:82 Cragbone, see Crackbone Craig, see also Craik Craig, John (actor, c. 1920), 27:38; 40:111, 112 Craigie, Capt. Andrew (1703-1766), 4:36; 27:44-47 Craigie, Mrs. [Capt.] Andrew (Elizabeth Gardner of Nantucket; “Mama” Craigie), 27:46, 50-51, 52, 56, 88 Craigie, Dr. Andrew (1754-1819), 4:36; 25:60n69; 33:9
– account book of, 12:9; 27:91
– as apothecary, 10:57-58; 14:73; 16:35; 27:47-50, 53-55 passim, 84; 29:19, 71; 37:18
– birth and early days of, 27:46-47
– and Craigie Bridge, see Bridge(s)
– and “Craigie’s Point,” 16:33, 54, 76, 88-90
– death of, 11:20; 21:103; 25:20; 27:65
– family and social life of, 9:7, 11, 16, 19-20. 26, 35, 36; 21:102-3; 27:51-52, 56-65 passim
– heirlooms of, 27:88-89
– land speculation, bridge- and road-building by, 9:28, 33; 14:56-59 passim, 73-75; 16:88-92; 22:71; 27:54-55, 61-63, 65, 75, 77, 79; 31:26, 38, 42; 32:26; 36:93; 37:18, 20
– – – and East Cambridge Court House, see East Cambridge
– and lawsuits, 14:49, 57, 74-75; 37:18
– miniature of, 25:52; 27: frontispiece, 56; 57, 86n96, 87-88
– secret letters to, 25:53-54; 27:69-85, 91; 28:88
– street (Cambridge St.) sometimes called after, 14:64 (see also Craigie Street [Cambridge])
– summerhouse (and site) of, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– unacknowledged daughter of, see Allen, Polly (or Mary)
– Vassall house owned/occupied by, see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House (105 Brattle St. )
– as warden of Christ Church, 16:35; 27:60 Craigie, Mrs. [Dr.] Andrew (1772-1841; Elizabeth [“Betsy”] Shaw), 9:7, 16, 29, 35, 65; 11:24; 14:74; 16:35-36; 27:61; 28:24, 85; 29:19; 32:26; 37:18; 43:44-45
– death of, 4:35; 25:52-57; 27:89; 28:63, 31:57; 33:19; 43:44
– – – bequests to Harvard, 25:53; 27:68; 38:83
– – – tomb, 16:36; 25:55-56 (and illus. following); 27:67
– education of, 16:88; 25:21, 27, 31, 56; 27:66, 89
– poems on, 25:51-52n47, 54n56, 58-60
– portrait of, 25:52 (illus. following); 27:88
– roominghouse of, see Vassall-Craigie-Long-fellow House (105 Brattle St.)
– secret romance of, 25:53, 54; 27:58-59, 67n60; 29:71
– social life of, 9:11, 19-20, 22, 23. 30; 21:102-3; 27:60, 63 Craigie [?], Debby (1813), 9:36 Craigie, Elizabeth (sister of Dr. Andrew), 27:46 Craigie, Elizabeth (daughter of following), see Foster, Mrs. Bossenger Craigie, Elizabeth Gardner, see Craigie, Mrs. [Capt.] Andrew Craigie, Elizabeth Shaw, see Craigie, Mrs. [Dr.] Andrew Craigie, Lt. George (of Saviskaill, 1791), 27:44n3 Craigie, John (1755-1774; brother of Dr. Andrew), 27:46, 47, 51 “Craigie,” Miriam (Mrs. Craigie’s servant), see Servants/”hired help” Craigie, Sir William A. (1940s), 27:44n3 Craigie, Wainwright & Co. (New York City), 27:55n32 Craigie (Canal) Bridge and Craigie Bridge Corporation, see Bridge(s) Craigie Brook, see Craigie Street Craigie Circle, 31:57 Craigie Estate, 31:58
– island in lake or “fishpond” (“Worcester’s Pond”) on, 20:94; 25:25, 26 (illus. facing); 26:53; 31:57, 58, 59, 60; 33:96, 98 (see also Ponds and lakes)
– plan of, 14:72; 25:20; 31:frontispiece Craigie family
– exhibition of memorabilia of (1941), 27:87-91
– paper on (1941), 27:43-36
– variations of name, 27:90 Craigie House, see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House (105 Brattle St.) Craigie Street (Cambridge), 26:14; 42:131
– architecture on, 18:33; 20:57; 26:40 (illus. #13 following), 41, 44; 31:57; 42:46; 43:31 (illus. #6, #7 following), 45, 46, 167, 168, 169
– brook (“Lost”) across, 20:94; 25:109; 31:44-60
– Cambridge St. known as, 14:64 (see also Cambridge Street)
– horse cars on, 22:52, 55, 106; 35:17; 39:84; 42:89
– laid out (1852), 31:56; 37:18
– – – Berkeley St. cut through to, 26:118
– naming of, 14:65; 32:26
– residents on, 11:8; 12:7; 18:33; 21:67; 40:96
– -Sparks-Brattle St. junction, see Brattle Street (Cambridge) Craigie Street (Somerville), 20:129 Craigie’s Hill, 31:56
– summerhouse on, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Craigie’s Mills (Maine), 27:65, 90 Craigie’s Pond, see Craigie Estate Craigie’s Road, 16:48 Craik, see also Craig Craik, Dr. James (1730-1814), 27:50, 55 Cram, Ernest R. (engineer, c. 1900), 34:116 Cram, Ralph Adams (1863-1942; architect), 32:102 Cram, Robert N. (thesis on architecture, 1922), 43:81 Cranch, Rev. Christopher (1813-1892), 11:14n2 Cranch, Hannah, see Bond, Mrs. William Cranch, John (of England, 1815), 25:78 Cranch, Joseph (of England, c. 1820), 25:79 Cranch, Mary, see Bond, Mrs. William Cranch (second wife) Cranch, Selina, see Bond, Mrs. William Cranch (first wife) Cranch, Judge William (1769-1855), 11:14; 12:21 Cranch family, 25:84 Crane, Mayor Edward A. (1914-1982), 42:64
– “Observations on Cambridge City Government under Plan E” (1977 informal talk), 44:87-103 Crane, Margaret, see Fuller, Mrs. Timothy, Jr. Crane, Maj. Peter (of Canton, c. 1800), 11:33 Crane, Thomas (committee member, 1777), 13:21, 24, 28 Crawford, F. Stuart, 37:127
– “The George G. Wright Collection” (1958 paper), 37:91-106 Crawford, Mary C. (author, 1903), 26:49n1, 57n106, 61 Crawford, Thomas (1813-1857; sculptor), 34:89, 91 “Crazy Mary,” 44:25. See also Cambridge “characters” Creation theory, see Religion Credit, see Economic conditions; Mortgages and debts Credit Union Movement, 40:35 Creek Lane, 14:34. See also Brattle Square; Eliot Street Creighton Street, 20:131 Crescent Place (Boston), 9:8 Cresson, William Penn (Dana biographer, 1930s), 16:83; 26:82-92nn42-60 passim; 33:9n9, 160 Crime
– and courts-martial, see Army
– delinquent children, see Children
– murder and murder cases, 13:11; 14:44; 21:104, 118; 35:93
– – – Corbet case (1769), 40:124
– – – Eastman-Grogan, 35:83
– – – “Murder in Cambridge” (1978 paper), 44:193
– – – Negroes executed for, 17:50-53
– – – poisoning (1899), 21:66
– – – Selfridge (1806), 9:11-12; 41:64
– – – Webster, see Webster, Dr. John White
– pickpockets, 36:107
– religious dissension as, 24:67-82 (see also Religion)
– Sabbath observance and, 16:102; 32:26
– Sacco-Vanzetti case, 34:12
– slavery seen as, 37:84 (see also Slavery)
– vandalism (at Mount Auburn Cemetery), 44:188
– See also Corporal punishment; Court(s); Fines and penalties; Jail(s); Law(s); Treason; Violence Crimean War, see War(s) Crocker, Edgar (bank official, 1890s), 41:52 Crocker, Edgar (grandson of above; bank official, 1960s), 41:52 Crocker, Emma, see Smith, Mrs. Emilius Crocker (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:34, 46, 49 Croe, John (of Billerica, 1654), 9:76 Cromwell, Henry (Boston Loyalist, 1760s), 10:44 Cromwell, Oliver (1599-1658; lord protector of England), 19:69; 26:74; 30:31; 32:65
– adherents of, 3:7; 6:21; 7:101; 14:88; 23:71; 30:32; 32:74 Cronkhite, Dean Bernice Brown (of Radcliffe, 1923-59), 41:146; 44:150, 152 (and illus. following) Cronkhite Graduate Center, 44:152 (and illus. #13 following) Crook, Gen. George (1829-1890), 17:87 Crooked Street/Lane, 3:13; 8:30; 14:34, 65. See also Holyoke Street Crosby, Dr. Dixie (of New Hampshire, 1870s), 20:109 Crosby, Simon (1608-1675; landowner), 22:78 Crosby[ie], Simon [Symon] (1637-c. 1725; of Billerica), 9:76, 77; 14:47, 98 Crosby[ie], Mrs. Simon (Rachel Brackett), 9:77 Crosby, Thomas (landowner, d. 1703), 14:98; 21:82 Crosby, Captain (1775), 18:67 Crosman, see also Crossman Crosman, Robert (joiner, of Taunton, c. 1725-45), 21:51 Cross, Prof. Charles R. (physicist at MIT, early 20th c.), 34:112, 115 Cross Canal, see Canal(s) Cross Street, 30:73. See also Hancock Street Crossman, see also Crosman Crossman, Fannie, see Kiernan, Mrs. Thomas J. Croswell, Rev. Andrew (1860s), 31:34 Croswell, Miss Anna (Ash St. resident, late 1800s), 31:33 Croswell, Prof. James Greenleaf (d. 1915), 30:85-86; 31:34 Croswell, Naomi, see Dana, Mrs. Daniel Crothers, Alice (b. c. 1860), 33:100, 108 Crothers, Alice Ames, see Crothers, Mrs. Bronson Crothers, Dr. Bronson (Francis Ave. resident, 1925-40), 32:26; 33:114; 41:30
– on “Junior Committee” (1905-06), 44:106, 108, 115, 116-17, 119 Crothers, Mrs. Bronson (Alice Ames), 41:30 Crothers, John (son of elder Samuel Crothers), 33:100, 109 Crothers, Mrs. John (Nancy Ann), 33:100-103, 105, 114
– son’s letters to, 33:109-13 Crothers, Miss Katharine F., 31:7; 44:108n2, 116
– “The Early Life of Samuel McChord Crothers” (1950 paper), 33:100-116 Crothers, Louise Bronson, see Crothers, Mrs. Samuel McChord Crothers, Miss Margery (b. c. 1880), 31:19, 20; 41:30; 44:108n2 Crothers, Samuel (grandfather of Samuel McChord Crothers), 33:100, 109 Crothers, Rev. Samuel McChord (1857-1927), 2:29; 7:88; 30:13-20 passim; 31:65; 32:26; 40:145; 41:142
– address of, on Dr. Holmes (1909), 4:63-68
– early life of (1950 paper on), 33:100-116
– house of, 28:105; 30:9
– and Junior Committee of First Parish, 44:108-20 passim
– papers by:
– – – “Archibald Murray Howe” (1917), 12:23-24
– – – “The Citizen and Neighbor” (1911, on Col. Higginson), 7:22-26; 20:29 Crothers, Mrs. Samuel McChord (Louise Bronson), 22:96; 33:111, 113-14; 41:30; 44:108, 113-18 passim
– Eliot letter to, 33:116
– “Reminiscences of Cambridge” by (paper read by daughter Katherine, 1945), 31:7-21; 44:108n2 Crowninshield, Benjamin W. (1772-1851; merchant), 41:56 Crowninshield, Benjamin W. (Harvard 1858; organizes Glee Club), 32:87; 41:93 Crowninshield, Francis B. (Boston home of, 1850), 41:60 Crowninshield, Frederic[k] (1845-1918; artist), 34:72-73 Crowninshield family (Salem), 44:133 Cruikshank, George (1792-1878; British illustrator), 28:72, 73, 81, 87 Crum, Miss (teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1870s), 32:40 Cuba (Vassall family slave), see Vassall family Cuban students at Harvard (c. 1900), 31:12-13 Cudworth, Capt. James (1659/60), 24:78n29 Cudworth, Mrs. (Quaker, 1659), 24:78n26 Culpepper, Frances Edna, see Livingston, Mrs. Albert Henry Cultural societies, see Club(s); Society(ies) (organizations) Cummin, Hazel (writer, 1928), 43:171 Cummings, Abbott Lowell (antiquarian, 1950s, 1960s), 37:128, 129; 44:37
– “Identifying the 17th Century House” (1961 paper mentioned, not quoted), 39:167 Cummings, Charles A. (1833-1905; architect), 26:46 Cummings, Prof. Edward E. (Irving St. resident, 1890s), 40:145; 41:35; 42:25 Cummings, Mrs. Edward E. (Rebecca Ware), 41:35; 42:25 cummings, e. e. (1894-1962; poet), 35:107; 41:35; 42:24, 27 Cummings, Jacob (bookseller, 1812), 44:77 Cummings, Miss Jane (Irving St. resident, 1890s), 41:35 Cummings, Prentiss (historian, 1894), 39:80n7 Cummings, R. O. (thesis, 1935), 28:31n9 Cummings, Thomas Harrison (1925 address quoted), 15:11; 43:78 Cummings (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:35, 42, 43, 52 Cummings & Hilliard (booksellers/publishers, 1812), 44:77. See also Hilliard, Deacon William Cummington, Massachusetts, 25:68 Cuneo Press, 44:82. See also Printers Cunningham, Andrew (of Boston, late 1700s), 19:78 Cunningham, Mrs. Andrew (Polly Lewis), 19:78 Cunningham, Edward Linzee (of Boston; Harvard 1829), 12:16, 19 Cunningham, George Inman (d. 1865), 19:46n1 Cunningham, Mrs. George Inman (Mary Bradley Winchester), 19:46n1 Cunningham, Hilda: greenhouse built for (c. 1910[?]), 43:167 Cunningham, Joseph Lewis (early 1800s), 19:46n1, 78 Cunningham, Mrs. Joseph Lewis (Sarah Inman Linzee, first wife; d. 1825), 19:78 Cunningham, Mrs. Joseph Lewis (Mary Ann Riche Inman, second wife), see Inman, Mary Ann Riché Cunningham, Mary Bradley Winchester, see Cunningham, Mrs. George Inman Cunningham, Mary Winchester (daughter of above), see Barnard, Mrs. Joseph Tilden Cunningham, Phebe (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:66 Curfew, see Society (people) Curley, Mayor [of Boston] James Michael (1874-1958), 44:94 Currency and currency depreciation, see Money Currier, J. J. (historian), 10:57n2 Currier, Dr. J. W. (of Lexington, 1870s), 20:109 Currier, T. Franklin (Harvard Librarian, c. 1915), 35:60 Currier House (Radcliffe), 44:153 Curry, John J. (city manager, 1952-66), 39:74; 41:11; 44:97-98, 99, 101, 102 Curtis, Judge Benjamin Robbins (1809-1874), 12:14, 17; 23:84; 41:124; 43:54 Curtis, Francis Gardner (early 1900s), 19:46n1 Curtis, Mrs. Francis Gardner (Mary Winchester Barnard), 19:46n1 Curtis, George Ticknor (1812-1894; lawyer), 10:138; 23:58 Curtis, Mrs. George Ticknor (Mary Story), 23:58 Curtis, George William (1824-1892; author, orator), 7:19; 14:27; 17:61; 21:124; 28:96; 33:117; 41:98
– on Craigie House, 25:22n1, 31n18, 54n55; 27:61n47
– and political reform, 20:27, 34, 36, 46 Curtis, Mrs. Greely (Fanny [Susan] Hooper, b. 1877), 43:15 Curtis, Joseph H. (landscape engineer, 1902), 43:16 Curtis, Thomas (businessman, 1814), 16:94 Curtis, Thomas B. (landowner, 1846), 23:24 Curtis, Wenlock (of Philadelphia, c. 1700), 24:81 Curtis, Mrs. Wenlock (Elizabeth Bowers), 24:80, 81 Curtis, William (London botanist, 1730s), 43:128, 136 Curtis, Miss (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1810), 9:33 Curtis family, 10:75 Curtis Davis Soap Factory (1880), 40:24 Curtis Publishing Company (Philadelphia), 44:81 Cushing, Caleb (1800-1879; statesman), 6:15 Cushing, E. L. (in Book Club, 1831), 25:110 Cushing, Rev. Jacob (1730-1809; at Westham), 16:98 Cushing, Judge John (mid-1700s), 17:52 Cushing, Josiah S. (publisher, 1870s), 20:86 Cushing, Miss Kate Wendell (teacher, c. 1900), 35:111, 113, 114 Cushing, Luther S. (court historian, 1862), 38:32n13 Cushing, Nathan (Harvard Overseer, late 1700s), 13:39n3 Cushing, Polly (at Princeton, Mass., 1798), 11:38 Cushing, Thomas (1725-1788; Council member), 9:39n4; 13:20, 39n3, 46, 51; 30:58; 33:71; 39:157n27 Cushing, Thomas (Harvard 1834; educator), 34:20 Cushing, Judge (1780), 3:67, 74 Cushing, Mrs. Judge, 26:93n62 Cushing, Rev. (of Waltham, 1792), 3:111 Cushing, Mr. (Princeton, Mass., 1798), 11:37 Cushing, Mr. (tutor, 1832), 28:112 Cushman, Charles F. (businessman, c. 1910), 40:34; 41:31 Cushman, Mrs. Charles F. (Sally Adams), 41:18, 31, 37 Cushman, Charlotte Saunders (1816-1876; actress), 33:154; 34:91 Cushman, Edith (schoolgirl, 1890s), 34:64 Cushman, Robert A. (CPA, 1960s), 40:34; 41:37; 42:27, 28 Cushman, Mrs. Robert A. (Esther Lanman), 41:26, 37
– “Where the Old Professors Lived” (1970 paper), 42:14-30; 43:7n1 Cuspidors and cuspidor mats, 40:35-36. See also Tobacco, use of Custis, Martha (“Patsy”), see Washington, Mrs. George Customs, see Manners; Society (people) Customs Commissioners (Boston, c. 1770), 20:117; 39:152, 155, 156, 162; 40:125 Customs duties, see Taxation/taxes (tariff) Customs houses, 39:111
– Boston, 20:38
– Salem, 25:68 Cutler, Anna C., see Woodman, Mrs. Walter (second wife) Cutler, Miss Annie (Kirkland Pl. resident, 1903), 23:79 Cutler, Ben (of Boston, 1780s), 19:68 Cutler, Rev. Curtis (Harvard 1829), 12:15; 37:35 Cutler, Capt. Ebenezer (1700-1777), 10:31n1 Cutler, Mrs. Ebenezer (Anna Whitney), 10:31, 32, 39 Cutler, Prof. Elbridge L. (1870), 14:7; 36:27 Cutler, George H. (Sunday School superintendent, early 20th c.), 20:78 Cutler, Isaac (builder, mid-1800s), 23:79, 81; 41:17n2 Cutler, James (1606-1694; settler): descendants of, 5:53 Cutler, John, “Jr.” (1663-1714; in fish weir case), 5:41 Cutler, John (Freemason, officiates at Washington’s funeral, 1799), 15:27 Cutler, Rev. Manasseh (1742-1823; botanist), 38:78-79; 43:137 Cutler, Miriam, see Foster, Mrs. Joseph (first wife) Cutler, Sarah (d. 1805), see Hill, Mrs. Samuel Cutler, Miss Sarah (Kirkland Pl. resident, 1903), 23:79 Cutter, Barbary (or Barbara), see Corlet[t], Mrs. Elijah Cutter, Mrs. Elizabeth (d. 1662), 2:16; 14:98
– descendants of, 5:53; 19:88 Cutter, Emma Maria, see Mitchell, Mrs. John Cutter, Frederick Spaulding (1853-1935; schoolmaster), 41:133, 140; 44:13 Cutter, Judge R. Ammi (1960s), 41:52 Cutter, Mrs. R. Ammi (Plant Club, 1950s), 35:27 Cutter, Richard (c. 1611-1693; landowner), 2:16; 14:98
– descendants of, 5:52
Cutter, William (landowner, 1630s), 2:16; 14:98; 22:20, 76 (Map 1)
Cutter, William (of England, 1654), 24:78n29
Cutter family, 10:115; 22:27
Cutting, Louis W. (bank official, 1890s), 41:45
Cutting, Zechariah (c. 1710), 8:21
Cutting, Mrs. Zechariah (Elizabeth Wellington), 8:21
Cutting & Washington Company (radios), 34:122
Cutts, Miss M. Estelle (niece of Dolley Madison, 1840s), 23:58
Cutts (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:46

D

Dabney, Mr. and Mrs. (Willard family friends, 1819), 11:20
Dabney family, 22:51
Daguerre, Louis (1789-1851; inventor of photographic process), 33:18
Daguerreotypes, see Photography
Dahl, see also Dall
Dahl, Mrs. Norman (president of Window Shop, mid-20th c.), 43:105
Dailey, see also Daly
Dailey, Gertrude Winship, see Sortwell, Mrs. Alvin Foye
Dailey, William (1870s), 5:108
Dailey, Mrs. William (Mary E.), 5:108
Dakin, Anna Felton (archivist, 1930s), 38:50n53; 42:111
Dakin & Metcalf (printers, c. 1820), 15:19
Dall, see also Dahl
Dall, William H. (1845-1927; naturalist), 2:83
Dallas, Alexander James (1759-1817; lawyer, statesman), 10:178
Dallas, Sophia, see Irwin, Mrs. William W.
Dallin, Cyrus E. (sculptor, 1920s), 35:102
Dallinger, Judge Frederick W. (1950s), 17:10; 20:75; 35:107
Dallinger, John (anti-slavery worker, c. 1840), 20:68, 70, 71
Dallinger, William W. (CHS member, d. 1924), 1:67; 3:56; 38:129
Dalton, Charles H. (of Boston, 1891), 24:31
Dalton, James (of Boston, mid-1700s), 17:51
Dalton divorce case: Dana argues in, 10:153, 165
Daly, see also Dailey
Daly, Mayor Augustine J. (c. 1900), 1:31, 32; 17:23; 41:135
Daly, John (Harvard 1903; son of Mayor Augustine J.), 41:135
Dame, L. L. (historian, c. 1835), 40:45
“Dame” schools, see School(s)
Damon, George L. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:41
Damon, Theron J. (of American Antiquarian Society, 1940s), 27:86n96
Damon Safe & Iron Works, 41:41
Dams and dikes, 16:33, 42, 46; 22:66, 73, 76; 35:81; 39:29-30, 34, 35, 108, 128
– Billerica dam, and Sudbury meadows, 40:55, 58
– Boston mill dam, 16:114
– for flood control, 39:37
– “Great Dam,” 16:76, 77
– Mill Dam and Mill Dam Corporation, 7:61, 65; 39:29
– Prison Point Dam and Corporation, 7:61; 16:90
– for water storage, 40:58; 41:9, 10
– See also Charles River (as tide water); Charles River Dam; Floods and flooding; Water supply Dana, Abiah (b. 1656; son of 1st Richard), 26:75 Dana, Allston (1905), 44:114 Dana, Benjamin (b. 1660; son of 1st Richard), 5:21n1, 22, 29-30; 26:75, 77, 78
– son and daughter-in-law of, 26:78 Dana, Capt. Caleb (on meetinghouse committees c. 1750; d. 1769), 24:58, 59 Dana, Charles Anderson (1819-1897; New York editor), 26:76, 77 Dana, Dr. Charles Loomis (1852-1935), 26:77 Dana, [Ruth] Charlotte (d. 1822), see Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [Sr.] Dana, [Ruth] Charlotte (1814-1901; daughter of above), 21:103; 26:117; 29:62; 31:57-58; 33:10n13, 11 Dana, [Ruth] Charlotte (d. 1903), see Lyman, Mrs. Francis Ogden Dana, Daniel (1664-1749 [or 1751]; son of 1st Richard), 5:22; 21:86; 24:58; 26:75, 77-78, 121, 123 Dana, Mrs. Daniel (Naomi Croswell), 21:86; 26:78, 123 Dana, Daniel, Jr. (on meetinghouse committee, 1748), 24:58 Dana, Rev. Edmund (son of 2d Richard; d. 1823), 3:57-58, 63-64; 11:32n; 26:83, 95n64; 33:9, 10
– given incorrectly for Francis, 14:65 Dana, Hon. Mrs. Edmund (Helen Kinnaird), 3:57-58, 63-64; 26:83, 95n64 Dana, Edmund Trowbridge (1779-1859; brother of 1st Richard Henry), 11:18, 27, 28, 29; 29:13, 14n2, 39n22, 65
– expelled from Harvard, 26:95, 105
– residences and property of, 11:32n; 14:45, 55, 67; 18:27, 40n2; 21:85; 26:98-99 Dana, Edward (of England, c. 1620; brother of 1st Richard), 26:65-66 Dana, Edward [?], see Dana, “Little Ned” Dana, Prof. Edward Salisbury (1849-1935; at Yale), 26:76 Dana, Elizabeth Ellery, see Dana, Mrs. [Chief Justice] Francis Dana, Miss Elizabeth Ellery (1789-1874; “Betsey”; daughter of above), 9:65; 11:18n2, 23-24, 32n; 21:85; 26:96; 27:64, 67n60; 33:9, 10, 11 Dana, Miss Elizabeth Ellery (1846-1939; “Lily”; sister of Richard Henry 3d), 3:96; 10:159; 11:32n; 17:63, 74; 20:60n1; 21:82, 83, 85; 22:72; 26:80n39, 91n57, 120; 32:101
– The Dana Family in America, 26:66n2, 68n10, 73n23, 24, 77, 122n105
– diary of (1868), 17:71-73, 79
– papers by:
– – – “Lieutenant James Dana at the Battle of Bunker Hill” (1910), 5:21-32
– – – “The Vassall House” (1931), 21:83-86; 33:159 Dana, Elizabeth Whittemore, see Dana, Mrs. [Lt.] James Dana, Chief Justice Francis (1743-1811), 10:51n3, 165; 11:43; 25:115
– as ambassador, 3:59-60, 61, 76; 5:29; 10:143, 159; 11:82; 16:14, 16; 21:85; 25:119; 26:82-93 passim, 115, 121; 33:160
– arrests man for appearing in court without a coat, 32:28; 39:61
– biographical sketches of, 3:57-63; 26:83-95
– and Continental Congress, 3:58, 60; 10:143, 159; 25:119; 26:84-86, 121
– and Craigie petition, 14:75
– erroneous reference to (as “Edmund”), 14:65
– family of, 11:11n1, 21n4, 22n4; 17:43; 20:61; 26:77, 79; 27:64
– grandson’s description of, 26:94-95
– journals of foreign travels of, 11:82
– portrait of, 10:159
– property owned by, 14:44, 55, 60; 16:39, 48, 82, 83; 29:68; 33:9; 35:81 (see also Dana houses)
– R. H. Dana paper on (1908), 3:56-78
– in slavery case, 40:133
– as Supreme Court Justice, 3:56, 60, 61, 62; 25:119; 26:91
– and West Boston Bridge, 7:58, 59; 16:39, 83; 35:80 Dana, Mrs. (Chief Justice) Francis (Elizabeth Ellery), 3:57, 66, 69; 21:85; 26:79, 91, 93n63
– street named for, 14:65; 26:95n64 Dana, Francis, Jr., 11:11n1, 21n4; 17:43; 20:61; 43:74 Dana, Mrs. Francis, Jr. (Sophia Willard, 1775-1840), 9:65; 11:11n1, 21n4; 17:43; 20:61 Dana, Dr. Francis (1806-1872; grandson of Chief Justice), 2:29, 32; 20:61, 62; 26:106n78; 30:15. See also Dana houses Dana, Mrs. (Dr.) Francis (Isabella Hazen White), 20:61, 62 Dana, George Francis (landowner; d. 1822), 43:144 Dana, Lt.-Col. George Hazen (b. 1837), 20:61-62 Dana, Mrs. George Hazen (Frances Matson Burke), 20:61 Dana, “Hariot” (daughter of Rev. Edmund), 3:64 Dana, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1881-1950; writer, lecturer), 25:107, 108, 112; 29:23n28; 31:31n11, 57; 33:9nn6, 8, 33n48, 34n49; 34:25; 41:40
– minute on death of, 33:160-61
– papers by, 25:20n1, 53nn52, 53; 29:35nn2, 3; 33:161; 43:149-50
– – – “Allston at Harvard” (1943), 29:13-33
– – – “Allston in Cambridgeport” (1943), 29:34-67; 33:14nl9
– – – “The Chronicle of the Craigie House” (1930, not read), 22:8
– – – “Chronicles of the Craigie House: The Coming of Longfellow” (1938), 25:19-60; 27:61n47, 64n54, 67n60, 86-87n96
– – – “The Dana-Palmer House” (1946; revised, 1949), 33:7-36
– – – “The Dana Saga” (1940), 26:63-123; 33:10n14
– – – “Longfellow and Dickens” (1942), 28:55-104
– remarks by:
– – – on Craigie exhibition (1941), 27:87-91
– – – on Rev. Samuel Longfellow (1919), 14:113 Dana, Miss Isabella (b. 1847), 20:61, 62 Dana, Jacob (1655-1698; son of 1st Richard), 5:22; 26:75, 77 Dana, Rev. James (1735-1812; son of Caleb), 26:76 Dana, Lt. [later Gen.] James (1735-1817; son of Jedidiah)
– at Battle of Bunker Hill (1910 paper on), 5:21-32 Dana, Mrs. James (Elizabeth Whittemore), 5:25 Dana, Gen. James (lawyer): and Harvard Branch Railroad (1850s), 38:29-34 passim, 38n32, 39, 44, 47 Dana, Prof. James Dwight (1813-1895; geologist), 17:30; 26:76 Dana, James Freeman (1793-1827; chemist), 17:30, 32; 26:76 Dana, Jedediah (1708-1787), 5:21n1 Dana, John (b. c. 1650; son of 1st Richard), 26:75 Dana, John Cotton (1856-1929; librarian), 26:77 Dana, Rev. John Jay (compiles memoirs, 1865), 26:75n29 Dana, Joseph (1656-1700; son of 1st Richard), 26:75 Dana, Rev. Joseph (1742-1827), 10:105; 25:103; 26:76 Dana, “Lily,” see Dana, Miss Elizabeth Ellery (1846-1939) Dana, Lucy, see White, Mrs. Jonas Dana, Martha Remington, see Allston, Mrs. Washington (second wife) Dana, Mary Elizabeth (1805-1886; granddaughter of Chief Justice Francis), 11:21n4 Dana, Mary Green (1717-1763): tomb of, 26:93n63 Dana, Mary Rosamond, see Wild, Mrs. Henry Fearing Dana, Gen. Napoleon Jackson Tecumseh (1822-1905), 20:61; 26:77 Dana, “Little Ned” (younger brother of Richard Henry, Jr., mentioned in 1823), 33:11 Dana, Peter (b. 1916; great-grandson of R. H., Jr.), 26:106n79 Dana, Richard (1617-1690)
– descendants of, 5:21, 54; 21:86; 26:63, 68, 77-123
– early life of, 26:63-67, 100, 120-21
– settles in Cambridge, 5:21; 14:102; 21:86; 26:63-77, 123; 33:160
– See also Dana houses Dana, Mrs. Richard (Anne Bullard), 26:74, 77, 123 Dana, Judge Richard (1700-1772), 3:56-57; 26:77, 101, 115, 121, 123; 30:55; 33:160
– biographical sketch of, 26:78-83
– portrait of, 10:159; 26:79, 80, 84, 91n57
– property owned by, 22:68, 75 Dana, Mrs. [Judge] Richard (Lydia Trowbridge), 2:56; 26:93n63, 123; 33:9 Dana, Richard Henry [Sr.] (1787-1879; poet and editor), 1:70; 2:39, 62; 3:45, 63; 11:27, 29; 26:77, 93n63, 104-11 passim, 115, 117, 123; 33:9-10, 13, 33, 35, 160; 35:83
– and Allston, 29:45n48, 46n50, 47, 52n73, 65, 66
– biographical sketch of, 26:95-101
– childhood of, described, 26:102-5 passim
– Dickens and, 28:63-64, 75, 90, 91
– as editor of North American Review, 10:159; 33:11
– Ellery letter to, 26:79n38, 91n58
– expelled from Harvard, 26:95
– poetry of, 2:24; 11:22n4, 23; 25:29n24; 26:96-99, 110, 121; 33:12, 30
– portrait and photograph of, 10:159; 26:100
– quoted, 26:111; 28:63-64; 29:13-14, 63; 33:11
– residences of, see Dana houses Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [Sr.] ([Ruth] Charlotte Smith), 9:66; 21:85; 26:105n75, 123
– death of (1822), 11:32n; 21:86; 26:102; 33:10 Dana, Richard Henry [Jr.] (1815-1882; author, lawyer), 3:65; 15:21; 24:86; 26:117, 123; 29:43n41; 33:11
– Adams biography of, see Adams, Charles Francis, Jr.
– biographical sketches of, 26:101-17, 121; 33:13
– birthplace of, see Dana houses (#9)
– exhibit (1915) of books and other writings by, 10:162-65
– as Harvard Overseer, 36:27
– journal of, see Diaries and journals
– letters of, 26:90n55, 108-11 passim, 115-16nn94-98 passim; 29:39n22
– notes of, to Wheaton’s International Law, 10:155, 165; 26:117
– papers about (1915):
– – – “As an Antislavery Leader” (Storey), 10:135-42
– – – “As a Lawyer and a Citizen” (Choate), 10:142-58
– – – “As a Man of Letters” (Perry), 10:127-32
– – – remarks by Bishop Lawrence, 10:123-26, 132-33, 142, 158
– portraits, photographs, papers, etc., of or concerning, 10:123 (illus. facing), 160-62
– quoted, 2:127; 7:31-32; 10:127-32 passim; 26:81n40, 90, 94-95, 100-16 passim; 28:52; 29:39n22, 45, 57, 63-66 passim; 32:27
– residences of, see Dana houses
– schooling of, 5:25n2; 17:59
– Seaman’s Friend, 10:143, 164; 26:112
– and slavery issue, 10:132-42, 147-51, 155, 165; 23:84, 85; 26:104, 107, 113-15, 121; 33:23; 37:84, 86
– To Cuba and Back, 10:130, 165
– Two Years Before the Mast, 7:28; 10:126, 127, 143, 145, 154; 11:32n, 55; 12:27-28; 20:60; 21:58, 124; 26:66n3, 77, 90, 101, 109-12, 116, 117, 120; 29:56; 33:13, 23, 160; 35:83; 42:113
– – – editions of, 10:162-64; 26:111-12
– – – quoted, 28:52; 38:85 Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [Jr.] (Sarah Watson), 10:165; 26:108-9, 111, 118, 120, 123 Dana, Richard Henry [3d] (1851-1931; reformer), 6:28, 72; 17:72; 20:5; 26:93-94n63, 101, 123; 32:101; 41:41, 124
– addresses, papers, and remarks by:
– – – Agassiz 100th anniversary (1907), 2:75-76
– – – Cambridge 275th anniversary (1905), 1:25-27
– – – on election as CHS president (1914), 9:60-61
– – – on Everett’s inauguration, 2:127
– – – “Francis Dana” (1908), 3:56-78
– – – “General Peleg Wadsworth” (1908), 3:37-39
– – – on Prof. William H. Goodwin (1907), 2:115-17
– – – on Col. Higginson (1911), 7:5-8, 10-11, 22
– – – at Holmes Centenary (1909), 4:39-40
– – – “Journals of Travels in England, in 1875-1876” (1914, mentioned), 9:37, 49
– – – on Judge Story (1912), 7:31-32
– – – on Tudor house paper (1908), 3:99-100
– biographical sketch of, 26:117-20, 121-22
– and Boat Club, 31:32; 39:127, 128
– as CHS founder and benefactor, 3:96; 25:46n39; 32:116
– – – purchases Vassall portraits, 10:8n1
– as editor of father’s speeches, 33:13n17
– and music, 32:87, 89
– and political reform, 7:72; 11:56; 20:44, 46; 22:25; 33:160
– weds Edith Longfellow, 11:55; 26:111, 120; 30:23 Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [3d] (Edith Longfellow), 4:40; 26:123; 30:23; 33:160; 42:124
– biographical sketch of (Gozzaldi paper, 1916), 11:53-56
– as child, 26:119-20; 28:88, 89, 97
– coasting with children, 7:22
– and Female Humane Society, 9:69, 70
– – – gives paper on (1914), 9:62-70; 18:18n1
– as Sunday School teacher, 11:55; 30:14; 34:67 Dana, Richard Henry 4th, 26:123 Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [4th] (Ethel Nathalie Smith), 26:123 Dana, Richard Henry [5th] (b. 1912; publisher), 26:80n39, 123 Dana, Robert (of England; 1571-1644), 14:102; 26:64-66, 67, 123 Dana, Mrs. Robert (Elizabeth Barlow[e]), 14:102; 26:123 Dana, Rosamond, see Wild, Mrs. Henry Fearing Dana, Ruth, see Dana, [Ruth] Charlotte Dana, Samuel (b. c. 1650; son of 1st Richard), 26:75 Dana, Samuel F. (geologist, 1818), 17:30, 32 Dana, Samuel Luther (1795-1868; chemist), 11:16, 27n1; 25:97; 26:76 Dana, Mrs. Samuel Luther ([Ann] Theodora Willard, first wife; d. 1828), see Willard, [Ann] Theodora Dana, Mrs. Samuel Luther (Augusta Willard, second wife), 11:27, 30 Dana, Samuel Whittelsey (1760-1830; of Connecticut), 26:76 Dana, Sarah Ann (1791-1866), 9:65; 11:18, 23-24, 32n; 21:85; 26:96; 27:64, 67n60; 33:9-10, 11 Dana, Sarah Watson, see Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [Jr.] Dana, Sophia Willard (1775-1840), see Dana, Mrs. Francis, Jr. Dana, Sophia Willard (daughter of above), see Ripley, Mrs. George Dana, Col. Stephen (1740-1822), 26:77 Dana, Susan (infant, d. 1822), 21:85, 86, 103; 26:102; 33:10 Dana, Thomas (1694-1752; innkeeper until 1735), 8:33; 24:58 Dana, Thomas, Jr. (1723-1817; signs meetinghouse petition, 1748), 24:58 Dana, William (1745-1809; at Valley Forge, 1777-78), 5:30 Dana, William D. (charts Dana family, 1881), 26:75n30 Dana, William Parsons (1833-1927; artist), 26:77 Dana, Miss (“fancy goods” shop of, 1840s), 8:38 Dana Brook, 26:71 Dana Collection (of paintings), 29:52-53nn74-79 passim Dana family, 1:67; 10:115; 11:20; 13:84; 22:27
– in America (1940 genealogy), 26:66n2, 73n23, 77, 122n105
– coat of arms of, 26:80n39, 91
– as Daunay or D’Aunay, 26:64-65, 123
– estate of, 22:67, 72; 26:92; 30:75
– – – plan of, 14:72
– at Harvard, 26:78; 33:160
– houses of, see Dana houses
– portraits of, see Paintings
– “Saga of” (1940 paper), 26:63-123
– streets named for, 14:62, 65, 67; 26:95n64 (see also Dana Street)
– tombs of, see Tomb(s) and tombstone(s) Dana Hill, 18:27, 22:66, 68; 23:25; 33:15; 39:110, 114
– architecture on, 26:38; 42:36
– F. Dana house on, see Dana houses (#8)
– fortifications on, 43:141-42
– naming of, 5:29
– residents on, 32:89; 34:99; 36:95
– as Ward 4, 44:90 Dana houses, 26:69, 70 (map showing locations of)
– #1-#3 Richard [1st] (Bow St.; “Pines”; Roxbury Path), 26:69, 72
– #4 Richard [1st] (“Dana Homestead,” Roxbury Path), 26:73, 77
– #5 Benjamin and Stephen (near Great Oak), 26:77
– #6 Daniel (Roxbury Path), 13:22; 26:77
– #7 Judge Francis (“Trowbridge house,” Mount Auburn and Dunster), 11:32n; 21:85; 26:91
– #8 Judge Francis (Dana Hill, built 1785), 1:19, 56; 3:62; 7:59; 11:32n; 25:118; 26:91, 95, 121; 33:9; 35:81
– – – burns (1839), 10:159; 26:94; 43:44
– – – Fuller family in, 11:33; 26:94; 28:11, 23
– #9 Richard Henry [Sr.] (Green St., “Cambridgeport,” birthplace of R. H. [Jr.]), 11:32n; 16:95; 26:99, 101-2, 120; 35:83
– #10 Richard Henry [Sr. and Jr.] (“Dana-Palmer” house, 11 Quincy St., built 1823), 11:24n1; 18:27, 36n2, 41-42; 26:102-4; 29:35; 32:119; 33:7n1, 10-36, 55
– – – architecture of, see Architecture, styles of (Greek Revival)
– – – built (by Dr. Thomas Foster), 11:32n; 20:60; 21:86, 104; 33:10
– – – as first house on Quincy St., 18:27, 42n1
– – – as Harvard Observatory, 18:42n1; 25:79; 33:15-19, 21, 25, 29-30, 35
– – – moving of, 32:119; 33:25, 33-36
– – – purchased by Harvard (1835), 33:14, 15
– #11 Richard Henry [Sr.] and Dr. Francis (“Bates-Dana” house, Brattle and Church, built c. 1817; torn down, 1927), 11:32n; 20:60-62; 26:105; 33:14
– #12 Richard Henry [3d] (Allston house, Auburn and Magazine), 26:118 (see also Allston, Washington)
– #13 Richard Henry [Jr.] (on part of old Vassall estate, Phillips and Berkeley Sts.; built c. 1850), 11:55; 20:99; 21:58; 25:116, 121; 26:118-19
– #14 Mrs. Richard Henry [Jr.] (152 Brattle; built 1887), 21:7; 23:16; 26:120
– #15 Richard Henry [3d] (113 Brattle, built C. 1887), 6:42; 9:70; 11:56; 20:5; 26:120; 42:129
– #16 Elizabeth Ellery (15 Appian Way), 26:120
– others:
– – – Judge Francis (Clark St.), 35:83
– – – Richard Henry [Sr.] (Broadway and Columbia St. ), 11:32n; 26:102
– – – Richard Henry [Sr.] (Vassall house), see Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall)
– – – Richard Henry [Sr.] (“Wigglesworth house,” now Boylston Hall), see Wigglesworth house
– – – Richard Henry [Sr. and Jr.] (Boston, c. 1835), 11:32n; 21:59
– – – Richard Henry [Jr.] (Beacon Hill, Boston, 1843), 29:63
– – – “Mr. Dana, of savings bank” (Follen St., c. 1840), 20:97 “Dana Library,” 26:98. See also Cambridge Public Library “Dana Park,” 26:99 “Dana Point” (California), 26:106n79 Dana Spa, 34:19 Dana Street, 34:30, 99; 43:141, 142
– architecture on, 26:40 (illus. #3 following )
– as “boundary,” 16:46, 86; 22:62, 66; 25:132; 35:79; 36:114; 42:83
– F. Dana house on, see Dana houses (#8)
– as “Highway to Common Pales,” 14:35; 22:62
– houses between West Boston Bridge and (1793), 7:59; 25:115, 118
– as “last of Old Cambridge” (1951), 34:19
– naming of, 5:29; 16:62, 65; 26:94n63, 95n64; 33:15
– Quincy St. known as, 14:67; 18:27; 33:14-15
– school established (1845), 22:21
– street railway/subway to, 20:54; 32:89; 39:86, 101 Dana’s Landing, 26:69, 72 Dana-Palmer house, see Dana houses (#10) Dancing, 23:53; 27:61
– balls and cotillions, 9:16, 18, 19, 23; 23:57; 27:57, 58, 63; 28:23, 27; 32:39-40
– – – of “Convention Troops,” 13:66
– – – in England, 32:15, 17-18
– – – at Harvard, 11:17, 23, 28
– – – among Loyalists, 17:56; 19:49; 26:57
– – – misbehavior at, 9:22
– – – at Papanti’s, 25:37; 30:18
– – – in Russia (1878), 24:114, 127-33 passim
– at Boat Club, 39:131-32, 137, 140, 141
– at Brattle Hall, 30:20; 44:105
– at “coffee parties,” 44:113, 118
– and dancing schools, 11:37, 55; 18:34, 35; 25:37; 26:40; 30:18, 79-80; 35:41-42; 42:130; 43:16
– – – disapprobation of, 3:25; 10:26n1
– at Harvard inauguration, 9:12
– in public, view of and rules about, 36:48-49; 39:131-32; 41:146, 147, 151 (see also Manners)
– square dances, 39:141
– – – Virginia Reel, 44:113
– waltzing, 43:15
– See also Parties and entertainment Danckaerts, Jasper (1639-c. 1704; Dutch visitor to Harvard, 1680), 3:17; 11:62, 66 Dandridge, Martha (“Patsy”), see Washington, Mrs. George Dane, Nathan (1752-1835; statesman), 40:21n25
– and Harvard Law School, 41:121-23 Dane Hall (Harvard; old location), 1:64, 66; 7:64; 22:102; 25:37; 30:25; 31:63
– architecture of, 4:30; 41:118 (illus. #2 following), 125-26
– Law School held in, 10:150; 20:53; 25:120; 29:69; 30:16, 26; 41:124, 129-30
– Longfellow’s sketch of, 25:26 (and illus. following)
– See also Harvard Law School “Dane Law School,” see Dane Hall Dane Professorship, 34:82 Danforth, Anna, see Bridge, Mrs. Matthew Danforth, Elizabeth (d. 1680), see Belcher, Mrs. Andrew [1st] Danforth, Elizabeth (d. 1721), see Foxcroft, Mrs. Francis [1st] Danforth, Rev. John (1660-1730), 11:62; 22:65 Danforth, Capt. Jonathan (1628-1712), 9:76, 77; 21:81 Danforth, Lydia, see Beaman, Mrs. William Danforth, Mary, see Parish, Mrs. Thomas Danforth, Nicholas (selectman, tavern keeper, d. 1638), 7:53; 10:103; 14:93; 21:80, 81; 22:72; 37:30
– descendants of, 5:53 Danforth, Otis (shoe dealer, c. 1850), 15:33 Danforth, Rev. Samuel (1626-1713), 3:17; 21:81; 42:107, 108 Danforth, Judge Samuel (1696-1777), 6:23; 10:65, 85; 14:71; 24:59; 33:38; 35:93-94; 37:21; 43:71 Danforth, Gov. Thomas (1622/3-1699), 7:100-101; 9:77; 14:39, 93
– as Harvard Treasurer, 21:80; 24:76
– house of, see Foxcroft-Danforth house site
– landholdings of, 21:80-81; 22:64, 72, 73-74, 76 (Map 1)
– and Quaker persecution, 24:70, 71, 76, 79 Danforth, Mr. (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:67 Danforth, Miss (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1810), 9:20 Danforth family, 10:115; 21:80; 22:27 Danforth houses
– Judge Samuel (Dunster St.), 6:23
– Gov. Thomas, see Foxcroft-Danforth house site Danforth Street, 14:63 Daniell, Emily, see Longfellow, Mrs. William Pitt Preble Daniell, Otis (of Boston, 1870), 8:52 Daniel[l], Robert (landowner; d. 1655), 14:98; 22:76 (Map 1); 28:29 Daniels, Dan (blind newsman, Harvard Square), 42:119 Daniels, Mabel (Radcliffe 1900), 44:153 Daniels, Richard (of Billerica, 1669), 9:75 Daniels Hall (Radcliffe), 44:153 Danielson, Timothy (Council member, 1770s), 13:39n3 Danish East India Company, 39:152. See also Trade and commerce Danker[s], see Danckaerts Dante Club/Society, see Club(s) Danvers, Massachusetts, 21:40; 22:87; 25:67 DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution)
– gateway of, to Common, 33:39; 43:79, 80
– Hannah Winthrop Chapter, 3:51, 96; 6:38, 76; 17:36, 54; 23:74; 25:87; 27:99; 33:42, 158; 43:80, 143, 146 (see also History, Cambridge)
– Wyeth Chapter (Idaho), 28:36
– See also Women’s clubs/organizations Darby (Vassall family slave), see Vassall family Darley, Felix O. C. (1822-1888; illustrator), 28:87 Darley, Sir Richard (of Yorkshire, c. 1600), 22:82
– sons of (Henry and Richard), 42:101 Darling, Betty (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:60 Darling, Eugene (choirboy, 1880s), 27:33 Darling, Herbert (choirboy, 1880s), 27:33 Dartmouth, Lord (William, 2d Earl of: 1731-1801), 21:120; 37:52; 39:145n2, 157-58
– letters to (1775), 5:67n3, 69n3 Dartmouth (ship), 39:155-56 Dartmouth College, 20:109; 23:42; 34:37
– and Dartmouth Controversy (1819), 21:106
– Dr. Holmes as professor at, 6:48 Dartmouth Street (Boston), 34:72 Darwin, Charles (1809-1882; British naturalist), 3:29; 4:58; 7:20; 20:58
– Agassiz’s views of theories of, 35:44
– Darwinian revolution, 43:140 Darwin, Mrs. (Kirkland St. resident, mid-1800s), 23:77 Daughters of the American Revolution, see DAR Daunay or D’Aunay, see Dana family Davenport, A. M. (landowner, c. 1920), 34:87 Davenport, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. (Francis Ave. residents, 1890s), 41:28 Davenport, Edward A. (businessman, 1890s), 41:48-49 Davenport, Rev. John (1597-1669/70), 44:51 Davenport, John (tavern keeper, c. 1830), 20:126, 127, 129, 131 Davenport, Rufus (businessman, c. 1800), 7:59; 16:43-44, 85, 86 Davenport (Boston builder, c. 1900), 35:59 Davenport & Bridges (Watertown, c. 1860), 16:38 Davenport & Tucker (Boston commission merchants, 1800), 16:43 Davenport estate, 20:134 Davenport house, see Watson-Davenport house Davenport’s Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Davidson, see also Davison Davidson, Mr. (lectures on evolution, 1890s), 31:16 Davidson house (1935), 23:78 Davies, Godfrey (California librarian, 1930s), 43:25 Davies, Mrs. Godfrey (Prof. Peggy Dunbar), 43:25 Davis, Alexander Jackson (1803-1892; architect), 44:185n21 Davis, Amasa (quartermaster-general, 1817), 6:12 Davis, Andrew McFarland (1833-1920; lawyer, antiquarian), 21:63; 43:167
– “A Few Words about the Writings of Thomas Shepard” (1908 paper), 3:79-89; 43:125 Davis, Anna (“Nannie”), see Lodge, Mrs. Henry Cabot Davis, Asa (Boston machine shop of, 1840s), 14:127, 128 Davis, Betsy (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:59 Davis, Charles G. (c. I860; lawyer), 10:138, 148, 165 Davis, Charles H. (Harvard 1896; Reservoir St. resident, 1930s), 43:24, 167 Davis, Adm. Charles Henry (1807-1877), 7:104; 18:34, 35; 22:98; 23:24-34, 35-40 passim, 47 Davis, Mrs. Charles Henry (Harriette Blake Mills), 23:25, 26, 31, 35, 36-38, 40-41 Davis, Adm. Charles Henry, Jr. (“Harry”; d. 1921), 18:34; 23:28, 34, 35-36, 38 Davis, Comm. Charles Henry, III (1930s), 23:35 Davis, Charles Henry, IV (b. 1918), 23:35 Davis, Clara, see Abbott, Mrs. Edward (first wife) Davis, Constant Freeman (tutor, d. 1867), 18:34; 23:34-35, 38 Davis, Daniel (Boston machine shop of, 1840s), 14:125, 126, 128 Davis, Dolor (landowner; d. 1673), 14:100; 22:76 (Map 1) Davis, E. L. (writer, 1950s), 43:137n18 Davis, Evelyn (“Daisy”), see Adams, Mrs. Brooks Davis, Frank Du Pont (banker, d. c. 1880), 18t34; 23:34, 36, 38 Davis, George Thomas (of Sandwich, 1829), 12:16 Davis, Harold Stearns (of Boston, 1920s), 20:70 Davis, Prof. Harvey (of Ash St., 1880s; later head of Stevens Institute), 31:34; 40:145 Davis, Isaac P. (friend of Francis Dana, c. 1850), 3:65-66 Davis, J. Edwin (Harvard 1883; businessman), 40:24, 30 Davis, Jefferson (1808-1889; Confederate president), 10:161; 39:11 Davis, John ( 15501 ?) -1605; English navigator), 33:135 Davis, Judge John (1761-1847; Harvard Treasurer), 4:13, 14, 17, 19; 7:68; 11:23n2, 45n3; 16:81; 38:74; 44:78n26, 79 Davis, John F. (d. 1968): “The Life Story of Cambridge Water” (1967 paper), 41:7-15; 42:7; 43:8 Davis, Louisa (b. c. 1790), see Minot, Mrs. William Davis, Louisa (b. 1860; niece of above), see Luce, Mrs. John D. Henley Davis, Mary (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Davis, Mary [Sohier], see Foster, Mrs. Joseph (second wife) Davis, Mason (landowner, mid-1800s), 14:65 Davis, Philip (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:61 Davis, Philip W. (Boat Club, 1931), 39:137; 41:35 Davis, Col. P. Stearns (d. in Civil War, 1860s), 36:103 Davis, Richard (friend of Jose Glover, 1600s), 3:9 Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. (Irving St. residents, 1889-1915), 41:35 Davis, Mr. S. (Hill and Jenks family friend, c. 1810), 9:20, 27, 30, 36 Davis, Mrs. S., 9:27, 29, 36 Davis, Thomas (“Propeller”; Boston printer, 1860s), 20:86 Davis, Walter G. (on Tercentenary Committee, 1930s), 27:98; 39:85n23; 42:93; 43:150 Davis, Prof. William Morris (1850-1934; geologist), 23:43, 79; 41:28, 168 Davis, Mrs. William Morris, 23:79; 41:28 Davis, Prof. William Stearns (at U. of Minnesota, 1920s), 20:70 Davis, Miss (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:54 Davis (Whig candidate for governor, 1840), 15:37 Davis (research scientist, 1940s), 40:40 Davis family, 23:27 Davis house (No. 38 Quincy St.), see Quincy Street Davis Square (Somerville), 39:84 Davis Street (Cambridge), 14:65 Davis & Taylor (real estate firm, 1870s), 44:161, 163 Davison, see also Davidson Davison, Prof. Archibald T. (“Doc”), 32:84, 88; 41:31, 97-103 passim; 44:148-49 Davison, Mrs. Archibald T., 41:31 Davison, Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. (Irving St. residents, 1930-45), 41:34 Davison, Dr. [M.D.] and Mrs. (Francis Ave. residents, 1913-30), 41:31 Davison family, 41:18 Davol, Stephen B. (writer, c. 1900), 19:29, 30 Dawes, Thomas (Boston patriot, 1770s), 30:51 Dawes, William (1745-1799; patriot, gives 1775 alarm), 30:57; 42:82 Dawes (Harvard 1801; Commencement speaker), 11:35, 42, 52 Dawney, Edward (1535-1611; of England), 26:123. See also Dana family Dawney, Robert, see Dana, Robert Dawson, Prof, and Mrs. Alden B. (Scott St. residents, 1940s), 41:38 Day, Francis H. (of England), 23:34 Day, Mrs. Francis H. (Mary Bullard, b. 1860), 23:34 Day, Gardiner (church historian), 35:25; 42:8 Day[e], Isaac (“of London”; buys first Cambridge tavern, 1671), 37:30 Day[e], “John,” see Day[e], Stephen Day, J. Tuckerman, 43:24 Day, Mrs. J. Tuckerman (Dorothy White; d. 1934), 43:24 Day, Mary (Herbarium librarian, c. 1920), 38:83 Day[e], Matthew (1619-1649; printer; college steward), 3:12, 16-17; 15:22; 27:30; 38:88, 95, 96, 99; 44:64, 65 Day, Mrs. Munroe (Garden Ter. resident, 1940s), 33:57; 38:62 Day, Robert (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102 Day[e], Stephen (1594-1668; printer), 3:11-12, 13; 8:31; 14:101; 15:22; 25:115, 118; 27:30; 38:92-93; 44:64, 80-81
– given as “John,” 32:69, 84
– site of house, 8:31
– See also “Daye Press” Day[e], Stephen, Jr., 3:12; 27:30 Day[e] family, 3:13; 6:22; 39:15 Day house (38 Kirkland St.), 26:39, 40 (illus. #4 following) “Daye Press,” 3:6, 19
– sites Of, 1:64; 3:16-17; 30:23; 32:84, 105; 38:93; 44:64, 65
– Vermont ownership of, 3:18n1
– See also Printers Day Street, 39:15 Deacons’ Books, see Expenses (account books showing) Deaf, the: teaching of, 42:11. See also School(s) Dean, see also Deane Dean, Miss Rosamond (schoolmistress, early 20th c.), 42:133 Deane, see also Dean Deane, Charles (1813-1889; historian), 1:65; 22:48, 55; 26:25; 27:35; 28:118; 30:74, 75, 87; 41:156 Deane, Mrs. Charles, 30:75 Deane, Charles [Jr.] (b. c. 1850), 30:75 Deane, George Clement (Clement Circle named for; d. 1929), 22:48 Deane, Mary (schoolgirl, 1860s), 32:36 Deane, Ruthven (schoolboy, 1860s), 24:86, 87, 88, 93 Deane, Rev. Samuel (1733-1814; Harvard Librarian): diary of (1761-1814), 11:69 Deane, Samuel (historian, 1831), 24:78n27 Deane, Walter (schoolmaster, 1880s), 22:51; 26:33; 34:71; 35:20, 21 Deane, Mrs. Walter (daughter of Rev. J. I. T. Coolidge), 22:51 Deane family/property, 1:65; 22:48, 49, 56; 24:87; 26:25; 28:117; 30:87; 32:34; 41:156, 166, 167 “Deanery,” see Episcopal Theological School Dearborn, Gen. Henry (1751-1829; secretary of war), 11:19 Dearborn, Gen. Henry A. S. (1783-1851; president of Massachusetts Horticultural Society), 9:21; 34:78, 79, 83; 44:176-86 passim Dearing & Gooding (provision store, mid-1800s), 8:39 Death, 9:24
– in automobile accident (1915), 11:87; 33:55
– drownings:
– – – bridge and ferry accidents, 9:24; 16:38, 53-54
– – – at sea, 2:28; 9:9; 21:101; 27:31; 30:70;32:28; 33:46; 41:157
– – – swimming accidents, 8:15; 11:63-64; 26:104; 33:13
– funeral(s), 11:27, 64; 21:89-90; 23:55; 29:64-65; 31:41, 63; 32:106; 43:25
– – – of British officer (1778), 13:67-68
– – – clothing for, see Clothing
– – – expense of, 9:39n1
– – – Loyalist, 10:19, 43-44; 21:99; 30:62
– – – Masonic (of Washington), 15:27
– – – mock procession (students, 1800), 11:47-48n1
– – – prohibited on Sabbath, 16:103
– – – of slave, 10:64n3
– (see also Burying ground[s]; Tomb[s] and tombstone[s])
– inquests into, 16:25
– murder, see Crime
– new notions of, 44:177, 180-81, 187, 189, 190
– in quicksand, of man and horse, 21:112
– in road collapse, 16:56
– from smallpox and yellow fever, see Disease
– suicide, 9:15-16; 10:68n1; 36:117
– as “vicissitude” of life, 31:10
– “witchcraft” and, 17:48-49
– See also Execution(s); Wills and testaments De Blois, Stephen (King’s Chapel organist, 1740), 10:16n1 Debs, Eugene V. (1855-1926; socialist), 40:145, 156 Debts, see Mortgages and debts DeButts, Elisha (botanist, 1820), 43:138 Decatur Street, 14:63; 22:72 Decimal system, change to, see Money Declaration of Independence, 4:35
– authorship disputed, 5:15
– events leading to, 26:121; 32:105; 39:159
– Gettysburg Address compared to, 36:7
– instructions to representatives (1772) as, 13:84
– “Mecklenburg,” 5:11
– signers of, 3:57; 6:23; 8:13; 9:6; 10:143. 162, 189; 13:84, 85; 15:43; 18:23; 21:84; 26:79; 30:17; 32:26; 33:71, 75; 37:25; 44:160
– signing of, 3:58; 18:48; 26:85 Decoration, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc. (ornamentation of) Decorators, interior, see Business and industry (interior decorators) De Costa, Mary (Scotch nurse of Dana children, c. 1815), 21:103 Decoster, Temple (housewright, c. 1760), 23:21 Dedham, England, 14:97 Dedham, Massachusetts, 21:102; 26:42; 27:53, 61n43, 67n61; 43:167
– boundaries of, 21:34, 36-37, 47, 80; 22:98; 43:115
– Charles River in, 39:35, 36
– church case in (1820), 43:120
– early roads to, 14:37, 38, 39; 32:109
– first public school in, 13:90; 32:69
– Haven family of, 27:51, 63, 88
– History of (Worthington), 21:34, 37
– regiment formed in (1630s), 15:26
– settlement of, 14:94; 21:32, 34; 38:91
– whipping of Quaker in, 24:71 Dedham Historical Society, 11:74; 25:68; 27:66n58, 86n96 Dedham Island, 21:34 Dedham Transcript, see Periodicals (general) Deer Island (Boston Harbor): Indians imprisoned on, 7:99; 26:72 Deerfield, Massachusetts, 33:39
– Historical Society and museum, 9:48-49; 25:68 Deerfoot Farm: Lowell at, 33:84 Defence (ship), 1:35; 14:92, 96; 15:25 Defense: Charles River as, 39:28. See also Boston, Massachusetts; Fortifications De Forest, Dr. and Mrs. (Reservoir St. residents, 1930s), 43:24 de Gall, General (1777), 13:25, 63 Degas, Edgar (1834-1917; painter), 35:68 De Gozzaldi, see Gozzaldi Degrees, honorary, see Harvard College/University DeGuglielmo, Joseph A. (city manager, 1960s), 41:11; 44:99 Dehon, Bishop Theodore (Harvard 1795), 9:36n2 de Lancey, Darragh (MIT 1890; businessman), 42:53 Delaney, Pat (politician, 1928), 44:88 Delano, Mrs., school of (c. 1850), 20:97 Delano, Mr. (in Dramatic Club, 1872), 38:52 Delano, Miss: New Bedford house of (c. 1910[?]), 43:167 Delano family, 43:28 Delaware, Lord (Thomas West; 1577-1618), 14:54n1, 96 Dellenbaugh, Frederick S. (electronics manufacturer, 1930), 34:122 Delta Manufacturing Company (electronics), 34:122 “Deltas” (triangular lots of land), 18:27, 40; 20:91, 93, 127, 135; 22:73; 23:71; 30:27; 31:31; 33:146; 43:80
– Arsenal “Square” as, 6:11
– “heater piece” (Garden St. and Concord Ave.), 8:34, 36; 33:46
– at Kirkland and Quincy Sts. (now site of Memorial Hall), 1:14; 18:32; 21:80; 25:22, 129; 30:12; 34:63; 43:153
– – – as exercise ground, 1:17; 18:31; 20:93
– “Little Common,” 43:75
– See also Holmes Place DeMain, Anne, see Hannum, Mrs. Leander Moody DeMille, James (of Halifax, mid-1800s), 21:62 DeMille, Mrs. James (Libby Pryor), 21:62 Doming, David (rope maker and fence-viewer, c. 1700), 31:25 Demmon, Reuben (landowner, 1833), 20:126 “Democracy, Cleveland,” 20:26-27, 38, 46, 52 Democratic party, 4:24; 10:135; 15:37; 23:58; 28:22, 23; 34:49; 37:82; 39:11, 21; 44:94
– newspapers supporting, 20:89
– “return of” (1880-96), 7:6, 7; 20:25-52 passim
– See also Federalist party/federalism; Political parties; Politics Demos, Prof, and Mrs. Raphael (Francis Ave. residents, 1940s), 41:30 “Den, the”
– near Church St. (“Old College House”), 8:36; 14:35 (see also College House [Harvard Square])
– on Follen St., 18:39; 20:96 Denison, see Den[n]ison Denmark: and American Revolution, 3:72, 73 Dennen, Rev. Ernest J. (c. 1900), 20:15, 99; 43:167 Dennie, Thomas (bridge incorporator, 1784), 16:39 Dennie, William (committee member, 1773), 30:54 Den[n]ison, Ann Borodell (of Connecticut, c. 1640), 42:104n6 Den[n]ison, Maj.-Gen. Daniel (settler, 1633), 7:83; 10:100, 101; 14:83, 84, 90; 21:23; 22:76 (Map 1); 24:76nl9; 30:38
– descendants of, 19:88 Den[n]ison, Mrs. Daniel (Patience Dudley; d. 1690), 30:31, 34 Dennison, Miss (builds Berkeley St. house, c. 1850), 21:59 Dennison family, 22:68 Dennison’s (paper goods), 41:143 DeNormandie, Reverend (1906), 44:119 Denton, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick (Reservoir St. residents, 1918-24), 43:17 Depression, economic, see Economic conditions (panic/crisis/Depression/recession) DeQuedville, Mary Frances, see Briggs, Mrs. LeBaron Russell DeQuedville (carpenter and upholsterer, late 1800s), 33:50 Derby, Capt. John (of Salem, 1770s), 30:59 Derby, Richard (1712-1783; Council member), 13:39n3, 40, 41, 43
– house of (Salem), 25:68 Derby Wharf (Salem), 25:68 Derry, Cecil Thayer: “Pages from the History of the Cambridge High and Latin School” (1954 paper), 35:91-109 Deshon, Caroline A., see Batchelder, Mrs. Eugene Deshon, Daniel (1864), 21:106 Design, Harvard School of, see Harvard School(s) de Sola Pool, Prof. Ithiel (of MIT: Irving St. resident, 1960s), 41:35 De Sousa, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony (Farrar St. residents, 1940-60), 41:37 De Sousa, Mr. and Mrs. Robert, Jr. (Farrar St. residents, 1960s), 41:37 De Sumichrast, see Sumichrast De Tocqueville, see Tocqueville “Detriments,” “Detur,” see Harvard College/University Deutsch, Martin (Reservoir St. resident, 1970s), 43:29 de Valcourt, Mr. (librarian[?], 1950s), 34:22 Devens, Agnes, see Osborne, Mrs. Thomas Mott Devens, Agnes Howard White, see Devens, Mrs. Arthur Lithgow Devens, Arthur Lithgow (m. 1852), 25:129 Devens, Mrs. Arthur Lithgow (Agnes Howard White), 13:86; 25:128, 129; 30:13, 19; 32:7, 22; 34:65-66, 76 Devens, Judge (Gen.) Charles (1820-1891), 1:70; 4:31; 10:149; 33:51 Devens, Maidie (Dramatic Club, 1877), 38:53 Devens, Samuel (Harvard 1829; classmate of O. W. Holmes), 1:49; 12:16; 28:56 Devens, Mrs. (Cambridge Book Club, 1833), 28:115 Devens family, 34:68 Devens house (155 Brattle St.), 41:157 Devereau, George (quartermaster general, 1848), 6:8 Devereux, George Humphrey (Harvard 1829; of Salem), 12:13, 16, 20 “Devil” theory, see History Devonshire Street (Boston), 16:96 Devotion, “Goodman” Edward (Brookline landowner, 1662), 14:38; 25:66 Devotion house (Brookline), 6:16; 25:66 DeVoto, Bernard (1897-1955; author), 39:24 Dewey, Bradley (businessman, 1930s), 41:52 Dewey, Judge Charles A. (1850), 41:69 Dewey, Prof, and Mrs. Davis R. (Berkeley St. residents, c. 1910), 21:70 Dewey, Adm. George (1837-1917), 23:30 Dewey & Almy Chemical Company, 41:52 Dewire (liquor licensing) case, 13:11. See also Wine and spirits DeWolf[e] Street, 8:35; 37:99; 42:37 Dexter, Dr. Aaron, 16:88, 127; 43:129
– appointed professor at Harvard (1783), 4:6; 38:70, 71 Dexter, Catherine, see Hilliard, Catherine Dexter Dexter, D. Gilbert (newspaper publisher, late 1800s), 20:86, 88 Dexter, Franklin (1793-1857; lawyer), 4:86, 89; 10:139, 145; 34:79; 39:61
– erroneous reference to, see Dexter, Henry Dexter, Franklin Bowditch (1842-1920; historian), 33:64n27 Dexter, George Minott (1802-1872; of Boston): gravestone of, 15:50 Dexter, Henry (1806-1876; sculptor), 28:58, 79
– given as “Franklin,” 34:91 Dexter, Rev. Henry Martyn (1821-1890), 38:109 Dexter, Miss Mary Deane (CHS member, d. 1950), 26:54n53; 32:41, 42; 35:26
– “Notes” (on Sparks St., 1932 paper), 22:49 Dexter family, 22:55 Dexter Professorship, 11:19n Dial, The, see Periodicals (Boston) Diaries and journals
– Adams, John (1760s), 3:57; 30:51-52; 40:128n15
– Adams, John Quincy (1807, 1820s), 26:92-93; 28:22, 23
– Alcott, Bronson (1835), 29:39
– Amazeen, Andrew (chief mate of Pilgrim; 1836), 10:161
– Andrews, John (1770s), 5:64, 65-66
– Appleton, Frances (later Mrs. H. W. Longfellow; 1836), 25:30n16
– Baldwin, Simeon (of Yale; 1784), 11:68
– Bentley, Rev. William (of Salem; 1792-1816), 11:69; 16:106-8, 109; 28:12
– Birket, John (1750), 10:32-33
– Burney, Fanny (1770s), 22:35
– “Commonplace Book” (Harvard student; 1660), 42:114
– Crothers, Samuel McChord (as child; 1869), 33:103-5
– Dana, Francis (1780s), 11:82
– Dana, “Lily” (Miss Elizabeth Ellery Dana; 1868), 17:71-73, 79
– Dana, R. H. Jr., 7:31-32; 10:135, 137, 138, 144, 150; 26:101-2, 104-5, 108, 116; 29:45n45, 55n83, 57, 63-66 passim
– Dana, R. H. (3d)(of “Travels in England”; 1875-76), 9:37, 49
– Deane, Rev. Samuel (1761-1814), 11:69
– Dudley, Dorothy (1775), 18:50; 37:31-32; 43:150
– of Dutch visitors to Harvard (1680), 3:17; 11:62-63
– of “eligible young lady” (c. 1840), 40:47
– Eliot, Rev. Andrew (1744), 10:64n2
– Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1830s-1840s), 10:134; 29:38n15, 42n32, 50n64, 54n82, 62n90
– Fields, Mrs. James T. (Annie; 1868), 28:94
– Fitch, Jabez (1770s), 10:53n1
– Fuller, Elizabeth (1790), 28:18-20
– Fuller, Timothy, Jr. (1798-1801), 11:33-53, 75
– Hanson, Charles L. (c. 1890), 34:38
– of Harvard presidents, faculty, and other officials, 42:17, 21, 113
– – – 1592-1826, 11:58-62, 69-72; 16:130; 17:53; 38:15n13
– (see also Sibley, John Langdon; Waterhouse, Dr. Benjamin, below)
– of Harvard students, 42:113-14
– – – 1653-1801, 11:33-53, 58, 62-64, 72-75; 21:91; 42:114
– – – 1850s, 38:37n26
– Heath, Gen. William (1777-78), 13:52n1, 74n1; 18:65
– Higginson, Thomas Wentworth (1840s), 28:63; 37:78, 79-80
– Holyoke, Mrs. Mary (of Salem; 1770s), 10:49
– Hooker, Rev. Thomas (notebook of, exhibited 1933), 22:16
– Hutchinson, Thomas (1778-79), 5:75nn1, 5
– Inman, Lt. George (1782-89), 11:82; 19:46-47, 51-77, 78-79
– Lanman, Prof. Charles (1880s), 42:17, 21
– Lanman, Mrs. Charles (1904), 42:20
– Lechford, Thomas (d. 1642), “Note Book” of, 5:17
– Longfellow, Miss Alice (1868), 28:97, 98, 99-100
– Longfellow, Henry W., 25:25n8, 26n10, 32-49 passim, 112; 27:69; 28:57, 71, 85-88 passim, 95, 104n; 29:44; 31:59; 33:23, 24n37
– – – Notebook on Craigie House, 25:21n3, 22-25 passim, 31, 38, 51, 52n49, 53; 27:56, 57, 67n60; 31:58, 60
– Lynde, Benjamin (Sr. and Jr.; 1770s), 40:126n10
– Mather, Cotton and Increase (1660-1721), 11:59, 70-71
– Mifflin, George (c. 1868), 19:19
– Mitchell, Jonathan (c. 1650; in Latin), 31:63
– Nichols family, 38:137
– orderly books of soldiers (including “enemy”) during Revolution, 5:64-65n2, 80n4; 11:58, 64-66, 75-83; 13:19n1, 35n1, 53n2, 57n2, 58, 61n4; 15:10; 16:126; 17:7; 18:61, 63-65, 71; 30:57n, 67; 37:48, 51-52, 57-58 (see also Inman, Lt. George, above)
– Parkman, Rev. Ebenezer (1779-80), 11:67-68
– Peabody, Sophia (1830), 27:67n61
– Prentiss, Mary Freeman (1865), 32:35
– Puritan (early 1600s), 32:49, 51
– Pynchon, William (1780s), 16:104
– Quaker, 11:58; 24:68, 80-81
– Quincy, Mary Sophia (1825 and 1829), 4:90-92; 12:7
– of Revolutionary committee and Congress, 10:47nn4, 6
– Riedesel, Baroness von (1777-83), 11:58, 77; 25:87-88; 37:20, 67-68
– Rowe, John (1764-73), 10:19, 23nl, 27-32 passim, 39, 44; 19:48, 49-50; 30:51-56 passim
– scrapbooks, 10:72n3; 19:82; 41:107; 42:115-16, 118; 43:158-59, 161-62, 165-66
– Sewall, Samuel (late 1600s), 7:76; 11:59-60; 21:89; 26:71, 75; 32:85; 38:17
– Shepard, Rev. Thomas (1640s), 3:80-81, 83; 11:82-83
– Sibley, John Langdon (1848, 1850s), 37:34-35, 36, 37; 42:114-15
– Sparks, Jared (1847-51), 44:133-34, 136
– Stiles, Ezra (1770s), 26:85n44
– Storrs, Lt.-Col. Experience (1774), 5:25-26
– Tudor, Frederic (1828), 28:31, 38, 53
– Tudor, Deacon John (1786), 41:159-60
– Waterhouse, Dr. Benjamin (1830s), 4:22-23, 25-37; 27:44n5; 29:16n8, 18, 19, 20
– Whitney, Rev. George (1820s), 27:68n63
– Winthrop, Gov. John (1630s), 10:89, 98, 101; 30:34; 32:108; 40:81n39; 44:42, 45, 48
– Winthrop, Prof. [Judge] John (1742-79), 10:67n1; 11:71-72; 42:120
– Wyeth, John B. (1830s), 2:34; 28:36-38
– Wyeth, Capt. Nathaniel (1830s). 28:36, 42-44 Dickens, Charles (1812-1870; British novelist), 21:123; 22:43, 56; 24:27; 26:111; 27:69; 34:19; 35:47n1; 37:79
– in America (1842 and 1867-68), 27:69; 28:59-68, 73, 86-96, 103; 29:44-45; 33:19-20; 34:23-24, 91; 37:33
– – – arrival of (1842), 28:55, 57-58, 59 (illus. facing)
– – – plan of table at dinner party (1868), 28:95 (illus. facing)
– – – quoted on Boston, 41:55-56
– – – reenactment of events (1942), 28:104n
– and “Dickens parties,” 18:38; 21:66; 25:96; 26:119
– and Longfellow, 28:55-104; 29:46
– – – letter to, 28:67 (and illus. facing)
– portraits of, 28:55 (illus. facing), 58, 79, 94 (illus. facing) Dickens, Mrs. Charles (Catherine Hogarth), 28:65. 71, 79, 81 Dickens, Charles, Jr., 28:81, 89 Dickens, Francis Jeffrey (son of Charles), 28:101 Dickens, Kate (daughter of Charles), 28:97 Dickens Fellowship of Boston, 28:104n Dickinson, Edward (schoolmaster, c. 1820), 16:65-66 Dickinson’s stereotype foundry, 19:15. See also Printers Dickson, see also Dixon Dickson, Brenton H.: “The Middlesex Canal” (1965 paper), 40:43-58 Dickson, John (1656-1736/37; owner of fish weir), 5:39-40, 41 Dickson, William (selectman; d. 1692), 5:38; 17:36, 37, 22:76 (Map 1) Dickson family, 10:115 Dickson-Goddard-Fitch house, 3:52; 5:39, 40; 20:128 Diehl, Leo (representative to General Court, 1940s), 44:93, 94 Dietrich, Frederic S. (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 21:71 Dighton Rock, 25:67 Dikes, see Dams and dikes Diligence of Ipswich (ship), 25:97 Diligent (ship), 7:82 Dim|m]ick, Calvin (bank official, 1856), 20:132 Dimmock, Prof. William (at Adams Academy, Quincy, 1870s), 8:52 Diplomacy
– Congress’ views of (1783), 26:89
– in Penobscot affair, 5:94
– “shirtsleeves,” 13:74
– See also Ambassadors and consuls Dipper, Mr. (King’s Chapel organist, 1756), 10:23, 42 Directories (city)
– Boston, 6:28
– – – 1789, 1796, 16:81
– – – 1849-50, 41:60
– – – 1870s and 1880s, 44:162
– Cambridge, 31:33n12; 37:35; 41:133n2
– – – early, “Gleanings from” (1921 paper), 15:30-40
– – – 1847-57, 15:30-39; 18:18; 23:25, 76, 93; 34:99n2; 38:30nn11, 12; 39:9, 115; 41:17
– – – 1860s, 15:39-40; 18:19; 23:38
– – – 1870s, 18:19-20; 20:103n1; 39:87n27; 44: 162
– – – 1880s, 44:162
– – – 1922, 18:22
– See also Maps and plans Disease
– apoplexy, 14:74; 35:93
– asthma, 4:49, 50, 56; 37:66
– Bigelow’s essays on, 43:138-39
– “Black Death” (plague), 26:95-96 (see also epidemics, below)
– “Bright’s,” 20:104
– burial grounds and, 44:173-74
– cancer, 12:41; 25:55
– cholera, 12:29; 16:50
– cold, “candy for,” 2:27
– “consumption,” see tuberculosis, below
– croup, 11:28; 26:102
– “decline,” 9:14, 22, 37
– diphtheria, 20:105; 42:29
– dropsy, 9:35
– dysentery, 27:64 (see also epidemics, below)
– “dyspepsy,” 40:58
– in early colony (c. 1630), 8:18; 10:88, 89; 33:143
– English tea as “cause” of, 39:149
– epidemics, 16:128; 41:162; 43:10
– – – 1647, 32:105; 38:94
– – – 1739, 21:96
– – – 1778, 13:53n1
– – – 1798, 11:34, 35, 36
– – – 1807, 9:22
– – – 1817, 11:18n2; 21:85; 26:95-96; 27:64; 33:9-10
– – – 1819, 1822, 44:174
– – – 1872, see of horses, below
– – – 1918, 38:125; 41:158
– gout, 10:30n1, 58; 13:67
– hay fever (“rose cold”), 16:118-19; 25:49
– hiccoughing (death from), 16:41
– Hodgkin’s, 36:12
– of horses (1872). 34:63; 39:86
– among Indians, 44:43, 45
– infantile paralysis (polio), 38:125-26
– influenza, 9:28; 31:18-19; 41:158
– and Lister’s methods, 20:107
– malaria (“river fever”), 4:48; 16:122-23; 23:30, 31, 32
– measles, 16:59-60; 20:60; 26:105; 41:162
– mineral waters in treatment of, 11:13
– plague, see “Black Death,” above
– pneumonia, 44:117
– polio, see infantile paralysis, above
– puerperal fever, 42:104
– – – O. W. Holmes and, 4:48, 52, 61
– “quinsy,” 42:106; 43:115
– scarlet fever, 21:60; 33:53; 34:98; 42:11, 29
– “settled fever,” 28:18
– smallpox, 6:50; 7:80; 10:65-66; 13:53n1; 15:26; 30:49; 37:57, 62; 42:98
– – – deaths from, 2:16; 3:12, 14; 9:6; 12:29; 14:54; 15:26; 16:84; 19:72; 38:92; 42:99, 108; 44:43, 45
– – – vaccination for, 4:24-25, 37; 11:19n3; 13:33; 14:46; 16:127-28; 19:70, 72; 27:48; 29:17, 18; 32:28-29; 33:46; 38:73, 76; 43:73, 127; 44:73-74
– sore throat, “throat distemper,” 11:49, 50; 21:95
– “spotted fever” (typhus), 9:33; 23:53
– sulphur bag as prevention of, 44:118
– tide waters and, 16:47
– tuberculosis (consumption), 4:53; 10:74n2, 76; 12:28; 14:134; 20:23; 25:85; 33:18, 145; 35:93; 36:109; 42:112
– – – Anti-Tuberculosis Society, 7:85; 18:22; 33:158
– typhoid fever, 3:107; 25:83
– typhus, see “spotted fever,” above
– and visits to the sick, 2:21, 23, 31
– whooping cough, 2:23, 27; 41:162
– yellow fever, 25:101
– death from, 7:78; 11:15; 25:101
– epidemics (1798, 1819, 1822), 11:34, 35, 36; 44:174
– See also Death; Health; Medicine, practice of Dissenters, see Religion Distance
– Cambridge to Boston, see Boston, Massachusetts (routes and transportation to)
– from meetinghouse to town boundary, 42:79
– and travel time, see Travel/transportation (speed of) Distilleries, see Business and industry (brewery-distillery) “Disunion,” 37:87-88
– and Disunion party (1840s), 37:80
– See also Civil War, U.S.; Politics; Slavery “Ditch,” the (swamp, near corner of Oxford and Jarvis Sts.), 25:132; 34:66. See also Swamp(s) Diver, Colin (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:36 Divinity Avenue, 23:78; 41:16
– buildings moved to and from, 18:44; 33:25; 41:38; 43:62; 44:21-22 (see also Houses, meetinghouses, etc.)
– in mid-1800s, 1:14, 16; 34:65; 38:40; 41:26 Divinity Hall (Harvard), 15:32; 25:37; 34:65; 38:27, 30; 41:26; 44:21
– architecture of, 28:110
– residents in, 26:25, 29; 32:82; 36:68 Divinity Library, see Library(ies) Divorce, see Domestic and family life (marriage) Dix, Anna, see Wellington, Mrs. Joseph, Jr. (third wife) Dix, Joel, 8:25 Dix, Mrs. Joel (Martha Wellington, b. 1761), 8:25 Dix, Capt. Jonas (Waltham official, mid-1700s), 8:25 Dix, William G. (friend of W. Irving, 1859), 29:39n19 Dix (Harvard student suspended, c. 1800, for “disturbing the public devotions”), 11:38n2, 51n Dix, Miss (Higginson family friend, 1828), 2:31 Dixon, see also Dickson Dixon, Martha (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:66 Dixwell, Arria Sargent, see Howe, Mrs. Archibald Murray Dixwell, Epes Sargent (1807-1899; schoolmaster), 4:89, 12:23; 17:65; 21:123; 28:115; 32:34; 33:54 Dixwell, Mrs. Epes Sargent (daughter of Nathaniel Bowditch), 33:54 Dixwell, Esther, see Owen, Mrs. Charles H. Dixwell, Fanny, see Holmes, Mrs. Oliver Wendell, Jr. Dixwell, Mary, see Wigglesworth, Mrs. George Dixwell, Susan, see Miller, Mrs. Gerritt Smith Dixwell estate, 20:94. See also Garden Street houses (No. 58) Dizer, Francis (“marriner” of Charlestown, before 1771), 5:61 Doane, Thomas (1821-1897; engineer, benefactor of Doane College, Nebraska), 33:150 “Dock Square (Boston), 10:188; 14:51; 17:60; 41:57 Docks and wharves, see Business and industry (shipping) Doctors and doctors’ fees, see Medicine, practice of Dodd, Mrs. Sarah W. and Misses (1920s): boardinghouse of, 23:46-47. See also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boarding-houses Dodd, Mead & Company (publishers), 38:105 Dodd & Livingston (booksellers, 1911), 38:107 Dodge, Cyrus (of Maine, c. 1860; uncle of Edward S.), 30:81, 82, 83, 84 Dodge, Mrs. Edward (Sparks St. resident, 1890s), 41:167 Dodge, Edward Sherman (b. 1852; musician), 32:84, 87
– autobiography of, 30:72-91 Dodge, [John] Frederic (1847-1927; brother of Edward S.), 30:73, 75, 79, 80, 87, 88, 89 Dodge, Frederick (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:41 Dodge, Hannah (of Maine, c. 1860; aunt of Edward S.), 30:82 Dodge, Miss Hannah Augusta (teacher, c. 1865), 30:79 Dodge, John Calvin (1810-1890; lawyer), 20:40, 44; 30:72, 73, 74, 80, 81, 83, 87; 39:89n32 Dodge, Mrs. John Calvin (Lucy Sherman), 30:72, 75, 79, 81, 82, 84, 88 Dodge, John Frederic, see Dodge, [John] Frederic Dodge, Mary Abigail (1833-1896; pseud. “Gail Hamilton”), 30:79 Dodge, Michael (of Maine, c. 1860; uncle of Edward S.), 30:82 Dodge, Col. Theodore A. (1842-1909), 23:39-40, 47; 36:82; 40:23-24, 29, 30, 34 Dodge, Mrs. Theodore A. (Jane Marshall Neil), 23:39 Dodge, Thomas (of Ipswich, 1770s), 25:102 Dodge, William Walter (1849-1921), 30:73, 79, 80, 87 Dodge, Mr. (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:52 Dodge family and property
– Fayette St., 30:72, 73-74, 80, 87
– Sparks St., 22:47, 49; 30:87; 41:158 Doe, Chief Justice Charles (1830-1896; of New Hampshire), 7:34, 45 Dogs, see Animals Doherty, Mrs. (third wife of Dr. Brown-Sequard), 23:86 Dolbear, Prof. Amos E. (at Tufts; inventor, 1890s), 34:115, 122-23 Dolbear, Benjamin L. (son of above), 34:122 Dolby (Dickens’s manager, 1868), 28:94-95 Dole, Nathan H. (1852-1935; music critic), 32:88; 40:145 Dole, William A., Jr. (Harvard 1918; newspaperman), 36:119-20 Dolley, Mr. and Mrs. William (paupers, 1775), 18:17n2 Dolling, Mary, see Gookin, Mrs. Daniel (second wife) Dolphin (ship), 23:27 Domestic and family life
– “at home” days, see paying calls, below
– and bathtubs/bathrooms, 16:120; 21:113, 117; 22:44; 25:89; 42:23, 29; 43:14, 23, 26; 44:134
– candlemaking, see Lights and lighting
– carrying fire, 36:75 (see also Heating)
– cattle-raising, 44:59-61 (see also Animals)
– and charges (at Harvard) for bed-making, sweep, personal laundry, 38:15 (see also Servants/”hired help”)
– cooking, see Food
– and counseling, 38:128
– “country life” (1811) described, 3:102-7
– darning stockings, 28:21; 44:107
– death and funerals, see Death
– diaries describing, see Diaries and journals
– dishwashing, 34:59
– eccentricities in, see Cambridge “characters”
– in England, see letters describing, below
– entertainment in, see Parties and entertainment
– family prayers, 3:20-21
– family relationships, 25:130-31
– among Loyalists, see Loyalists
– family size, 43:22
– – – 10 to 26 children, 2:20, 23; 10:9; 11:14, 66-67; 15:41; 16:29; 17:42-43; 18:36n2; 22:70, 88; 23:27; 26:74; 28:17-18, 110; 33:63n25
– – – “significance” of, 8:13
– funerals, see Death
– and “Grand Tour” of Europe, 17:60
– guardianships in, 10:26, 27-28; 26:50; 37:17
– “hired help” in, see Servants/”hired help”
– and holidays, see vacations, below; Holidays, fairs, and festivals
– hospitality, 33:81-82, 103
– household duties of children, 28:18-19
– and “identity,” 42:127
– inventories of possessions and property, 3:13; 8:17; 27:67-68; 28:30; 30:38, 49; 42:107
– – – Nutting, 5:59, 60, 96-97
– – – Vassall, 10:10, 13n2, 15n4, 62n4, 65, 68n2, 69, 79-85; 21:95, 97; 26:54, 55
– jelly-making, 33:54; 34:61
– letters describing:
– – – in England (1851-52), 32:8-23
– – – Mrs. Higginson (1827-28), 2:20-32
– – – to Mrs. Jenks (1806-13), 9:8-37
– – – Willard family (1816-30), 11:17-32
– manners in, see Manners
– marriage:
– – – “banns,” 13:86
– – – as civil contract, 31:63; 32:106
– – – and Dalton divorce case, 10:153, 165
– – – license for, 16:24
– – – and “obey” in marriage service, 7:21
– – – prenuptial agreement (1849), 20:133
– – – of Radcliffe student, 41:155
– – – slaves as part of dowry (1742), 10:62
– – – weddings, clothes for, and celebrations of, 9:35; 11:20, 24-25; 16:39; 21:89, 25:89, 32:106; 37:43, 44:119
– of minister, 36:56
– and moving:
– – – of furniture and household goods, 23:52; 30:26; 40:118
– – – of houses, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– in New Hampshire village, described (late 1800s), 34:43-44
– in “Old Cambridge,” 1:18
– and parental permission for Harvard courses,38:75; 43:129
– parties, see Parties and entertainment
– paying calls, 2:23, 28; 3:104-5, 9:9, 13-20 passim, 32, 36, 37
– – – “at home” days for, 41:167
– – – New Year’s Day, 25:105
– and pets, see Animals
– private theatricals, see Theatre
– quilting, 9:36-37
– servants in, see Servants/”hired help”
– simplicity/provincialism of, 1:18
– and social life:
– – – of Loyalists, see “Convention Troops”; Loyalists
– – – in Washington, D.C. (c. 1814), 33:75
– (see also hospitality, above; Parties and entertainment)
– soap and soap-making, 11:60; 22:49; 44:60
– spinning and weaving, 16:24; 28:18-19
– spring cleaning, 42:28
– and “store closet” (late 1800s), 21:117, 22:49, 34:61
– Sunday walks, 30:74
– and superstitions:
– – – ghost stories and “haunted” houses, 10:73; 17:72; 21:103-4, 116, 118; 24:90; 31:57-58
– – – regarding trees, 33:98
– and tea-drinking, 39:148-49 (see also Tea)
– and travel, see Travel/transportation
– vacations, 17:61; 25:135; 31:10; 34:68
– – – “down…Eastward,” 25:139
– – – from Harvard, 38:12
– – – in Maine and New Hampshire, see Maine, State of; New Hampshire
– – – school, 13:106; 30:80-81; 32:99; 42:28
– – – social agency camps, 36:47
– – – summer camps for children, see Children
– – – at summer homes or resorts, 10:13n1; 28:30-31; 37:34; 40:47; 43:43
– visiting the sick, 2:21, 23, 31
– washing clothes, 21:97; 25:89; 34:59, 38:15
– – – “washing day,” 9:34
– (see also soap and soap-making, above)
– weddings, see marriage, above
– and wills, see Wills and testaments
– See also Celebrations; Children; Clothing; Economic conditions; Expenses; Food; Houses, meetinghouses, etc.; Labor; Manners; Parties and entertainment; Prices; Social class; Society (people); Women Donahoe (injured on street railway, 1856), 39:83 Donald, W. A.: South Yarmouth house of (built c. 1900), 43:160, 167 Donham, Dean Wallace C. (of Business School, c. 1920), 27:25; 35:73 Donkey and donkey cart, see Animals “Donkey” as term for schoolmasters, 30:79. See also School(s) Donnell, Orrin (Maine skipper, c. 1900), 33:121 Donnell, Mrs. Orrin (daughter of John Gilley), 33:121 Donnelly, Mr. (superintendent of parks, 1930s), 35:22 Donnelly Field, 42:87 Donnison, Elizabeth Quincy, see Hodges, Mrs. Richard Manning Donnison, Judge William (1770s), 5:108 Donovan, James (politician, 1880s), 20:45 Donovan, Mrs. James (Frances Cooper-Marshal): “The YWCA in Cambridge” (1955 paper), 36:41-51 Donovan, William (probation officer, c. 1920), 17:23 Doody, Frank (store manager, 1960s), 41:112-13 Dooley, William G. (Marker Committee chairman, 1960s), 42:34, 37, 47 Dorchester, Massachusetts, 25:79, 81, 29:7, 31:23
– boundaries of, 21:31, 34-37 passim, 41, 47, 80
– churches at:
– – – first (1630), 10:89, 99, 104, 21:22, 32:110, 33:143; 43:124, 44:47, 49
– – – second (1636), 42:104-5
– early roads to, 14:37
– fortification of:
– – – 1630s, 32:71; 44:43
– – – 1775-76, 11:78, 37:50
– founding and settlement of, 7:78, 14:32, 21:21, 22, 24, 22:17, 60; 25:63; 32:58; 33:142; 38:91
– – – and removal to Connecticut, 10:100, 104, 32:63
– – – and removal to Georgia, 43:148
– Higginson family home in, 28:110
– naming of, 21:21, 32:60
– Oliver (later Everett) property in, 10:33, 15:41, 16:39, 21:119; 33:60-61, 65, 68-69, 151, 37:24
– public school in, 32:69
– Royall tomb at, 10:16n2
– street railway/subway to, 39:98n63, 102
– subway tunnel to, 39:31
– town government of, 22:18, 19; 25:64
– Vassall property in, 10:60
– Walter Baker house in, 33:65 Dorchester Neck, 37:50, 61 Dorr, Josephine (schoolgirl, 1890s), 42:129 D’Orsay, Count Alfred (1801-1852, French dandy), 28:73, 79, 81 Doubleday, Miss Elizabeth (b. c. 1770, friend of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:50 Dougherty, Fr. Manasses P. (d. c. 1877), 15:34 Douglas, Col. John (1770s), 5:29 Douglass, Frederick (c. 1817-1895, abolitionist), 7:15 Douglass, Misses (church benefactors, early 1900s), 20:79 Dover, Massachusetts, 21:37 Dover, New Hampshire, 24:70 Dover Street (Boston), 38:42, 39:84 Dow, “Charlie” (Harvard 1892), 34:39 Dow, Dr. David C., 44:88 Dow, Dr. David C., Jr., 44:88
– papers by:
– – – “Biographical Sketch of Thomas Shepard” (1972), 42:95-109; 43:125
– – – “Murder in Cambridge” (1978), 44:193 Dow, George Francis (antiquarian, c. 1900), 11:70, 73; 19:42; 20:102 Dow, George L. (on Hospital Board, 1928-53), 39:48 Dow, Dr. James A. (d. 1931), 20:103. 104, 108; 39:48 Dow, Moses (of Charlestown; publisher), 33:154 Dow, Prof. Sterling (Emerson Scholar, 1957-76), 39:54; 41:38; 44:39
– Emerson Scholar report (1957-58), 37:126-30
– “Life in the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House: The Emerson and Dow Years” (1976 paper), 44:29-38 Dow, Mrs. Sterling (Elizabeth Sanderson Flagg), 37:128; 39:54; 41:38; 44:29, 32, 34, 35, 37 Dowden, Edward (1843-1913; British writer), 2:48 Dower rights, see Wills and testaments Downey, Timothy F. (schoolmaster; d. 1952), 35:101, 102, 103 Downing, Andrew Jackson (1815-1852; architect), 26:42 Downing, Mrs. Antoinette (of Rhode Island; architectural historian), 39:75; 42:33, 36 Downing, Lucy A. (schoolteacher, 1858-96), 13:108 Downs, Lydia (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1806), 9:14 Dowry: slaves as part of (1742), 10:62. See also Domestic and family life (marriage) Dowse, Edward (Congressman, 1822), 27:51-53, 61 Dowse, Mrs. Edward (Sarah Phillips), 27:53n28 Dowse Institute, 41:46 Doyen, Mr. (on “Junior Committee,” 1906), 44:114, 116, 117 Doyle, William E. (Cambridge St. resident, mid-1800s), 36:95 Dracut, Massachusetts, 21:97 Draft, the, see Army Drake, Sir Francis (15401?J-1596; English navigator), 33:134 Drake, Francis (of England; d. 1634), 3:10; 14:84-85 Drake, Francis S. (1828-1885; historian), 39:154n25, 157n28 Drake, John (beneficiary of will, 1634), 3:10 Drake, Samuel Adams (1833-1905): histories by, 6:9; 13:20n2, 66n1; 18:46, 52n1; 19:47; 21:84n1; 25:87; 30:32; 33:60nn10, 12, 13, 65; 39:29n15, 61, 62, 63; 43:142, 150 Drama, the, see Theatre Draper, R. & S. (Boston printers, 1763), 44:68 Draper (Harvard student suspended, 1800, for “disorder”), 11:48n Drawbridges, see Bridge(s) Drawing(s), see Allston, Washington; Arts, the; Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth; Maps and plans; Paintings Drayton, Mr. (member of Continental Congress), 3:59 Dred Scott decision, 20:30 Dresser, Mr. (Raymond St. resident, before 1884), 20:101 Dresser, Miss (daughter of above, c. 1901), 44:10 Dresser house and estate (Raymond St.), 21:64; 33:57; 38:116, 119; 44:10 Drew, Edward Bangs (Harvard 1863; “China hand”; d. 1924), 12:33; 21:68; 33:52-53 Drew, Mrs. Edward Bangs, 21:68 Dreyfus Collection, see Fogg Art Museum Drinking, see Wine and spirits Drinkwater, Arthur (b. c. 1880; City Councilman), 39:127; 44:88 Driver, Dr. Stephen W. (1370s), 1:59; 3:52; 7:81; 20:103, 106; 39:48 Droney, John (district attorney, 1950s, 1960s), 44:93 Drown, Rev. Edward (Oxford St. resident, 1880s), 31:13; 36:13, 16, 17 Drowne, Deacon Shem (makes weathercock, 1721), 33:45; 43:121 Drownings, see Death Druggists and drugstores (apothecaries and apothecary shops), see Medicine, practice of Drury, Captain (1776), 11:77, 80 Dryden, John (1631-1700; British poet): Lowell quoted on, 33:82 “Dublin Street,” 42:76. See also Population (foreign-born) Dudley, Ann[e], see Bradstreet, Mrs. Simon Dudley, Deborah (1645-1683; Mrs. Jonathan Wade), 30:39 Dudley, Dorothy: diary of (1775), 18:50; 37:31-32; 43:150 Dudley, Dorothy Yorke, see Dudley, Mrs. Thomas (first wife) Dudley, Gov. Joseph (1647-1720), 30:39; 32:113 Dudley, Laura Howland, see Saunderson, Mrs. Henry Hallam Dudley, Mercy, see Woodbridge, Mrs. John Dudley, Patience, see Den[n]ison, Mrs. Daniel Dudley, Judge Paul (1650[?]-1681; brother of Joseph), 22:65; 30:39 Dudley, Judge Paul (1675-1751; son of Joseph), 30:39 Dudley, Paul (surveyor, sets milestones, 1729, 1744), 14:39 Dudley, Capt. Roger (father of Gov. Thomas; d. 1590[?]), 14:83; 30:29 Dudley, Mrs. Roger (Susanna Thorne), 30:29-30 Dudley, Rev. Samuel (1606-1683), 2:14; 8:31; 22:76 (Map 1); 30:31-37 passim; 32:113; 44:48
– site of house, 1:58 Dudley, Mrs. Samuel (Mary Winthrop, first wife), 30:35; 32:113 Dudley, Sarah (1620-1659; Mrs. Benjamin Keayne; later Mrs. Thomas Pacy), 30:31, 34 Dudley, Gov. Thomas (1576-1653), 13:82; 15:26; 16:112, 113, 21:29; 32:111; 33:142n2; 37:10; 44:52
– Cambridge house of (built 1631, burns 1666), 1:57; 3:14; 8:31; 15:25-26; 21:10, 78; 30:35, 37; 39:57
– – – “luxury” criticized, 6:21; 15:26; 22:60; 30:36; 44:42, 45
– descendants of, 2:14; 5:53; 7:83; 8:30; 12:69; 19:88; 26:96; 32:113
– elected, 21:27; 30:39-40
– English background of, 14:83; 30:29-33, 39
– and First Church:
– in Boston, 10:88; 32:107
– in Cambridge, 10:89-91 passim, 97, 100, 101
– and fish weir controversy, 5:35; 44:46
– as founder of Cambridge, 7:52; 8:17; 14:32; 30:28-47, 31:37, 38; 32:58, 107, 110; 39:126; 42:79; 43:112; 44:42-45, 47, 48, 53, 61
– land holdings of, 9:71, 72, 76, 78, 21:47; 22:60, 66, 76 (Map 1)
– letter of, to Countess of Lincoln, 30:32-33, 35, 36, 43; 31:37; 39:26n8; 44:42
– moves to Ipswich and Roxbury, 10:100; 15:25; 21:79; 30:38; 32:110; 44:45 Dudley, Mrs. Thomas (Dorothy Yorke, first wife), 30:31, 34, 38-39 Dudley, Mrs. Thomas (Mrs. Catherine Hackburne, second wife; later Mrs. John Allen), 30:39 Dudley, Mrs. William Perry (Rosamond Houghton), 12:68 Dudley, Mr. (Loyalist, 1770s), 30:63 Dudley, Mr. (on meetinghouse committee, 1827), 20:64 Dudley family, 14:80; 30:7
– at Harvard, 30:7; 32:113 Dudley house, see Dudley, Gov. Thomas Dudley-Lowell house (Willows-Palisades), 1:60; 3:52 Dudley Street (Boston), 30:42; 39:99 Dueling, see Violence Duell, Prentice (c. 1940; specialist in Etruscan art), 27:27 Duer, William (1747-1799; financier), 27:54-55 Duffy, Miss Gertrude (school psychologist, c. 1900), 35:106 Dufour, Joseph (French wallpaper designer, 1820s), 37:71-72; 39:52 Duguid, William (architect, 1939), 43:50 Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection/Center for Byzantine Studies (Harvard), 27:27; 44:31 Dumbolton, Lorinda, see Wellington, Mrs. Elbridge Gerry Dumbreck, Elizabeth Sarah, see Corne, Mrs. Adolphus M. Dummer, Lt.-Governor (c. 1700), 36:54 Dun, Dean Angus (at Episcopal Seminary, 1940s), 18:23; 36:17, 19 Dunbar, Charles (grandson of Dean Charles F.), 43:10 Dunbar, Dean Charles Franklin (1830-1900), 20:33; 26:22, 27-28; 36:35, 36; 43:10, 30
– C. W. Eliot’s recollections of, 12:37-41, 45 Dunbar, Mrs. Charles Franklin (sister of Prof. Copeland), 39:44; 43:10 Dunbar, Miss Chloe (Canton candy shop of, mid-1800s), 34:69 Dunbar, Dr. F. A. (Hospital house officer, 1888), 39:49 Dunbar, Louise B. (historian, 1922), 40:16n16 Dunbar, Prof. Peggy, see Davies, Mrs. Godfrey Dunbar, Rose, see Gay, Mrs. Edward Randolf Dunbar, William, (son of William H.), 43:10 Dunbar, William Harrison (Harvard 1882), 43:10 Dunbar, Mrs. William Harrison, 43:10 Dunbar family, 12:39, 41 Dunbar houses, 26:40 (illus. #9 following); 43:10-11, 18, 25 Duncan, see also Dunkin Duncan, Charles A. (of Danvers, 1960s), 39:103n76 Duncan, Lt. George W. (1700s), 7:78 Duncan, Mrs. George W. (Margaret Weeks), see Atherton, Mrs. Abel Willard Dundass, [British] Captain (1770s), 30:55 Dunham, Mrs. Dows (Marion Jessie): “The Old Burying Ground in Cambridge” (1953 paper), 35:23-25 Dunham, Edward F. (publisher, 1870s), 20:86 Dunkin, see also Duncan Dunkin, Susan (1822; “of Bethune descent”), 11:24n5 Dunlap, Elizabeth (sister of Frances; d. c. 1855), 33:80n72 Dunlap, Frances, see Lowell, Mrs. James Russell (second wife) Dunlap, William (1766-1839; arts historian), 29:16n10, 38, 56n87
– letters to, 29:15n5, 17n11, 27n37, 56nn87, 89 Dunning family, 41:167 Dunster, Elizabeth (“cousin” [niece] of Henry), see Bowers, Mrs. Benanuel Dunster, Elizabeth (sister of Henry), see Willard, Mrs. Simon (second wife) Dunster, Elizabeth Atkinson, see Dunster, Mrs. [Rev.] Henry (second wife) Dunster, Elizabeth Harris [Glover] (first wife of Henry), see Harris, Elizabeth Dunster, Rev. Henry (1609-1659; first president of Harvard 1640-54), 8:34; 14:36; 37:31; 38:11, 17, 69; 42:110
– arrival of (from England), 3:14-15; 26:67; 44:65
– called to Harvard presidency (1640), 3:15-17; 14:101; 26:67; 32:67-68, 111, 112; 38:7, 14; 42:80; 44:65
– death of, 16:122
– – – burial place, 1:39; 25:106
– and doctrine (expelled from church and college, 1654), 3:18, 89; 14:102; 22:99; 24:78; 29:69; 30:63; 32:27, 76; 39:58-59; 42:80; 43:115
– English background of, 14:82, 101-2; 26:67; 32:111
– family and descendants of, 5:53; 17:42; 24:78, 80
– and Glover heirs, 3:12, 16; 24:7; 38:93, 95; 39:59; 44:65
– land ownership by, 2:14; 3:16; 9:72, 75; 22:68, 76 (Map 1)
– marriages of, 6:22; 26:67; 27:30; 32:69; 44:65
– Papers of (in Harvard Library), 3:12; 26:67n7
– street named for, 14:62, 65; 25:120; 32:27 (see also Dunster Street) Dunster, Mrs. [Rev.] Henry (Elizabeth Harris [Glover], first wife; d. 1643), see Harris, Elizabeth Dunster, Mrs. [Rev.] Henry (Elizabeth Atkinson, second wife), 26:67; 44:65 Dunster, Henry (landowner, 1717), 5:38 Dunster, Rev. Isaiah (1720-1791): diary of, 11:82 Dunster, Mary, see Willard, Mrs. Simon (third wife) Dunster family, 10:115; 22:27, 68 Dunster house, 16:22 Dunster House (Harvard), 39:29 Dunster Street, 7:86
– car-barns on, see Street railway(s)
– known (originally) as Water St., 8:30; 14:34, 39n1; 16:92; 25:97; 30:36; 39:126
– laid out, 32 :108
– renamed, 14:62, 65; 32:27
– shops on (1800s), 1:22; 8:37, 38, 39; 30:22, 23; 37:91; 41:17
– sites identified on, 1:64; 2:14; 3:17, 51; 6:23; 7:75; 14:54, 71n2; 25:125; 33:41
– – – Dudley houses (Thomas, Samuel), 1:58; 8:31; 15:25; 21:10, 78; 30:36
– – – first meetinghouse, see Meetinghouse sites
– – – printing press, 1:64; 32:84, 105
– – – tavern, 6:21; 9:30n2
– (see also Dana houses [#7]; Hicks, John [patriot])
– wharf and ferry at foot of, 1:58; 7:52, 53; 8:31; 14:33, 37, 39n1; 20:110; 33:144; 39:126 Dupont, Flag Officer Samuel F. (1803-1865), 23:29, 30 Dupont, T. Coleman (1863-1930; capitalist), 42:52 DuPont Athletic Center (MIT), 42:64 Dupree, A. Hunter (writer, 1959), 43:139n26 Dupriez, Prof, and Mrs. Leon (of Belgium; Irving St. residents, 1916-17), 41:36 Duquesne, Prof. E. J. A. (1913), 42:91 Durant, Aldrich (1911), 6:77 Durant, Mrs. Aldrich (Susan Gould, first wife, d. 1955), 36:127 Durant, Mrs. AJdrich (Faith Lanman, second wife), see Lanman, Faith Durant, Rev. Henry F. (1822-1881; founder of Wellesley), 10:153; 36:43 Durant, Mrs. Henry F., 36:43 Durant, Henry W. (b. c. 1880; son of William Bullard), 6:77 Durant, Mary Ann, see Bullard, Mrs. Amos Durant, William B. (Francis Ave. resident, 1925-30), 6:77; 41:28 Durant, Mrs. William B., 41:28 Durant, William Bullard (1844-1911; lawyer): obituary, 6:76-77 Durant, Mrs. William Bullard (Caroline B. Aldrich), 6:77 Durgin-Park, 41:146. See also Restaurants Durkee, Major (at Battle of Bunker Hill), 5:28 Durrell, Harold Clarke (CHS member, d. 1943), 35:91 Durrell, Oliver H. (bank official, 1890), 36:95; 41:43, 44 Dustin, Charles Moody (of Maine; first Law School student, 1817), 41:117 Dutch East India Company, see Holland (Netherlands) Dutch Reformed Church, 36:66. See also Religion Dutton, Warren (art commissioned for, 1835), 29:50n67 Duxbury, Massachusetts, 14:99; 25:62; 32:109; 38:94; 43:170
– History of (Winsor), 26:24; 41:157
Duyckingk, Evert (glass maker, mid-1600s), 19:33
Dwight, Edmund (1780-1849? philanthropist), 29:49n62
Dwight, John Sullivan (1813-1893; music critic) 2:75; 21:67; 32:83, 87, 89-90, 92
Dwight, Susanna, see Howe, Mrs. Estes [elder]
Dwight, Thomas (friend of Gen. Knox, 1786), 40:16n15
Dwight, Dr. Thomas (1843-1911), 4:55
Dwight, Rev. Timothy (1752-1817; Yale president), 3:39n1; 38:74
Dwight, Mr. (friend of Higginson family, 1827), 2:25
Dwight, Mrs. (friend of Higginson family, 1827), 2:22
Dwight’s Journal of Music, see Periodicals (general)
Dwyer, Miss Nora (secretary to Harvard president Lowell, c. 1930), 35:119
Dyer, Hannah, see Church, Mrs. Benjamin, Sr. (second wife)
Dyer, Cmdr. Nehemiah M. (1839-1910), 41:169
Dyer, Sarah, see Fuller, Mrs. Abraham

E

E. A. & F. L. Chapman, see Chapman, E. A. & F. L.
Earle, Alice Morse (1853-1911): The Sabbath in Old New England, 16:105
Earle, Miss Caroline (of Jamaica Plain; educational pioneer, 1870s), 36:28
Earle, Charles C. (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145
Earle, Walter F. (Francis Ave. resident, 1911-19), 18:23; 40:147; 41:28, 48
Earle, Mrs. Walter F. (Elizabeth Hyde), 41:28
Earthquake (1816), 16:96. See also Weather
Eason, Joseph (landowner, 1635), 22:78. See also Easton, Joseph
East, Robert A. (historian, 1930s), 40:14-18
East Boston, Massachusetts, 34:41; 43:59, 145
– settlement of, 22:59; 33:139
– shipyards in, 37:107-8
– wharves in, 42:88
– See also Boston, Massachusetts East Boston High School, see School(s) East Boston tunnel, see Tunnel(s) East Bradford, see Groveland, Massachusetts East Cambridge, 20:108- 21:25; 43:145; 44:164
– Court House, county offices, jail moved to, 8:36; 15:37; 17:21, 48; 34:99; 35:81; 37:37; 38:120; 39:113
– – – Craigie and, 10:58n2; 14:74; 16:54, 92; 27:62; 29:71; 36:95; 39:63-64 (and illus. following), 111; 42:83
– – – Police Court, 17:21-22; 39:68-69
– first house built in, 1:66; 3:52; 16:75; 22:69 (see also Graves-Haugh house)
– first schools in, 13:90-91, 98; 35:95 (see also School[s])
– as historic survey area, 42:36, 38, 93
– “Historical Insights” (1977 slide lecture), 44:193
– industrial development and decline in, see Business and industry
– land holdings in (1600s-1700s), 16:33, 76, 77 (illus.); 22:58, 62, 68-71 passim; 26:68; 27:62; 37:18
– military importance of, 36:94 (see also Fortifications)
– newspapers of, 20:88 (see also Periodicals [Cambridge])
– Phip[p]s property in, see Phip[p]s, Col. David; Phip[p]s, Lt.-Gov. Spencer
– physician in (1870s), 20:108
– population (native vs. foreign-born) in, 39:119; 43:94
– post office in, 15:37
– public park planned (1892), 39:123
– railroad in, 20:129
– as separate village, see “Old Cambridge”
– “Story” of (1956 paper), 36:93-105
– street railway to, 30:26, 81; 39:80-87 passim, 104
– – – viaduct for, 39:102, 106
– streets laid out (1811, 1869), 14:58
– Unitarian Church in, 42:84
– Water Works in, 25:131
– See also Cambridgeport; Lechmere Point East Cambridge Female Charitable Society, see Charity East Cambridge Land Company (1861), 14:58, 66, 67; 25:139; 39:116, 121 East Cambridge Savings Bank, see Banks and trust companies East Cambridge viaduct, see Bridge(s) East Chelmsford, see Lowell, Massachusetts East End Christian Union, see Charity East India Companies and trade, see Trade and commerce East Indies, 3:67 East Lexington, 25:70. See also Lexington, Massachusetts East Street, 16:92; 36:95 Easter Day celebrations, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Eastern Massachusetts Regional Planning Project, 42:39-40 Eastham, Melville (electronics manufacturer, c. 1910), 34:118, 119 Eastlake, Charles L. (author of Hints on Household Taste), 26:46 “Eastlake” architecture, see Architecture, styles of Eastman, George (1854-1932; inventor, philanthropist): and MIT, 42:53-54, 55, 57, 59 Eastman building (MIT), 42:58 Eastman family, 35:83
– and Eastman-Grogan murder trial, 35:83 Easton, Alexander (writer, 1859), 39:84n20, 85n22 Easton, Joseph (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91. See also Eason, Joseph Easton, Massachusetts, 18:15n1 Eaton, Amasa (of Providence; rents Berkeley St. house c. 1900), 21:64 Eaton, L.: Genealogical History of Reading (Mass.), 5:56n3 Eaton, Nathaniel (1609-1674; first “master” of Harvard), 3:14; 14:102; 22:63; 32:67; 33:144, 146; 42:80 Eaton, Mrs. Nathaniel, 32:67 Eaton, Walter Prichard (actor, 1920s), 40:112 Eaton, Gen. William (1764-1811), 5:31, 32 Eaton, Mr. (preaches at First Church, 1808), 9:28 Eaton (fire chief, 1869), 36:81, 90, 91 Eaton Street, 35:82 Eayres, Joseph (carpenter, mid-1700s), 30:52 Eccentricities, personal, see Cambridge “characters” Eccles, Richard (landowner, 1684), 14:33, 102; 31:24 Eckert, Maud, see Wilcox, Mrs. Edward T. Eclipse, total
– 1806, 16:45-46, 87-88; 25:76
– 1851, 25:83
– 1869, 33:104-5
– See also Astronomy; Weather Economic conditions
– and architecture, 26:43-44; 43:51
– Civil War (during and after), see Civil War, U.S.
– debts, see Mortgages and debts
– for early settlers (1630s), 44:59-61
– effect of, on religion, 16:100
– embargo and, see Trade and commerce (restrictions on)
– gold discovered (California, 1840s), 26:111; 34:98
– inflation
– – – 1650s, 38:8
– – – 1707, 38:11
– – – 1712, 38:21n24
– – – 1863, 39:86
– – – 1892, 39:123; 42:48
– – – 1918, 39:103
– – – 1920s, 15:58; 20:70
– – – 1950s-1970s, 34:94; 37:43; 42:12; 43:107
– panic /crisis /Depression /recession
– – – 1640s, 42:105
– – – 1790, 21:52; 27:61; 37:32
– – – 1817, 13:111
– – – 1837, 4:28; 8:25; 14:126; 44:185
– – – 1849, 38:28
– – – 1857, 28:116
– – – 1870s, 19:43; 22:54; 25:140; 36:112; 39:119, 120, 121; 42:9; 43:121, 154; 44:164, 165
– – – 1884, 42:123
– – – 1893, 39:123; 42:49; 43:158
– – – 1898, 40:29
– – – 1921, 40:31-32
– – – 1929-1930s, 32:48; 34:14, 90, 103; 35:100; 36:120; 37:38-39; 38:62; 40:13, 33; 40:150; 41:51-52, 110; 42:21; 43:24, 98, 99, 164; 44:88, 150
– – – 1942, 28:116
– poverty, 20:115; 23:93; 39:90
– – – relief of, see Charity; Welfare, public
– Revolutionary War (during and after), see Revolutionary War
– and Shays’s Rebellion, 40:21-22
– and tramps (1870s), 22:54
– wealth, 22:86
– – – “cattle” as, 37:29; 44:58-61
– – – distribution of (1850s), 39:119
– – – of early settlers, 37:29
– – – of Loyalists, 15:42; 16:24; 17:56; 21:97; 22:99; 33:58-65 passim, 69; 35:79; 37:14, 25, 67; 43:86
– World War II and, 34:94
– See also Business and industry; Expenses; Labor; Money; Mortgages and debts; Prices; Professions; Taxation/taxes; Trade and commerce; Wages and salaries Economic Recovery Administration (ERA), see WPA projects Economy Club, see Club(s) Economy grocery store: built (1927) on site of Bates-Dana house, 26:106n78. See also Dana houses (#11) Eddy, Caleb (canal manager, 1830s), 40:55, 57-58 Eddy, Mary Baker (1821-1910; founder of Christian Science Church), 4:66; 34:91 Eddy, W. O. (electronics manufacturer, c. 1910), 34:117-18 Eddy family, 14:100 Edelstein, Prof. Tilden G.: “Thomas Wentworth Higginson: His Antebellum Years” (1958 paper), 37:75-89 Edes, Henry Herbert (CHS founder), 16:11; 17:42; 27:47n13
– “Deacons’ Books of the First Church in Cambridge” (1915 paper), 10:114-15; 43:125 Edgell, Professor (of Fine Arts; 1930s), 44:90 Edgerton, see Egerton Edgeworth, Maria (1767-1849; English novelist), 1:16 Edinburgh Review, see Periodicals (general) Edison, Thomas (1847-1931; inventor), 34:68 Edmands, see also Edmonds Edmands, Benjamin Franklin (father of John R.), 5:105 Edmands, Mrs. Benjamin Franklin (Catherine Rayner), 5:105 Edmands, John Rayner (1850-1910; Mountain Club founder, benefactor), 33:52; 41:41
– obituary, 5:105-6 Edmands, Mrs. John Rayner (Helen Louise Atkins), 5:106 Edmands, General (1854), 10:150 Edmonds, see also Edmands Edmonds, Mr. and Mrs. George P. (Fayerweather St. residents, 1970s), 43:28 Edmonds, Walter D. (b. 1903; author), 27:75n81 Edmonds, William A. (historian, 1960s), 39:72 Edson, Sylvester (tavern keeper, c. 1830), 20:131 Edson (surveyor, c. 1859-79), 14:73 Education
– adult:
– – – Cambridge Center for, 37:11; 40:153; 42:43; 43:110
– – – “G.I. Bill,” 40:151
– – – Prospect Union and, see Educational Exchange of Greater Boston, Inc.
– in architecture (c. 1890), 43:156-57
– classical vs. scientific, 4:67 (see also Language[s])
– and coeducation, see for women, below
– and educational reform, 20:53; 34:83; 44:155
– – – elective system introduced, see Harvard College/University
– – – by C. W. Eliot, 2:123; 22:103; 26:21-32 passim; 31:15; 34:9-10, 38, 41, 46; 35:35; 36:65, 66, 69; 37:108; 41:125, 126; 44:155
– – – by A. L. Lowell, 22:103; 34:9-11, 13-17; 41:110; 44:149, 155
– and examinations, 2:22
– – – at Berkeley St. School, 32:37
– – – Civil Service, 40:144
– – – at Harvard, see Harvard College/University
– – – for high school admission (c. 1840), 13:95
– – – by School Committee, 13:105-6
– of founding fathers, see of Puritans, below
– freedom in, 2:55
– General Education program (Harvard), 44:155
– government support of, 2:15 (see also School[s])
– Harvard School of, see Harvard School(s)
– and historic preservation, 25:68-69
– and illiteracy/literacy, 32:70; 39:119
– of Indians, see Indians
– in languages (classical and romance), see Language(s)
– lectures as form of, 11:31; 35:95; 37:83; 38:81; 40:143, 144, 145; 43:59, 104, 130-35 passim
– – – by Emerson, 1:52-53; 36:103
– – – at Harvard, 11:18-19, 21, 35; 12:43; 14:6-7, 25; 38:72-73
– Massachusetts Board/Department of, 10:145; 35:97; 40:149
– medical, see Medicine, practice of
– moral, 13:97-98, 103-4
– Negroes and, see Negroes
– parental permission for (at Harvard), 38:75; 43:129
– postwar (“G.I. Bill”), 40:151
– progressive, 41:24
– Puritan view of, 13:89; 27:30; 30:41-42; 32:54, 66, 68, 69, 77-78; 36:53-55, 74; 38:7
– of Puritans, 1:38; 14:101; 32:66, 109-10; 33:136; 36:54-55; 42:78; 43:114
– scholarships, 35:105; 43:107
– – – Harvard, 38:20-21; 42:106
– – – Radcliffe, 32:48; 41:142; 42:123
– – – will establishing (at Phillips Andover), 18:24
– secondary (Cambridge High and Latin), 35:92-104 (see also School[s])
– “sketching” lessons, see Arts, the
– Sputnik and, 42:63
– for women, 1:17; 5:107; 7:18, 20; 11:88; 13:94-95; 28:22, 26-27; 31:15; 43:134n14
– – – coeducation, 4:50-51; 13:91, 96-97; 36:24-29; 40:150; 42:65; 43:91; 44:132, 140, 151
– – – Harvard and, 4:50-51; 34:70; 36:23-39; 43:91; 44:132, 151-56
– – – at MIT, 42:65; 43:153, 155-57
– – – opposition to “improvement,” 11:19
– (see also Radcliffe College)
– See also Apprenticeship; Colleges and universities; School(s); Schoolbooks Educational Exchange of Greater Boston, Inc.
– naming of, 40:152
– as “Prospect Union,” 37:93, 97
– – – “Beginnings of” (1966 paper), 40:139-54
– – – “in Perspective” (1966 paper), and rebuttal to (“Historical Perspective”), 40:155-61 Edward III (1312-1377; king of England), 14:24; 23:83; 26:64 Edward IV (1442-1483; king of England), 8:13; 14:86 Edward VI (1537-1553; king of England), 40:62 Edward VII (1841-1910; king of England)
– as Prince of Wales, 32:24
– – – visits Cambridge (1860), 16:124; 21:122; 34:85 Edward (ship), 19:72 Edward Everett Square (Dorchester), 14:37n1; 33:61n15 Edwards, Rev. Bela (1802-1852), 20:64 Edwards, Rev. Jonathan (1703-1758), 29:70; 42:98 Edwards, Mrs. Thomas (Sarah Stone, b. 1645), 7:76 Edwards (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:48 “Eel Pot,” 36:99. See also Trinity Methodist Church Eelking (“Hessian” officer, 1777-78), 13:26n2, 61n2, 63n4, 64n4, 68 Egerton, Hugh Edward (editor, 1915), 33:66n33, 67n36 Ehlers, E. (naturalist; Gottingen, 1907), 2:80 Ehrlich, David P. (tobacco merchant; d. 1942), 41:111-12, 115
– and David P. Ehrlich Company, 41:111-15 Ehrlich, Mrs. David P. (daughter of Ferdinand Abraham), 41:111 Ehrlich, Henry (Harvard 1934; nephew of David P.), 41:112 Ehrlich, Richard (Harvard 1922; nephew of David P.), 41:112, 114, 115-16 Ehrlich, William (Harvard 1925; nephew of David P.), 41:34, 112, 114 Ehrlich, Mrs. William, 41:34 Eighteenth Amendment (Volstead Act), see Wine and spirits (and temperance movement) Eire, Dr. Simon (of Watertown and Boston; d. 1658), 7:75-76 Eisenhower, Dwight (1890-1969; U.S. president 1952-60), 42:63 Ekman, Miss (singing teacher, early 20th c.), 42:132 Ela, Dr. Walter (on ffospital staff, 1880s), 39:48 Ela, Mrs. (builds Ash St. house, 1865), 31:34 Elderly, care of
– Cambridge Homes for Aged People, 5:108; 10:169, 185; 18:20; 37:10, 14, 95; 41:46
– funds for, 34:66; 41:165
– housing units for, 42:66
– Old Folks Home, 24:64
– Old Ladies Home, 44:110, 119
– See also Age; Charity Eldridge, Mrs. (worker with Indians, c. 1900), 17:88-91 Election(s), church, 10:101; 17:93
– legal status of, 10:106-12 passim Election(s), political, 37:101; 42:85
– biennial, opposed, 7:6
– 1600s, 7:100; 21:27; 30:39-41; 32:57, 73; 42:79
– – – at “Election Oak” (1637, Winthrop-Vane), 1:67; 18:55; 32:59, 74; 33:37; 35:29; 42:80; 43:70, 76
– – – and “Election Sermons” (1630s, 1669), 3:83; 32:109
– – – to General Court (Assistants, Deputies), 30:39; 44:45, 52
– – – of selectmen, 8:19
– 1769, “disallowed,” 37:12
– 1779, congressional, 33:72
– 1780s, of wardens, 16:103-4
– 1792, presidential, 3:61
– 1797, presidential, 15:43
– 1798, congressional; controversy, 11:38
– 1800, presidential and gubernatorial, 3:61; 11:43n1
– 1808, presidential, 3:61
– 1810, 1811, gubernatorial, 15:43; 33:74-75
– 1812, presidential, 16:54
– 1840s:
– – – city, 22:23
– – – national and state, 10:135, 136, 146-47; 15:37; 37:82
– 1850, congressional, 7:12; 32:14; 37:83-84
– 1858, gubernatorial, 23:86
– 1860, national and state, 10:136, 25:137; 39:8, 9
– 1872, national and state, 20:34
– 1880s:
– – – Australian ballot introduced, 6:72; 10:193; 13:9; 33:160
– – – and liquor licensing, 13:9-16; 20:41, 43
– – – national and state, 7:6-7, 10; 20:35, 38, 43, 46, 48-49; 37:94
– 1890s:
– – – city, 22:25
– – – national and state, 7:6; 20:48-49
– 1908, national, 44:33
– 1916, city, 22:26
– 1928, national and state, 36:120
– 1940, 1942, city, 44:92-93
– 1959, 1963, and fluoridation issue, 41:13-14
– See also Politics; Voting Election(s), presidential, at Harvard, see Harvard College/University “Election Oak,” see Election(s), political (1600s) Elective system, see Harvard College/University Electric Railway Journal (1908), 39:101. See also Periodicals (general) Electricity, 23:91; 34:67-68; 41:158; 42:29
– “electric cars,” see Street railway(s)
– first installed at Harvard, 43:35
– Harvard power station, 39:98
– Lovering’s lectures on, 3:33
– in Russian theatres (1878), 24:114, 124
– See also Lights and lighting Electronics, see Business and industry Elevators, see Technology Eliot, see also Elliot; Elliott Eliot, Miss Abigail (Francis Ave. resident, 1925-57), 41:28
– Nursery School of, 41:37 (see also School[s]) Eliot, Rev. Andrew (1718-1778; Harvard Corporation member), 10:64n2; 13:39n3, 43, 44n3 Eliot, Anna, see Ticknor, Mrs. George Eliot, Asaph (of Boston; father of Mrs. Isaac Royall, Sr.), 10:14n2 Eliot, Carola (Mrs. L. V. Goriansky), 23:80 Eliot, Catharine, see Norton, Mrs. Andrews Eliot, C. D. (mapmaker, 1880), 14:77 Eliot, Charles (uncle of Charles William; d. unm.), 17:60 Eliot, Charles (1859-1897; landscape architect), 12:25-26; 17:61; 23:80; 39:27n13, 34-35; 41:22, 168; 42:15, 85, 87 Eliot, Mrs. Charles: house built for, 18:37 Eliot, Charles William (1834-1926; Harvard president 1869-1909), 1:70; 2:121; 3:36; 4:84; 6:56; 25:116, 117; 28:106, 115; 34:55, 56, 91; 35:120; 36:56; 38:50; 39:88; 41:24; 44:24, 146
– addresses and papers by:
– – – accepting Harvard memorial (1884), 33:147-48
– – – Agassiz 100th anniversary (1907), 2:102-5, 108
– – – Cambridge 275th anniversary (1905), 1:41-42
– – – Holmes Centenary (1909), 4:40-42, 45-46, 52-54, 62, 68
– – – Longfellow 100th anniversary (1907), 2:54-56, 107
– – – Lowell 100th anniversary (1919), 14:5-11
– – – Lowell reminiscences (1921), 15:45
– – – “Personal Recollections of Dr. Morrill Wyman, Professor Dunbar, Professor Sophocles, and Professor Shaler” (1917), 12:25-45
– – – “Shady Hill” (1924), 17:60-62; 43:7n1
– “anecdotal reminiscences” of (Greene paper, 1950), 33:117-33
– appointments by, 20:58; 41:156, 158; 42:16-17; 43:12
– as bicyclist, 35:115; 44:23
– bridge named for, 22:119; 42:87 (see also Bridge[s])
– and Cambridge Fire Department, 36:111
– educational reforms by, see Education
– family of, 2:118; 17:74; 23:34, 80; 41:21, 168; 43:21
– and Fogg Museum, 27:11, 20
– and Harvard Classics, 12:27
– Harvard Memories, 17:60n1; 35:115; 42:113
– and historic preservation, 25:67
– inauguration of, 42:84
– letters of:
– – – to Samuel and Mrs. Crothers, 33:115, 116
– – – to Major Higginson, 32:93-95
– and music at Harvard, 32:82, 83; 41:98
– personality of, 31:17-21; 33:118-33 passim; 35:115; 42:19-20
– and political reform, 20:32-52, 59
– – – on Cambridge City Council, 13:124; 22:28
– as professor:
– – – Harvard, 2:117; 3:30
– – – MIT, 41:33; 42:15
– and Prospect Union, 40:144, 145, 146
– and Radcliffe, 5:111; 36:25-26, 28, 29, 32, 38, 39; 44:140, 144, 155
– residences of, 1:15; 18:43; 28:30; 41:33; 42:14-15, 16; 44:30 (see also Quincy Street [houses on])
– quoted, 26:13-14, 15, 19, 26-30 passim, 34; 29:8; 32:89, 113-14; 33:26, 153; 34:38-39; 35:37, 51-52, 97, 116; 40:141; 41:126; 42:29, 119
– as tutor, 2:123; 26:26-27 Eliot, Mrs. Charles William (Ellen Derby Peabody, first wife; d. 1869), 12:26; 26:20, 22; 41:33 Eliot, Mrs. Charles William (Grace Mellen Hopkinson, second wife; d. 1924), 9:68; 12:26-27; 31:10, 19; 32:89; 33:116, 119, 120, 123, 130; 41:168; 42:20
– as “Bee” member, 17:66, 71-81 passim; 33:126
– as bicyclist, 35:115; 44:23
– in Dramatic Club, 38:52, 53, 56
– as schoolgirl and teacher, 32:35, 36, 38 Eliot, Charles William [2d] (Harvard 1920; landscape architect), 39:32n27; 42:15, 17, 33, 74, 76, 116; 43:9, 16, 23-30 passim, 142, 143; 44:23, 93, 94-95
– brickyard plans drawn by, 42:68-69 (illus.), 73
– notes of, on historic books and resource materials, 43:147-51
– papers by:
– – – “Around the Top of the Hill: Houses and Neighbors” (1973), 43:7-31; 44:169
– – – “The Charles River Basin” (1961), 39:23-38
– – – introduction to “Fort Washington” papers (1975), 43:141-43
– – – “A 125th Anniversary: From Village, Town, City, to?” (1971), 42:77-94 Eliot, Mrs. Charles William [2d], 43:7, 10, 23, 27, 28 Eliot, Rev. Christopher R. (Francis Ave. resident, 1920s), 41:28 Eliot, Mrs. Christopher R. (Mary Jackson), 41:28 Eliot, Elisabeth (daughter of Rev. S. A.), see McGiffert, Mrs. A. C., Jr. Eliot, Elizabeth [Brown] (daughter of Asaph of Boston), see Royall, Mrs. Isaac [Sr.] Eliot, Elizabeth Lee, see Eliot, Mrs. Frederick May Eliot, Elizabeth Lyman, see Bullard, Mrs. Stephen Hopkins Eliot, Frances, see Fremont-Smith, Mrs. Frank Eliot, Rev. Frederick May (Irving St. resident, 1940-60), 41:34 Eliot, Mrs. Frederick May (Elizabeth Lee), 41:34 Eliot, Henry Ware, Jr. (Harvard 1902), 34:47; 35:115-16, 123 Eliot, Rev. John (1604-1690), 2:17; 7:98-99, 100; 9:75; 10:94; 26:71-72, 81n41; 36:54; 44:51
– Bible and Indian translations by, 3:17; 6:23; 26:72; 32:27, 70; 44:66
– founds and preaches at Roxbury, 14:81; 30:38; 32:110, 111; 44:47 Eliot, Rev. John (1754-1813; son of Rev. Andrew), 25:103, 116 Eliot, John F. (high school principal, 1880s), 35:112; 37:108 Eliot, Dr. Martha May (Francis Ave. resident, 1950s), 41:28 Eliot, Rev. Richard R. (1751-1818; at Water-town), 16:98, 108[?] Eliot, Rosamond, see Rice, Mrs. William G. Eliot, Samuel (1739-1820; Boston merchant; grandfather of Charles W.)
– founds Eliot Professorship (1814), 2:118
– purchases “Shady Hill,” 17:60; 41:21; 42:14 Eliot, Samuel (1821-1898; educator), 36:32 Eliot, Mayor [of Boston] Samuel Atkins (1798-1862; Harvard Treasurer; father of Charles W.), 2:75; 15:37; 17:60-61; 23:84; 28:115; 41:21, 33; 42:14-15; 43:54, 60, 62
– History of Harvard, 32:79; 43:150
– and music in Boston and Cambridge, 32:79-82; 41:98
– scrapbook compiled by, 42:115-16 Eliot, Mrs. Samuel Atkins, 2:24 Eliot, Rev. Samuel Atkins (1862-1950; son of Charles W.), 20:23; 27:33; 28:29, 34; 33:149; 39:25n8, 26nn9-11; 41:168; 42:20, 89; 43:9, 16-29 passim
– and Dramatic Club, 38:52-53, 55
– History of Cambridge, 41:46; 42:94; 43:21, 147-50 passim
– house of, see Reservoir Street
– “Information Please” quiz conducted by (1939), 25:113-21; 34:126
– papers by:
– – – “All Aboard the ‘Natwyethum’!” (1942), 28:35-54; 34:126
– – – “Mr. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes” (1935), 23:67-71
– – – “The Preservation of Historic Houses” (1938), 25:65-69
– – – “A Significant Cambridge Anniversary” (1948), 32:104-14; 43:125
– – – “Some Cambridge Pundits and Pedagogues” (1940), 26:13-35; 33:18n28, 25n38; 34:126
– – – “Some Musical Memories of Cambridge” (1947), 32:79-95; 34:126
– “A Tribute to” (Howe paper, 1951), 34:125-26; 43:165 Eliot, Mrs. (Rev.) Samuel Atkins (Frances Hopkinson), 21:68; 32:93; 43:9, 20-23 passim, 30-31
– “The Romance of Street Names in Cambridge” (1946 paper), 32:25-29 Eliot, Prof. Samuel Atkins, Jr. (Harvard 1913), 43:9, 15, 22n5, 28 Eliot, Theodore Lyman (son of Rev. S. A.; Harvard 1925), 43:22n5 Eliot, Thomas Hopkinson (son of Rev. S. A.; Harvard 1928), 41:32; 43:18-19, 22n5; 44:93, 94 Eliot, Mrs. Thomas Hopkinson, 41:32 Eliot, T. S. (1888-1965; poet, playwright), 35:75; 38:57 Eliot, William H. (1795-1831; choirmaster), 32:80 Eliot Bridge, see Bridge(s) Eliot family, 42:14-16, 115 Eliot house, see Reservoir Street Eliot House (Harvard), 22:59; 32:109; 34:16; 39:98 Eliot Professorship, 2:116-21 passim Eliot Square, 14:39; 43:44 Eliot Street, 7:52; 13:90; 14:34, 64; 22:97; 39:24, 26, 126; 44:58. See also Marsh Lane “Eliot’s Oak,” see Trees (oak) Elizabeth I (1533-1603; queen of England), 14:85, 88; 32:53-54; 33:134-36 passim; 36:55; 40:59, 61n2, 62
– commissions and patents granted by, 30:29, 30; 33:137
– death of, 10:92; 32:55 Elizabeth (ship), 8:20 Elizabeth and Ann (ship), 21:79 Elizabeth Islands (off Cape Cod), 35:52 Ellery, Miss Ann (1755-1834; daughter of William, the “Signer”), 11:29 Ellery, Benjamin (m. 1749), 10:33, 66; 13:83 Ellery, Mrs. Benjamin, see Vassall, Lucy Bar[r]on Ellery, Elizabeth (daughter of William, the “Signer”), see Dana, Mrs. [Chief Justice] Francis Ellery, Elizabeth (granddaughter of William, the “Signer”), see Sedgwick, Mrs. Robert Ellery, Lucy, see Channing, Mrs. William Ellery, William (1727-1820; the “Signer”), 3:57; 4:26; 10:162; 11:29n1; 13:83, 84; 21:84
– quoted, 26:79, 80, 85, 90-91
– street named for, 25:121; 32:26 Ellery, Mrs. William (Ann[e] Remington), 13:84; 21:84-85 Ellery, William, Jr. (c. 1800), 21:85 Ellery, Mr. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:21 Ellery house (Gloucester), see White-Ellery house Ellery Street, 1:56; 14:62, 65; 26:94n63, 95n64, 101; 28:11; 32:26; 35:97 Elliot, Elliott, see also Eliot Elliot, Mr. (of Boston; on Bridge committee, 1640), 14:38 Elliott, Charles Wyllys (m. 1855; later Appian Way resident), 25:135; 32:100 Elliott, Mrs. Charles Wyllys, see White, Mary Greene Elliott, Howard (of Boston, c. 1900), 32:101; 43:167 Elliott, Mary (schoolgirl, 1820), 28:26 Elliott, Prof. William Yandell, 44:97 Elliott, Mr. (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:52 Ellis, Benjamin Peirce (Cambridge resident, 1930s), 23:90 Ellis, Dean [Dr.] Calvin (1826-1883), 26:22, 28 Ellis, David (Massachusetts Ave. resident, mid-1800s), 38:111 Ellis, Rev. [Prof.] George E. (1814-1894), 10:110n; 27:35; 33:151; 44:176n9, 178n11, 179n13 Ellis, Harry (1860-1895; educator), 34:103-4; 38:111 Ellis, Helen Peirce, see Peirce, Helen Ellis, Dr. Laurence B. (Francis Ave. resident, 1930s), 41:31 Ellis, Mrs. Laurence B. (Alice Whiting), 41:31 Ellis, Mary (daughter of David), 38:111 Ellis, Rufus (mid-1800s), 23:89 Ellis, William R. (real estate agent; d. 1902), 12:65; 41:41 Ellis (counsel for Anthony Burns, 1854), 23:85 Ellis (Roxbury historian), 30:42 Ellis (son of Rufus; marries Helen Peirce), 23:89 Ellis & Melledge (real estate), 12:65 Ellsworth family (New Hampshire), 16:52-53 Elm House, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Elm Street (Cambridge), 14:57, 64; 16:90 Elm Street (Somerville), 20:128, 129; 39:84 Elmer, Edward (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:75, 78 Elmwood (Cambridge), 2:55; 23:93; 31:26; 43:89, 159
– architecture of, 6:25; 26:58, 59, 60; 33:62, 66, 92; 42:44; 43:50
– bequeathed to Harvard, see owner(s) of, below
– building of, see Oliver (Thomas) and building of, below
– on exhibition (1919, 1930), 14:29; 27:99
– Gerry (Elbridge) at, 1:60; 9:7; 15:42-44; 16:39; 22:100; 24:64; 25:115, 118; 29:72; 32:96; 33:62n21, 68, 72-76, 90-91, 92; 35:50
– – – mob action against, 15:43; 37:25-26
– – – road built behind, 9:33; 14:58
– – – store built opposite, 9:26; 13:85, 86; 14:59n1
– in Historic District, 39:74; 42:34, 41
– Lowell family at, 1:15-16; 14:6, 7, 41; 22:107; 25:88-89, 127, 129; 26:51; 27:12, 34; 28:35, 93; 33:76-80, 83, 91, 92; 35:50; 37:26; 44:160
– – – as J. R. birthplace, 1:60; 22:100; 29:72
– – – library at, 14:20; 15:44-45
– – – Longfellow’s poem on, 3:46; 12:47-48
– – – love of, 14:25; 15:45; 25:137; 33:78-80, 84
– – – photographs of, 27:8
– military hospital at, 16:8, 128; 17:100; 37:25
– Oliver (Thomas) and, 1:60; 22:71; 26:60; 33:90; 37:24, 67
– – – building of, 5:58; 13:83; 15:41; 16:39; 17:55; 24:63-64; 26:50; 33:58, 65-66; 37:25; 44:160
– – – date discrepancies, 25:87
– (see also patriot “attack” on/confiscation of, below)
– as only house on Elmwood Ave., 1:16; 35:18
– owner(s) of, 17:54; 25:67
– – – Harvard as, 33:85, 92; 42:117
– – – papers on (1921, 1949, 1957), 15:41-45; 33:58-93; 37:11, 24-26, 27
– – – Porters as, 15:41; 33:85-92
– (see also Gerry [Elbridge] at; Lowell family at; Oliver [Thomas] and, above)
– patriot “attack” on/confiscation of, 13:22, 44; 15:42; 16:24; 17:57; 21:119, 120; 22:71, 100; 30:58; 33:67, 68; 37:25; 43:71, 84, 85, 87-88
– William Vassall house near, see Waterhouse house Elmwood (Concord farm, 1892), 38:124 Elmwood Avenue, 1:60; 16:113; 22:59; 24:63, 64; 25:129; 27:99; 32:101; 37:24
– architecture on, 43:159, 167
– in Historic District, 42:41, 44; 43:37, 89
– laid out, 14:64, 66
– – – connecting streets laid out, 14:74, 104; 44:160
– old highway along route of, 14:33, 41-42, 58; 23:76; 25:118; 27:10; 39:26 (see also Charlestown-Watertown road)
– Orne property/store near foot of, 14:59n1; 32:96
– street railway to, 22:106; 35:18
– trees on, 33:97, 98
– Wells’s school (Fayerweather house) opposite, 1:52; 22:93, 100
– See also Elmwood (Cambridge) Elton, James (of Devon, c. 1800), 21:120 Elton, Mrs. James (Emily Oliver, daughter of Thomas), 21:120 Elton, Prof. Oliver, 33:65-67nn29-35 passim
– “Thomas Oliver” (1931 paper), 21:119-21 Elwell, Frank E. (1858-1922; sculptor), 34:91 Elwell, Mr. and Mrs. (friends of Hill and Jenks families, 1813), 9:36, 37 Ely, Col. John (1770s), 5:30 Ely, Nathaniel (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:78 Ely, Rev. Robert Erskine (forms Prospect Union, 1891), 40:139, 143, 145, 156, 157, 158 Emancipation issue, see Slavery Emancipation of Massachusetts (B. Adams), 5:16 Embankment, the, see Charles River Embankment Embargo (1807-09), see Trade and commerce (restrictions on) Emerson, Charles Chauncy (d. mid-1800s), 27:11 Emerson [?], Charlotte (Ellen Emerson letter to, 1857), 35:44 Emerson, Edith, see Forbes, Mrs. William Emerson, Dr. Edward Waldo (1844-1930; of Concord), 4:53; 34:73, 74; 35:43, 45, 51, 89; 40:145
– address of, on Dr. Holmes (1909), 4:54-62
– sister’s letters to, 35:48 Emerson, Mrs. Edward Waldo, 34:73 Emerson, Elizabeth, see Bradbury, Mrs. William S. Emerson, Ellen Tucker (b. 1839; daughter of Ralph W.), 35:35, 39
– letters from and to, 35:40-45, 46-50 Emerson, Frances White, see Emerson, Mrs. [Prof.] William Emerson, George Barrell (1797-1881; educator), 38:78, 83
– school of (Boston), 7:104 (see also School[s]) Emerson, Haven (of Concord, 1850s), 35:40 Emerson, Rev. Joseph (Harvard 1798; brother of Ralph W.), 11:44, 47 Emerson, Mrs. L. Eugene (Plant Club president, c. 1900), 35:22, 24, 31 Emerson, Ralph Waldo (1803-1882; philosopher), 4:44; 7:18, 19, 26, 29; 26:30, 31; 28:59; 33:78, 152; 38:78; 41:57, 59, 98; 43:154; 44:178
– and Atlantic Monthly, 41:62
– biography of (Rusk), 35:35
– as Cambridge resident, 1:52; 2:62, 75; 10:183; 11:29; 25:116; 37:76
– daughter’s letters to, 39:43, 44-45
– Dickens and, 28:86, 87, 90, 94
– as educator, 2:32; 10:127; 11:29n3; 26:103; 28:24-25; 33:13; 36:27
– family of, 11:29, 42n1; 34:73; 35:39, 42, 50, 51, 89
– house of (Concord), 25:67
– as lecturer, 1:52-53
– – – profits of, 36:103
– J. R. Lowell and, 14:20, 21; 23:63
– Phi Beta Kappa oration of (1867), 20:29
– portrait of, 37:127
– quoted, 1:26, 53; 2:72; 7:25-26; 25:136; 26:103; 32:109; 44:191
– – – on Agassiz, 2:77
– – – on Allston, 29:37-38, 41, 50, 54n82, 62, 65, 66; 33:14
– – – on Cambridge, 14:21
– – – “Rhodora,” 44:17
– – – on slavery, 10:134
– as radical, 37:82
– writings of, 2:63; 11:44n1; 15:21; 19:23; 28:117; 29:41; 33:79; 36:29 (see also quoted, above; Diaries and journals)
– – – letters, 27:12 Emerson, Mrs. Ralph Waldo (Lydia [“Lydian”] Jackson, second wife), 28:25; 35:42, 43, 49 Emerson, Thomas (of Ipswich, 1630s), 10:172 Emerson, Rev. William (Revolutionary chaplain; grandfather of Ralph W.): quoted, 35:89 Emerson, Rev. William (1769-1811; father of Ralph W.), 11:42; 26:93; 35:51 Emerson, Mrs. (Rev.) William (Ruth Haskins), 11:29 Emerson, William (son of above), 29:38n15, 65n107
– schools of (Cambridge and Boston), 11:29n3 (see also School[s]) Emerson, Judge William (of New York, mid-1800s), 27:11 Emerson, Dean William (d. 1957), 37:127; 44:36
– and Hooper-Lee-Nichols house, 16:7; 22:71; 24:21; 26:50; 37:69, 70, 74, 117, 126; 44:29-31, 32 Emerson, Mrs. [Dean] William (Frances White [Moffat]; d. 1957), 16:7; 26:50, 57n110, 58n112; 33:62; 37:69-70, 74, 127; 44:29-31, 32
– bequeaths house to CHS, 24:21; 37:71, 115-16, 117, 126; 44:29n1 Emerson, Mr. (at “Junior Committee” party, 1906), 44:116 Emerson family, 27:11, 12
– and “Emerson sisters,” 27:13 (see also Emerson, Ellen Tucker; Forbes, Mrs. Edith [Emerson]) Emerson Hall (Harvard), 18:44, 45; 34:53; 35:116, 117; 44:20, 24-25, 90 Emerson house, see Hooper-Lee-Nichols house Emerson (William and Frances White) Scholar, see Dow, Prof. Sterling Emerton, Clara (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:42, 47 Emerton, Prof. Ephraim (1850-1935; historian), 15:13; 16:111; 17:62; 18:21; 23:43; 26:32; 35:120-21, 122; 36:65-66; 40:145
– minute on death of, 23:13
– “Recollections of 60 Years in Cambridge” (1927 paper), 20:53-59; 31:57 Emerton, Mrs. Ephraim, 44:111 Emery, Ann Taylor Oilman, see Abbot, Mrs. George Jacob Emery, Manning (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:42 Emery, Judge Nicholas (Dartmouth 1795), 12:68 Emery, Ruth, see Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis Emery, Thomas (businessman, c. 1865), 25:139 Emery, Judge Woodward (bank official, 1890), 17:23; 25:139, 140; 41:41
– Bartlett reminiscences by (1906), 1:82-87 “Emma” (Ellen Emerson’s letters to), 35:42, 43 Emmanuel Church (Boston), 33:24; 36:13 Emmanuel College, see Cambridge, England (Cambridge University) Emmanuel Society (Radcliffe), see Women’s clubs/organizations Emmel, Charles (furniture designer, mid-1800s), 36:96 Emmet, Fisher, & Flowers (pottery, c. 1815), 16:94 Employment, see Labor; Profession(s) Enabling Act (1960s), 39:72, 74; 43:89. See also Historical preservation; Law(s) Enclosure Act (1830), 43:74-75. See also Fences and walls; Law(s) Endecott, see Endicott Endicott, Emma, see Marean, Mrs. J. Mason Endicott [Endecott], Gov. John (c. 1589-1665), 7:52; 16:112; 24:70n6, 73-74n13, 75; 30:35; 32:110, 111; 39:59; 44:44, 46-47, 54
– arrival of, 21:20; 27:46; 30:33; 33:141-42 Endicott, Mrs. William C. (b. c. 1860; granddaughter of Samuel G. Ward), 35:40 Endicott family, 41:136
– at Harvard, 32:113 Enebuske, Mrs. Claes J. (Sarah McKean Folsom; d. 1939), 21:65; 25:16, 95, 96
– “Charles Folsom and the McKeans” (1939 paper), 35:97-112; 31:56; 33:52 Engineer Hall (Harvard), 43:62 England, see Britain England Company, see Plymouth Company English, George Bethune (1787-1828): excommunication of, 29:78-80 English, William (Boston reporter, 1842), 29:45n44 English, “Brother” (Harvard 1811), 36:60 English High School (Boston), 34:20. See also School(s) English Liberties, or the Freeborn Subjects’ Inheritance (Carter), 5:23 Enon, see Wenham, Massachusetts Ensign, James (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 22:76 (Map 1) Entertainment, see Arts, the; Club(s); Dancing; Domestic and family life; Music; Parties and entertainment; Society(ies) (organizations); Sports and games; Theatre Enthusiast, The, see Periodicals (general) Epidemics, see Disease Episcopal Church, 5:17n2; 10:125; 11:28, 55; 13:30; 16:104; 18:56; 33:139; 36:68, 70; 43:112
– corporate power of deacons of, 10:112
– and “Episcopal controversy” (c. 1740), 10:33n
– history of (Addison), 36:17
– and Huntington controversy (1860), 18:41-42; 33:23-25; 34:28; 36:62
– King’s Chapel changed to Unitarian congregation, 23:27; 41:42
– during Revolutionary War, 29:68-69
– secession from Congregational Church to, 5:58n5, 63; 9:32n1; 10:170; 16:79; 43:118-19
– Wellesley Conference, 21:69
– See also Christ Church; Church of England; King’s Chapel (Boston); St. James Church; St. John’s Memorial Chapel; St. Peter’s Church Episcopal City Mission, 34:41 Episcopal Theological School, 36:68; 43:91
– Deanery and land of, 13:87; 31:56; 32:7, 101; 36:17; 37:16; 41:27, 167; 42:43
– Harvard Divinity School and, 36:14, 71
– “Story of” (1955 paper), 36:7-21
– See also School(s) Epler, Rev. Percy H.: “Elias Howe, Jr., Inventor of the Sewing Machine” (1919 paper), 14:122-39 Epworth Methodist Church, see Methodist Church E.R.A. Headlights (1951), 39:105n80. See also Periodicals (general) ERA projects, see WPA projects Erics[s]on, Leif, see Leif Ericsson Erie (ship), 23:28 Erie Canal, 40:44. See also Canal(s) Erie Street, 14:62 Erikson, Leif, see Leif Ericsson Erinton, see Errington Ernst, Mrs. H. C. (Jamaica Plain house of, c. 1900), 43:167 Errington, see also Harrington Errington, Abraham (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Errington, Mrs. Ann[e] (of Shepard congregation; d. 1653), 14:98
– gravestone of, 17:34 Erskine, Clara, see Clement, Mrs. James H. Erskin[e], Sir William (Inman family friend, 1780s), 19:65 Erving, see also Irving Erving, William (d. 1791; Harvard benefactor), 38:70 Esquire magazine, see Periodicals (general) Essex (slave, mid-1700s), 17:51. See also Slavery Essex (British ship, captured c. 1812), 25:99 Essex, Massachusetts, 21:41 Essex County (England), 7:71-77 passim; 10:90-96 passim; 14:79-85 passim, 86 (map facing), 87-98 passim; 15:24; 21:79; 32:61; 42:99, 101; 44:41, 49, 55, 58, 59 Essex County (Massachusetts), 6:19; 10:156; 21:41, 42
– created as “shire” (1643), 39:58
– and Essex County Court, 17:20; 40:126
– redistricting of, 33:75 (see also Gerry, Gov. Elbridge) Essex Gazette and New England Chronicle (Salem weekly; later [as New England Chronicle] first newspaper in Cambridge), 15:16; 18:62; 30:59; 44:67. See also Periodicals Essex Institute (Salem), 9:47; 11:64n1, 65; 19:42; 21:83n1; 23:87; 25:67; 26:56nn88, 96, 60; 27:46n11; 30:59n; 39:152n18
– diaries in possession of, 5:56n4; 11:76-82 passim; 18:65n2 “Essex Junto” (Federalist group), 11:45. See also Federalist party/federalism Essex Street (Boston), 19:34; 39:32 Essex Street (Cambridge), 1:56; 8:37; 14:62; 16:87; 22:67 Estes, Ivory P. (shopkeeper, late 1800s), 8:39; 30:21 Estes, Mrs. Ivory P., 30:21 Ether anesthesia, see Medicine, practice of Etiquette, see Manners; Social class Eustis, Benjamin (mid-1700s; father of Gov. William), 9:6 Eustis, Prof. Henry Lawrence (1819-1885; engineer), 4:83 Eustis, Margaret (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Eustis, Richard (small boy in 1890s), 31:8 Eustis, Sadie (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:53, 56 Eustis, Gov. [Dr.] William (1753-1825), 9:6, 14, 15, 28; 22:48; 27:47, 62, 63
– letter to Craigie from, 27:53-54 Eustis Street (Boston), 21:27; 30:42 “Evangelical” Church, 20:63
– and Trinitarian-Unitarian controversy, see Unitarian Church Evans, C. H. (editor, c. 1900), 20:89 Evans, Charles (1850-1935; bibliographer), 38:96, 109; 44:68 Evarts, Jeremiah (1781-1831; lawyer), 16:105-6 Evarts, Rev. Prescott (1859-1931), 20:99; 41:142; 42:82
– obituary, 21:76-77
– “On a Certain Deplorable Tendency…to Abstain from Church-Going–as Observed in…1796” (1922 paper), 16:97-109 Evarts, Richard C. (“Stitch”; CHS member), 41:43, 141
– Jabberwocky parody by, 44:26-27
– papers by:
– – – “The Class of 1903” (1969), 41:132-40; 44:17n
– – – “Colonel Richardson and the Thirty-Eighth Massachusetts” (1961), 39:7-22 Evarts, William Maxwell (1818-1901; statesman), 10:154, 157, 161; 21:76; 23:84 Eveleth, Charles (at Fogg Museum, 1895), 35:57 Eveleth, Ellen Holman, see McKenzie, Mrs. Alexander Eveleth, Joseph (Suffolk County Sheriff, 1850), 41:87 Eveleth, Mrs. Joshua (of Princeton, Mass., 1790), 28:19 Eveleth, Mr. (college carpenter, early 1800s), 33:40 Evelyn, Capt. W. G. (1774), 5:66n2 Everett, Alexander Hill (1790-1847; brother of Edward), 44:181-82 Everett, Dean [Rev.] Charles Carroll (1829-1900), 20:58; 26:22, 30-32; 33:51, 114; 36:65, 66-67, 70; 10:145 Everett, Mrs. Charles Carroll, 39:44 Everett, Charlotte (1850s; daughter of Edward), 23:53-54 Everett, David (1770-1813; Boston attorney), 11:53 Everett, Rev. [Gov.] Edward (1794-1865; Harvard president 1846-49), 7:32; 13:98; 15:21, 38; 20:36; 28:23; 29:78; 31:64; 32:17; 34:38; 41:59; 44:182
– character of, 3:20-21; 4:32; 23:53; 33:152-53
– in Congress, 2:119; 23:53, 54; 33:152
– as Craigie House lodger, see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House (105 Brattle St.)
– as diplomat, 23:53; 28:80; 33:152
– as Governor, 4:28, 32; 25:58; 33:152; 35:13; 40:102
– as Harvard president, 1:66; 3:15n1; 4:88; 5:45; 15:37; 21:105; 28:115; 33:150; 35:95; 41:64, 72; 43:54; 44:131
– – – E. E. Hale on, 4:92-93
– – – inauguration of, 2:127; 36:107
– – – and Negro at Harvard, 42:111-12
– – – photograph of, 35:116
– – – residence of, 18:32; 33:153n7
– – – resignation of, 33:152
– as Harvard professor, 2:118-19, 121; 4:47; 11:21, 23. 29; 21:123; 28:117; 33:152, 153n7
– house of (Dorchester), 33:60, 151
– and Mount Auburn Cemetery, 34:79, 91; 44:176, 179
– as orator, 1:81; 2:31, 127; 14:24; 23:53; 25:37n30, 59n66, 108; 33:146-53 passim; 34:88; 35:95; 36:60; 43:77
– portrait of, 33:153n7
– as preacher, 9:37; 33:151
– quoted, 13:93-94; 23:53; 25:37; 28:118; 33:146, 149; 43:77-78; 44:124
– and slavery issue, 23:84; 28:80; 33:152
– street named for, see Everett Street Everett, Mrs. Edward (daughter of Peter Char-don Brooks), 11:23n2, 28 Everett, Mildred (daughter of Dean Charles C.), 33:51 Everett, Stevens (Berkeley St. resident, mid-1800s), 21:65 Everett, Mrs. Stevens (sister of Anne Abbot), 21:66, 67 Everett, William (son of Edward; schoolmaster, 1880s), 3:20; 28:118; 40:101-2 Everett, William (son of Stevens; late 1800s), 21:66 Everett, Miss (sister of Edward; Mrs. Nathan Hale), 21:105 Everett, Massachusetts, 21:27, 41
– boundaries of, 21:30, 34 Everett family, 25:106 Everett house (Berkeley St.), 21:66. See also Everett, Rev. [Gov.] Edward Everett Street, 14:62; 18:30; 22:77; 30:14; 34:65, 66, 75; 44:114
– naming of, 14:62; 25:120; 32:27; 33:151, 152; 41:19
– proposed extension for, 41:19 “Evergreen Nunnery,” see School(s) Every Saturday (magazine), 19:22. See also Periodical (general) Evolution
– vs. creation theory, 3:24, 29; 34:44
– lectures on (New York, 1890s), 31:16
– See also Darwin, Charles Ewan, Prof. Joseph (botanist; 1970s), 43:132n10 Ewell, Charlotte A. (teacher and schoolmistress, 1872-1920), 41:133-35, 138, 140; 44:14, 17, 19 Ewell, Gen. Richards, (1817-1872), 41:134 Ewell, Mr. (caretaker of Cook property, 1890s), 38:113 Examinations, see Education Exchange Coffee House (Boston): burns (1819), 16:58, 66, 96.- – See also Fire(s); Taverns, inns, hotels, and boarding-houses Excommunication, see Religion Execution(s)
– on Cambridge Common/Gallows Hill (1700s, early 1800s), 10:67n1; 17:46-53; 38:120
– in England (Puritan times), 32:50
– of John Brown, 2:51; 7:15; 37:88
– of Quakers, 24:69, 75
– See also Corporal punishment; Witchcraft trials Exeter, New Hampshire, 25:97, 110; 44:48. See also Phillips Exeter Academy Expenses
– account books showing:
– – – Christ Church, 10:25n1; 23:19, 20, 23
– – – Craigie, 12:9; 27:91
– – – Deacons’ Books (1637-1723), 10:114-15
– – – of Harvard Stewards (1650-1712), 37:7-21
– – – Lt. George Inman (1780s[?]), 19:47
– – – Rev. Parkman (1779-80), 11:67-68
– – – H. Vassall (1755-59), 10:12n1, 22-29 (and illus.), 34n3, 41n2, 42, 47n5, 63-64; 26:55
– – – “Window Shop” (1939-40), 43:97-98
– – – J. Winthrop (1766-79), 11:72
– arrest warrant for Quakers (1664), 24:72n8 (and illus. facing)
– Boat Club:
– – – float repairs, 39:141
– – – moving, 39:138, 139
– – – shower bath (“for the ladies”), 39:137
– – – tickets and dues, 39:132, 134, 137
– boat and canoe (c. 1910), 39:131, 134
– bridge construction costs, see Bridge(s)
– building and repair:
– – – 1640 (Harvard study), 3:15; 38:14
– – – 1650 (First Church), 38:17
– – – 1707 (Court House), 39:60
– – – 1718 (Massachusetts Hall), 3:18
– – – 1750s (meetinghouse), 24:52
– – – 1760s (Christ Church), 10:25n1; 23:19, 20; 33:64
– – – 1771 (barn frame), 5:62
– – – 1806 (meetinghouse), 16:86
– – – 1811-12 (Holworthy Hall), 7:65
– – – 1813-16 (county buildings), 16:92; 39:64, 111
– – – 1829 (“president’s house”), 4:91
– – – 1831 (Law School), 41:123
– – – 1838 (high school), 13:95
– – – 1848-49 (arsenal), 6:13
– – – c. 1850 (Nichols house), 37:69
– – – 1852 (meetinghouse), 20:70
– – – 1872 (meetinghouse), 43:121
– – – 1881 (Law School), 41:126
– – – 1896 (Court House), 39:66
– – – 1909 (Boat House), 39:128, 131
– – – 1923-25 (Fogg Museum), 27:25
– – – 1926 (parish house), 43:122
– – – 1927 (meetinghouse), 20:70
– – – 1931 (Court House and Boat House), 39:69, 136
– canal construction, 40:51, 53, 54
– care of horse (1791), 10:72
– Casino share costs (1882), 31:31; 39:126
– cemetery lot maintenance, 34:90-94 passim
– charity donations, 6:29 (see also Charity)
– city (1846-95), 42:88
– clothing costs, see Clothing
– “communion table” cost (Second Church, 1793), 43:117
– confiscated property costs, paid by crown, 33:67
– “Convention Troops,” 13:30, 64, 73, 75-79
– costumes for hostesses in historic house exhibition (1930), 27:99-100
– dinner parties:
– – – 1770s, 31:25
– – – 1841 (“Dickens Dinner” tickets), 28:61
– doctors’ fees, see Medicine, practice of
– “express” (New York-Boston, proclaiming peace, 1815), 16:57
– fence (ornamental) around Fort Washington (1858), 43:145
– fencing of “impaled land,” 14:34
– fines, see Fines and penalties
– fire damage (1869), 36:81
– Fire Department (1845 and 1932), 22:21
– fire engine (1803), and per hour (c. 1850), 16:42; 36:80
– firewood, see Firewood
– food, see Food (prices of)
– Fort Washington restoration (1850s, 1970s), 43:145, 146
– – – of fortifications, borne by towns, 10:90; 32:59-61
– freight:
– – – 1630s, 7:53
– – – 1755-59, 10:22
– – – c. 1770, 5:59, 61
– funeral, 9:39n1
– glass-mending (at Harvard, 1650-1712), 38:9, 15
– Harvard:
– – – 1631, 7:57
– – – 1650-1712, 21:78; 37:13; 38:7-22
– – – 1757-59, 10:26, 30
– – – c. 1780, 4:11-12; 11:66-68; 43:129
– – – 1793, 7:58
– – – c. 1800, 4:14; 11:34, 42; 29:24; 38:71, 72
– – – 1811, 4:18
– – – 1812, 7:65
– – – c. 1870, 4:85; 36:27-34 passim; 41:98
– – – c. 1905, 41:129
– – – 1939-40, 27:39-40
– (see also building and repair, above; Fines and penalties; Food)
– heating costs, see Heating
– Historic Commission survey, 39:75
– Hoosac Tunnel construction costs, 40:50
– increase in living costs (1778), 13:78n3
– interest (town, 1845 and 1932), 22:21
– interest rates, see Mortgages and debts
– labor, see Wages and salaries
– lawsuit:
– – – 1656 (Dunster-Glover case), 39:59
– – – 1700s, 16:31, 74, 82
– – – 1800s, 16:86, 87; 40:55-56
– MIT tuition (1918, 1919), 42:56
– ordination of minister (c. 1670), 31:63
– pew rent, see rent, below
– planting around Christ Church and Common (1950s), 35:27-28, 31
– Police Department (1932), 22:21
– poor relief, see Charity
– postal (1806), 9:10
– powder magazine cost (1818), 14:45
– printing (Proceedings, 1917), 12:54
– printing press (1802), 44:72
– railroad (Harvard Branch) construction and operation (1840s), 38:26-27, 32-45
– rent, 8:35; 10:54; 13:30-31, 44n3, 64; 20:119-20; 22:75; 33:14; 36:105; 37:69
– – – from “Convention Troops,” 13:29-31, 64
– – – fish weir, 5:38
– – – Gallows Lot, 17:47
– – – Harvard printing office, 44:78
– – – Harvard rooms, 7:65; 34:16; 38:9. 14, 18; 41:129
– – – Harvard wine cellar, 38:9, 14, 21
– – – pew, 5:63; 10:42
– – – and rent control, 44:101
– – – during Revolutionary War, 13:44; 19:57
– – – safety vault, 41:41
– – – stable, 10:12n1
– road/street building and maintenance, 14:45, 47, 59; 22:21
– school, 13:90, 102-3; 16:41, 48; 22:21 (see also Harvard, above)
– servants, and support of, 10:24-25, 71n3, 72, 73-74
– snow removal (1856), 25:133
– Soldiers’ Monument cost, 43:77
– street maintenance, see road/street building and maintenance, above
– street railway cable system (estimated), 39:94
– town (1845 and 1932), 22:21
– travel, 5:61n1; 10:26-27, 29 (see also Prices [fares])
– “tree-planting,” 41:53
– tuition, see Harvard; MIT tuition, above
– Water Works, 41:8, 10, 12, 13
– weathervane repairs (1785), 33:45
– well-digging (1806), 16:45
– See also Economic conditions; Fines and penalties; Finances and fund-raising; Money; Mortgages and debts; Prices; Taxation/taxes Explorations
– of Charles River, 16:111; 21:21, 22; 39:24, 25
– coastal (1602), 33:135 Express
– goods shipped by, see Business and industry (shipping)
– messages sent by, see Communication(s)

F

Fabens, Mary, see Boles, Mrs. Mary Fabens
F. A. Colburn’s jewelry store (1912), 8:36
Factories, see Business and industry
Factory whistle, 40:34
Faculty Club, see Club(s) (at Harvard)
Fagginger-Auer, Prof. J. A. C. (Dutch theologian), 36:66
Fahrney, Mrs. Pearl Brock (CHS member, 1950s), 34:29
Fair, Prof. Gordon M. (Scott St. resident, 1935-50), 41:12, 38
Fair, Mrs. Gordon M., 41:38
“Fair Harvard” (Gilman), 13:86; 32:78
– writing of (200th anniversary, 1836), 4:27; 23:113; 33:15; 36:59; 41:95
– written at Fay House, 27:99; 28:113; 44:142
– See also Music Fair Oaks Street, 14:63; 39:15 Fairs and festivals, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Fairbairn, John (Sheriff, 1899-1920s), 42:119 Fairbanks, Charles F. (businessman, 1883), 42:73 Fairbank(s), Dexter (on meetinghouse committee, c. 1830), 20:64, 66 Fairchild, Mrs. (Brattle St. resident, 1915), 43:167 “Faire” (first) grammar school, see School(s) Fairmount Street, 22:73 Fairweather, see Fayerweather Falcon (British warship, 1776), 19:52 Fales, Samuel (in Dedham church case, 1820), 43:120 Fales, Mrs. (daughter of Edward Gray), 20:95; 28:115 Fales family, 20:96 Fales house, 20:98 Fall River, Massachusetts, 30:50
– boat train to, 40:33 Falxa house, see Brattle Street houses (No. 133) Familiar Quotations, see Bartlett, John Familists (sect), 44:47. See also Religion Family life, family size, see Domestic and family life Family Welfare Society, see Charity Faneuil[l], Benjamin (builds house on “Roxbury Path,” c. 1750), 10:19; 26:72n19 Faneuil, Peter (1700-1743), 26:72n19 Faneuil Hall (Boston), 25:68; 26:72n19
– meetings at:
– – – anti-slavery (1854), 23:85
– – – labor union (early 20th c.), 33:128
– – – Leif Ericsson ceremony (1887), 40:102
– – – political (1852), 10:137
– – – speeches at (1837, 1865), 7:27; 10:154
– – – town meetings (1760s, 1770s), 3:56; 26:78, 82; 30:53
– during Siege of Boston, 22:40
– weathervane of, 33:45 Faneuil Hall Market (Boston), 32:100; 34:104 Faneuil Street (Cambridge), 26:72n19 Fares (bridge tolls, ferry, omnibus, railroad, street railway), see Prices Farewell, see also Farwell Farewell, George (lawyer, 1687), 39:63 Fargo, Moses (of Connecticut): orderly book kept by (1775), 11:70 Farley, Miss Caroline (Plant Club member, 1889), 35:18 Farley, George (Billerica, mid-1600s), 9:75, 76 Farley (committee member, 1777), 13:51 Farley, Miss (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:52 Farlow, Prof. William G. (1844-1919; botanist), 18:38; 24:83; 27:13; 35:45; 40:145
– buys Quincy St. house (1894), 18:38 Farlow, Mrs. William G. (Lillian Horsford), 13:7; 19:7; 23:92; 28:106, 117; 40:100; 43:168
– in “Bee,” 17:77, 79, 82, 83
– and Berkeley St. School, 32:32, 36, 38
– “Quincy Street in the Fifties” (1925 paper), 18:27-45; 33:25n40; 43:7n1
– on Radcliffe committee (1878), 6:52 Farlow Herbarium, 44:21. See also Botany Farm and Garden Association, 35:22 “Farms, the,” see Lexington, Massachusetts Farms and farming, see Agriculture and horticulture Farmers’ Alliance (1880s), 20:27 Farmer, Mr. (butcher, 1870s), 30:13, 16-17 Farnham, see also Farnum Farnham, J. C. (Humane Society secretary, late 1800s), 6:28 Farnsworth, Amos (1754-1847): diary of (1775-79), 11:76 Farnsworth, Dr. Charles H. (1870s), 20:103 Farnsworth, Mrs. Ward (Jean Bartholow Magoun), 43:24 Farnum, see also Farnham Farnum, Miss Elizabeth (historian, 1930s), 22:13n1; 35:24 Farragut, Adm. David G. (1801-1870), 25:99-100; 39:21
– letters from, 25:101-2, 110-11 Farrar, see also Farrer Farrar, Florence (schoolgirl, 1890s), 34:64 Farrar, Prof. John (1779-1853; mathematician), 1:16; 11:29, 31; 28:26; 36:59; 41:33
– houses of, 41:119; 44:135
– street named for, 41:37; 42:25 (see also Farrar Street) Farrar, Mrs. John (Eliza Rotch), 1:16-17; 4:89; 41:33 Farrar, Samuel (Harvard 1793; artist), 42:118 Farrar (formerly Webber) house, 41:118 (illus. facing), 119. See also Harvard Law School (buildings of) Farrar-Moore house, 44:135 Farrar Street, 41:22, 25, 36, 38
– residents on (1890-1969), 41:37; 42:14-27 passim; 44:112 Farrer, see also Farrar Farrer, Miss Fanny (British friend of Longfellow’s), 28:92 Farrington, Charles C. (historian, 1918), 43:81 Farrington, Thomas (landowner, c. 1780), 16:78 Farrington (“agent” for John Vassall property, Revolutionary period), 10:71 Farrington (of Osgood & Farrington, apothecaries before Revolution), 8:33, 38 Farrington (editor of Horticulture magazine, c. 1920), 35:20 Farwell, see also Farewell Farwell, Deacon Levi (mid-1800s), 14:65
– shop of, 1:22; 2:31; 8:37 Farwell, Stephen T. (Humane Society president, 1860-72), 6:28 Farwell, Deacon William (opposes slavery, c. 1840), 20:69, 71-72 Farwell family, 22:27 Farwell Place (formerly School Court), 7:104; 13:98; 14:65; 23:19; 35:25, 26-27; 39:48; 42:45 “Farwell’s Corner” (Boylston St.), 8:37, 39 Fashions, see Architecture, styles of; Clothing; Hairdressing fashions; Jewelry Fast-days, see Religion Father Mathews Total Abstinence Society, 36:103. See also Wine and spirits (and temperance movement) Faulkner, Barry (painter, 1920s), 33:60 Faulkner, F. (on meetinghouse committee, 1827), 20:64 Faxon, Hope (Dramatic Club, 1939), 38:62 Fay, Capt. Aaron (1770s), 5:56 Fay, Almira, see Leavitt, Mrs. Erasmus Darwin Fay, Anna Maria (“A.M.”; “Annie”; mid-1800s), 24:41-47 passim; 32:8-15 passim, 21, 22
– letters quoted, 24:47; 32:13, 17, 23-24 Fay, Rev. Charles (Harvard 1829), 12:15, 18; 16:65 Fay, Harriet (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Fay, Isaac (Hospital benefactor, 1870s), 16:116; 35:86; 39:44 Fay, Joseph Story (b. 1812): letter from, 24:30-31 Fay, Miss Maria Denny (b. 1820), 12:35; 13:86; 21:105; 25:128, 129; 33:44; 42:121; 44:142
– letters of, from England (1851-52), 32:7-24 Fay, Pauline, see Jackson, Mrs. Arthur L. Fay, Richard Sullivan (son of Judge Samuel P. P.), 16:65; 32:8, 11-22 passim Fay, Richard Sullivan, Jr., 32:17, 20 Fay, Samuel Howard (son of Judge Samuel P. P.), 32:8 Fay, Judge Samuel Prescott Phillips (b. c. 1790), 9:10; 13:86; 22:24; 25:45; 28:115; 32:7, 18, 21, 92; 41:77
– residences of, 9:7, 18; 25:128; 35:53n2 (see also Fay House)
– and trees on Cambridge Common, 33:38; 35:30 Fay, Mrs. Samuel Prescott Phillips (daughter of Samuel Howard), 9:7, 9, 10, 16, 18; 13:86; 25:128 Fay, Miss S. B. (of Woods Hole, c. 1910), 43:168 Fay, Sidney (b. 1876; historian), 40:156 Fay House, 20:19
– architecture of, 20:95; 27:99; 43:43; 44:139, 142-43, 144
– early days of, 23:26; 28:113; 33:41, 43, 153n7; 43:73
– – – Fay family in, 24:30; 25:128; 32:7, 92; 33:44; 35:53n2
– – – hens kept at, 12:35; 26:17; 42:121
– – – McKean family in, 25:104
– – – Radcliffe acquires, 22:107; 44:142-43
– history of (Baker), 20:20n1; 33:44; 43:81
– sit-in held at (1968), 44:153
– site of (1630s), 22:77
– views of (1875, 1881, 1887), 44:139, 142-43, 152 (illus. #1, #4, #5, #7 following) Fayerweather, Anne, see Mason, Mrs. Thaddeus (third wife) Fayerweather, Hannah, see Winthrop, Madam John Fayerweather, Hannah Waldo, see Fayerweather, Mrs. Thomas Fayerweather, John (of Westborough, d. c. 1827), 17:58; 32:23 Fayerweather, Mrs. John (Sarah), 17:58 Fayerweather, Rev. Samuel (1770s), 17:57; 37:23 Fayerweather, Sarah (second wife of John Appleton), see Appleton, Mrs. [Consul] John Fayerweather, Sarah (Mrs. John (of West-borough), 17:58 Fayerweather, Sarah Hubbard, see Fayerweather, Mrs. [Capt.] Thomas Fayerweather, Thomas (of Boston, mid-1700s; father of Capt. Thomas), 17:57 Fayerweather, Mrs. Thomas (Hannah Waldo), 17:57 Fayerweather, Capt. Thomas (d. 1805), 9:19n1, 33; 14:65; 17:57, 58; 24:64; 37:23; 42:118
– troops quartered on, 5:25-26; 11:66, 78; 25:88
– See also Ruggles-Fayerweather house Fayerweather, Mrs. [Capt.] Thomas (Sarah Hub-bard; d. 1804), 17:57, 58 Fayerweather house and estate, see Ruggles-Fayerweather house Fayerweather Street, 14:71; 20:18; 26:26, 46; 29:68; 37:22; 39:86; 43:9-19 passim, 26-30 passim, 165; 44:142, 163-68 passim
– architecture on, 43:11, 160 (illus. #5 following), 161, 167
– laid out, named, 14:65; 43:8 Fayerweather-Lee Historic District, 39:74; 42:34, 35, 41 Fayette Street, 16:90
– architecture on, 26:41
– Cambridge High and Latin Schools on, 13:105; 30:84; 34:67; 35:96, 97
– Dodge house on, 30:72, 73-74, 80, 87 Fearing, Daniel B. (Harvard benefactor, early 20th c.), 27:38 Federal National Bank, see Banks and trust companies Federal Register, see Periodicals (general) Federal Reserve Act, see Law(s) Federal Street (Boston), 11:29n3
– Federal Street Church, 11:34
– Federal Street Theatre, 32:81 Federal Street (Salem), 23:87 Federalist party/federalism, 3:62; 10:135; 40: 14
– vs. Democrats/Whigs, 4:24; 16:83, 127; 28:22, 23; 33:73-74; 38:73, 76
– in elections (1798, 1800), 11:38, 43n1
– “Essex Junto,” 11:45
– Harvard attitude toward, 11:43n1; 33:74
– See also Politics Feer, Robert A. (at Northeastern University, 1964): “The Devil and Daniel Shays” (1964 paper), 40:7-22 Fein, Albert (architecture historian, 1960s), 43:81 Felch, Jemima, see Hasey, Mrs. Abraham Felch, Samuel (tailor, c. 1760), 10:24 Fellows, Harvard, see Harvard Corporation Fellows, Society of (Harvard), 34:16-17 Fellows’ Orchard, 3:17; 22:65; 26:59; 29:23; 33:9 Fellowship Club (Boston), see Club(s) Felton, Cornelius Conway (1807-1862; Harvard president 1860-62), 14:8; 16:124; 29:45n47; 33:23, 25; 37:77; 38:26
– in Cambridge society, 1:70; 2:75; 7:32; 25:110; 28:112, 115
– character of, 2:129, 130; 3:25-26; 26:103n71; 28:56, 63, 66, 92; 33:20, 154
– and Dickens, 21:123; 28:59, 63-71 passim, 75-86 passim, 91, 92, 104n; 33:19-20; 34:23; 35:47n1
– family of, 33:155; 35:36; 38:32n14; 43:60, 64
– inauguration of, 2:125-26, 127-28; 21:17-18; 33:20n32
– library of, 27:37
– and Longfellow, 25:22, 25, 36, 37, 43, 47, 48, 107; 28:56, 66, 67, 77-79 passim; 33:20, 154; 35:47
– papers on (1907, 1931), 2:117-30; 21:122-24
– photograph of, 35:116
– quoted, 2:120-29 passim; 28:56, 64-65, 77, 78; 29:43; 33:21
– – – on architecture, 26:102n71; 31:58; 33:16, 17, 19
– residences of, 1:15; 18:34, 42-43; 33:21, 30, 36
– scholarship of, 2:116, 117-20, 124; 26:103n71; 33:20, 30, 32. 154
– on School Committee, 13:110; 35:96
– street named for, see Felton Street
– as teacher, 2:119-22, 125; 3:26; 35:47-48, 53
– as tutor, 2:118, 126 Felton, Mrs. Cornelius Conway (sister of Elizabeth Caryl, 18:34; 35:47; 43:60-61 Felton, Cornelius Conway, Jr. (b. 1852), 21:122 Felton, Mrs. Cornelius Conway, Jr. (Eunice Whiting F.)
– papers by:
– – – “Mrs. Alexander and Her Daughter Francesca” (1919), 14:106-13
– – – “President Cornelius Conway Felton” (1931), 21:122-24; 33:19n29 Felton, Julia (schoolgirl, 1850s), 35:46 Felton, Lisa (schoolgirl, 1850s), 18:35 Felton, Molly (schoolgirl, 1850s), 18:43; 35:48 Felton, Samuel M. (1809-1889; engineer), 33:155; 38:26-34 passim, 38, 47 Felton Hall (Harvard), 33:151 Felton Street, 14:62; 25:120; 33:151 “Female High School” (1841),. see School(s) Female Humane Society, see Charity Fences and walls
– around arsenal, 33:49
– burned for firewood, 10:52n1; 31:26
– around burying ground (Garden St.), 22:77; 25:126; 33:40-41; 35:23; 41:161
– – – gates to be replaced (1936), 24:10
– around Casino, 39:127
– cattle enclosed by, 31:53; 42:80; 43:69
– children sitting or walking on, 9:5; 18:31, 40; 22:54; 32:26
– around Christ Church, 35:26-27
– around (or in) Common, 4:26; 14:46; 20:93; 25:126; 30:14; 33:38, 39, 41; 35:30, 31, 33; 39:113; 43:73-76, 80
– – – DAR gateway, 33:39; 43:79, 80
– – – Enclosure Act (1830) and, 43:74-75
– disregard of, 38:114, 117
– and Dudley Gate (Quincy St.), 30:29
– “famous rail fence” (at Bunker Hill), 5:21, 26, 27
– around Fort Washington (ornamental), 43:143, 145, 146
– around Fresh Pond (c. 1890), 41:9
– and gateposts, 14:105; 32:26
– granite, 41:160; 44:185
– around Harvard Yard, 30:12-13, 14, 25
– – – gates in, 3:53; 23:36; 25:103; 30:12, 16, 41; 33:124; 40:115; 42:71; 43:84
– hedges, see Agriculture and horticulture
– and Holmes Field Gate, 33:37, 95
– and “impaled land” (1630s), 9:71; 14:34; 16:75; 20:126; 21:24, 84; 22:18, 60, 76-77; 26:66; 32:61; 37:29
– around Lechmere estate, 26:57
– Mount Auburn fence and gate, see Mount Auburn Cemetery
– around Norton’s Woods, 23:77-78
– palisade, see Fortifications
– around private houses or gardens, 20:101; 21:58; 22:50-55 passim; 24:95; 25:128; 30:15, 20, 27; 31:47-48; 33:29; 41:27, 167
– around Storer house (near Fresh Pond), 3:106
– town wall, see Fortifications
– turnstile in Farrar St. hedge, 42:17
– around Vassall estate, 9:7; 10:11n3; 21:109; 26:53, 55; 31:28, 29, 39, 57
– Viewer of (as town office), 26:73; 31:25
– around Wadsworth House garden, 1:19
– around Washington Elm, 22:22
– against wild animals, see Animals
– across Windmill Lane/road to Brick Wharf (and gate in), 10:11n1; 31:25-26 Fenn, Anna Yens (schoolgirl, 1890s), 42:132 Fenn, Rev. Dan Huntington (b. 1897), 41:30
– “Let Us Remember: A Cambridge Boyhood” (1976 paper), 44:9-27 Fenn, Mrs. Dan Huntington, 41:30 Fenn, Dorothy {daughter of Dean William W.), 44:18 Fenn, Dean (Rev.) William Wallace (1862-1932), 18:12; 23:43; 35:116; 36:70, 71; 44:9, 14, 18, 24, 27
– Quincy St. house of (moved), 18:44; 33:25; 44:20-22 (and cover photo) Fenn, Mrs. William Wallace (Faith Huntington [Fisher]), 18:44; 44:9, 13, 18 Fennel, Mr. (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:59 Fenno, John (1751-1798; editor), 11:81 Fens and Fenway (Boston), 39:32, 34; 42:50 Fenton, Captain (friend of John Rowe, 1771), 19:48 Fenwick, Bishop Benedict J. (1782-1846), 36:99 Ferguson, Prof. William Scott (Scott St. resident, 1916), 41:38; 44:34, 35 Ferguson, Mrs. William Scott, 41:38 Fernald, Mr. and Mrs. Mason (Reservoir St. residents, 1970s), 43:10 Ferris, Emma Baldwin, see Livingston, Mrs. Oscar Frederick (first wife) Ferris, John (organist, choirmaster, 1960s), 41:102 Ferry, Miss Barbara (tobacco shop manager, 1950s), 41:111, 112 Ferry(ies), 11:64; 16:38; 23:17; 33:69
– animals accommodated on, 7:54, 55
– bridges replacing, see Bridge(s) (effects of)
– Cambridge/Bridge Sts. (petition for, 1738), 14:56
– Charlestown (estab. 1631), 7:53, 54, 57; 14:33; 33:143-44; 39:109; 43:73; 44:58
– Dunster St. (estab. 1635), 7:53; 8:31; 14:33, 37, 39n1, 47; 20:110; 22:66; 37:29; 39:26, 126
– – – site marked, 1:58
– and “ferriage” charges, see revenue from, below; Prices (fares)
– Kennebec River (Maine), 30:81
– Mount Auburn (estab. 1633), 7:53, 54-55, 56; 26:69n11
– revenue from, 33:144; 41:159
– and storehouse at ferry landing, 32:101
– See also Travel/transportation Fessenden, John (settler, 1637), 14:101 Fessenden, Miss Marion Brown (CHS member; d. 1930), 39:57
– as descendant of early settlers, 5:53 Fessenden, Nicholas (1650-1718/19): descendants of, 5:53 Fessenden, Nicholas, Jr. (1681-1719; schoolmaster), 22:75; 24:6; 35:93 Fessenden, Sewall H. (glass seller, late 1800s), 19:41 Fessenden, Thomas Green (1771-1837; satirist), 34:88 Fessenden, William Jr. (Harvard 1737; schoolmaster), 10:19, 31; 33:63n26; 35:93 Festivals, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Fettee, Mr. (art teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1870s), 32:37 ffessenden, see Fessenden Fiedler, Arthur (1894-1979; orchestra conductor), 35:107 Field, see also Fields Field, David Dudley (1781-1867; lawyer), 7:45 Field, Mrs. Herbert H. (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 21:66 Field, Joseph M. (1810-1856; actor), 28:59 Field, Rachel (1894-1942; novelist), 40:119 “Field Lane,” 14:35; 22:61 Fields, see also Field Fields, James T. (1817-1881; editor and publisher), 2:62; 4:61; 7:32; 19:21-22; 33:81; 37:89
– and Dickens, 28:58, 86, 87, 91-95 passim, 100; 29:44 Fields, Mrs. James T. (Annie Adams), 4:60; 7:32; 28:91, 93, 94, 95, 102 Fields Osgood & Company (publishers), 19:22 Fifth Street, 18:19 Filene, Edward A. (1860-1937; merchant), 40:35 Fillebrown, Edward (1749-1798; tanner), 21:104 Fillebrown, Thomas (d. 1714): descendants of, 5:52, 53 Fillebrown, Thomas (“Convention Troops” quartered on, 1770s), 13:24n1 Fillebrown family, 10:115 Filley, Mrs. Oliver B. (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 21:61 Finances and fund-raising
– church, see Religion
– for education, 43:107, 108, 110 (see also Education [scholarships])
– Harvard, see Harvard College/University (funding of)
– for historic preservation, 42:32, 40, 44; 43:89, 92, 93, 143, 145, 146
– by lottery, 3:54, 55; 7:65; 10:23
– Maria Bowen Fund (CHS), 24:23
– for private schools, 42:130
– Radcliffe, 44:150-51
– YWCA, 35:44, 45-46
– See also Cambridge (Mount Auburn) Hospital (individuals and organizations aiding); Economic conditions; Expenses; Fines and penalties; Money; Prices; Taxation/taxes; Wages and salaries Finch, E. E. (portrait painter), 24:26 Finch, Henry T. (Harvard 1876; music critic), 32:88 Fine Arts Museum (Boston), see Museum(s) Fines and penalties
– for absence from public worship (1659), 24:78n26
– for allowing children to carry fire (1636), 36:75
– for allowing hogs to run loose (1646, 1647), 14:47, 70
– “Bee” (1868), 17:71, 72
– Book Club ( 1888), 28:116
– for breaking parietal rules (Radcliffe, c. 1919-1960s), 41:147, 149, 153-54, 155
– for damaging Common (1830), 43:74
– for digging ground from highways (1678), 14:47
– for entertaining Quakers (1660s), 24:70, 79
– for entertaining strangers (1647), 18:13
– for failing to attend monthly meeting (1632), 10:91
– for failing to clean streets (1634, 1642), 14:46; 22:64
– for failing to keep ladder available (1650), 36:77
– for failing to observe Sabbath, 16:101-4 passim; 33:141
– for failing to restrain dog (1662/3), 14:48
– for felling trees (1633), 14:33; 23:76
– at Harvard, 11:39n2; 38:9
– – – for card-playing, 37:14
– – – for entering buttery, 38:13
– – – for failing to ask blessing, 11:48
– – – for making noise, 10:30-31n1; 11:49
– – – for neglect of studies, 38:13
– – – for tardiness or absence, 10:30n1; 29:24; 38:14, 16
– – – for throwing bread, 11:44
– (see also Harvard student(s) [discipline of])
– for intoxication (1636), 37:30
– for lack of “ordinary” within town (1656), 37:31
– for misuse of government funds, 20:67
– probation vs., 16:26
– for refusing to serve as warden (1782), 16:103-4
– for reviling ministers (1663), 24:79n31
– selectmen, for tardiness at meetings (1684), 43:115
– for violating fire ordinances (1636, 1650), 36:75, 77
– See also Law(s) Finnegan, Ann (Webster household domestic, 1850), 41:78 Fiorelli, David (Ehrlich’s manager, Boston, 1950s), 41:112 Fire(s)
– Boston:
– – – 1760, “great fire,” 10:114; 11:74
– – – 1794, ropewalks, 39:30
– – – 1800s, 4:34; 19:23; 29:51n70; 41:72
– – – 1819, Exchange Coffee House, 16:58, 66, 96
– – – 1824, “great fire” (Beacon St.), 23:51, 52
– – – 1827, Wells publishing house, 17:58; 22:92; 25:92
– – – 1872, “great fire,” 15:51; 34:63
– – – 1900s, Revere House, 25:91
– and bucket brigade, 10:12n3; 36:78, 79; 37:80; 42:110
– and bucket niche in house, 23:92
– “in Cambridge” (1956 paper), 36:75-92
– Cambridge:
– – – c. 1671, Court House, 24:82n35; 39:59
– – – 1700s, Hooper-Lee-Nichols house, 37:129
– – – 1750, Phip[p]s house, 16:31; 22:69-70; 36:95
– – – 1754, meetinghouse, 24:51
– – – 1775, see Charlestown, below
– – – 1777, Foxcroft house, 20:118; 41:20
– – – 1800s, 4:34; 13:101; 16:54; 22:75; 42:117
– – – c. 1820, Foxcroft house, 41:33
– – – 1839, first tavern; Dana house, 6:21; 10:159; 26:94; 43:44
– – – 1840, H. Vassall house (servant sets); Craigie barn, 21:104-5; 23:57; 25:44-46; 27:67
– – – 1844, Stone farmhouse, 13:86
– – – 1850s, 16:40; 20:98; 34:29; 39:113
– – – 1869, Chapman carriage works, 36:81
– – – 1890s, 23:44-45; 34:64-65; 40:34
– – – 1900s, 25:46n39; 34:30; 38:124; 40:34
– – – 1904, trolley bridge, 39:101n68
– – – 1917, Agassiz house, 18:35; 35:37
– – – 1923, East End Union, 18:20
– – – 1967, Farrar-Moore house, 44:135
– (see also Charlestown; at Harvard, below)
– canal boat (1840), 24:38
– carrying, 36:75 (see also Heating)
– Charlestown (destroyed, 1775), 10:54; 19:51; 33:149; 41:160 (see also Bunker Hill, Battle of)
– Chicago (1871), 25:95; 34:63, 69
– danger of, 8:35; 11:39n3; 20:118n1; 36:75-77; 41:126; 42:19; 44:45
– and fire alarms, 30:16; 35:60; 40:34; 44:11
– – – “Brighton bull,” 30:21
– and fire engines, 18:35; 36:77-91 passim; 44: 11
– – – attached to horse car, 39:85
– – – college engine-house, 8:36
– – – cost of ( 1803), 16:42
– – – Fire Department refuses, 10:12n3; 36:78
– – – gift of, 36:111
– – – hourly charge for, 36:80
– – – private, 10:12n3; 26:55; 36:78
– – – steam, 36:80-82, 83, 90; 39:20
– at Harvard:
– – – 1764, Harvard library, see Harvard Hall
– – – 1876, Hollis Hall, 30:14-15
– – – c. 1900, Thayer Hall, 35:60
– – – 1918, Dane Hall, 41:130
– – – Massachusetts Hall (three times), 34:18; 42:70
– and hose bridges (for street railway), 39:85
– Montreal (“great fire,” 1768), 18:17n2
– Nantucket (1846), 27:45, 66
– New York (1835), 4:28; 24:30
– ordinances regarding (1636, 1650), 36:75, 77
– schoolhouse, 13:101
– Somerville (1954), 36:88, 92
– Somerville convent (c. 1830), 1:50
– and volunteer fire fighters, see Cambridge Fire Department
– water supply and, see Water supply
– See also Cambridge Fire Department Fire Department, see Cambridge Fire Department Fire engines, see Fire(s) Fireplaces, see Food (cooking/kitchens); Heating; Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Firewood, 32:97; 34:84
– for army (1770s), 10:52n14; 20:92; 25:70; 31:26; 33:38; 37:60
– Common as source of, 43:68, 69
– donations of, toward minister’s salary, 31:64
– driftwood as, 22:73
– at Harvard, 4:18; 8:36; 11:68; 22:72; 29:24; 38:9, 16
– – – shipped from Maine, 44:79
– – – woodhouses for, 7:64
– price of, 9:66; 10:22; 38:9
– scarcity of (1770s), 5:59n10; 10:52n1; 13:17, 32, 33, 35, 38; 17:58; 20:92; 22:67; 26:60; 31:26; 33:38; 37:60
– for schools, 13:91; 35:94
– shipping of (by water), 5:59n10; 40:45, 49; 44:79
– and wood-burning locomotives, 30:81; 38:36
– See also Heating; Trees Firmin, Deacon (First Church, 1630s), 10:97 First Baptist Church (Central Square, Cambridgeport), 13:110; 20:65; 36:43; 39:40, 117; 42:115
– deacons and ministers of, 8:37; 10:173; 16:64-65; 20:64; 35:87; 42:111
– See also Baptist Church First Church (Boston), see Boston, Massachusetts First Church and Parish, 10:74n2; 20:128; 25:26, 108; 29:68-69
– annexation of Charlestown and Watertown territory by (1754), 14:78; 24:58-62
– anniversary of (250th, 1886), 7:84; 42:94; 43:151
– – – C. W. Eliot’s address at, 32:113-14
– – – Judge Holmes’s address at, 23:70-71; 32:114
– and baptism controversy, see Religion
– beginning of (1633-36), 1:35-40; 10:86-115; 23:71; 31:61-65; 32:61-63; 34:29; 42:103; 43:112, 113-14n, 124
– – – early name of, 10:105
– bell for, 43:118
– CHS seal depicts church, 3:6, 19
– as corporation, 10:112
– covenant of, 44:48 (see also Religion)
– deacons of (in legal controversy, 1820), 10:112-13 (see also ministers and deacons of, below)
– Deacons’ Books of, 10:114-15; 18:16; 43:125
– “Distaff Side” (1933 paper), 22:80-96
– division of (Trinitarian-Unitarian [Holmes] controversy, 1828), 1:34, 39, 51; 2:29; 4:29, 41; 10:112-13; 11:30-31; 20:63; 29:70, 71; 31:64; 33:12; 34:30; 42:83; 43:119-21, 124, 125, 148; 44:69
– and excommunication proceedings (1808-14), 29:73-81
– General Court meets in church, 10:100; 42:82
– Harvard and, 1:38-39; 10:43n1; 24:59; 31:66
– – – “gallery money” for, 38:9, 17
– histories of, 1:35-40; 3:109-13; 10:86-115; 17:92-97; 29:68-81
– meetinghouses built, 3:18; 10:42, 90, 97; 16:86; 17:92, 97; 24:49-66; 31:62, 64; 42:80; 43:118 (see also Meetinghouse sites)
– ministers and deacons of, 1:35, 39; 2:29; 3:16, 18, 110-13; 9:6, 10; 10:97, 99-100, 112-13; 11:42n1; 16:98; 17:58, 92, 97; 21:64; 22:80-91 passim; 23:67; 24:50-62 passim; 26:74; 29:69-81 passim; 31:64-65; 32:29; 36:60; 37:11; 38:77; 43:113-19; 44:69, 70 (see also entries for individual ministers and deacons)
– parish organized (1733), 17:92-97
– parsonage of, 22:88 (see also Parsonage[s])
– pew ownership and sale, 5:62; 10:43; 16:79; 24:59; 31:64
– Poor’s Fund, 18:16-17
– Records of, 5:55-58nn; 26:74n28
– secession from (by Episcopal congregation), see Episcopal Church
– Second and Third Parishes separate from, 16:44; 17:96; 39:109; 42:79; 43:119 (see also Brighton, Massachusetts; Menotomy [now Arlington])
– sextons of, 6:24
– See also First Church and Parish, Congregational (Shepard Memorial Church); First Church and Parish, Unitarian-Universalist First Church and Parish, Congregational (Shepard Memorial Church), 6:77; 8:36; 10:110; 11:81; 34:41; 41:44; 42:103
– Archives of, 42:96
– history of (1974 paper), 43:111-26, 151
– Hoyt controversy and, 20:74
– ministers and deacons of, 10:180, 188; 13:110; 20:75; 21:65; 29:70-71; 31:64-65; 39:40, 89; 43:113-24; 44:69
– organization of, under Rev. Holmes, see Holmes, Rev. Abiel (as pastor of First Church)
– parsonage given to, 32:115; 33:50, 53
– sexton of, 2:34
– Shepard Historical Society of, 10:184; 32:115
– sites and buildings of, see Meetinghouse sites
– steeple and weathervane of, 3:46; 25:108; 33:44-45; 43:121-22; 44:19-20
– transfer of members to (from Prospect Church), 20:74
– view of, from Memorial Hall tower (1875), 44:139, 152 (illus. #1 following)
– See also Congregational Church/Congregationalism; First Church and Parish; Shepard, Rev. Thomas First Church and Parish, Unitarian-Universalist, 2:29; 7:84; 10:169, 175, 185; 11:55; 12:23, 69; 17:44; 18:18, 22; 21:64; 41:165; 42:103
– Annual Meeting of, 44:115
– beginning of (1633-36), 1:34; 10:110; 31:61-62; 42:103
– benefactors of, 18:22; 31:65; 41:165
– burying ground near, see Burying ground(s) (old, Garden St.)
– Children’s Library at, 44:114
– Harvard Commencements held at, see Harvard College/University
– Holmes controversy and, see First Church and Parish (division of)
– Junior Committee of Twelve of, 44:105-17 passim
– meetinghouses of, 8:36; 25:126; 31:64; 33:40; 42:80, 83
– – – architecture of (1833), 26:41
– ministers and deacons of, 2:29; 6:77; 7:104-5; 17:59; 22:93, 94, 96; 25:93; 31:61-65; 33:114, 115-16; 41:142, 157
– Parish House (“Vestry”) of, 30:14; 40:147; 44:106, 107, 113, 115
– parsonage of, 33:45
– “Recollections of…in 1905-1906” (1942 paper, read in 1978), 44:105-20
– Sunday School of, 11:55; 30:14; 33:50; 44:18
– Third Congregational and Lee Street societies join, 34:30-32
– Women’s Alliance of, 27:99
– See also First Church and Parish; Unitarian Church; Universalist Church First Church/Parish (Nantucket), 27:58, 84 First Corps of Cadets (Boston, Civil War), 2:39 First Evangelical Congregational Church in Cambridgeport, see Prospect (Street) Congregational Church First Fruits, see New England’s First Fruits First National Bank (Boston), see Banks and trust companies First Parish, see First Church and Parish; First Church/Parish (Nantucket) First Religious Society, see Newburyport, Massachusetts First Street, 14:52; 36:98; 39:121 First Universalist Church, see Universalist Church Fischer, see also Fisher Fischer, William G. (hotel owner, 1875), 37:34 Fish, Frederick P. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:41 Fish, Margaret (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:43 Fish Street (Boston), see North Street (Boston) Fish weir, see Fishing (as industry) Fisher, see also Fischer Fisher, Ethel (Radcliffe 1883), 44:142 Fisher, Faith (Huntington), see Fenn, Mrs. William Wallace Fisher, George (merchant and editor, mid-1800s), 14:130-35 passim; 20:86; 32:91-92; 36:109 Fisher, Rev. George Park (1827-1909), 36:27 Fisher, Jabez (Council member, 1777), 13:39n3 Fisher, Dr. John (1797-1850), 34:88 Fisher, Dr. Joshua (of Beverly, d. c. 1833; Harvard benefactor), 38:86; 43:139, 140 Fisher, Sarah Cordelia, see Wellington, Mrs. Austin Clarke (second wife) Fisher, Thomas (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1) Fisher, William Ames (music historian), 41:90 Fisher, Captain (friend of Parkman family, late 1700s), 11:68 Fishing (as industry), 5:17
– in Alewife Brook, 20:125
– for alewives, 5:33-37, 40, 41-42
– early explorations and, 33:135
– fish weirs built, 5:34-41; 39:126; 41:7; 44:44, 46
– and “fishing” corn, 5:33-41 passim
– General Court and, 5:32, 35-36, 41; 21:41, 45-46
– on Menotomy River, 41:7
– – – paper on (1910), 5:32-43
– oyster fishing, 16:75; 35:80, 89
– and salt fish business, 15:40; 37:23
– See also Business and industry Fishing (as sport), see Sports and games “Fishponds,” 26:53, 56. See also Craigie Estate; Ponds and lakes Fisk, see also Fiske Fisk, James L. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:41 Fisk, Mrs. J. C. (with Massachusetts Indian Association, 1890s), 17:84 Fisk, Rev. Wilbur (1792-1839), 33:151 Fisk, William (alderman, 1846), 20:64; 22:24 Fisk, Mrs. (Quincy St. resident with three sons, mid-1800s), 18:36 Fiske, see also Fisk Fiske, Augustus H. (Buckingham Pl. resident, c. 1910), 43:168 Fiske, Mrs. Charles (May Thorndike; schoolgirl, 1880s), 32:42 Fiske, Ensign David ( 1623/24-1710/11; wheelwright, surveyor), 14:70-71, 94
– descendants of, 5:53, 54 Fiske, John (1842-1901; historian), 2:62; 13:76n2; 19:29; 20:58; 24:99; 30:29; 32:92; 33:71n47; 36:27, 80; 40:145; 41:125
– quoted, 15:27, 28; 16:82; 30:33; 32:28; 39:85
– sites of houses, 1:65; 21:59, 70; 25:116, 121; 44:30 (see also Stoughton house) Fiske, Mrs. John (sister of James Brooks), 21:59, 70; 41:166 Fiske, Mrs. Mary (mother of John), see Stoughton, Mrs. Edwin Wallace Fiske, Minnie Maddern (1865-1932; actress), 35:122 Fiske, Rev. Nathan (1733-1799): diary of, while Harvard student (1754), 11:73 Fiske, Sarah Ripley, see Bobbins, Mrs. Chandler Fiske, Rev. Thaddeus (1762-1855; at West Cambridge), 16:46, 98 Fiske family, 21:63, 70 Fitch, Rev. Jabez (1717), 3:112 Fitch, Jabez (1775), 10:34
– diary of, 10:53n1 Fitch, Samuel (Loyalist, of Boston, 1778); 10:49 Fitch, Rev. Mr. (from Andover, late 1800s), 20:96 Fitch house, see Dickson-Goddard-Fitch house Fitch-Gilbert family (Fayerweather St. residents, 1902), 43:18 Fitchburg Railroad, see Railroad(s) Fitchburg Station (Boston), 25:131 Fitz, Miss (dressmaker, 1870s), 30:19 Fitzgerald, John E. (politician, 1880s), 20:45 Fitzgerald, Mayor (of Boston] John F., 6:58; 43:29 Fitzpatrick, Frank (North Ave. resident, mid-1800s), 36:95, 101 Fitzpatrick, Fr. John B. (1812-1866), 36:99 Fitzpatrick, Professor (with Art Dept., c. 1900), 27:20 Five Nations, see Indians “Five of Clubs,” see Club(s) Flag, English: at Castle Island (1630s), 44:46 Flag, U.S., 17:67, 78
– “Cambridge” (1775), 15:11, 56
– and flagpole erected on Common (1914), 43:80
– lack of official, 18:58 Flagg, Eliza (slave), 10:73n3. See also Vassall family Flagg, Elizabeth Sanderson, see Dow, Mrs. Sterling Flagg, George Whiting (1816-1897; painter): Allston portrait by, 29:16 (illus. following) Flagg, Gershom (stable owner, 1758), 10:12n1 Flagg, Dr. Henry Collins (c. 1800; stepfather of Washington Allston), 29:14-15, 19, 23, 31 Flagg, Mrs. Henry Collins, 29:32, 33 Flagg, Jared B. (Allston biographer, 1892), 29:24n29, 36n10, 42n33, 61n96, 62n101, 63nl06 Flagg, Wilson (writer, 1860s), 44:186n24 Flanders, Miss Elizabeth B. (teacher, early 20th c.), 35:108 Flandrau, Charles M. (1871-1938; essayist), 34:40n3 Flebbe, Mrs. Beulah Dix (playwright, 1920s), 40:112 Fleet, John and Thomas (Boston printers, 1798), 15:17-18 Fleet Street (Boston), 21:90, 91 Fleetwood, Col. George (one of regicides, 1649), 3:7 Fleetwood, Mrs. George (Katherine Owfield), 3:7 Fleisher, Rabbi Charles (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Fleming, see also Flemming Fleming, Dr. Alexander (1881-1955; British bacteriologist), 33:117 Fleming, John (publisher; d. 1800), 30:53, 64, 67 Fleming, Thomas J. (historian, 1960), 39:29n16 Flemming, see also Fleming Flemming, J. Frederick (editor, 1922), 20:90 Fletcher, Joanna, see Ames, Mrs. William Fletcher, Louise, see Chase, Mrs. C. L. Fletcher, William (on meetinghouse committee, 1753), 24:59 Fletcher, Dr. William K. (1870s), 20:103, 108 Fletcher, Professor (theologian; author, 1950s), 36:20 Fletcher family (of England, 1630s), 14:90 Flint, Deborah, see Lee, Mrs. Thomas Flint, Ensign Edward (of Salem, mid-1600s), 16:18 Flint, Gladys R. (Lowell essay prize winner, 1919), 14:29 Flint, Rev. Henry (ordained in Braintree, 1640), 23:80 Flint/Flynt, Rev. Henry (1675-1760), 2:16; 3:112; 42:122
– diary of ( 1724-47), 11:70
– and “Flint’s pond,” 2:16 Flint, Mr. (landowner, 1642), 9:72 “Flip,” see Wine and spirits Floods and flooding
– by Charles River, see Charles River (as tide water)
– by “Craigie Brook,” 25:109; 31:56, 57
– See also Dams and dikes; Weather Flora, see Agriculture and horticulture; Botany “Floricultural Club” (Cambridge Plant Club), see Club(s) Flowering of New England, The, see Brooks, Van Wyck Flucker, Lucy (Mrs. Henry Knox), 19:50 Flying Hart (ship), 7:96 Flynt, Henry, see Flint/Flynt, Rev. Henry Fogg, James (brother of William; d. 1855), 35:58 Fogg, Maj. Jeremiah (1776), 6:21 Fogg, Mrs. Jeremiah (Lydia Hill), 6:21 Fogg, William Hayes (1817-1884; manufacturer), 27:12, 16; 35:57-58 Fogg, Mrs. William Hayes (museum benefactor), 27:12, 16, 23; 35:57 Fogg Art Museum, 34:9; 38:113; 44:134
– Allston paintings at, 29:52n74, 53nn76, 79; 34:19
– architecture and architect of, 23:25; 27:14, 17, 21-25 passim
– bequests and donations to, 27:11-27 passim; 35:57-58, 61-63, 72-75 passim
– Copley paintings at, 22:88
– Dreyfus Collection at, 35:69
– Friends of, 27:23; 35:67-68
– Gray Collection/Fund at, 27:18; 35:57, 61-63, 65
– history of, (1941, 1954 papers on), 27:11-27; 35:57-78
– “new” (present):
– – – construction of, 18:33, 45; 27:24-25; 35:72-73
– – – dedication of (1927), 35:74
– – – expansion of, 27:13
– – – site of, 27:24-25; 35:35, 37, 45, 50
– “old” (Robinson Annex/Hunt Hall), 27:16, 17, 21-24, 26, 100; 35:57-61, 69, 75
– – – graffiti on back of, 44:25-26
– Oriental art in, 27:20, 21, 24; 35:67, 68, 75
– personnel at, 33:52; 41:23
– pipe organ at, 27:68
– See also Arts, the; Museum(s) Fogg Brothers (c. 1850), 35:58 Follen, Prof. (Rev.) Charles (1796-1840), 1:13, 17; 2:26; 11:30, 31; 18:40; 20:99; 21:65; 36:61
– biographies of, 18:7n1
– death of, 32:28; 33:46
– house built by, see Follen-Todd-Walcott house
– street named for, 14:65; 25:121; 32:28 (see also Follen Street) Follen, Mrs. Charles (Eliza Lee Cabot), 1:17; 2:27; 11:30; 20:95, 99 Follen, Mrs. (“eminent teacher in Boston,” 1828), 11:31 Follen Place, 14:65 Follen Street, 2:39; 6:13; 18:39; 20:15; 21:59; 33:37, 49, 99; 41:136
– architecture of, 26:40 (and illus. following)
– arsenal on corner of, see Arsenal (Cambridge)
– Bowen house on, offered to CHS, 24:18-19, 20-21
– brook on, 20:97; 31:55
– naming of, 14:65; 32:28
– “Reminiscences of” (1928 paper), 20:91-101; 31:55 Follen-Todd-Walcott house, 20:95, 97-98; 26:40 (illus. #12 following), 43; 31:55; 33:46 Folsom, Rev. Charles (1794-1872; chaplain; Harvard Librarian; editor), 1:22; 15:19; 21:64-65, 68; 28:112; 31:58; 44:76, 84
– paper on (1939), 25:97-112; 31:56 Folsom, Mrs. Charles (Susanhe Sarah McKean), 9:66, 68; 21:65; 25:102, 107-10 passim; 28:112; 31:58-59 Folsom, Mrs. Charles Follen (CHS donor, 1914), 9:62 Folsom, Elizabeth (Garden St. resident, 1920s), 43:168 Folsom, Elizabeth Howe, see Folsom, Mrs. Norton Folsom, James (of Exeter, N.H., 1794), 25:97 Folsom, Mrs. James (Sarah Oilman), 25:97 Folsom, John (joins Hingham colony, 1615; moves to Exeter, N.H., 1630s), 25:97 Folsom, Mrs. John (Mary Gilman), 25:97 Folsom, Miss Mary: girls’ school of (late 1800s), 21:65. See also School(s) Folsom, Gen. Nathaniel (1726-1790), 7:82; 18:57 Folsom, Dr. Norton (late 1800s), 21:65; 25:95; 38:53, 54, 55 Folsom, Mrs. Norton (Elizabeth Howe), 21:65; 25:95 Folsom, Sarah Gilman, see Folsom, Mrs. James Folsom, Sarah McKean, see Enebuske, Mrs. Claes J. Folsom house, 31:56 Food
– apples, apple “pyes,” 2:28
– – – Baldwin developed, 40:52; 42s 120
– for armed forces:
– – – British (1770s), 5:81n; 19:52, 54
– – – Continental troops/militia (1770s), 11:66; 18:69; 37:48
– – – “Convention Troops” (1770s), 13:17, 56, 78, 79
– – – Union Army (1860s), 40:99, 100
– of “Banks Brigade”/”Bee,” 17:65, 72, 77
– “Berwick sponge cake,” 30:81
– at Boston Museum art school, 34:72
– bread, sale of, 8:34; 37:31; 43:116 (see also Retail and food stores [bakeries])
– clams, 35:89
– codfish, 34:60 (see also Fishing [as industry])
– Colonial diet “staples,” 10:22
– on Commencement Day, 3:105; 15:20 (see also at Harvard, below)
– of Concord student (1840s), 28:25
– cooking/kitchens, 21:97; 23:79
– – – equipment for (inventoried, 1769), 10:80-81
– – – fireplace/brick (“Dutch”) oven, 23:79; 25:89, 125; 34:59; 36:75; 37:72
– – – gas stove, 42:10
– – – Spartan fare, 26:17-18, 29; 42:27
– – – “tin kitchen,” 34:59
– – – water used in, 40:58
– (see also Domestic and family life)
– “country breakfast,” “country dinner” (c. 1810), 3:103, 104, 105
– “delicacies,” 41:66
– at Dickens Dinner (Boston, 1842), 28:62
– and first public eating place near Harvard Square, 30:21
– fish, see codfish, above; prices of, below
– at Harvard, 26:29; 34:40
– – – from “Buttery,” 29:20 (see also Harvard College/University)
– – – at Commencement, 11:27; 15:20
– – – “Commons,” 8:38; 9:24-27; 11:44, 49; 18:30; 22:103; 25:131-32; 26:95; 29:20, 27; 33:40; 38:11-12. 18, 33n17, 49; 41:20, 33
– – – cooks and bakers and, 8:31, 34, 38
– – – “Hasty Pudding,” 29:27
– – – price of (1600s), see prices of, below
– – – professors’ (Sophocles, Langdell), 26:17-18, 29
– – – “sizings,” 11:67; 38:9, 11-12, 18
– – – student complaints about, 9:24-27; 15:20; 26:95; 37:30
– hasty pudding, 3:103, 106; 29:27
– “heavy tea” (evening meal), 26:114
– Horsford’s work on chemistry of, 40:99, 100
– Indian, 35:89
– Indian pudding (in England, 1783), 19:67
– jelly-making, 30:81
– kitchens, see cooking/kitchens, above
– for Loyalists during Revolution, 30:62
– milk, 13:56; 16:38, 54; 34:60 (see also Animals)
– New England boiled dinner, 42:16
– oysters:
– – – consumption of, by Prof. Felton (1842), 34:23
– – – sale of (1816), 8:35
– at parties, 16:23; 44:107-8, 109, 112, 114. 115, 116
– at Porter’s Tavern (1799), 29:29
– – – Porterhouse steak, 37:35
– prices of, 10:22, 114; 25:94
– – – at Cambridge Synod (1643), 32:108
– – – England (1850s), 24:47
– – – fish (c. 1640 and 1700), 5:35, 36, 38, 41
– – – at Harvard (1600s), 32:108; 38:9, 10, 11-12, 18
– – – restaurant, 37:35
– and slaughter houses, see Business and industry
– in “store closet,” 21:117; 34:61
– strawberries at Cape Ann (1630), 30:34
– at strawberry parties, 16:23
– Thanksgiving dinner, 28:18
– at Trust Company dinners, 41:50-51
– turtle meat, 10:29; 31:25
– See also Agriculture and horticulture; Business and industry; Domestic and family life; Fishing (as industry); Parties and entertainment; Restaurants; Retail and food stores; Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses; Tea; Wine and spirits Foote, Flag Officer Andrew H. (1806-1863), 23:30 Foote, Arthur W. (1853-1937; composer), 32:84, 87 Foote, George (of Vermont, 1770s), 7:104 Foote, Rev. Henry Wilder (CHS member, d. 1965), 16:97; 27:45n10; 32:85; 38:87, 109; 42:94; 43:151
– “The Harvard Divinity School as I Have Known It” (1956 paper), 36:53-74 Foote, Miss Mary Bradford (1827-1912): obituary, 7:104 Foote, Nathaniel (of Watertown and Connecticut, 1630s), 7:104 Foote, Mrs. Rosa, see Hutchins, Rosa Forbes, Abner (writer, 1851), 39:119 Forbes, Allyn B. (on burying-ground committee, 1930s), 22:13n1; 35:23 Forbes, Edith, see Webster, Mrs. Kenneth G. T. Forbes, Edith Emerson, see Forbes, Mrs. William Forbes, Prof. Edward Waldo (Harvard 1895), 13:87; 20:9; 32:99; 37:127, 128; 41:23, 99; 44:36
– as Fogg curator, 27:20-27; 35:57, 61, 64, 65-68, 72-74
– papers by:
– – – “The Agassiz School” (1953), 35:35-55
– – – “The Beginnings of the Art Department and of the Fogg Museum of Art at Harvard” (1941), 27:11-27; 35:35 Forbes [?], Ellen (1858), 35:46 Forbes, Prof. Elliot: “The Musical Scene at Harvard” (1968 paper), 41:89-104 Forbes, Glidden (schoolboy, 1908), 43:29 Forbes, Mrs. Harriette M. (of Worcester): “Early Cambridge Diaries” (1916 paper), 11:57-69 Forbes, Harry (schoolboy, 1908), 43:29 Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Magoun (Reservoir St. residents, 1908), 43:29 Forbes, Sir John (British physician, mid-1800s), 4:51 Forbes, John M. (1813-1898; financier), 7:15 Forbes, “Mac” (schoolboy, 1908), 43:29 Forbes, Rev. Perez (1742-1812): diary of, while Harvard student (1759-60), 11:74 Forbes, Lt.-Col. William (“Willy”; father of Edward W.), 27:13; 35:45, 46 Forbes, Mrs. William (Edith Emerson), 27:13, 14; 35:35, 38, 44, 45, 50
– letters to and from, 35:40-41, 43, 44, 46-51 Forbes, William A. (Police Court clerk, 1920s), 17:23 Forbes, Captain (and King’s Chapel, 1756), 10:42 Forbes, Mr. (grandfather of Edward W.), 35:44 Forbes, Mr. (Boat Club member, 1920s), 39:133 Forbes family, 16:79 “Forbes Plaza” (Holyoke Center), 41:53 Forbes-Robertson, Sir Johnston (1853-1937; English actor), 40:115, 117 Forchheimer (Pierian Sodality leader), 41:102 Ford, Deville (of Maine, mid-1800s), 30:82 Ford, Emily, see Akin, Mrs. William Lyman Ford, Henry (1863-1947; industrialist), 19:27; 20:102; 21:54 Ford, Prof. James (d. 1944), 40:146, 147, 151, 158 Ford, John (newspaper editor, mid-1800s), 20:86; 36:109 Ford, Joseph Sherman (of Maine, mid-1800s), 30:82 Ford, Dr. Samuel (of Maine, mid-1800s), 30:81-83, 84 Ford, Mrs. Samuel (Sarah Sherman), 30:82 Ford, Sarah Ellen (of Maine, mid-1800s), 30:82 Ford, Worthington Chauncey (historian; d. 1942), 39:158n31
– “Certain Defects in the Publications of Historical Societies” (1910 paper), 5:5-20 Ford, Professor (c. 1900), 35:122 Fore River Ship and Engine Company (Quincy), 35:84 Forest Pond, 34:84. See also Mount Auburn Cemetery; Ponds and lakes Forest Street, 42:25 Forrester (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:46 Forst, Abraham, see Frost, Abraham Forster, John (1812-1876; English biographer and critic), 28:57, 59, 65-87 passim, 93, 100-104 passim; 29:45n48 Forster, [British] Major (1778), 13:79 Fort Devens (Ayer, Massachusetts), 43:162 Fort Hall, Idaho, 28:36, 50, 52-53, 54 Fort Hill (Boston), 27:52; 29:60 Fort Independence (“The Castle”), 6:6-8, 11; 37:12 Fort Norumbega, see Norumbega Fort Putnam (1775), 6:34; 22:71; 36:94, 99; 43:143
– site established, 1:66 Fort Street, 14:60, 67 Fort Warren, 6:13; 43:145
– Civil War prisoners at, 34:33 Fort Washington (1770s), 39:29; 41:166; 42:82
– restoration of, 23:10, 99; 39:72; 43:141-46
– – – recommended (1917), 12:51
– – – as residential square (1840s), 43:144-45
– site of, 1:56; 14:35; 16:38; 22:58; 29:26, 35 Fortesque, Sir John (English historian, 1928), 39:158n29, 164n32 Fortifications
– of Bay Colony, 21:21, 23; 22:59; 30:35; 31:23, 24; 32:65, 71-72; 33:95; 39:25; 43:112; 44:41, 43-45, 61
– of Dorchester (1630s, 1775-76), 11:78; 32:71; 37:50; 44:43
– fosse, 31:24, 54-55; 33:9, 14; 39:126
– palisade against Indians, see town wall planned/palisade built, below
– Revolutionary War, 11:78; 14:40, 60; 18:27, 57, 63; 29:26; 33:9, 148-49; 36:94; 39:29; 42:82; 43:141-43, 144 (illus. facing), 145 (illus. facing)
– – – of Bunker Hill, 5:26, 27; 33:148; 37:50, 51
– – – of Halifax, N.S., 5:69-70
– – – sites marked, 1:56
– (see also Siege of Boston; entries for individual forts)
– town wall planned/palisade built (1630s), 10:10; 22:97, 106; 30:36-37; 31:24, 30, 38, 44, 53-55, 57; 32:59-61; 33:95; 39:126; 41:26; 42:80; 43:85; 44:41, 44
– – – expansion beyond, 21:31 (see also Cambridge, Massachusetts [boundaries of])
– – – taxation to pay for, 9:71; 10:90; 21:24; 31:23; 32:59-61; 44:44-45, 46
– – – trees felled for, 30:36; 33:37
– – – West Gate of Palisade, 24:63
– (see also Trees [willow])
– watch-house (and controversy over), 44:44-45
– See also Castle William/Castle Island; Fences and walls; entries for individual forts Fortune magazine, see Periodicals (general) 47 Club, see Club(s) 47 Workshop, see Theatre (Harvard) Fosbroke (at Episcopal Theological Seminary, c. 1900), 36:16 Fosgate’s market, 44:12. See also Retail and food stores Foss, Alden S. (CHS member), 37:129
– “Boston Woven Hose and Rubber Company: Eighty-four Years in Cambridge” (1964 paper), 40:23-42 Fosse, see Fortifications Foster, Dr. Andrew (d. 1831), 9:7, 14, 19, 23, 28, 29-30, 37; 21:102, 103; 27:52, 64 Foster, Mrs. Andrew (Mary Conant), 21:103 Foster, Bossenger (1742-1805)
– Craigie letters to, 27:61, 62hn48, 49, 75
– death of, 10:58; 27:63
– family of, 9:23nn1, 2; 11:13, 18n2; 15:27; 21:85, 102, 110; 22:89; 23:56; 27:51
– land ownership by, 16:89; 27:54, 55
– portrait of, 27:56, 57, 88
– silver porringer of, 27:88-89
– in Vassall (Henry) house, 15:27; 22:89; 27:89 Foster, Mrs. Bossenger (Elizabeth Craigie, first wife), 9:7, 19-37 passim; 21:102, 103; 22:89; 27:46, 51, 57, 63; 29:72 Foster, Mrs. Bossenger (Mary Craigie, second wife), 11:18n2; 22:89; 27:46, 51, 52, 56-57, 64, 88, 89 Foster, Bossenger, Jr. (“Bos”; d. 1816), 9:7, 23; 21:102, 103; 27:51, 52, 56, 64
– miniature of, 27:57, 88 Foster, Catharine (daughter of Charles C., c. 1840), 25:129 Foster, C. C. (landowner, 1816), 3:101 Foster, Miss C. H. (of Needham, c. 1910), 43:168 Foster, Charles Chauncy (Kirkland St. resident, 1836-75), 21:106; 23:57; 25:129; 41:32 Foster, Dr. Charles F. (c. 1860), 7:81 Foster, Edward (of Scituate; early settler), 15:27; 27:51 Foster, Elizabeth [“Betsy”] (daughter of following), see Haven, Mrs. Samuel Foster, Elizabeth Craigie, see Foster, Mrs. Bossenger Foster, F. Apthorpe: Waquoit cottage of, 43:168 Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Francis C. (Hospital benefactors; Berkeley, later Oxford St., residents), 16:116; 21:59 Foster, George (d. 1817, in epidemic), 9:7; 11:18n2, 32n; 21:85, 86, 102, 103; 26:96; 27:64; 33:9-10 Foster, Dr. Isaac (Harvard 1758), 30:58, 63 Foster, Deacon James [Thomas?] (of Boston, 1770s), 22:88 Foster, James (court-martial trial of, 1775), 37:58 Foster, James (cordwainer, 1778), 37:21 Foster, James (d. 1817, in epidemic), 9:7, 23; 11:18n2, 32n; 21:85, 86, 102, 103; 26:96; 27:52, 64; 33:9-10 Foster, Rev. John (1763-1829; at Brighton), 11:40; 16:97; 43:119 Foster, John (1782-1836), 9:7, 23; 21:102, 103, 104. 110; 27:52, 64 Foster, Joseph (d. 1835), 9:33
– “and Shays’s Rebellion” (1921 paper on), 15:27-29 Foster, Mrs. Joseph (Miriam Cutler, first wife), 15:27 Foster, Mrs. Joseph (Mary Davis [Sohier], second wife), 15:27 Foster, Joshua (businessman, 1883), 42:73 Foster, Margery S.: “The Cost of a Harvard Education in the Puritan Period” (1959 paper), 38:7-22 Foster, Mary (d. 1815), see Foster, Mrs. Bossenger (second wife) Foster, Mary (d. 1817), see Milliard, Mrs. Timothy Foster, Miss Mary Craigie (1795-1811), 9:7, 23; 21:102, 103; 27:63-64 Foster, Dr. Michael (of England, c. 1900), 21:61 Foster, Mrs. Michael, see Swan, Margaret Foster, Richard (Sheriff, mid-1700s), 17:52 Foster, Samuel (nephew of Mrs. Craigie; sells land, 1849), 43:44-45 Foster, Sarah (daughter of Charles C., c. 1840), 25:129 Foster, Sarah Banks, see Foster, Mrs. [Deacon] Thomas [James?] Foster, Sarah Bossenger, see Foster, Mrs. Thomas Foster, Susan Cabot, see Batchelder, Mrs. Francis Lowell Foster, Thomas (pewterer, c. 1740), 21:102; 27:51 Foster, Mrs. Thomas (Sarah Bossenger), 21:102 Foster, Deacon Thomas [James?] (of Boston, 1770s), 22:88 Foster, Mrs. [Deacon] Thomas [James?] (Sarah Banks, second wife), 22:88 Foster, Dr. Thomas (d. 1831), 9:7, 23, 28, 30; 11:24n1; 21:102, 103, 110; 27:52, 64
– builds “Dana-Palmer” house (1822/23), 11:32n; 20:60; 21:86, 104; 33:10 (see also Dana houses [#10]) Foster, Dr. (in Mr. Bradish’s house, 1777), 13:44 Foster, Mr. (of Boston; in London, 1780s), 19:64 Foster family, 10:115; 14:80; 27:63-64; 32:14, 22
– in Vassall house, see Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall) Foster property, 22:66 Foster Street, 37:18 Fothergill, Dr. John (1712-1780; of London), 4:23, 24, 30; 16:127; 43:127, 128, 130, 131 Founders’ House, see Radcliffe College Founding of Harvard College, The, see Morison, Samuel Eliot Foundries, see Business and industry Fountains: in Mount Auburn Cemetery, 34:84 Fourierism, 34:25. See also Brook Farm Fourth of July, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Fourth Street, 1:66; 3:52; 14:40; 17:21; 36:94, 99, 102, 104; 39:69 Fowle, Daniel (printer, 1754), 26:78-79 Fowler, Ambrose (of Westfield, 1669), 23:90 Fowler, Miss Frances (Francis Ave. resident, 1905-10; later Kirkland Pl. resident), 16:29; 23:15; 34:64; 41:28
– “Kirkland Place” (1935 paper), 23:76-94 Fowler, Samuel (of Westfield, c. 1800), 23:90 Fowler, Mrs. Samuel (Maria Jones), 23:90 Fowler, Samuel Jones (1851-1931; engineer), 18:33; 23:78, 81, 90, 91, 92; 41:28 Fowler Street, 14:63 Fox, George (1624-1691; English religious leader), 24:69, 70n6, 74 Fox, Gertrude (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:43 Fox, Judge Jabez (Irving St. resident, 1889-1922), 17:23; 20:39, 40, 44; 39:91; 41:34; 42:25 Fox, Mrs. Jabez, 41:34 Fox, Mayor James A. (1880s), 13:9; 17:23 Fox, Thomas (on highway committee, 1662), 14:38 Fox (1798 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:36 Fox, Mr. and Mrs. (Francis Ave. residents, 1941), 41:30 Fox family, 22:27 Fox Island, 38:54 Foxborough, Massachusetts, 21:37, 38 Foxcroft, Judge Francis (1657-1727; landowner), 14:103; 22:72, 73; 41:19, 32 Foxcroft, Mrs. Francis (Elizabeth Danforth; d. 1721), 22:72; 41:19 Foxcroft, Judge Francis [Jr.] (1695-1768; Loyalist), 20:118; 41:19-20 Foxcroft, Francis (landowner, 1810), 14:57; 41:20n3 Foxcroft, Francis Augustus (Harvard 1829), 12:15 Foxcroft, Frank (temperance advocate, 1890s), 20:75; 38:115
– “No-License in Cambridge” (1918 paper), 13:9-16; 20:41 Foxcroft, Henry (Loyalist, 1770s), 22:71 Foxcroft, John (Loyalist; d. 1802), 10:71; 14:64; 17:47; 20:117-18, 119, 122; 41:20 Foxcroft, John (nephew of above), 20:119 Foxcroft, Rev. Thomas (1697-1769), 2:16n3; 22:72-73 Foxcroft family, 10:115; 22:27; 41:20 “Foxcroft House,” see Foxcroft-Danforth house site Foxcroft property, 18:27; 22:68, 75; 23:24, 25; 41:19-20 Foxcroft Street, 14:64; 38:115-16; 41:19. See also Cambridge Street Foxcroft-Danforth house site, 1:63; 21:80; 41:19-20, 32-33
– fires at (1777, 1820s), 20:118; 41:20, 33
– “Foxcroft House” (boardinghouse) at, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses (Miss Upham’s boardinghouse)
– See also Oxford Street (“No. 1”) Foye, Sophia Augusta, see Sortwell, Mrs. Daniel Robinson Frame, Rev. James Everett (Harvard 1891), 35:112 Framingham, Massachusetts, 14:93; 24:29
– land holdings in, 21:81
– settlement of, 7:75; 11:37n1
– slaves bought in, 28:20 France
– ambassadors or commissioners to, 10:159; 16:14, 15; 27:55 (see also Appleton, John; Franklin, Benjamin; Gerry, Gov. Elbridge)
– civil law of, 7:39-46 passim
– and England (during American Revolution), 3:59, 69, 76; 5:83; 16:72; 19:58, 62, 68; 26:82
– and French and Indian Wars, see War(s)
– and “French” architecture, see Architecture, styles of (mansard-roof)
– and French Revolution(s), 13:85; 15:43; 16:100
– Harvard visited by officers from (1917), 34:11-12
– Huguenot refugees from, 33:148n6
– “Longfellow and” (1928 paper, mentioned), 20: 14
– North American colonies of, 5:76, 79; 6:6; 21:19; 26:82
– Ohio land sales to emigrants from, 27:54-55
– in Seven Years War, 22:30
– wallpaper imported from, 21:56; 31:71-72; 39:48-49 (illus. between), 52
– and “XYZ affair” (1798), 3:61; 6:11; 11:36; 15:43; 33:73; 37:26 Francis, Rev. [Prof.] Converse, 20:95, 98; 24:66; 25:121; 28:115; 36:63, 65 Francis, Mrs. Converse, 20:98 Francis, Rev. Eben (1819-1892), 41,18, 27 Francis, Ebenezer (Harvard Treasurer; d. 1858), 4:90, 91, 92; 41:17; 44:79 Francis, Ebenezer (1790-1886; “college carpenter”), 23:78; 41:17-18, 27 Francis, Miss Helen (1846-1933; daughter of Rev. Eben), 23:78; 41:18, 27 Francis, Richard (d. 1687), 14:98
– descendants of, 5:54; 22:119 Francis, Rev. Mr. (of Watertown, 1829), 12:21-22 Francis Avenue, 23:77, 78, 79; 34:64
– “and the Norton Estate” (1967 paper), 41:16-39; 42:116
– residents of (1836-1969), 20:12; 22:16; 41:27-32; 42:26 Francis family, 10:115 Francis Place/Street (later Francis Avenue), 41:18, 27 Francke, see also Frank; Franke Francke, Prof. Kuno (1855-1930; philologist), 18:7n1; 23:43; 35:121; 39:134 Franco-Prussian War (1870), 23:91. See also War(s) Frank [first name] (Boat Club caretaker, 1947), 39:139 Frank P. Merrill Co., 8:36, 39 Frank Street, 20:133; 37:36 Franke, see also Francke; Frank Franke, Gilbert (awarded Longfellow Medal, 1910), 5:46 Frankland, Lady Agnes Surriage (1726-1783), 10:44, 47n3; 30:62 Frankland, Sir Charles Henry (“Harry”), 30:62 Franklin, Benjamin (1706-1790; statesman), 8:13; 10:178; 22:46; 23:77; 26:90; 30:66; 39:157n27; 43:128; 44:81, 144
– as ambassador to France, 3:59, 76; 4:23; 26:87
– in England (1774), 3:57; 9:40; 14:99
– and “Independency,” 26:85
– quoted, 14:99; 30:70
– statue of (Boston), 34:88 Franklin, Massachusetts, 21:37, 38 Franklin Fire Society, 36:79, 80. See also Cambridge Fire Department Franklin Hall, 39:9 Franklin Street (Boston), 27:45; 41:80 Franklin Street (Cambridge), 1:56; 43:142
– schoolhouse on, 13:91-93; 16:48 Franquinet (painter, 1839): Longfellow portrait by, 25:42 (and illus. following) Frary, Sampson (of Deerfield, 1680s), 10:172 Frary house (Deerfield, Mass.), 10:172; 33:39 Fraser, Mrs. Cecil E. (Esther Stevens), 10:22
– papers by:
– – – “The John Hicks House” (1929 and 1932), 20:110-24
– – – “Painted Decoration in Colonial Homes” (1930), 21:50-57 (illustrated) Frederick the Great (1712-1786; king of Prussia), 7:39 Frederick William IV (1795-1861; king of Prussia), 2:85; 4:88; 43:56-59 passim Free Church of Worcester (1850s), 37:85, 87 Free Masons, see Masonic Order Free Soil party, 7:6, 12; 10:135-37, 141, 146; 25:136; 37:82, 83, 87. See also Politics Freedley, Vinton (theatrical producer), 38:57 Freedom
– in education, 2:55
– and freemen, freeman’s oath, 5:52; 32:59, 64, 74; 44:53, 64 (see also Voting)
– of the press, 26:78-79; 44:66
– of speech, 34:12-13; 37:83
– of worship
– – – at Harvard, 34:41
– – – Puritans and, see Puritans and Puritanism Freeka, Jemima (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Freeman, Alice E., see Palmer, Mrs. George Herbert Freeman, Miss Elizabeth (teacher, c. 1910), 32:47 Freeman, Enoch (1706-1788): diary of, while Harvard student (1729), 11:73 Freeman, Rev. Frederick (d. 1883), 5:17n2 Freeman, Harriet, see Oliver, Mrs. Thomas (second wife) Freeman, Rev. James (1759-1835), 5:l7; 11:38-39, 42, 44; 23:27 Freeman, John R. (1855-1932; engineer), 42:54 Freeman, Lois (Mrs. Davis, mother of Charles H.), 23:27 Freeman, Stephen Albert (of Middlebury College, 1950s), 35:106 Freeman, Mr. (buys house built by Samuel Clarke, 1807), 9:23 Freeman & Bolles (printers), 19:16 Freemen, freeman’s oath, see Freedom Freese, John W. (on site-marking committee, 1906, 1908), 1:55, 67; 3:56 Freight, see Business and industry (shipping); Expenses Freiligrath, Ferdinand (1810-1876; German poet): Longfellow letters to, 28:73, 76-77, 79 Fremont-Smith, Mrs. Frank (Frances Eliot), 43:10, 22n5 French, Allen (author, 1940s), 30:62, 68 French, Daniel Chester (1850-1931; sculptor), 3:99; 20:98; 24:86, 88; 33:44, 146 French, John (settler; d. 1646), 22:76 (Map 1) French, John (of Billerica; d. 1712), 9:76 French, William (tailor, d. 1681), 8:31; 9:76, 77; 14:95-96; 22:76 (Map 1) French, Judge (of Concord; father of Daniel C. ), 20:98; 33:44 French and Indian Wars (1689-1763), see War(s) French lessons, see Language(s) (modern European, and instruction in) “French neutrals,” see Acadian exiles French population, 42:73, 76. See also Population (foreign-born) French Revolution(s), see France Fresh Pond, 14:42; 25:41; 41:161, 166; 44:159-60, 161
– birds and flowers in marshes near, 22:110; 24:88, 89; 30:86; 35:15; 41:167
– as boundary, 16:23; 17:56; 21:31; 22:76; 24:63; 28:30; 32:98; 37:24, 65
– cattle-grazing near, 44:60, 61
– “dining on turtle” at, 10:29; 31:25
– Fire Department at, 36:91
– fishing and hunting at, 3:99; 10:31; 24:89
– “Highway to,” 14:34, 68; 33:40; 37:10, 16; 38:111
– as hospital site (proposed), 16:115; 35:86; 39:45
– ice-cutting business at, see Ice and icehouses
– land owned at or near, 8:20; 21:79
– Menotomy River as outlet of, 5:40, 42, 43 (see also Menotomy River)
– as public park, 24:89; 39:34; 41:92; 42:87
– railroad to, 20:129; 38:39; 41:159; 42:88
– – – Fresh Pond Station, 44:165
– settlement around (1834), 28:32
– skating on, see Sports and games
– specimen trenches at (World War I), 34:12
– summer camp for children near, 18:22
– as summer resort or country seat, 3:100; 28:30-31, 42-43
– as swampland, 24:63
– Tudor house at (1908 paper on), 3:100-109
– view of, from Lake View Ave., 44:162-67 passim
– as water supply, see Water supply
– See also Ponds and lakes Fresh Pond Hotel, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Fresh Pond Lane, 2:36; 6:25; 14:104, 105; 16:38; 24:63; 32:44; 39:97; 41:158 Fresh Pond Parkway, see Streets and highways (parkways) Frick, Miss Helen C. (Fogg Museum benefactor, early 20th c.), 27:26 Friedrich, Prof, and Mrs. Carl J. (Francis Ave. residents, 1930s), 41:28 Friend, The; Friends Intelligencer, see Periodicals (general) Friends, Society of, see Quakers Friendship House (1940s), 43:104 Frisbie, Prof. Levi (1783-1822), 11:18n3; 25:121; 41:32 Frisbie, Mrs. Levi (later Mrs. James Hayward), 11:18; 41:32 Frisbie Place, 18:45; 23:88; 34:65 Friz[z]ell, John (merchant; d. 1723), 21:90; 37: 13 Friz[z]ell, Mrs. John (Jane), 21:90 Friz[z]ell, John [2d] (d. 1731), 21:90, 91; 31:37; 37:13-14 Friz[z]ell, Mrs. John (2d] (“Widow Frizzell”), see Bronsdon, Mercy Friz[z]ell family, 21:91 Friz[z]ell house, 21:91. See also Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall [1736]) Friz[z]ell Lane, see Fleet Street (Boston) Frobisher, Sir Martin (1535[?]-1594; English mariner), 33:135 “Frog Pond”
– Boston Common, 41:58
– Cambridge, 16:37; 20:94; 22:67
– See also Ponds and lakes Front Street, 14:66. See also Massachusetts Avenue Frost, Abraham (b. 1754; Loyalist), 5:76n5 Frost, David (and Harvard Corporation bill, 1811), 4:19 Frost, Deacon Edmund (landowner; d. 1672), 9:77; 14:98; 22:76 (map 1); 23:78; 41:16-17 Frost, Edmund (1715-1777; landowner), 23:78; 41:17
– memoranda of (1755-70), 11:82 Frost, Elizabeth, see Frothingham, Mrs. Thomas Frost, Ephraim (son of Deacon Edmund; d. 1718), 23:78; 41:17 Frost, Deacon Gideon (landowner; d. 1803), 3:110; 6:21; 17:47-48; 20:129; 23:78; 41:17 Frost, Dr. Gideon, Jr. (b. 1755), 23:78 Frost, Horace W. (Boat Club, 1946), 39:138 Frost, James (1643-1711; of Billerica), 9:77 Frost, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd S. (Farrar St. residents, 1921-40), 41:37 Frost, Lucy C. (landowner, 1830), 17:48 Frost, Martha (Mary), see Austin, Mrs. Thomas Frost, Mary (“Convention Troops” quartered on, 1777), 13:24n1 Frost, Robert (1874-1963; poet): “of Brewster Village” (1965 paper on), 40:84-93 Frost, Dr. Samuel (1638-1711; of Billerica), 9:77 Frost, Sarah (1754-1821; daughter of Deacon Gideon), 9:66; 17:48 Frost, Walter (landowner, c. 1805), 20:129; 23:78; 41:17 Frost, William (1774-1832; landowner), 17:48; 23:78 Frost family, 9:76; 10:115 Frost property, 14:61; 17:47-48; 41:16n2 Frost & Higgins (tree and landscape contractors), 35:28 Frost (Cooper-Frost-Austin) house, see Cooper-Frost-Austin house Frothingham, Miss Eugenia: house of (built 1922), 43:160 (illus. #6 following), 162, 168 Frothingham, Francis E.: houses of, 43:160 (illus. #6 following), 162, 168 Frothingham, Mrs. Hannah (d. 1806): gravestone of, 17:37 Frothingham, Rev. Octavius Brooks (1822-1895), 20:29; 26:101n70; 33:11n15 Frothingham, Rev. Paul Revere (biographer, 1925), 25:25n6; 44:113 Frothingham, Richard (1812-1880; historian), 5:28; 10:52n1; 16:81; 17:52; 24:79n31; 33:150; 43:142; 44:181n15 Frothingham, Thomas (m. 1785), 41:17 Frothingham, Mrs. Thomas (Elizabeth Frost), 41:17 Frozen Truth, The (temperance publication), 13:10, 12, 13 Fruitlands (Harvard, Mass.), 25:67 Frye, Col, Joseph (1711/12-1794), 16:80; 18:65; 37:57 Fuel, see Coal; Firewood; Heating Fugitive Slave Law, see Slavery Fuller, Sgt. Abijah (1775), 5:26, 27 Fuller, Abraham (b. 1702; surveyor), 13:39n3; 14:42, 71 Fuller, Mrs. Abraham (Sarah Dyer), 14:71n3 Fuller, Abraham (landowner; d. 1847), 28:12, 21, 26 Fuller, Abram (Willard family friend, 1820s), 11:31 Fuller, Gov. Alvan T. (1920s), 34:12 Fuller, Rev. Arthur Buckminster (1822-1862), 11:33, 34; 28:24, 28 Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. Carleton (Francis Ave. residents, 1940-45), 41:32 Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. (Francis Ave. residents, 1930-40), 41:31 Fuller, Constance (architect, c. 1910), 43:171 Fuller, “Dan,” see Fuller, Lucian Deane Fuller, Rev. Daniel (of Gloucester), 28:13 Fuller, Debby (sister of Timothy, Jr., 1801), 11:52 Fuller, Miss Edith Davenport (CHS member; d. 1925), 11:33, 34, 75 Fuller, Elisha (b. c. 1780; brother of Timothy, Jr.), 28:21 Fuller, Elisha (manages cotillion, 1822), 11:23 Fuller, Elizabeth (b. 1775; sister of Timothy, Jr.), 28:23
– diary of, 28:18-20 Fuller, Mrs. Elizabeth Channing (schoolgirl, c. 1900), 41:158, 167 Fuller, Mrs. George (widow of artist; Berkeley St. resident, c. 1900), 21:70 Fuller, Gertrude, see Nicholas, Mrs. Arthur B. Fuller, Henry H. (grandson of following), 28:21 Fuller, Henry Holton (brother of Timothy, Jr.), 28:21 Fuller, Jacob (son of Thomas, father of Rev. Timothy), 28:15 Fuller, John (settler; d. 1698), 14:71n3- – Fuller, Joseph (1653-1730), 14:71n3 Fuller, Mrs. Joseph (Lydia Jackson), 14:71n3 Fuller, Lucian Deane (“Dan”; 1884-1941; newspaper publisher ), 36:108, 118-21 Fuller, Mrs. Lucian Deane (Mabelle N. Sargent), 36:121 Fuller, [Sarah] Margaret (1810-1850; Countess Ossoli; journalist, critic), 4:66; 9:65; 16:50; 23:63; 28:12, 21-27 passim; 35:82-83
– biographies of, 7:20, 28; 29:41n30; 35:82
– birthplace of, see Margaret Fuller House
– education of, 26:103; 28:22, 26-27; 33:13
– Emerson letter (1843) to, 29:37n14, 38n15, 66n109
– gravestone of, 28:11 (illus. facing)
– letters of, 28:26-27, 28; 29:41
– Lowell quoted on, 25:114, 117
– paper on (1959; not quoted), 38:134
– quoted, 26:94; 29:51
– as teacher, 5:108 Fuller, Mary (“Bee” member, 1868), 17:72 Fuller, Nancy (daughter of Lucian D.), 36:121 Fuller, Rev. and Mrs. Oliver Payson (of Chatham, 1880s), 36:118 Fuller, Richard Frederick (1324/25-1869; lawyer), 11:33; 28:24-25 Fuller, Robert O. (Hospital trustee, 1870s), 16:115; 20:75; 35:86-87 Fuller, Sally (sister of Timothy, Jr., 1790s), 11:36; 28:19, 20 Fuller, Sarah, see Fuller, [Sarah] Margaret Fuller, Stephen P. (surveyor, 1822-65), 14:72, 77 Fuller, Thomas (d. 1698), 28:11, 12-15
– “and His Descendants”
– – – Fuller paper (1902), 11:34
– – – Nichols paper (1942), 28:11-28 Fuller, Rev. Timothy Sr., 11:33, 52; 16:49; 28:15-18, 21, 22 Fuller, Mrs. Timothy [Sr.] (daughter of Rev. Abraham Williams), 11:44; 28:20 Fuller, Hon. Timothy, Jr. (1778-1835), 16:49-50; 28:11, 17, 19, 20, 21-24, 27
– diary of, while Harvard student, 11:75
– – – excerpts from (1798-1801), 11:33-53
– letters to, from daughter Margaret, 28:26-27 Fuller, Mrs. Timothy, Jr. (Margaret Crane), 11:33; 16:50; 28:23, 26 Fuller, William (brother of Timothy, Jr.), 28:21 Fuller, William Henry (son of Timothy, Jr.), 28:24 Fuller, Mrs. William Henry (Frances Elizabeth Hastings), 28:24 Fuller, Captain (of Col. Brattle’s regiment, 1770s), 5:56 Fuller, Deacon (at Plymouth, c. 1630), 10:87 Fuller, Dana & Fitz (iron and steel merchants), 35:86 Fuller family
– coat of arms of, 28:13
– residences of, 11:33; 23:78; 26:94; 27:5, 11, 15, 23; 28:11, 12, 18, 23 (see also Valentine-Fuller house) Fulton, John A. (painter and glazier; d. 1900), 20:119 Fulton, Mrs. John A. (Lorinda Howe), 20:119-20 Fulton, Robert (“Toot”; 1765-1815; inventor), 27:83; 40:55 Fund-raising, see Finances and fund-raising Funerals, see Death Funkhouser, Erica Beale (on Historical Commission, 1975), 43:147 Fur trade, see Trade and commerce Furbish, Mr. (singer, 1823), 11:25 Furness, Horace Howard (1833-1912; Shakespearean scholar), 1:70 Furniture, 3:102-3, 106; 10:13; 16:22; 21:114, 116, 117; 28:30
– British styles of, in America, 21:52
– in Craigie House, 25:56; 26:81; 27:89
– Fogg family bed at Museum, 27:21; 35:58
– Hitchcock chairs, 21:54 (and illus. facing); 41:162
– “Longfellow” chair, see Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
– painted decoration of, 16:22-23; 21:50-54 (and illus.)
– schoolhouse, 13:91, 92, 93, 96
– See also Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
Furniture dealers, see Retail and food stores
Furniture moving, see Domestic and family life

G

Gade, Anna (Berkeley St. child, c. 1860), 21:61
Gade, Gerhard (of Norway, late 1800s), 21:64
Gade, Mrs. Gerhard (Helen Allyn), 17:73; 21:64
Gade family, 21:63
Gage, L. (member of “Bee,” 1892), 17:79
Gage, Louisa C., see Perrin, Mrs. Franklin (m. 1855)
Gage, Rev. Nathaniel (b. 1830), 10:185
Gage, Mrs. Nathaniel (Abby Richardson Gardner), 10:l85
Gage, Gen. (Gov.) Thomas (1721-1787), 4:35; 22:36; 37:21
– and Bunker Hill, 33:148-49; 37:52; 39:29
– Church (Benjamin) and, 30:57-63 passim, 65n, 68, 69
– evacuates Boston, 33:67
– Loyalist attempt to dissuade (1775), 16:32, 72; 33:67; 37:25; 43:71
– Loyalists under protection of, 10:47; 31:26
– and Nutting (John), 5:63-65, 67, 72
– officers under, 21:120; 22:30
– and removal of powder magazine to Boston, 5:63; 37:12; 43:85 Gage, Mrs. (daughter of Rev. Joseph H. Allen), 33:43 Gage sisters (Sybil, Margaret, Anna, Miriam, schoolgirls, 1890s), 32:43; 44:113
– “one of” (on “Junior Committee,” 1905), 44:106, 108 Gager, Deacon (of First Church, Boston, 1630), 10:89 Galaxy Magazine, see Periodicals (Boston) Galbraith, Prof, and Mrs. John K. (Francis Ave. residents, 1950s), 41:31 Gale, Annie E., see Williston, Mrs. Lyman Richards Gale, Justin Edwards (b. 1843), 32:40
– school of, see School(s) Gale, Mrs. Justin Edwards (Emma M. Whitman), 32:36, 40 Gale, Mary (schoolgirl, 1860s), 32:35 Gale, Theophilus (Harvard benefactor; d. 1677), 7:69 Gale, Rev. Wakefield (of Rockport, 1840s), 32:40 Gale, Mrs. Wakefield (Mary Louisa Bigelow), 32:40 Galen (ship), 38:77 Galen Street Bridge, 7:54. See also Bridge(s) Gallison, Mrs. H. H. (founds Radcliffe Choral Society, 1898), 41:97 Gallows Hill, “Gallows Lot,” 20:126; 38:120
– paper on (1923), 17:46-53 Gally, John (College barber; d. 1796), 29:22 Gamage, see also Gammage Gamage, Adelaide and Sarah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Gamage, William (appraiser, 1778), 10:85 Gamble, John (English wallpaper manufacturer, 1803), 39:53 Games and gambling, see Sports and games Gammage, see also Gamage Gam[m]age, Drs. William (father and son, late 1700s), 11:36; 16:126; 20:97, 135; 38:70 Gammage, Mrs. (death of, 1809), 9:30 Gamwell, Edward F. (editor, late 1800s), 20:88 Gannet, see also Gannett Gannet, Deborah F. (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Gannet, Mr. (friend of Waterhouse, 1811), 4:18 Gannett, see also Gannet Gannett, Rev. Caleb (1745-1818; college steward), 3:110; 16:94; 29:73, 79; 37:19; 41:120, 128, 130
– diary of, 11:70
– house of, see Gannett house Gannett, Mrs. Caleb (Katherine Wendell), 14:61; 16:94 Gannett, Rev. Ezra Stiles (1801-1871), 22:90 Gannett, John, 23:91 Gannett, Mrs. John (Ruth Stiles; 1767-1808), 9:28; 22:90; 23:91 Gannett, Rev. Thomas Brattle (1789-1851), 11:70; 16:56-57, 87, 94; 42:83 Gannett, Mrs. Thomas Brattle (Deborah Fox-croft White), 16:56, 95 Gannett, Rev. William C. (1840-1923), 36:64 Gannett, Mr. (buys portion of Wells-Newell property, 1907), 25:90 Gannett house (Caleb Gannett), 6:24; 20:127; 41:120, 128; 43:73 Gannett House (built 1838; Law School), 26:39; 33:39, 40; 41:118 (illus. #3 following), 128-29, 131 Gannett property (railroad station on), 38:32; 41:26 GAR (Grand Army of the Republic)
– Charles Beck Post, 18:41
– John A. Logan Post 186, 7:81
– Post 56, 37:93 Garden Club, Cambridge, see Club(s) Garden Federation, 35:22. See also Agriculture and horticulture Garden House (built 1810-11; later Asa Gray house), 33:56; 38:77, 82, 116; 41:165; 42:41. See also Botanic Garden Garden Pond, see Halcyon Pond Garden Street, 20:93-94, 101; 28:30, 106; 31:56; 35:113; 40:118; 44:113
– architecture on, 18:29, 33; 33:49; 42:39; 43:168, 169
– arsenal on, see Arsenal (Cambridge) (site of)
– Botanic Garden on, see Botanic Garden
– as boundary, 37:9, 16, 17; 44:139
– burial ground on, see Burying ground(s)
– churches on, see Christ Church (Episcopal); Meetinghouse sites
– the Common and, 17:46; 23:19; 33:37-40
– early settlement of, 7:74; 14:97; 22:77-78, 79
– fire station on, 44:10
– as “Highway to Fresh Pond/Great Swamp,” 14:34, 42, 45; 33:40; 38:111 (see also Fresh Pond)
– in Historic District, 42:37, 41
– “History of” (1949 paper), 33:37-57; 43:7n1
– milestone on corner of, see Milestone(s)
– naming of, 14:45, 65; 32:25; 38:111
– – – early names, 6:12; 14:34, 45, 65; 20:99; 33:48
– Radcliffe area of, 38:112; 41:145; 44:145
– schoolhouses on, see School(s)
– street railway on, 30:26; 35:17; 39:84, 87, 97 (see also Street railway[s])
– trees planted on, 35:24 (see also Trees)
– Washington and Whitefield Elms on, see Washington Elm; Whitefield Elm Garden Street houses, 10:24n2; 17:67 (see also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses); 21:68; 33:50-52; 35:19; 41:136
– No. 1 (Saunders homestead), 10:188; 31:33 (Glenn, 1939), 25:13
– Nos. 2 and 3 (Sarah Bobbins Howe), 20:93; 24:28; 25:125; 30:14; 33:41, 42, 43, 46
– No. 3 (Whiting), 33:46
– Nos. 4 and 5 (1830s), 33:43
– No. 4 (later Mclntyre), 43:169
– No. 10 (Fay House), 20:19; 33:43; 44:144 (see also Fay House and site)
– No. 12 (torn down by Commander Hotel, 1960s), 39:76
– No. 18 (William James; later Cogswell; now Hotel Commander), 31:56; 32:38; 33:29, 46-47
– No. 44 (Cook; given to Shepard Church for parsonage), 32:115; 33:50, 53
– No. 52 (apartment house), 33:53, 54
– No. 55 (Uriah Howe; later Folsom), 25:16, 95-96; 33:51-52; 43:168
– No. 57 (Benjamin Vaughan), 7:105; 20:8; 23:9;29:7; 31:52
– No. 58 (Dixwell; later Misses Houghton; later Munn), 11:86; 15:7; 17:65; 18:46; 20:94; 27:5; 33:53, 54-55
– No. 61 (Edmands, given to Radcliffe), 5:106
– No. 88 (Asa Gray), see Garden House
– See also Browne & Nichols Preparatory School; Garden Street (“History of”); Hodges-Tower house; Vaughan, Dr. Charles E.; Warner house (Radcliffe), Wyeth, Maj. Jonas Garden Terrace, 33:57; 38:119 Gardens and gardening, see Agriculture and horticulture; Botanic Garden; Botany Gardiner, see also Gardner Gardiner, Sir Christopher (1630s), 44:46, 55 Gardiner, Maj. Isaac (d. 1775; first man killed), 1:65 Gardiner, Rev. John ?, 9:35 Gardiner, John Hays (theologian, c. 1900), 43:150 Gardiner, Mary L’Hommedieu, see Horsford, Mrs. Eben Norton (first wife) Gardiner, Phoebe Dayton, see Horsford, Mrs. Eben Norton (second wife) Gardiner, Samuel Smith (of New York, c. 1840), 40:100, 101 Gardner, see also Gardiner Gardner, Abby Richardson, see Gage, Mrs. Nathaniel Gardner, Anson B. (Boat Club, 1914), 39:134 Gardner, Capt. Christopher (of Nantucket, 1760s), 27:44 Gardner, Mrs. C. S. (Plant Club, 1950s), 35:27 Gardner, Elizabeth (of Nantucket), see Craigie, Mrs. [Capt.] Andrew Gardner, Rev. Francis (Harvard 1755), 11:37 Gardner, Frank A. (historian, c. 1900), 27:46n11 Gardner, Henry (Council member, 1770s), 13:39n3 Gardner, Gov. Henry Joseph (1818-1892), 23:86 Gardner, Isabella Stewart (1840-1924; Mrs. John [“Mrs. Jack”] Lowell Gardner), 27:19; 33:89 Gardner, John (of Nantucket; three of same name), 27:46 Gardner, Sheriff John (of Nantucket; fourth in line), 27:65 Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. John L. (of Boston, 1850s), 32:18 Gardner, Mrs. John Lowell, see Gardner, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Joseph (of Boston, 1850s), 32:18 Gardner, Mary, see Coffin, Mrs. Jethro Gardner, “Aunt” Priscilla (c. 1790), 27:52, 64-65 Gardner, Richard (of Nantucket, c. 1660), 27:46 Gardner, Samuel Pickering (Harvard 1786), 10:175 Gardner, Mrs. Sarah (d. 1743), 17:36 Gardner, Sarah Russell, see Gray, Mrs. Horace (second wife) Gardner, Thomas (of Cape Ann, 1620s), 27:46 Gardner, Thomas (of Brookline, 1635), 10:185 Gardner, Col. Thomas (d. 1775), 5:56-57; 13:85; 37:48 Gardner, Dr. (“late of Boston,” 1780s), 19:68 Gardner Museum (Boston), 33:89. See also Museum(s) Garfield, James A. (1831-1881; U.S. president 1880-81), 25:138 Garland, Hamlin (1850-1940; novelist), 40:145 Garrad, Margaret, see Stone, Mrs. Gregory (first wife) Garrett, Wendell D. (editor), 40:27; 41:116; 42:34
– papers by:
– – – “The Discovery of the Charles River by the Vikings According to the Book of Horsford” (1966), 40:94-109
– – – “The Topographical Development of Cambridge, 1793-1896” (1963), 39:108-24; 42:49; 43:73nn7, 8, 74 Garrison, Francis J. (publisher, late 1800s), 19:28, 30
– house of (Lexington, 1900), 43:168 Garrison, Lloyd McKim (Harvard 1888), 39:14n Garrison, William Lloyd (1805-1879; abolitionist), 7:16, 18; 10:134; 20:28; 23:84; 37:75, 83, 89; 40:145; 42:78 Garrison, William Lloyd (1900s), house of, 43:168 Garrison-style architecture, see Architecture, styles of Gas, see Heating; Lights and lighting Gaskill, Hannah, see Nichols, Mrs. David Gaskill, Samuel (persecuted Quaker, 1600s), 7:83 Gaskill, Mrs. Samuel (Provided Southwick), 7:83 Gaskill, Samuel (son of above), 7:83 Gaspée (British cutter) incident (1772), 39:162 Gassett, Henry (Harvard 1834; musician), 32:86-87 Gates, Charles A. (at Prospect Union, 1920s), 40:147 Gates, Gen. Horatio (1728/29-1806), 3:74, 76; 21:100; 22:31, 39; 25:122; 30:64
– and “Convention Troops,” 13:19, 20, 23, 26nn4, 5, 30, 35, 60, 69-74 passim, 80 Gates, Prof. Lewis E. (1860-1924; critic), 35:117 Gates, see Fences and walls Gavelkind (British land tenure), 14:99. See also Wills and testaments Gay, Dean Edward Randolf (Francis Ave. resident, c. 1915), 41:29; 43:25, 30 Gay, Mrs. Edward Randolf (Rose Dunbar), 41:29; 43:10, 25 Gay, Dean Edwin Francis (ret. 1936; Highland St. resident), 23:43; 43:12, 25 Gay, Mrs. Edwin Francis, 43:25 Gay, Ernest L. (Harvard benefactor, before 1929), 27:37 Gay, Fanny (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Gay, Frederick L. (Harvard benefactor, before 1929), 27:37 Gay, Dr. George H. (witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:71 Gay, George Henry (Harvard benefactor, before 1929), 27:37 Gay, H. Nelson (Harvard 1896; benefactor), 27:37 Gay, John (Harvard benefactor, before 1929), 27:37 Gay, Mrs. (daughter of “Mr. Dana of savings bank,” before 1850), 20:97 Gearner, Edmund (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1) Geddes, Alice Spencer (editor, c. 1900), 20:86 Gee, Ebenezer (on meetinghouse committee, 1748), 24:58 Gee, Joshua, Jr. (Harvard “Library-Keeper,” 1732), 44:67 Gehring, Dr. John G. (1920), 24:98 Geldowsky furniture factory, 36:98. See also Business and industry Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, etc., see Savage, James Genealogical Register, see Historical Society(ies) (New England Historic-Genealogical ) Genealogy
– “and local history” (1913 paper), 8:12-14
– Savage’s “Dictionary of,” see Savage, James General Banks (barge), 44:109. See also Travel/transportation General Court, see Massachusetts General Court/Legislature General Douglas MacArthur Square, 33:40 General Female Training Institute, 36:42 General Radio Company, 34:118, 119-20, 121 General Sullivan (canal boat, c. 1800), 40:44-45 Genings, see also Jennings Genings, “Goodman” (child of, “bewitched,” late 1600s), 17:48-49 Geology
– of Beacon Hill (Boston), 17:30
– of Boston Basin, 44:159-60
– building stone, 10:43n3; 23:19-20; 33:66; 43:9
– – – granite for Bunker Hill Monument, 33:149
– – – granite for Mount Auburn gate, 44:185, 192
– of Captain’s Island, 39:45
– clay and clay pits, 8:22; 22:76, 78; 24:61, 89; 28:30; 42:68-69 (maps), 70-73; 44:10 (see also Brick and brickmaking) and creation theory, 34:44
– gravel banks, 16:111, 114
– Harvard course in (mineralogy, 1820), 38:71, 72, 74, 77
– of Mount Auburn, 44:178
– paving stone, 26:55
– quicksand (man and horse lost in), 21:112
– slate, 17:32, 34-37
– and topography, see Maps and plans
– See also Tomb(s) and tombstone(s) George, Charles H. (theologian, 1961), 40:66n9 George, Henry (1839-1897; economist), 20:27; 40:159; 44:91n1 George, William R. (1866-1936; founder of George Junior Republic), 44:110 George I (1660-1727; king of England), 17:95 George II (1683-1760; king of England), 6:7, 10; 21:59; 44:68
– Massachusetts General Court functions under, 17:93 George III (1738-1820; king of England), 13:62; 16:34, 125; 21:116, 119; 32:44; 39:158n29, 159; 44:68
– adherents of, 4:35; 10:45; 17:57; 26:84; 33:65, 66, 69 (see also Loyalists)
– appointments by, 5:87; 26:50, 51; 33:38, 66; 37:25
– birthday celebrated by Loyalists (1778), 13:61
– and Burgoyne, 13:75; 22:31, 33-34
– F. Dana’s views of, 3:70-73 passim, 77, 78
– defiance of, 7:37; 24:86; 33:59, 70; 39:153; 43:85-88 passim
– quoted, 39:164
– toast to (1764), 30:52 Georgetown, Massachusetts, 21:41 Georgia: as colony, 33:70 Georgian Society (1930s), 23:10 Gericke, Wilhelm (1845-1925; orchestra conductor), 32:93 Germain, Lord George (1716-1785), 5:71-72. 75, 81, 86-87, 88; 22:31, 32
– communications to, 5:65n1, 70n3, 77n5 Germaine, Mrs. Mary (household helper, 1930s), 23:90 Germaine family, 20:98 German Empire: Civil Code of, 7:39 German glassmaking, 19:33, 34. See also Business and industry German influence and scholarship, 4:85-86; 37:79
– at Harvard, 2:119; 3:27; 35:120, 121; 36:63, 65, 66 German lessons, see Language(s) (modern European, and instruction in) German population, 36:96, 98, 102; 39:118. See also Population (foreign-born) German (“Hessian”) troops in Cambridge, see “Convention Troops” Germania Orchestra, 32:90, 94. See also Music Germanic Museum, see Museum(s) Germany, feelings against, in World War I, 33:50; 35:114-15; 41:97 Gerould, Charles W. (Harvard 1883; teacher), 35:113; 37:108; 44:115 Gerould, Mrs. Charles W. (Florence Russell), 44:112, 114, 115
– “Historical Sketch of the First Church in Cambridge (Unitarian)” (1933 paper, printed 1945), 31:61-65 Gerrish, Elizabeth (widow of Joseph Green, second wife of Rev. William Brattle), 22:86-87 Gerrish, Joseph (of Wenham, mid-1600s), 22:86 Gerrish, Mrs. Joseph (Ann Waldron), 22:86 Gerry, Gov. Elbridge (1744-1814), 3:61; 9:16, 22, 26; 10:74n1; 40:9n4, 20
– early residences of, 24:64; 33:68, 69n40
– at Elmwood, see Elmwood (Cambridge)
– in France (“XYZ affair”), 11:36; 15:43; 33:73
– and “Gerrymander,” 13:85; 15:43; 33:75; 37:26; 44:160
– at Harvard (social standing of), 33:63
– land sales by, 6:12; 13:85, 86; 14:105; 32:96, 98, 101
– on Revolutionary Committees, 13:85; 30:58; 33:70
– street named for, 25:121; 32:26
– as vice president, 1:60; 13:85; 15:43; 29:72; 33:71, 75-76; 37:26 Gerry, Mrs. Elbridge (Anne Thompson), 9:22, 31; 13:85; 15:42-43, 44; 29:72; 33:72-76 passim; 37:26 Gerry, John (brother of Elbridge), 13:85; 33:69 Gerry, Thomas (father of Elbridge), 13:85; 33:68-69 Gerry Street, 25:121; 32:26 Gerry’s Corner, 37:18 Gerry’s Landing, 16:111, 114, 115; 20:9; 31:23; 32:97; 35:50; 39:25, 26, 126, 136, 138
– bridge at, 42:87
– “and Its Neighborhood” (1918 paper), 13:81-88; 43:7n1
– known as “Oliver’s Landing,” 24:66; 32:96
– known as “Sir Richard’s Beach/Landing,” 13:82n1; 24:62, 66; 32:96; 39:143
– known earlier as “Watertown Town Landing,” 22:59
– Leif Ericsson and, 32:99; 39:125, 142-43
– marker placed at, 21:10; 24:66
– name change suggested (1937), 24:15, 66 Gerry’s Landing Parkway, 21:10. See also Memorial Drive “Gerrymander,” see Gerry, Gov. Elbridge Gest, Morris (theatrical producer, 1920s), 40:117, 118 Gettens, Rutherford J. (at Fogg Museum, 1920s; chemist), 35:72 Gettysburg Address, 44:18 Geyer, Frederick C. (in Vassall house, 1791), 10:58; 11:13; 21:102. See also Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall) Geyer, John Just (stonecutter, 1793), 17:31 Geyer, Mary Ann, see Belcher, Mrs. Andrew [5th] Geyer, W. F. (landowner, 1791), 27:56 Ghost stories, see Domestic and family life (and superstitions) “Giantess,” see Servants/”hired help” (“Miriam the Giantess”) “G.I. Bill,” see Education (adult) Gibbens, see also Gibbons Gibbens, Alice Howe, see James, Mrs. William Gibbens, Mrs. Eliza P. (Irving St. resident, 1891-1925), 41:35; 43:168 Gibbens, Margaret, see Gregor, Mrs. Leigh R. Gibbons, see also Gibbens Gibbons, Dr. John (Negro slave of, 1755), 17:51 Gib[b]ons (landholder, 1635), 16:75 Gibbons Creek/River, 22:58, 59, 60, 62, 68-69 Gibbs, Rev. Henry (d. 1723), 22:87; 24:50, 51 Gibbs, Mrs. Henry (Mercy Greenough), 22:87 Gibbs, Margaret, see Appleton, Mrs. Nathaniel Gibbs, Dr. [Oliver] Wolcott (1822-1908; chemist), 4:82-83; 28:9 Gibbs, Miss and Mr. (on “Junior Committee,” 1906), 44:115, 116 Gibons, see Gibbons Gibson, Charles Dana (1867-1944? illustrator), 34:91 Gibson, Elizabeth, see Wellington, Mrs. Josiah Gibson, John (of Shepard congregation; d. 1694), 5:38; 10:103; 14:98; 22:78 Gibson, Lucy, see Coes, Mrs. Aury Gates Gibson, Rev. R. Jerrold (Francis Ave. resident, 1960s), 41:27 Gibson (in militia, 1775), 30:57 Gifford, Fannie Stearns Davis (writer, 1920s), 20:70 Gifford, Dr. G. Edmund, Jr., 43:l39nn22, 25
– “The Medical Botany of the New England Area: 1782-1842” (1975 paper), 43:127-40 Gifford, W. L. R. (Harvard 1884; librarian), 8:49 Gilbert [first name] (Brewster’s chauffeur), 24:91 Gilbert, Helen (chairman of Harvard Overseers), 44:156 Gilbert, Sir Humphrey (1537[?]-1583; English explorer), 33:137 Gilbert, Jonathan (of Hartford, 1670s; father-in-law of Andrew Belcher, Jr.), 21:86 Gilbert, Sarah, see Belcher, Mrs. Andrew, Jr. (first wife) Gilbert, Rev. Washington (1860s), 37:35 Gilbert & Sullivan Players, 41:104. See also Music Giles, George A. (president of Common Council, 1905), 1:32
– Cambridge 275th anniversary address by (1905), 1:32-33 Giles, Joel (of Townsend, 1829), 12:16, 20 Gill, Moses (on committee to meet Washington, 1775), 30:61 Gill, Thomas (Boston reporter, 1842), 29:45n44 Gillespie, James (inventor, 1872), 36:82; 40:23 “Gillie” (Robert Frost’s dog), see Animals Gilley, John (lighthouse keeper, Maine, c. 1900), 33:121 Gilman, Arthur (1837-1909; educator), 11:86; 12:67; 33:46; 38:29n9; 39:57, 70; 43:150
– and Gilman School, see School(s)
– obituary, 5:110-11
– “An Old-Time Society” (1896 pamphlet), 6:27-28; 18:18n1
– and Radcliffe, 5:111; 8:50; 36:23, 24, 25, 31, 32n15, 37-38, 39; 43:62; 44:140, 142, 143, 147 Gilman, Mrs. Arthur (Amy Cooke Ball, first wife), 5:110 Gilman, Mrs. Arthur (Stella Scott, second wife; m. 1876), 5:110
– on Radcliffe committee (1878), 6:52; 36:24, 39; 44:140 Gilman, Charles E. (Clerk of Somerville, mid-1800s), 38:26 Gilman, Col. Daniel (1700s), 7:82 Gilman, Dorothea Folsom, see Nichols, Mrs. [Rev.] Ichabod (first wife) Gilman, Edward (of Hingham, 1638), 5:110; 7:82 Gilman, Rev. E. W. (of Lockport, N.Y.; called to Prospect Congregational Church, 1854), 20:71 Gilman, Francis B. (Casino treasurer, 1882), 31:31 Gilman, Grace (daughter of Arthur), 36:39; 44:140 Gilman, Helen Williams, see Nichols, Helen Gilman Gilman, Councillor John (of New Hampshire, 1600s), 5:110; 7:82 Gilman, Gov. [of New Hampshire] John Taylor (1753-1828), 7:82; 23:81 Gilman, Dr. John Taylor (mid-1800s), 6:78; 7:81, 82 Gilman, Mrs. [Dr.] John Taylor (Helen Augusta Williams), 6:78; 7:81 Gilman, Miss Margaret E. (Radcliffe 1916; at Fogg Museum), 35:71-72 Gilman, Mary, see Folsom, Mrs. John Gilman, Nathaniel (of New Hampshire, c. 1800), 7:82 Gilman, Col. Nicholas (of New Hampshire), 7:82 Gilman, Judge Nicholas (of New Hampshire), 7:82 Gilman, Rev. Nicholas (1708-1748; of New Hampshire): diary of, while Harvard student (1724), 11:72 Gilman, N. P.: Profit Sharing (pub. 1890s), 19:27 Gilman, P. S. (choirmaster, c. 1870), 32:92 Gilman, Roger, 39:126, 127; 24:13
– papers by:
– – – “Victorian Houses of Old Cambridge” (1940), 26:37-48
– – – “Windmill Lane to Ash Street” (1945), 31:22-36; 39:125
– – – “The Wyeth Background” (1942), 28:29-34 Gilman, Mrs. Roger, 24:13 Gilman, Rose Rysse, see Houghton, Mrs. Henry Oscar, Jr. Gilman, Rev. Samuel (1791-1858? author of “Fair Harvard”), 4:27; 13:86; 28:113; 36:59-60, 74; 41:95; 44:142 Gilman, Mrs. Samuel (Caroline Howard), 13:86; 28:113, 117; 36:59 Gilman, Sarah, see Folsom, Mrs. James Gilman, Winthrop Sargent (of Illinois, c. 1800), 5:110 Gilman, Mrs. Winthrop Sargent (Abia Swift Lippincott), 5:110 Gilman (Lanman letter to, 1880), 42:17 Gilman Brothers (Boston wholesale druggists, c. 1870), 20:15; 37:92 Gilman Hall (Radcliffe), 44:147, 150 Gilman School, see School(s) Ginn, Edwin (1838-1914; textbook publisher), 34:53 Ginn & Company (Boston), 44:82. See also Publishers Ginter’s restaurant (1923), 41:146. See also Restaurants Girl Scouts, 20:81; 27:100, 101; 38:126. See also Club(s) Girls’ Friendly, 23:74. See also Club(s) Girling, Richard (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:93 Givens, Hannah Elizabeth, see M[a]cDuffie, Mrs. John “Glacialis” (artificial pond), 24:89. See also Ponds and lakes Glacken, John F. (water engineer, 1960), 41: 14 Gladden, Rev. Washington (1836-1918), 34:44; 40: 145 Gladstone, William E. (1809-1898; British statesman): quoted, 34:95 Glass
– and college glazier, 10:40; 38:15
– glass-mending charges (Harvard, 1600s), 38:9, 15
– manufacture of, see Business and industry; Sandwich glass
– windows in houses, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– windows in street railway carriages, 30:26; 39:83, 96 Gleason, Catharine (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Gleason, Charles Bemis (Annisquam cottage of, 1914), 43:168 Gleason, Lillian M. (1920 Longfellow prize winner), 15:4 Gleason, Mrs. Mary Eleanor Abbott, 41:158 Gleason, Mr. (building supervisor, 1840s), 36:99 Gleason’s Pictorial and Drawing Room Companion, see Periodicals (general) Glenn, Rev. C. Leslie (of Christ Church, 1930s), 21:119; 22:13n1; 25:13; 35:23, 24 Glenn, Mrs. C. Leslie, 25:13 Globe (U.S. whaleship; mutinied, 1825), 23:27 Gloucester, Massachusetts, 21:48; 31:10
– “Dana Beach” and “Island” near, 26:100
– fishing plantation ordered at, 21:41
– White-Ellery house in, 6:16
– See also Cape Ann (Massachusetts) Glover, Elizabeth, see Winthrop, Mrs. Adam Glover, Elizabeth Harris, see Harris, Elizabeth Glover, Jesse, see Glover, Rev. Jose [or Jesse] Glover, Dr. John (son of Jose; Harvard 1650), 3:9, 12, 16, 17; 39:59 Glover, Gen. John (1732-1797), 3:52; 13:26n4; 18:57; 37:57
– orderly book of (1775-76), 11:64, 65, 79 Glover, Rev. Jose [or Jesse] (d. 1638), 3:6-15, 118; 6:22; 8:31, 32; 14:82, 101; 27:30; 32:69; 44:64
– “and the Cambridge Press” (1960 paper on), 38:87-110 Glover, Mrs. Jose (Sarah Owfield, first wife; d. 1628), 3:7, 118; 38:90 Glover, Mrs. Jose (Elizabeth Harris, second wife), see Harris, Elizabeth Glover, Jose (grandson, d. 1702), 3:16 Glover, Priscilla, see Appleton, Mrs. [Capt.] John Glover, Roger (1623-1650; son of Rev. Jose), 3:7, 12, 16 Glover, Sarah, see Winthrop, Mrs. Dean[e] Glover, Sarah Owfield, see Glover, Mrs. Jose (first wife) Glover family (England), 38:89, 90 Glover heirs, see Dunster, Rev. Henry Glover Press, 8:39; 15:23. See also Glover, Rev. Jose; Printers “God’s Acre,” see Burying ground(s) (old, Garden St.) Goddard, Benjamin (1668-1748; carpenter), 6:20 Goddard, Benjamin (1744-1828; land annexed to Cambridge, 1802), 20:128 Goddard, Hepzibah (landowner, 1830s), 20:127 Goddard, Dr. John T. (1870s), 20:103 Goddard, Martha, see Cooper, Mrs. Walter Goddard, Nathaniel (1747-1830; land annexed to Cambridge, 1802), 20:128 Goddard, Stephen (1741-1820; land annexed to Cambridge, 1802), 20:128, 129 Goddard estate, 20:135 Goddard house, see Dickson-Goddard-Fitch house Godkin, Edwin L. (1831-1902; journalist), 20:27, 34, 46 Goelet, Capt. Francis (1750), 33:60 Goepp, Philip (Harvard 1884; choirmaster), 32:88 Goepper, Gustavus (businessman, mid-1800s), 36:95, 96 Goepper, Kenneth (1950s), 36:105 Goepper family, 36:96 Goethe, Ottilie von (Germany, 1830s), 29:40 Goff, see Goffe; Gough Goffe, see also Gough Goffe, Edmund [?] (landowner, 1630s), 33:9. See also Goff[e], Edward (d. 1658) Goffe, Edmund (landowner; d. 1726), 22:63, 74 Goff[e], Col. Edmund (c. 1670-1740), 5:39; 22:71, 72 Goff[e], Edward (landowner; d. 1658), 2:14; 14:36, 47, 98; 22:76 (Map 1); 33:9[?]; 42:108 Goffe, Edward (c. 1730), 22:66, 72-73 Goffe, Samuel (c. 1630-1705; landowner), 22:74 Goffe, William (d. Goffe family, 10:115; 22:27; 33:9 Goffe property, 22:72-75 passim Goffe’s Cove, 22:58, 67, 71 Goggins, see Gookin Gold, discovery of, see Economic conditions Goldberg, Bernie (city councilor, 1968), 44:98 Goldman, Prof. Hetty (Radcliffe 1916; archaeologist), 27:27; 35:75 Goldsmith, Oliver (1730[?]-1774; English author), 34:78; 44:178 Goldthwait, Ezekiel (Loyalist, 1770s), 10:37; 19:48 Goldthwait, Col. Thomas (c. 1780), 5:82n5 Goldthwaite, Mrs. (Hill and Jenks family friend), 9:20, 36 Gombosi, Otto (historian, 1940s), 41:101 Gomes, Rev. [Prof.] Peter J. (Sparks House resident, 1970s)
– “Jared Sparks and His House” (1978 paper), 44:123-37 Gompers, Samuel (1850-1924; labor leader), 7:J6; 33:128 Gooch, Lt. Nathan G. (1864), 7:81 Good, Timothy W. (Water Dept. superintendent, 1917-47), 41:10, 12 Good, Mayor (1914), 13:124 Good Government League, 8:51; 37:94 Goodale, Dorothy (engagement of, 1906), 44:114 Goodale, Dr. George L. (1839-1923; physician, botanist), 21:64; 22:55; 40:145 Goodale, Mrs. George L., 22:55, 95 Goodale, Jean (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:57, 63 Goodale, Mrs. Robert (Plant Club member, 1950s), 35:28
– “Christ Church Planting” (1953 paper), 35:25-28 Goodenough, see also Goodnow Goodenough, Rev. and Mrs. Erwin (Irving St. residents, 1960s), 41:34 Goodhue, Jonathan (of New York; sends “peace express” to Boston, 1815), 16:57 Goodman, John (landowner, 1635), 22:65 Goodman, Richard (of Hooker’s Company; d. 1676[?]), 10:102; 14:91; 22:64, 65 Goodman, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102 Goodnow, see also Goodenough Goodnow [Goodnough?], Edward P. (theatrical director, 1920s), 38:57, 58 Goodrich, Mamie (schoolgirl, 1860s), 32:36 Goodrich, Rev. Massena (on School Committee, 1840s), 13:110 Goodrich, William M. (1777-1833; organ builder), 32:92 Goodridge, Arthur M. (Boat Club, 1920s), 39:131 Goodridge, Mr. and Mrs. William H. (Scott St. residents, 1894-1912), 41:38 Goodspeed’s Book Shop (Boston), 38:104. See also Booksellers Goodwin, Miss Amelia Mackay (1835-1914), 35:18
– obituary, 10:174-75 Goodwin, Anna Harriet, see Vaughan, Mrs. Benjamin Goodwin, Mrs. Charles E. (daughter of Capt. Phelps of Alert), 10:160 Goodwin, Rev. Daniel R. (1811-1890), 7:105 Goodwin, E. (tavern keeper, 1853), 20:133 Goodwin, Elliott H. (Highland St. resident, 1928), 27:33; 43:168 Goodwin, Frank (m. 1866), 17:73 Goodwin, Mrs. Frank (Mollie Buttrick; “Bee” member, 1860s), 17:73; 32:36 Goodwin, Rev. Hersey Bradford (d. c. 1838), 10:174-75; 20:99 Goodwin, Mrs. Hersey Bradford (Amelia Mackay), 10:175 Goodwin, Hersey Bradford, Jr. (b. c. 1830), 10:175 Goodwin, John (Harvard tutor, c. 1870), 3:27-28 Goodwin, Thomas (1600-1680; English nonconformist), 40:69 Goodwin, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:98, 102; 14:89; 22:72, 76 (Map 1) Goodwin, Prof. William Watson (1831-1912; Hellenist), 1:70; 2:42, 115; 10:175; 18:43; 26:21, 22; 39:142; 40:145; 44:140
– address by, on Pres. Felton (1907), 2:117-30; 3:25; 33:19n29
– buys Follen St. house, 20:99
– and Cambridge Book Club, 28:116, 119 Goodwin, Mrs. William Watson, 17:84 “Goody” (servant), see Servants/”hired help” (at Harvard) Goodyear, Charles (1800-1860; inventor), 40:40 Gookin, Abijah (b. c. 1690; son of Rev. Nathaniel), 22:85 Gookin, Daniel (the elder; settles in Virginia, 1621), 7:95-96 Gookin, Maj.-Gen. Daniel (1612-1686/87), 1:57; 14:103; 22:84; 42:107, 108
– land ownership by, 9:72, 75, 76; 22:70
– and Quaker persecution, 24:70, 72, 73, 75
– tribute to (1912 paper), 7:95-103 Gookin, Mrs. Daniel (Mary Dolling, second wife), 7:97 Gookin, Edward L. (at Widener Library, 1940s), 30:11, 16 Gookin, Frederick W. (Gookin family historian, c. 1912), 7:95 Gookin, Hannah (daughter of Rev. Nathaniel; Mrs. Vincent Carter; d. c. 1692), 22:85 Gookin, Hannah Savage, see Gookin, Mrs. Nathaniel Gookin, Rev. Nathaniel (1656-1692), 3:18; 6:23; 22:85; 31:63; 43:116, 123, 124 Gookin, Mrs. Nathaniel (Hannah Savage), 22:85 Gookin, Rev. Nathaniel, Jr. (1687-1734), 22:85 Gookin, Samuel (d. 1743): Vassall suit vs. (1740), 16:74 Gookin, Vincent (brother of elder Daniel), 7:96 Gookin, Rev. Warner Foote: “Major-General Daniel Gookin” (1912 paper), 7:95-103 Gookin family, 10:115; 22:86 Gookin house, 33:62 Gookins, Mrs. (accommodations for British troops in house of, 1777), 13:50 Goold, see also Gould Goold, George (classicist, 1970s), 44:36 Gordon, Rev. George A. (1853-1929), 33:124; 34:44 Gordon, Gen. George H. (1823-1886), 10:176 Gordon, Hugh (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:64 Gordon, Rev. William (1782-1807; historian), 13:39n3; 18:58, 64; 40:11n9 Gordon, Rev. (Harvard Overseer, 1770s), 13:39n3 Gore, Gov. (1809-10) Christopher, 14:65; 27:47, 62n50 Gore, John (d. before 1660), 21:84 Gore, Mrs. John (Rhoda; later Mrs. John Remington), 21:84 Gore, John (draws Vassall coat of arms, c. 1760), 10:35n1, 38n3 Gore Hall (Harvard), 22:102; 26:15; 27:33; 33:124; 41:163
– architecture of, 26:41-42; 27:31; 33:17; 44:185-86
– as Harvard Library, 4:30n1; 26:25, 41-42; 27:18, 31; 28:63; 33:21; 34:40; 35:61; 44:23, 185-86
– See also Harvard Library Gore house (Waltham), 26:41 Gore Street, 14:40-41, 58, 63, 65; 36:94, 97 Gore Street Bridge, 14:41n1. See also Bridge(s) Gorges, Sir Ferdinando (c. 1566-1647; English explorer), 10:172; 33:138-39, 141; 44:46, 54, 55, 56 Gorges, John (son of Sir Ferdinando; 1629), 33:138 Gorges, Robert (son of Sir Ferdinando; 1632), 33:138 Gorham, Elizabeth Abbot, see Abbot, Elizabeth Gorham, Julia (schoolgirl, 1860s), 32:34, 36 Gorham, Nathaniel (1738-1796; president of Continental Congress), 40:19 Gorham, Mrs. (mother of Mrs. Joseph Brannan), 21:63 Goriansky, L. V. (1930s), 23:80 Goriansky, Mrs. L. V. (Carola Eliot), 23:80 Goriansky, Michael, 23:80 Gosnold, Bartholomew (explorer; d. 1607), 33:135 Goss, Miss Elizabeth K. (of Salem; b. 1854; educational pioneer), 36:35 Gothic Revival
– in architecture, see Architecture, styles of
– in literature, 26:96-97 Gott, Fanny, see White, Mrs. Horatio Stevens Gough, see also Goffe Gough, Priscilla, see Treat, Mrs. Robert Gould, see also Goold Gould, Prof. Benjamin A. (1824-1896; astronomer), 2:119; 20:96 Gould, Nathaniel D. (handwriting expert, 1850), 41:75 Gould, Susan, see Durant, Mrs. Aldrich Gould, Mr. (Negro soap boiler, 1815), 16:64 Gould, Mr. (builds house at 51 Highland St., 1872), 43:16 Gourley, Robert F. (1778-1863; Scottish city planner), 39:30-31 Government
– Cambridge city, see Cambridge, Massachusetts (organization and charter of)
– Cambridge town, see Selectmen; Town meeting(s)
– colonial, see Plymouth Colony/Plantation
– Massachusetts, see Massachusetts, Commonwealth of; Massachusetts Bay Company and Colony; Massachusetts General Court/Legislature Government Center (Boston), 42:88. See also Bowdoin Square Governors Island, 6:13; 11:77; 16:38, 54; 43:145 Gozzaldi, Amy de, see Hall, Mrs. Richard W. Gozzaldi, James (schoolboy, c. 1900), 41:136 Gozzaldi, Mary Isabella James (Mrs. Silvio de; c. 1855-1935), 8:29; 21:106, 110; 23:36
– and Berkeley St. School, 32:30-33, 38, 48
– and Cambridge history, 2:14n2; 9:61; 21:100; 22:89; 33:158; 43:82
– – – Paige’s History (Supplement and Index to), 6:33, 38, 39; 20:9; 43:147, 149
– as descendant of early settler, 5:52
– houses of (96 and 94 Brattle), 21:12, 14; 22:7; 23:49, 73; 41:137 (see also James, Thomas Potts; Vassall houses and land [Henry Vassall])
– minute on death of, 23:72-75; 32:30
– papers by:
– – – “The Bates-Dana House” (1927), 20:60-62
– – – “Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Richard Henry Dana (Edith Longfellow)” (1916), 11:53-56
– – – “A Child in a New England Colonial Garden” (1933), 31:27-28, 37-43; 33:96
– – – “Elmwood and Its Owners” (1921), 15:41-45
– – – “Extracts from the Reminiscences of Isabella (Batchelder) James” (1934), 23:49-61; 32:30
– – – “A Few Old Cambridge Houses” (1911), 6: 17-26
– – – “Gerry’s Landing and Its Neighborhood” (1918), 13:81-88; 43:7n1
– – – “Joseph Foster and Shays’s Rebellion” (1921), 15:27-29
– – – “Lieutenant George Inman” (1926), 19:46-79
– – – “Roger Harlakenden” (1920), 15:24-26
– – – “The Ruggles-Fayerweather House” (1924), 17:54-59; 25:87
– – – “The Seal of the Society” (1908), 3:5-19
– – – “Some Letters from Tory Row” (1914), 9:5-37; 25:25n7; 27:63n52; 29:72
– – – “The Vassall House” (1931), 21:78-83, 86-94, 102-18; 33:159
– as Plant Club president, 35:21
– reads Kent paper (1912), 8:29
– See also History, Cambridge (Historic Guide to Cambridge) Gozzaldi, Richard (schoolboy, c. 1900), 41:136 Gozzaldi, Capt. Silvio de, 23:73, 74; 41:137 Gozzaldi, Mrs. Silvio de, see Gozzaldi, Mary Isabella James Gozzaldi houses, see Gozzaldi, Mary Isabella James Grace, W. R., & Company, 41:52 Graffiti, 44:25-26 Grafton, J. (of Cambridgeport, 1819), 16:65 Grain (for animals), see Agriculture and horticulture Grampus (British warship, c. 1780), 5:78 Granary Burial Ground (Boston), see Burying ground(s) Grand Army of the Republic, see GAR Grand Junction Branch railroad, see Railroad(s) (Boston & Albany) Grand Opera House (Boston), 34:41 Grandgent, Prof. Charles H. (1862-1939; philologist), 35:74, 111, 114-15, 122; 37:108 Grandison, William (printer, c. 1900), 20:89 Granite, see Geology (building stone) Granite Street, 14:51 Grant, Charles H. (painter, mid-1800s), 10:160 Grant, Christopher (landowner, 1750s), 24:63; 33:65; 37:24, 25 Grant, Michael B. (d. 1817), 5:85n7 Grant, Mrs. Michael B. (Sophia Elizabeth Nutting, 1780-1862), 5:85, 92n4 Grant, Judge Robert (1852-1940): reminiscences (of 1869-79) by, 23:9 Grant, Seth (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102 Grant, Ulysses S. (1822-1885; U.S. president 1868-76), 10:157; 14:22; 20:26, 34, 61; 39:17; 40:100
– Memoirs of, 10:126 Grant Street, 18:27 Gras, Professor (c. 1920), 27:32 Graustein, Edward (schoolboy, 1903), 41:135 Graustein, Prof. Jeannette E.: “Natural History at Harvard College, 1788-1842” (1960 paper), 38:69-86 Gravel banks, see Geology Graves, Thomas (engineer, 1628/29)
– house and estate of, 1:66; 3:52; 6:33; 8:17; 10:88; 14:40, 41; 16:75; 22:69; 26:68; 36:93; 44:58
– lays out Charlestown, 16:75; 22:59; 33:142 Graves-Haugh house site, see Graves, Thomas “Graves’ Neck,” 14:40; 16:75; 21:24-25; 26:68
– British landing at, 6:33
– See also Haugh’s Neck; Lechmere Point; “Neck, the” Gravestones, see Tomb(s) and tombstone(s) Gray, see also Grey Gray, Miss Alice (schoolgirl, 1870s), 32:41. See also Grey, Alice Gray, Dr. (Prof.) Asa (1810-1888; physician, botanist), 1:70; 15:37; 21:106; 28:115; 32:28; 34:52, 91; 35:36, 47n1; 41:57; 43:59
– appointed to professorship, 38:86; 43:127, 139-40
– character of, 3:28-30
– garden named for, 34:84, 87
– house of:
– – – as Historic Landmark, 42:41
– – – moved, 33:56; 38:116; 41:165
– influence of, 4:47, 84; 20:58; 26:21
– Manual by, 34:83; 43:137
– quoted on Nuttall, 33:56; 38:82
– street named for, 25:121; 32:29 Gray, Mrs. Asa, 17:65, 84; 21:106; 33:56; 34:70; 41:165 Gray, Gen. Sir Charles (c. 1780), 19:61 Gray, Edward (Boston lawyer), 20:95 Gray, Mrs. Edward (Susannah Turrell), 20:95 Gray, Eleanor, see Tudor, Mrs. Henry D. Gray, Ellis (committee member, 1777), 13:20, 28 Gray, Francis Galley (1790-1856; Harvard benefactor), 27:12, 14, 23; 35:61; 43:63-64; 44:79 Gray, Frederick (son of Edward; brought up by Mme. Turrell), 20:95 Gray, Harrison (King’s Treasurer, 1773), 20:117 Gray, Horace (Harvard 1819; father of Prof. John Chipman Gray), 10:175 Gray, Mrs. Horace (Sarah Russell Gardner, second wife), 10:175 Gray, John Chipman (uncle of Prof. John C.), 16:38; 34:79
– house of, see “Larches, The”/”Larchwood” Gray, Prof. John Chipman (1839-1915; lawyer), 7:48; 22:108; 34:8; 41:125, 130; 43:13
– Agassiz anniversary address by (1907), 2:99-102, 108
– house and estate of, see “Larches, The”/”Larchwood”
– obituary, 10:175-77 Gray, Mrs. [Prof.] John Chipman (Anna Lyman Mason; d. 1932), 10:175; 14:105; 41:165 Gray, Roland (Harvard 1895; son of Prof. John C.), 10:175; 14:104 Gray, Thomas (1716-1771; British poet): Lowell quoted on, 33:82 Gray, Lt.-Gov. William (“Billy,” 1750-1825; of Salem), 10:177
– house of, see “Larches, The”/”Larchwood” Gray, William (Harvard 1829; nephew of Francis C.), 12:17, 20-21; 35:61, 62-63; 43:64. See also Gray family and Gray Collection and Fund Gray, Lt. (1775), 5:25 Gray, Mr. (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:67 Gray, Captain (1792; great-grandfather of Rev. Samuel Atkins Eliot), 28:35 Gray, Miss (daughter of Frederick), see Jackson, Mrs. Patrick T. Gray, Dean (of New York; at Episcopal Seminary, late 1800s), 36:13, 14, 15 Gray family and Gray Collection and Fund, 18:40; 27:14, 18; 35:57, 61-63, 65 Gray Gables, 38:112 Gray Gardens (East and West), 33:57, 99; 38:116, 119
– architecture on, 43:160 (illus. #6, #7 following), 162, 168 Gray Herbarium, see Botany Gray Street, 32:29; 38:112 Gray’s (Grays) Hall, 1:19; 20:53; 22; 102; 25:118; 30:27; 32:68, 108 Gray’s Woods, 24:88 “Grayhound,” see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses (“Greyhound”) Grayson, William (c. 1736-1790; lawyer), 40:11n8 “Greasy Village,” 43:145-46 “Great Awakening,” see Religion Great Barrington, Massachusetts, 40:16 “Great Bridge” (Boylston St.), see Bridge(s) “Great Bridge” (or “Mill Bridge,” Watertown), 7:54. See also Bridge(s) Great Britain, see Britain Great County Road, see County Road (to Watertown); “Great Road” Great Dam, 16:76 Great Depression, see Economic conditions (panic/crisis/Depression/recession) “Great House” (Charlestown), 33:142, 143. See also Charlestown, Massachusetts Great Marsh, see Marsh(es) Great Neck, see “Neck, the” Great Oak, see Trees (oak) Great Point Light, see Nantucket “Great Pond Rights,” 41:9. See also Water supply “Great River,” 5:42. See also Mystic River “Great Road,” 5:39; 17:46; 20:126. See also Massachusetts Avenue “Great Spring,” see Mishawum Great Swamp, 5:40; 22:78; 24:89; 28:30
– “Highway to,” see Garden Street
– See also Swamp(s) “Great wave” (1630-40), see Immigration Great Western (steamship), 28:75, 76, 80 Greaton, John (inn keeper, 1757), 10:29n2 Greaves, V. Ford (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Greek, knowledge of, see Language(s) (classical, knowledge of) Greeley, see also Greely Greeley, Horace (1811-1872; editor), 20:34, 35; 33:25-26, 46 Greeley, W. Roger (Lexington Historical Society president, 1930s), 25:67, 113 Greely, see also Greeley Greely, Frances, see Loring, Mrs. Edward Green, see also Greene Green, Bartholomew (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 10:103 Green, Bartholomew (1666-1732; Boston printer), 44:66, 68 Green, Elizabeth Gerrish, see Gerrish, Elizabeth Green, Miss Elizabeth L. (Plant Club member, 1890s), 35:18 Green, Miss Elizabeth Wentworth (schoolmistress, 1880s), 32:42 Green, Helen (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1) Green, J. (surveyor, 1784), 14:77 Green, Mayor [Rev.] James D. (b. 1798; first mayor of Cambridge, 1846), 13:90; 22:24; 36:100-101, 107; 39:114; 41:8
– quoted, 42:84 Green, John (Boston printer, 1760s), 44:68 Green, John Richard (1837-1883; historian): quoted, 3:77, 78 Green, Jonas (1712-1767; printer), 44:68 Green, Rev. Joseph (1675-1715), 22:86 Green, Mrs. Joseph, see Gerrish, Elizabeth Green[e], Percival (d. 1639)
– descendants of, 19:88; 22:119
– site and architecture of house of, 6:24 Green, Capt. (“Sergeant”) Samuel (1615-1701/2; printer), 3:17, 18n1; 10:103; 15:16, 23; 30:25; 32:104; 37:13; 44:65, 66, 68, 76, 81
– and “Cambridge Platform,” 38:88, 95-109 passim Green, Dr. Samuel A. (1830-1918), 24:25 Green, Samuel S. (“ex-Postmaster,” purchases property, 1810), 16:48, 92; 22:24 Green, Samuel Swett (1837-1918), 16:74, 92; 27:57-60nn37-42 passim, 90 Green, Mrs. Thomas H. (Martha Lorinda Wellington), 8:27 Green, Timothy (d. 1757; printer), 3:18n1 Green, Virginia Tanner (Mrs. Louis Lawrence Green; d. 1950), 27:99 Green family, 10:115 Green & Russell (printers), 20:112 Green Street (Boston), 8:38; 25:134; 34:69; 39:82; 41:59, 80
– Green Street Church, 9:8 Green Street (Cambridgeport), 11:32n; 18:19; 26:101; 32:26; 36:110; 39:92; 43:11 Green Street (Charlestown), 33:151 Greenback, Greenback-Labor party, see Political parties Greene, see also Green Greene, Albert (1802-1868; poet), 20:95 Greene, Dr. Benjamin D. (Harvard 1812; physician, botanist), 38:78, 83; 43:137, 139 Greene, Mrs. E. (Plant Club, 1950s), 35:27 Greene, Mrs. Elizabeth Copley (Boston, 1850s), 41:56 Greene, George Washington (1811-1883; historian), 28:87
– Longfellow’s letters to, 25:23, 32, 36, 42n33, 47; 28:66 (illus. following) Greene, Harding U., 42:44
– “The History of the Utilities in Cambridge” ( 1970 paper) , 42:7-13 Greene, Miss Helen F. (Kirkland Pl. resident, 1930s), 23:82 Greene, Henry Copley (Kirkland St. resident, 1935), 23:78, 79 Greene, James D. (in Humane Society, late 1800s), 6:28 Greene, Jerome D. (musician, 1930s), 23:46; 32:88, 89; 42:122
– “Charles William Eliot” (1950 paper), 33:117-33 Greene, Mrs. Jerome D., 23:46; 33:119 Greene, John (keeps Char lestown records, 1664), 8:17 Greene, John M. (of Lowell; Smith College benefactor), 23:82 Greene, J. W. (writer, 1851), 39:119 Greene, Miss Louise (Kirkland Pl. resident, C. 1900), 23:82; 43:168 Greene, Miss Margaret A. (housekeeper for Noyes family, 1895-1901), 41:158, 159 Greene, Gen. Nathanael (1742-1786), 3:76; 10:52n1; 18:64n3; 30:64; 31:26; 32:26 Greene, Professor (c. 1920), 27:32 Greenhalge Street, 14:63 Greenhill, Samuel (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:100; 22:76 (Map 1), 78 Greenhill, William (friend of C. Mather, 1640s), 3:81, 83, 87 Greenhouses, see Agriculture and horticulture Greenleaf, E. H. (curator of Gray Collection, 1870s), 35:62 Greenleaf, James (son of Simon; builds Brattle St. house, 1860s), 31:34
– portrait of, 32: 119 Greenleaf, Mrs. James (Mary Longfellow), 9:67; 11:55; 25:48, 49
– house of (76 Brattle), 26:40 (illus. #14 following), 44; 31:33, 34; 44:147
– portrait of, 32 : 119 Greenleaf, Prof. R. E. (Harvard 1877; botanist), 33:151 Greenleaf, Prof. Simon (1783-1853; lawyer), 4:87; 6:28; 7:32; 15:37; 22:22; 26:29; 28:115; 41:125
– house of (now 19 Ash St.), 31:34; 37:13
– purchases Audubon work, 28:117 Greenleaf, Stephen (Royall employee, c. 1800), 10:21n3 Greenleaf, Mr. (of Maine, 1806), 9:14 Greenleaf houses, see Greenleaf, Mrs. James; Greenleaf, Prof. Simon Greenleaf’s express office, 8:37 Greenough, Alfred (1830s), 29:36n9 Greenough, Chester (Harvard Housemaster, 1920s), 34:15 Greenough, Dean Chester N. (Quincy St. resident, mid-1800s), 18:38; 32:88; 36:39 Greenough, Mrs. Chester N., 18:38; 36:39 Greenough, Mrs. D. (Cambridge Book Club, 1852), 28:115 Greenough, David (of Boston; father of Henry and Horatio), 23:82 Greenough, Mrs. E. (Cambridge Book Club, 1845), 28:115 Greenough, Henry (1807-1883; architect), 18:33, 35; 29:36n9, 47n54
– houses designed by, 23:26, 82-83; 26:40 (illus. #11 following); 33:52; 42:39; 43:45 Greenough, Horatio (1805-1852; sculptor), 22:47; 23:35, 82-83; 29:51n71; 43:45
– quoted (on Allston), 29:47, 56 Greenough, Mrs. Horatio, 18:33, 35 Greenough, Prof. James Bradstreet (1833-1901; philologist), 33:42, 43, 49; 38:52, 53, 62; 44:140
– house of, 33:42; 38:52 (see also Appian Way) Greenough, Mrs. James Bradstreet, 33:42, 43
– on Radcliffe committee (1878), 6:52 Greenough, James J. (schoolmaster; of Noble & Greenough), 33:42; 38:55, 56 Greenough, Mrs. James J. (Kate Noble), 38:55 Greenough, Lily, see Hegermann-Lindencrone, Countess d’ Greenough, Louisa, see Blake, Mrs. Arthur W. Greenough, Mercy, see Gibbs, Mrs. Henry Greenough, Richard S. (1819-1904; sculptor), 34:89 Greenough, Dr. Robert (b. c. 1880), 33:42 Greenough, Sara (witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:80 Greenough, Rev. William (1755-1831; at West Newton), 16:98 Greenough, W. P. (in Dramatic Club, 1872), 38:52 Greenough house and estate, 42:39; 43:142. See also Greenough, Henry Greenough Parkway, 42:87. See also Streets and highways Greenough’s Cambridge Directory, 39:87n27. See also Directories (city) Greenslet, Ferris (c. 1900; writer), 19:29; 33:80n72, 82n78, 83; 35:45 Greenwood, Henry (leases market-house, 1813), 8:35 Greenwood, Mr. (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1809), 9:29 Gregg, Rev. James E. (Harvard 1902), 36:68 Gregor, Mrs. Leigh R. (Margaret Gibbens; Irving St. resident, 1925-41), 41:35 Gregor, Rosamond, see Heard, Mrs. John (Irving St. resident) Grenadier Battalion (1770s), 13:61n6. See also “Convention Troops” Grenville, George (1712-1770; British statesman), 39:145n2 Greville, Robert, see Brook[e], Lord Grey, see also Gray Grey, Alice (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:53. See also Gray, Miss Alice Grey, Richard (1694-1771; English scholar), 44:68, 73n17 Groyearth, Isaac (Indian worker, c. 1920), 17:91 “Greyhound, The” (Roxbury tavern), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses “Gribbons, Mrs” (charity recipient, mid-1800s), 17:71 Grid plan (“Newtown[e]”), see Maps and plans Gridley, Col. Jerry (friend of Henry Vassall, 1765), 10:39 Gridley, Col. Richard (1710/11-1796), 5:27; 11:80; 16:80; 33:148; 37:51[?] Gridley, Col. “Sam” (1775), 37:51. See also Gridley, Col. Richard Grier, Judge Robert (1794-1870), 10:154 Griffin (ship), 10:96; 14:85, 90; 21:80 Griffin Wharf (Boston), 39:156-57 Griffith, Mattie, see Brown, Mrs. Albert “Griffiths,” Rev. Mr. (impostor actually named Mieux, 1765), 10:32 Griggs, David R. (businessman, 1850), 7:62 “Griggs” (Vassall gardener), 26:55 Grimcke [Grimké], Angelina and Sarah (abolitionists, 1830s), 21:61 Griscom, Emma, see Smith, Emma Griscom Griscom, Dr. John Hoskins (1774-1852), 5:107 Griscom, Mrs. John Hoskins (Henrietta Peale), 5:107 Griscom, Ludlow (ornithologist), 34:87
– “Early History of Cambridge Ornithology” (1953 paper), 35:11-16 Griscom, Mrs. Ludlow (Edith Sloan), 35:27; 43: 165
– “The Planting on the Cambridge Common” (1953 paper), 35:29-33 Griscom family (Fayerweather St. residents, 1960s), 43:18 Griswold, Bishop Alexander V. (1766-1843), 23:57 Griswold, Mrs. A. M. (Craigie St. resident, 1901), 43:168 Griswold, Rufus W. (1815-1857; anthologist), 26:97; 34:35 Griswold (with Wyeth’s expedition, 1830s), 28:44 Griswold (Sparks St. landowner, c. 1890), 41:161 Grocery stores, see Retail and food stores Grodte, see also Grote Grodte, Frau (German teacher, c. 1900), 33:46 Grogan, Rev. Wells B. (at Shepard Church, 1960s), 43:123, 124 Gropius, Walter (1883-1969; architect), 35:121; 43:52 Gross, Prof. Charles (1857-1909; historian), 35:122 Grosvenor, Lt-Col. Thomas (1744-1825; of Connecticut), 5:26n1, 27, 28
– orderly book kept by (1775), 11:79 Grote, see also Grodte Grote, Miss Anna (teacher, c. 1910), 32:47 Grote, George (1794-1871; English historian), 44:34 Grote, Mrs. George (Harriet Lewin), 44:34 Groton, Massachusetts, 28:11, 12, 24, 27
– church at, 20:63
– founding and naming of, 10:190; 14:83 Grout, D. (soldier, 1775), 11:76 Grove Street (Boston), 14:52, 53; 39:82; 41:79 Grove Street (Cambridge), 4:48; 14:65; 39:98. See also Inman Street Grove Street (Watertown), 34:86 Groveland, Massachusetts, 21:41; 24:85 Grover Hermann building (MIT), 42:65 Grozier, Edwin Atkins (d. 1924), 44:88 Grozier, Richard (son of Edwin A.), 44:88 Grozier property, 37:16; 44:88 Grundmann, Otto (Boston art instructor, 1880s), 34:72 Guardianships, see Domestic and family life Guggenheim Foundation, 42:58 “Guggins, Mr.,” see Gookin, Maj.-Gen. Daniel Guild, Benjamin (Harvard tutor, 1777), 13:49 Guild, Benjamin (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1806), 9:15 Guild, Charles Eliot (b. 1827), 2:27 Guild, Eliza (Higginson family cousin, 1827) 2:25, 29 Guild, Mrs. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:27, 29 Guild, Mrs. and Miss (Tory Row residents, c. 1800), 9:7, 23, 30, 31, 33 Guild Row (Boston), 30:38 Gulick, Ann[e] (b. c. 1900; concert pianist), 42:133; 43:28 Gulick, Prof. Charles B. (Harvard 1890; classicist), 43:28, 30 Gulick, Mrs. Charles B., 43:28 Gulick, Charles B., Jr. (Harvard 1921), 43:28 Gulick, Millard (Harvard 1913; architect), 43:28 Gulick, Mrs. Millard (Alida Carey), 43:27, 28 Gummere, Prof. Francis Barton (1055-1919; at Haverford), 33:32 Gummere, Prof. Richard Mott (b. 1883), 33:30, 32, 36 Gund Hall (Harvard), 42:45; 43:91; 44:135 Gunpowder, see Powder and powdermills Gurley, Esther, see Wellington, Mrs. Isaac (4th) Gurney, Dean Ephraim Whitman (1829-1886), 12:39; 18:24, 25; 25:121; 26:22, 26, 27; 27:37
– house of, 26:26; 43:12-16, 23, 24, 26. 27, 30; 44:142 Gurney, Mrs. Ephraim Whitman (Ellen Hooper), 12:35; 35:39; 43:13, 15
– on Radcliffe committee (1878), 6:52; 44:142
Gurney Hill, 7:22; 41:166
Gurney house, see Gurney, Dean Ephraim Whitman
Gurney Street, 43:12, 28
Gutenberg, Johann (c. 1397-1468; German printer), 33:136
Gutheim family, 36:96
Guyot, Prof. Arnold Henry (1807-1884; geographer), 22:47; 23:82
Guyot-Horsford house, 22:47; 23:82; 26:41; 43:31 (illus. #6 following), 45, 46
Gymnasiums and gymnastics, see Hemenway Gymnasium; Sports and games

H

Habersham, Mr. (friend of Mrs. Andrew Craigie), 28:85
Hackburne, Samuel (d. before 1644), 30:39
Hackburne, Mrs. Samuel, see Dudley, Mrs. Thomas (second wife)
Haddon, Katherine (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1)
Hadley, Arthur T. (1856-1930; Yale president), 33:120; 42:20
Hadley, Mrs. Arthur T., 42:20
Hadley, Judge Samuel P. (of Chelmsford; d. 1919), 18:68
Hadley, Thomas (committee member, 1920s; d. 1934), 18:23
Hadley, Massachusetts, 13:29; 15:28; 24:37
Hagar, see also Hager
Hagar, Frank A. (son of F. W.; probation officer, 1902-14), 17:23
Hagar, F. W. (probation officer, 1881-1902), 17:23
Hagburne, see Hackburne
Hager, see also Hagar
Hager, Louis P. (editor, 1891), 39:93n48, 96n54
Hagia Sophia (Istanbul): Cambridge connection with, 27:27; 44:31-32
Haigh, Mrs. Walter F. R. (Emma Lane Ward; schoolgirl, early 20th c.), 43:20
Hailstone, Edward (book collector), 38:107
Hairdressing fashions
– pre-Revolutionary (judges’ wigs), 42:80
– 1760s (wigs or powder), 15:42; 17:56; 32:25
– c. 1800 (male), 11:12n1; 29:15, 22; 38:76
– 1815, 16:61
– mid-1800s, 1:51; 17:68, 72, 75-76; 24:42; 32:37, 39
– – – male, 18:44; 23:55, 62; 29:40, 46, 47
– late 1800s, 30:12; 32:43, 46; 41:162-63
– c. 1905, 1:52; 42:18 Halcyon Pond, 8:19; 34:84; 44:192 (and illus. #3 following). See also Mount Auburn Cemetery; Ponds and lakes Hale, see also Hales Hale, E. B. (attorney, 1881), 39:91 Hale, Rev. Edward Everett (1822-1909), 1:70; 4:34; 17:87; 23:92; 25:116; 34:20; 35:58; 36:66; 40:144
– on Harvard, 26:21-22
– letter of, to George J. Abbot (1845), 4:92-93; 5:45
– on Longfellow, 25:26
– as preacher, 4:92n1; 23:57; 34:41, 44 Hale, Elizabeth, see Smith, Mrs. [Judge] Jeremiah Hale, Emily (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:63 Hale, Rev. John: …Nature of Witchcraft (1702), 17:48, 49, 50 Hale, Lucretia (1820-1900; author), 23:57 Hale, Matthew (engagement of, 1906), 44:114 Hale, Rev. Moses (1750-1786): diary of, while Harvard student (1770), 11:74 Hale, Nathan (1784-1863; of Boston Daily Advertiser), 1:70; 12:37; 21:105, 108; 23:57, 63; 34:77; 44:176 Hale, Mrs. Nathan (sister of Edward Everett), 21:105, 108; 22:53; 23:57 Hale, Nathan, Jr., 23:57, 62; 28:57 Hale, Richard (Massachusetts Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:40 Hale, Richard W. (of Needham, c. 1910), 43:168 Hale, Miss Sarah (b. 1817; sister of Edward E.), 23:57, 58 Hale, Mrs. Sarah Josepha Buell (1788-1879; author, editor), 40:58 Hale, William (of New Hampshire, c. 1800), 11:25n1 Hale, Mrs. William (Lydia Rollins), 11:25n1 Hale, William Harlan (biographer, 1950s), 34:25 Hale, Mr. (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:68 Hale (Harvard tutor, 1784), 11:68 Hales, see also Hale Hales, John G. (surveyor, 1830), 14:69, 77, 78; 39:73; 43:94 “Halfway Covenant” (Nantucket), 27:58n38. See also Religion Haliburton, see Hal[l]iburton Hall, Albert Harrison
– papers by:
– – – “How Massachusetts Grew, 1630-42” (1930), 21:19-49; 49:79n1
– – – “Thomas Wellington ‘of Cambridge’” (1913), 8:14-29 Hall, Basil (“English traveler,” 1827), 2:22 Hall, Miss Constance (Garden St. resident, c. 1950), 33:50 Hall, Ebenezer (printer, 1775), 15:16; 18:62 Hall, Edward (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Hall, Rev. Edward Brooks (c. 1800), 6:77; 7:104 Hall, Mrs. Edward Brooks (Harriet Ware), 6:77; 7:104 Hall, Rev. Edward Henry (1831-1912), 10:110n; 31:64-65; 33:114; 41:157
– “The Cambridge Humane Society” (1911 paper), 6:27-32; 18:18n1
– obituary, 6:77; 7:104-5 Hall, Edwin Herbert (1855-1938), 23:43
– “Historical Sketch of Charitable Societies in Cambridge” (1925 paper), 18:11-26; 30:17 Hall, George E. (businessman, d. 1928), 40:31-32, 34 Hall, Henry (Fort Hall, Idaho, named for, 1830s), 28:50 Hall, James M. W. (bank official, 1890), 41:43, 44 Hall, John R. (architect, 1850s), 43:145 Hall, Max (editor): “Cambridge as Printer and Publisher: Fame, Oblivion, and Fame Again” (1977 paper), 44:63-83 Hall, Mrs. Maxcy Reddick (Elizabeth Holsombach; CHS secretary, d. 1974), 43:127 Hall, Norman (Harvard 1922; versifier), 41:108 Hall, Orrin (“West India goods” dealer, mid-1800s), 8:39; 30:18, 22 Hall, Richard W. (Hawthorn St. resident, 1926), 43:168
– “Recollections of the Cambridge Social Dramatic Club” (1960 paper), 38:51-67 Hall, Mrs. Richard W. (Amy deGozzaldi), 31:27; 38:57, 61-62, 63; 42:130 Hall, Samuel (1740-1807; printer), 15:16; 18:62; 39:56; 44:67 Hall, Stephen (Harvard tutor, 1777), 13:41-53 passim Hall, Thomas (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Hall, Thomas (b. 1825; mechanic), 14:127, 128-29 Hall, William S. (Boat Club, 1909), 39:129, 131 Hall, Mayor (1880), 20:36, 37 Hall, Mr. (builds house on Follen St., mid-1800s), 20:99 Hall (landowner, mid-1800s), 38:30 Hall, Reverend (substitute at First Church [Unitarian], 1906), 44:119 Hallett, Capt. Bangs (c. 1830), 10:160 Halley’s Comet (1835), see Astronomy Hal[l]iburton, Dr. John (father of Thomas C.; 1770s), 4:23, 36; 43:128 Hal[l]iburton, Thomas Chandler (1796-1865; “Sam Slick”), 4:23 Hallowe’en, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals Hallowell, May (West Medford art student, 1880s), 34:73 Hallowell, Commissioner (1770s), 21:120; 33:67 Hallowell (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:44 Hallowell family, 20:50 Hallowell, Maine, 21:65; 25:97 Halman, see also Holman Halman, Doris F. (at 47 Workshop, 1920s), 40:117, 122 Hamill, Samuel S. (organ manufacturer, c. 1860), 32:93 Hamilton, Alexander (c. 1756-1804), 4:32; 5:15; 7:38; 23:52; 26:89n53; 28:22, 110
– statue of (Boston), 16:25 Hamilton, Gail (pseud.), see Dodge, Mary Abigail Hamilton, [British] General (1770s), 13:24n1, 25, 60, 63n1 Hamilton, Massachusetts, 21:41, 79; 43:26. See also Ipswich, Massachusetts (Agawam) Hamilton Place (Boston), 23:57 Hamlen, see also Hamlin Hamlen, Charles S. (politician, 1880s), 20:45 Hamlet, William (of Billerica, late 1600s), 9:76 Hamlin, see also Hamlen Hamlin, Emmons (1821-1885; organ and piano manufacturer), 32:92 Hamlin, Joanne: dramatic enactment by (1979), 44:193 Hammett, Mr. (Milliard and Jenks family friend), 9:12, 15, 16-17, 18, 21, 22 Hammond, Elizabeth, see Shaw, Mrs. Bezaleel Hammond, Judge Franklin T. (Scott St. resident, 1909-59), 21:61; 30:8; 41:38 Hammond, Mrs. Franklin T. (Mabel McLeod; d. 1955), 21:61; 30:8; 36:127; 41:38 Hammond, Capt. Lawrence (1682), 5:41 Hammond, Mason (Harvard alumnus, 1946), 33:34n49 Hampden, John (1594-1643), 44:54-55 Hampshire Gazette, see Periodicals (general) Hampshire Street, 14:44, 57, 65; 16:43; 39:42; 40:24, 31
– laid out, 7:59; 14:50; 20:130; 35:81; 42:83
– naming of, 14:62
– – – renaming proposed (1928), 20:14
– railroad crossing, 20:129; 38:26, 30n12
– street railway on, 39:92; 40:27
– See also Beacon Street (Cambridge/Somerville); Middlesex Turnpike Hampton, New Hampshire, 24:70 Hancock, see also Hancox Hancock, Belcher (A.B. 1727; tutor), 20:96 Hancock, Charles Lowell (Harvard 1829; Commencement speaker), 12:15 Hancock, “Bishop” John (1671-1752), 6:23; 9:6; 21:87; 43:117 Hancock, Gov. John (1736/37-1793), 5:66, 108; 15:29; 26:81, 82; 30:49-54 passim; 39:151
– during Battle of Lexington, 9:75; 13:85
– bridge company of, see Bridge(s)
– on Committee of Public Safety, 3:19, 56; 30:56
– in Continental Congress, 30:63; 37:57
– family of, 6:23; 9:6; 16:84; 37:19
– as Harvard treasurer, 16:129
– opposes Constitution, 3:61
– and Penobscot, 5:83, 93n4
– Sewall v., 40:124-25
– street named for, 25:121; 32:26 (see also Hancock Street)
– -Ward letters, 37:55 Hancock, Mrs. [Gov.] John (Dorothy Quincy), 16:78; 37:19 Hancock, Mary Torrey, see Hancock, Mrs. Solomon [1st] Hancock, Mary Torrey (great-granddaughter of above), see Wyeth, Mrs. Jonas, 3d Hancock, “Molly” [Mary] (1741-1828; daughter of Solomon), 10:24n2 Hancock[e], Nathaniel (of Shepard congregation, 1630s; d. c. 1648), 5:36; 6:23; 10:103; 22:76 (Map 1)
– descendants of, 5:54; 22:119 Hancock, Nathaniel 3d, 9:6; 17:95 Hancock, Prudence, see Hill, Mrs. Abraham [2d] Hancock, Samuel (b. 1777; carriage-builder), 16:42, 85 Hancock, Solomon (c. 1706-1756), 16:84 Hancock, Mrs. Solomon (Mary Torrey), 16:84 Hancock, Solomon (1776-1862; grandson of above), 16:42, 84 Hancock, Thomas (1703-1763; Boston merchant), 39:50, 146 Hancock, Thomas (British inventor, c. 1840), 40:41 Hancock, Torr[e]y (1733-1778), 14:64; 16:84 Hancock, Mrs. Torr[e]y, see Wyeth, Sarah Hancock, Torrey (1778-1852): house of, see Hancock houses Hancock (Harvard tutor, 1750), 10:33 Hancock family, 10:115 Hancock Free Bridge Corporation, see Bridge(s) Hancock houses
– Boston, 2:113; 6:19; 17:33; 25:65; 41:60
– Cambridge:
– – – Nathaniel Hancock (built 1634), 6:22-23
– – – Torrey Hancock (built c. 1808), 43:97, 104
– Lexington, 25:68 Hancock Professorship, 4:16; 11:35n, 71 Hancock Street, 14:60, 64; 22:62; 30:73. 74, 88; 32:26; 34:30; 43:141. See also Church Street Hancox, see also Hancock Hancox, James (of England. 1791), 25:90-91 Hancox, Jane, see Wells, Mrs. William Handel and Haydn Society (Boston), see Music (societies) Handy, Mrs. Edward A. (of Barnstable, 1907), 43:168 Hanford, Ruth Crosby, see Munn, Mrs. James B. Hangman’s Island: slate from, 17:32 Hannah Winthrop Chapter, DAR, see DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) Hannum, Rev. Leander Moody (1837-1909): obituary, 10:177-78 Hannum, Mrs. Leander Moody (Anne Demain), 10:178 Hannum Hall (YWCA), 36:45 Hanover Street (Boston), 41:59
– Hanover Street Congregational Church, 20:63; 33:45; 43:119 (see also Congregational Church/Congregationalism) Hanson, Charles Lane (1870-c. 1960), 34:111
– “Four Years at Harvard College: 1888-1892” (1951 paper), 34:37-57 Hanson, Timothy (of Pennsylvania, c. 1700), 24:81 Hanson, Mrs. Timothy (daughter of Benanuel Bowers), 24:81 Hanus, Prof. Paul H. (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Harbinger, The (Brook Farm publication), 32:90 Harding, Charles L. (Hospital trustee, 1870s), 20:75; 35:86 Harding, Mrs. Charles L. (Julia N.), 20:75 Harding, Chester (1792-1866; painter), 21:114; 23:15; 38:137 Harding, Mayor Hamlin R. (1860s), 20:86 Harding, Samuel B. (historian, 1896), 40:13n11 Harding, Mrs. (friend of John Rowe, 1769). 10:44 Harding’s Gallery (Boston), 29:50nn67, 68, 51n69 Hardwick, Massachusetts, 19:16
– Paige bequest to, 6:40 Hardy, Miss Mary C. (teacher, c. 1900), 35:105-6 Hare, Bishop William Hobart (1838-1909), 17:87 Harken, Mrs. Dwight (president of Window Shop, 1970s), 43:105 Harkness, Edward S. (1874-1940; philanthropist), 34:11, 14 Harlakenden, Elizabeth (daughter of Roger), 15:26 Harlakenden, Elizabeth Bosville, see Harlakenden, Mrs. Roger (second wife) Harlakenden, Mabel, see Haynes, Mrs. John (second wife) Harlakenden, Margaret (b. 1638; daughter of Roger), 15:26 Harlakenden, Richard (brother of Roger), 15:24, 25; 42:99 Harlakenden, Roger (1611-1638), 3:14; 10:103; 14:37, 54, 96; 22:66, 78; 30:37; 42:99
– Gozzaldi paper on (1920), 15:24-26 Harlakenden, Mrs. Roger (Emlen, first wife; d. 1634), 15:24 Harlakenden, Mrs. Roger (Elizabeth Bosville [Godfrey], second wife; later Mrs. Herbert Pelham), 14:54; 15:25 Harlan, Prof. Lee (at Columbia, 1940s), 28:104n Harleian Society, see Society(ies) (organizations) Harlow, Andrew B. (baker, toll-gatherer, 1850s-1870s), 8:38; 15:32 Harlow, Dr. J. M. (of Woburn, 1870s), 20:109 Harlow, Joshua (b. 1779), 16:42, 44 Harlow, Mrs. Joshua (Clarissa Richardson), 16:44 Harlow house (Plymouth), 25:68 Harmon family (of England; in Berkeley St. house, c. 1860), 21:64 Harnack, Adolf von (1851-1930; German theologian) , 36:16 Harnden, William F. (1812-1845; pioneer expressman), 34:88 Harness making, see Horses (as transportation) Harney, Madame (teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1890s), 32:44, 45; 34:66 Harper, Lathrop C. (book collector, 1930s), 38:104, 108 Harper’s Ferry raid, see Brown, John (1800-1859) Harper’s Magazine, Harper’s Weekly, see Periodicals (general) Harpt, August (Berlin music master, c. 1860), 30:88 Harrer, Rev. John A. (Congregational Librarian): “The Reverend Jose Glover and the Beginnings of the Cambridge Press” (1960 paper), 38:87-110 Harriet (British mail packet, 1770s), 5:76-77 Harrington, see also Errington Harrington, Clarissa, see Rindge, Mrs. Samuel Baker Harrington, Fanny (1860s; later Mrs. Mackintosh), 34:33-34 Harrington, George (diplomat, late 1800s), 34:19, 22 Harrington, Rev. Henry Francis (1814-1887), 2:39; 34:19-29, 32-35 Harrington, Mrs. Henry Francis (Elizabeth Locke), 34:35 Harrington, “John,” see Harrington, Joseph (3d) Harrington, Joseph (of Roxbury; father of Rev. Henry F.), 34:20 Harrington, Mrs. Joseph (Rebecca), 34:20 Harrington, Rev. Joseph, Jr. (d. 1852), 34:27 Harrington, Joseph (aids in Restoration work, 1960s), 39:54
– given as “John,” 44:36 Harrington School (Cambridge), Harrington Memorial School (New Bedford), see School(s) Harris, Mrs. A. A. (Francis Ave. resident, 1886), 41:18, 28 Harris, Anna, see Palgrave, Mrs. Richard Harris, Miss Charlotte (Francis Ave. resident, 1894-1923), 41:28 Harris, Edward Doubleday (Vassall and Royall biographer), 10:7n1, 9n1, 14n1, 24n2, 25n3, 44-78nn passim; 20:96; 26:50nn14-17, 61; 27:65n57; 37:27 Harris, Elizabeth (second wife of Jose Glover; later first wife of Henry Dunster; d. 1643), 3:8-9, 13, 14-15; 6:22; 14:101; 27:30; 32:27, 69; 38:90-93 passim; 44:64, 65, 78
– descendants of, 19:88 Harris, Miss Elizabeth (d. 1939), 11:72; 17:63, 64, 66, 73; 25:110; 30:11, 15
– as descendant of early settlers, 5:52 Harris, Miss Emma Forbes, 35:18
– school of (1850s), 30:74-78, 85 (see also School[s]) Harris, Rev. George (1844-1922; Amherst College president), 23:80 Harris, Harriet, see Bond, Mrs. George Phillips Harris, Jonathan (landowner, c. 1800), 20:129 Harris, Miss Mary (Francis Ave. resident, 1894-1923), 41:28 Harris, Rev. Nathaniel (d. 1635, England), 3:8-9, 15 Harris, Nathaniel (landowner, 1754), 24:51 Harris, Neil (author, 1966), 43:76 Harris, Priscilla Langdon, see Hooper, Mrs. Henry Northey Harris, Richard (Harvard tutor; d. 1644), 3:9, 14-15, 118; 14:101; 38:14 Harris, Sarah (schoolgirl, 1850s), 30:78 Harris, Rev. Thaddeus Mason (1768-1842; of Dorchester), 11:35 Harris, Thaddeus William (1795-1856; Harvard Librarian, entomologist), 3:15n1; 15:37; 25:83, 109-10; 29:23n26; 30:74; 38:78, 83, 86 Harris, Walt (artist), 1932), 23:47 Harris, Prof. William E. (and metropolitan planning, 1923), 42:87 Harris, William Thaddeus (author, 1845), 22:13n1; 26:78n37, 93n63; 33:40; 35:23, 24 Harris, William Torrey (1835-1909; philosopher), 29:39n21 Harris, Misses (tavern doorstep the property of, 1911), 6:21 Harris family, 12:33 Harris property (Sparks St.), 22:47 Harrison, Benjamin (1833-1901; U.S. president 1888-92), 7:6 Harrison, Gilbert (of London, 1772; Ruggles creditor), 37:23 Harrison, Henry H. (editor, late 1800s), 20:88 Harrison, J. Thomas (printer, c. 1900), 20:89 Harrison, Peter (1716-1775; architect, of Newport), 23:18-19, 21, 22; 25:121; 33:64; 43:40 Harrison, William Henry (1773-1841; U.S. president 1840-41), 15:37; 25:94 Harrison & Abramovitz (architects), 44:153 Harrison Street, 20:133 Hart, Prof. Albert Bushnell (1854-1943; historian), 18:54n2; 20:88; 27:34; 40:145
– as descendant of early settler, 22:61; 23:8
– property of, 11:8; 32:101; 43:22, 26
– writings of, 5:12; 41:169; 42:122
– – – “Colonial Pirates and Privateers” (1907 paper, not quoted), 2:41 Hart, Prof. Henry M. (Fayerweather St. resident, 1960s), 43:27, 30 Hart, Mrs. Henry M., 43:27 Hart, John Goddard: house of (built 1924), 43:162, 168 Hart, Stephen (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:61, 76 (Map 1)
– house site to be marked (1933), 23:8 Hart (MIT treasurer, 1913), 42:55 Hartford, Connecticut, 10:101; 14:90; 27:75; 31:62
– Dickens visits, 28:65
– early town plan of, 44:61
– First Church of Christ in, 10:104-5
– – – and second church Covenant, 10:98-99
– growth of, 40:50, 51
– Hooker’s removal to, see Hooker, Rev. Thomas
– United Colonies meeting in (1644), 42:105
– Wadsworth Atheneum in, 27:14 Hartford Convention, 31:11 “Hartford Wits,” 27:54 Hartigan, Miss Lillian (drama teacher, 1950s), 35:103 Hartt’s Naval Yard, 29:26. See also Navy Yard Harugari Hall (East Cambridge), 36:102 Harvard, Rev. John (1607/8-1638), 3:85; 7:66; 32:112; 33:144-48; 42:78; 44:64
– at Cambridge University, 32:62, 66, 111; 33:144-45; 43:114
– library of, 27:30, 32; 30:42; 32:67; 33:145, 147; 36:53; 41:7; 42:81
– memorials to, 1:37; 33:146-48 Harvard, Mrs. John (Ann Sadler), 33:144, 145 Harvard (sloop owned by college), 44:79 Harvard, Massachusetts, 17:33; 33:55
– Fruitlands, 25:67 Harvard Alumni Association
– Associated Harvard Alumni, 44:156
– T. Roosevelt and, 33:124
– See also Harvard College/University (Alumni of) Harvard Alumni Bulletin, see Periodicals (Harvard) “Harvard Annex,” see Radcliffe College Harvard Archives, 26:68n9; 29:20, 27n38; 33:125; 37:75n; 38:7, 23, 37n27, 42n38, 44n41, 80; 41:91, 141; 44:69n8, 71-73nnl2-16, 77, 144
– diaries in possession of, 11:70, 71; 38:15n13; 42:21
– letters in possession of, 16:14; 24:78n29; 33:124; 38:50n53; 41:123n6; 42:21
– paper on (1972), 42:110-22
– scrapbooks in possession of, 42:115, 118
– Sparks and, 44:131-32
– War Archives and Archivist, 44:33
– See also Diaries and journals; Harvard College/University (College Papers of) Harvard Associates (trustees), 37:92 Harvard Astronomical Observatory, see Harvard Observatory Harvard Athletic Association (HAA), see Harvard College/University (athletics at) Harvard Bank, see Banks and trust companies Harvard Book
– (1875, Vaille & Clarke, eds.), 10:24n2, 34n1; 13:45n1; 18:42n1; 27:68n63; 33:9n8, 17n27; 38:50n53
– (1953, Bentinck-Smith, ed.), 42:113 “Harvard Branch Railroad,” see Railroad(s) Harvard Bridge, see Bridge(s) Harvard Business School, see Harvard School(s) Harvard Celebrities (H. W. Eliot), 34:47; 35:115, 123; 44:20 Harvard Classics (C. W. Eliot collection), 12:27 Harvard clubs, Harvard Club, see Club(s) “Harvard College” or “Old College” (first Harvard building), 27:30; 32:68, 108-9; 42:81 Harvard College/University
– Admission Committee, house of, 26:103n71; 33:32 (see also Dana houses [#10])
– Allston at, see Harvard student(s)
– Alumni of
– – – Associated, 44:156
– – – and reunions, 41:168
– – – at 200th anniversary (1836), 33:15
– (see also Harvard Alumni Association)
– “Annex” to, see Radciiffe College
– anniversaries of founding of:
– – – 200th (1836), 4:27-28; 25:26, 119; 33:15; 36:59
– – – 250th (1886), 14:10, 21; 20:37; 32:84
– – – 300th (1936), 24:25; 27:38; 32:78, 88; 35:24
– anniversary of Museum founding (100th, 1959), 43:54
– architecture of, see Architecture
– archives of, see Harvard Archives
– Art Department of, begun, 27:11-27 (see also Fogg Art Museum)
– athletics at, 1:17, 40; 34:48; 41:53
– – – and ballfield, 20:94
– – – crews, 25:121; 26:24
– – – first officially recognized, 18:28; 32:28
– – – Harvard Athletic Association (HAA), 39:134; 41:107, 109-10
– – – and Princeton, 34:49
– (see also Sports and games)
– Baldwin Prize at, 44:89
– bath house built, see Harvard student(s)
– becomes University, see transformation of, from College to University, below
– benefactors of, see funding of, below
– Biographical Sketches of Graduates of, see graduates of, below
– Board of Overseers of, see Harvard Overseers
– Board of Preachers of, see and university preachers, below
– Boat House of, 10:10n1; 39:127
– boat races at, see Sports and games (sculling)
– bomb exploded at (1842), see Harvard student(s)
– “Book of Possessions” of (1635), 22:63 (see also land/houses owned by, below)
– botanical studies at, see Botany
– brew-house at, 7:64 (see also Wine and spirits)
– bridge and ferry revenue paid to, see funding of, below
– building begun at, 3:15, 18; 32:108-9; 33:7-8
– – – first building, 27:30; 32:68, 108-9; 42:81
– – – oldest building, 3:18 (see also Massachusetts Hall)
– buildings as barracks, see Army
– and burying-ground wall (1735), 33:40; 35:23 (see also Fences and walls)
– “butlers” at, 2:17; 11:39n2; 38:111, 13, 16, 21
– buttery of, 29:20
– – – absence from, 11:39, 44, 50
– – – charges for, 11:67, 68; 38:16
– – – fine for entering, 38:13
– carpenter for, 8:36; 10:24; 33:40; 41:17
– – – carpenter’s shop (1920), 18:34
– Catalogue(s) of, 2:128; 14:21; 25:115; 32:113; 36:68; 44:66, 70n10
– – – printing of, 15:17-18
– – – 1600s, 44:65
– – – 1700s, 21:90; 44:67
– – – 1809-24, 15:18; 44:84
– – – 1826-84, 25:21n3; 44:84
– – – mid- to late 1800s, 8:53; 10:143; 25:21n3; 26:25; 32:82; 34:70; 36:14, 15, 27, 29; 41:96, 158
– – – 1910, 8:53
– “caution money” at, 38:16-17 (see also Expenses [Harvard])
– centenary observances of, see anniversaries of, above
– Chapel at, 29:20, 24; 34:15
– – – voluntary/elective system begins, 34:41, 44
– (see also and religion, below; Appleton Chapel; Holden Chapel; University Hall chapel)
– Charter of, 4:92; 30:42; 32:67, 68, 112; 42:81
– Church and, see and religion, below
– in Civil War, see Civil War, U.S.
– Class Day at (mid- and late 1800s), 3:22; 12:12; 18:32; 23:54; 33:125; 34:56
– Classes of 1829 and 1859, see “great classes” of, below
– coeducation at, 36:37 (see also Harvard student(s) [women as])
– “College Book” of (1700s), 10:28n1; 11:34-35n2, 62n1; 13:44n3, 45n3, 53n1 (see also Harvard Book)
– and “College Corn,” see funding of, below
– College Farm of (before 1655), 9:72, 75, 76
– College Papers of, 4:6-20nn passim; 7:67; 13:37n2, 48-50nn passim; 38:45n42; 41:118n1 (see also Harvard Archives)
– College Pump of, 30:13 (see also Water supply)
– as “colleges” (1860s), 20:53
– Commemoration at (1865), 14:10, 21
– Commencements at, 8:33; 13:100; 15:32, 43; 27:34; 34:55; 37:38, 108; 38:40; 41:121
– – – and commencement fees, 38:9, 17, 19
– – – date of, 3:22; 7:65; 15:37; 16:49; 27:62; 32:89-90; 35:112
– – – “Fair Harvard” composed for, see “Fair Harvard” (Gilman)
– – – first (1642), 32:67
– – – food and drink for, 3:105; 11:27; 12:14; 15:20; 30:21; 37:77
– – – as “gala day,” 3:105; 9:13, 14; 16:49; 19:49; 23:54; 27:57, 58, 62; 33:38; 35:30, 37:32; 38:18; 41:169; 43:118
– – – gown and mortarboard first worn at, 34:56
– – – held on Common, 20:127; 33:38; 35:30
– – – held at First Church, 3:19; 12:18; 31:64; 42:83-84; 43:118
– – – inaugurations at time of, 2:120, 125
– – – Lancers and, 1:27; 30:13; 41:169
– – – omitted (1770s), 13:53n1
– – – orations and odes at, 9:12, 38; 11:45, 52; 12:15-22; 24:80n2; 29:31-32; 33:64, 77-78
– – – processions at, 3:18; 20:127; 30:l3; 42:119
– – – 1642 (first), 32:67
– – – 1770s (omitted), 13:53n1
– – – 1792, 11:69
– – – 1813, 8:35
– – – 1825, 41:121
– – – 1829, 12:13-22
– – – 1838, 1839, 4:31-32, 34
– – – 1860, 2:125
– – – 1892, 34:56
– – – 1905, 41:167-68
– – – 1909, 33:124
– “Commons” at, see Food
– corporal punishment at, see Harvard student(s)
– as creditor of railroad, see Railroad(s)(Harvard Branch)
– curriculum changes of (1978), see reforms at, below
– “detriments” at, 38:9, 12-13 (see also Expenses [Harvard])
– “Detur” (award) at, 1:20-21
– diaries of officials and students of, see Diaries and journals
– disapprobation by, of dancing school, 10:26n1
– discipline at, see Harvard student(s)
– Dutch visitors to (1680), 3:17; 11:62, 66
– effect of, on Cambridge, 1:12, 18, 26-27, 38, 42, 70; 10:33n2; 13:44; 22:101-4; 24:61; 25:71; 42:80
– – – “town-gown” relationship, 1:18, 31-32, 38; 22:102; 37:78-79; 42:90; 44:103
– elections of presidents of, see presidents of, below
– elective system at, 2:122; 4:80; 22:103; 34:41, 44, 48; 38:70, 71, 72, 86; 44:149, 155
– – – and parental permission for courses, 38:75; 43:129
– (see also Education [and educational reform] )
– electricity first installed by, 43:35
– epidemics at, 11:35; 13:53n1; 16:128 (see also medical and health services at, below; Disease)
– established, see founding of, below
– examinations at, 4:82-83; 34:17
– – – entrance, 2:103; 12:33; 15:17; 16:16, 17; 22:109; 28:25; 30:87; 34:70; 35:112; 36:27; 37:108; 44:141
– – – grading of, 26:16, 18-19; 27:35-36; 33:26
– – – introduction of written, 2:121-22, 123; 17:62
– – – Law School, 41:124, 125
– – – Medical School, 17:62
– – – and security, 44:82
– – – tutorial system and, see tutors at, below
– – – women taking, 34:70; 36:27, 28, 32-38; 44:141
– expansion of, from dormitories in Yard, 30:23
– expenses at, see tuition at, below; Expenses (Harvard)
– expulsion from, see Harvard student(s)
– faculty at, see professors at, below
– Faculty Records of, 10:24n3, 30-31n1; 11:38n2, 39n3, 41n1, 47n1, 50n1; 13:46n1, 49n2, 52n2; 14:8; 29:24, 30, 32; 42:113
– families at and continuing at, 17:61; 44:70
– – – Dana, 26:78; 33:160
– – – Dudley, 30:7; 32:113
– – – Endicott, 32:113
– – – Saltonstall, 13:82; 16:113; 32:113
– – – Vassall, 10:17, 36n1; 16:34; 37:15
– – – Wellington, 8:15
– “fellow-commoners” at, 38:10
– Fellows of, 2:16; 34:16-17 (see also Harvard Corporation)
– and “ferriage” (ferry revenue), see funding of, below
– finances of, see funding of, below
– fines and penalties at, see Fines and penalties
– and fire department, see Cambridge Fire Department
– firewood for, see Firewood
– first building of, see building begun at, above
– and First Church, see and religion, below
– first Commencement at (1642), 32:67 (see also Commencements at, above)
– first graduate school of, see Harvard Graduate School
– first graduating class of (1642), 16:113
– first literary professorship endowed, 2:118, 121
– first organ acquired by, 27:68 (see also Music)
– first printed notice of (London, 1643), 2: 13-14
– first tutors of, 3:9 (see also tutors at, below)
– and Fogg Museum, see Fogg Art Museum
– food at, see Food
– Forestry Department of, 34:9
– 47 Workshop at, see Theatre (Harvard)
– founding of, 21:79; 30:42; 32:66-68; 38:7; 39:26; 41:7; 42:78; 44:41, 61
– – – Glover and, 3:6, 14; 14:101
– – – Shepard’s influence and, 1:34, 38; 42:105
– (see also site chosen, below)
– “Four Years at (1888-921” (1951 paper), 34:37-57
– fraternity at (Theta Delta Chi, 1858), 41:93
– Friends of Art, Archaeology, and Music at, 27:23
– funding of, 4:16
– – – benefactors (1600s), 3:15, 17, 55; 7:66-67, 69; 16:31; 26:68, 78; 33:142n1; 38:20; 44:144 (see also Harvard, Rev. John)
– – – benefactors (1700s), 3:54; 9:40, 43; 16:24; 21:90; 27:31; 33:60, 91-92, 151; 38:70
– – – benefactors (1800s), 4:79-80; 7:83; 9:32n1; 16:25; 23:41; 25:80; 26:23-24; 33:16, 19, 40, 55, 91, 146, 153n8, 154; 38:86; 39:46; 41:62, 63, 71-72, 121, 122, 126; 43:63-64, 139; 44:129 (see also Craigie, Mrs. [Dr.] Andrew; McKay, Gordon; Sophocles, Prof. Evangelinus Apostolides)
– – – benefactors (1900s), 5:106; 9:43n1; 10:193; 20:16; 24:95; 27:31, 36-38; 32:91; 33:33, 46, 85, 91, 147; 34:11, 89; 37:96; 40:114, 115
– – – by bridge and ferry revenue, 7:57, 58; 16:83-84; 33:144; 41:159
– – – by “College Corn,” 38:20; 42:105-6
– – – Divinity School, 36:60, 73
– – – by endowment (at founding, 1636), 1:38 (see also Massachusetts General Court/ Legislature [and Harvard College])
– – – and financial straits, 2:121; 3:79; 4:22
– – – by lottery, 3:54, 55; 7:65
– (see also Fogg Art Museum)
– General Court and, see Massachusetts General Court/Legislature
– German influence at, see German influence and scholarship
– glazier at, see Glass
– “Gold Coast” of, 30:23
– graduate school of, see Harvard Graduate School
– graduates of:
– – – Biographical Sketches of (Sibley), 2:16n2; 24:25, 26; 26:25; 37:23, 27; 42:108n14, 111, 113
– – – first graduating class (1642), 16:113
– – – Harvard Graduates Whom I Have Known (Peabody), 14:42n1
– (see also Harvard student[s])
– “great classes” of (1829, 1859), 3:36; 12:13-22
– health services at, see medical and health services at, below
– heating and lighting of, see Heating; Lights and lighting
– historic preservation by, see Historic preservation (of houses and locations)
– history(ies) of:
– – – “catechism” on, 19:11-12
– – – Eliot, 32:79; 43:150
– – – Peirce, 11:51n1; 43:151
– – – Quincy, 21:122; 22:13n1
– – – Warren (Law School), 41:118n1, 123n6, 129n8
– (see also Morison, Samuel Eliot)
– honorary degrees bestowed by, 1:75; 9:43; 10:176, 179; 12:21; 26:95; 30:86; 33:74, 130; 34:125; 41:121; 43:121
– – – “scandal” regarding, 9:20
– – – statesmen receiving, 4:30-31; 42:82
– hostess house for convalescents at, 20:99
– House Plan at, 34:10-11, 13-16, 17
– houses owned by, see land/houses owned by, below
– Indians at, see Indians
– “indifference” at, 27:34; 34:15, 48
– keys of, 4:92
– land/houses owned by, 1:49; 20:120, 123; 25:67; 26:41, 59; 41:23; 42:117
– – – 1600s, 22:63, 64-65, 72, 74, 76 (Map 1)
– – – c. 1815, 41:21, 23, 32
– – – 1830s, 8:36; 18:28; 33:14-15
– – – 1840s, 33:19
– – – 1855, 14:60; 38:49
– – – 1889, 41:33
– – – c. 1900, 1:16; 20:120, 23:80
– – – 1960s, 41:25; 42:45
– (see also Historic preservation [of houses and locations]; entries for individual houses)
– lands papers of, 42:116
– “Laws of,” 2:128
– – – 1655, 38:17
– – – 1798, 15:17
– – – 1800, 11:50n1
– lawsuits involving, see Law(s) (and lawsuits)
– leave of absence granted from (1756), 10:27-28
– Library and librarians of, see Harvard Library
– living conditions at, see Harvard student(s)
– Longfellow as professor at, see Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
– Longfellow’s sketch of, 25:26 (illus. following )
– “low points” of, 4:22, 92; 9:20, 25-26, 41; 10:6; 11:63; 35:30, 116-17
– Lowell as professor at, see Lowell, James Russell
– mascot for, 21:58; 34:52
– Master’s residence at (Adams House), see Apthorp-Borland house
– medical and health services at, 22:103; 37:20, 66; 44:154 (see also epidemics at, above)
– memorabilia of, 3:15; 42:110 (see also Harvard Archives) Meteorological Society of, 33:18, 22 (see also Harvard Observatory) military companies of, 10:30n1
– – – “Harvard-Washington Corps,” 20:132; 37:36 (see also Arsenal [Cambridge])
– – – “Mavortian band,” 11:35
– – – ROTC, 34:11; 40:115; 44:153
– and the ministry, 18:43, 44; 29:69; 36:55, 56 (see also and university preachers, below; Harvard Divinity School)
– “mistakes” of (in letting professors go), 35:14; 40:121
– -MIT merger (disallowed), 34:9; 36:71; 42:49, 50, 51
– Monitor at (c. 1700), 38:9, 15-16
– music at, see Music
– naming of, 3:53; 32:67, 112; 33:146; 41:7; 42:78, 105; 43:114
– “Natural History at, 1788-1842” (1960 paper), 38:69-86
– Naval Training Schools at (World War II), 33:32
– oldest building of, see building begun at, above
– Papers of, see College Papers of, above
– parietal regulations at, see Harvard student(s)
– parental permission for courses at, see elective system at, above
– and political science/politics, 20:32-33, 35-37, 45, 46
– – – Federalist leanings of, 11:43n1; 33:74
– preachers at, see and university preachers, below
– presidents and acting presidents of:
– – – Cambridge streets named after, 14:62; 22:46
– – – elections/inaugurations of, 2:125, 127-28; 3:19; 4:15, 79, 90-92; 9:12; 11:31n3, 59-60; 23:53; 34:38-39; 36:25
– – – Harvard Corporation/Overseers and, see Harvard Corporation; Harvard Overseers
– – – houses for, see “President’s house”
– – – ministers as, 18:43; 29:69
– – – presidency offered and declined (Glover), 3:11
– – – Reports (annual) of, 44:78
– – – and vice-president (Morton), 22:64
– (see also Bok, Derek C.; Chaunc[e]y, Rev. Charles; Conant, James Bryant; Dunster, Rev. Henry; Eaton, Nathaniel; Eliot, Charles William; Everett, Rev. [Gov.] Edward; Felton, Cornelius Conway; Hill, Rev. Thomas; Holyoke, Rev. Edward; Kirkland, Rev. John Thornton; Langdon, Rev. Samuel; Leverett, John; Locke, Rev. Samuel; Lowell, Abbott Lawrence; Mather, Rev. Increase; Oakes, Rev. Urian; Peabody, Rev. Andrew Preston; Pearson, Prof. Eliphalet; Pusey, Nathan Marsh; Quincy, Josiah [3d]; Rogers, Rev. John; Sparks, Prof. Jared; Wadsworth, Rev. Benjamin; Walker, Rev. James; Ware, Rev. [Prof.] Henry, Sr.; Webber, Rev. Samuel; Willard, Rev. Joseph; Willard, Rev. Samuel; Winthrop, Prof. (Judge) John. [Rev. Leonard Hoar, pres. 1672-75, is not cited.]
– printers for/as printer or publisher, 44:83
– – – 1600s, 3:16-18; 44:65
– – – 1700s, 15:16; 18:62; 44:67-69
– – – 1800s, 15:20-21, 22; 44:71, 82
– (see also Harvard University Press; University Press)
– professors at:
– – – Adams (J. Q.) as, 4:15; 25:104
– – – Eliot (C. W.) as, 2:117; 3:30
– – – Jabberwocky parody on names of, 44:26-27
– – – Longfellow as, see Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
– – – Lowell (A. L.) as, 34:9
– – – Lowell (J. R.) as, see Lowell, James Russell
– – – nicknames of, see Cambridge “characters”
– – – and Radcliffe students (early days), 44:143
– (see also Harvard Divinity School; Harvard Law School; Harvard Medical School)
– professors’ papers, 42:120 (see also Faculty Records of, above; Harvard Archives )
– Professorships at, 33:128-29
– – – Alford, 12:38; 33:150, 153n8; 44:128
– – – Boylston, 4:15; 25:104; 28:112; 44:146
– – – Bussey, 29:70
– – – Dane, 34:82
– – – Dexter, 11:19n
– – – Eliot, 2:116-21 passim
– – – Hancock, 4:15; 11:35n, 71
– – – Hersey, 4:21; 38:70; 43:129, 133, 134
– – – Hollis, 4:9; 6:22; 11:13n5, 31n1, 35n, 41n1, 71; 25:104; 36:56, 58, 59, 65; 38:69, 72
– – – McLean, 44:129
– – – Parkman, 4:48
– – – Perkins, 23:88, 89
– – – Phillips, 44:152
– – – Plummer, 3:23; 26:17; 33:24; 34:28
– – – Royall, 10:176; 11:31n2; 28:112; 33:92
– – – Rumford lectures and, 11:21; 28:115; 44:133
– – – Smith, 14:6; 25:108-9; 26:105n75
– – – Story, 10:176
– – – Winn, 23:13
– – – Zemurray, 44:152
– Publication Agent for, 44:82 (see also printers for/as printer or publisher, above)
– -Radcliffe affiliation, see Radcliffe College
– records of, see Harvard Archives
– reforms at (curriculum changes, 1978), 44:155 (see also elective system at, above; Education)
– “regent” created (1849), 44:131
– and religion, 1:38-39; 23:18; 29:69; 31:63; 34:44-45
– – – charges on, for “new meetinghouse” (1753), 24:59
– – – compulsory church-going and prayer, 16:9
– – – controversies and persecutions, 11:31; 24:52, 68-69, 72, 76, 80n32; 33:24
– – – First Church relationship, see Commencements at, above; First Church and Parish
– – – sectarianism, 4:15, 93; 33:124; 36:14nl2, 15, 62-68 passim; 41:96; 44:75
– – – services begun by (1814), 31:64
– – – and Theological School, 36:14-15
– (see also Chapel at; and the ministry, above; and University preachers, below; Harvard Divinity School; Religion )
– reminiscences of, 17:60n1; 25:100; 35:115; 41:119-20; 42:113
– reunions at, see Alumni of, above
– during Revolutionary War, 10:51; 37:49
– – – barracks in college buildings, 3:54; 13:37; 23:49; 33:148; 40:115; 42:82; 43:71; 44:67
– – – and “Convention Troops,” 13:37-55, 66
– – – leaves Cambridge, 10:52n3, 22:102; 35:30; 44:67
– – – students with troops, 18:68
– “Rotten Cabbage” and other rebellions at, see Harvard student(s)
– salaries at, see Wages and salaries
– scholarships at, see Education
– Science Center, 44:150
– seal of, 1:39; 4:92
– sectarianism at, see and religion, above
– site chosen, 36:53; 39:26; 42:78
– – – Salem considered, 1:34; 33:145; 43:114; 44:47
– – – Shepard’s influence and, 3:79; 31:63; 32:66, 112-13; 42:105; 43:114; 44:47 (see also founding of, above)
– “in the Sixties” (privately printed paper, 1935), 23:14
– size of:
– – – 1642, 31:63; 32:67
– – – 1680, 11:63
– – – 1690-91, 38:17
– – – 1788-95, 38:71; 43:129
– – – 1804, 42:7
– – – 1845, 1:20; 4:92-93
– – – 1855, 33:22
– – – 1874, 38:122
– – – 1888, 34:40
– – – 1960, 38:122
– sketch of, by Longfellow, 25:26 (illus. following)
– social precedence at, see Social class
– Society of Fellows at, see Fellows of, above
– stewards of, 11:61; 33«14; 38:11-12, 15-20 passim
– – – Bo[a]rdmans (four in three generations), 8:31; 16:72; 38:7, 17
– – – Day[e], 3:17; 44:65
– – – Gannett, 11:70; 411120
– – – Hastings, 10:177; 14:104
– – – Higginson, 2:20; 28:110; 37:76
– – – Stearns, 16:65; 38:39
– Stillman infirmary of, 7:85
– strike against (student and faculty, 1969), 44:153
– students at, see Harvard student(s)
– as taxpayer, see Taxation/taxes
– Tercentenary of, see anniversaries of, above
– theatre at, see Theatre
– and “town vs. gown,” see effect of, on Cambridge, above
– transcendentalism at, 37:77 (see also Transcendentalism)
– transformation of, from College to University, 26:15, 21; 35:35; 36:28
– treasurers of, 4:79; 33:14
– – – first (Herbert Pelham), 15:26
– – – Hancock (John), 16:129
– – – Hubbard (Thomas; 1752-73), 17:57
– – – Jackson (Jonathan; appointed 1807), 9:17
– (see also Brattle, Thomas; Danforth, Gov. Thomas; Davis, Judge John; Eliot, Mayor [of Boston] Samuel Atkins; Francis, Ebenezer; Hooper, Capt. Edward William; Storer, Ebenezer)
– Treasurer’s Report (1835), 33:14
– tuition at, 38:8-11, 18, 21-22; 44:77
– – – bridge revenue applied against, 7:57, 58
– – – cow in payment of, 21:78; 37:13
– – – paid to tutor, 38:8n3
– (see also Expenses [Harvard])
– tutors at, 2:16, 121; 3:32; 5:107; 10:33; 11:34-49 passim, 68-69; 23:87; 25:91; 28:112; 32:115; 34:100; 36:59; 38:11, 15; 40:101; 41:120; 43:12; 44:89. 98
– – – and “Convention Troops,” see Hall, Stephen
– – – criticized, 11:36, 40
– – – diaries of, 11:61, 70, 71
– – – Eliot (C. W.), 2:123; 26:26-27
– – – Felton (C. C.), 2:118, 126
– – – fines imposed by, 10:30n1; 11:44, 48, 49
– – – Harris (Richard; one of the first), 3:9, 15; 38:14
– – – Hilliard (Rev. Timothy), 9:10; 44:70
– – – Sophocles, 3:27; 12:32, 37
– – – tuition paid to, 38:8n3
– – – tutor stamps on floor (to call student), 3:27
– and tutorial system, 2:122; 11:34-35n2, 63; 34:10, 16; 44:149, 155
– and university preachers, 1:39; 10:181; 41:33; 42:119; 43:121
– – – Board of, 33:124
– – – residence of, 42:45; 44:135
– (see also Brooks, Bishop Phillips)
– Visitation Day at, 36:64
– women on faculty of:
– – – instructors (World War I), 44:148, 156
– – – professors, 44:152
– and women’s education, see Education (for women); Harvard student(s)
– in World Wars I and II, 14:10; 33:32-33; 34:11-12; 39:13; 42:113; 44:148, 151, 156
– -Yale boat race, 33:122-23; 39:13 (see also Sports and games)
– -Yenching Institute for Chinese Studies, 35:75
– See also Agassiz Museum (Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology); Harvard Divinity School; Harvard Graduate School; Harvard Law School; Harvard Library; Harvard Medical School; Harvard Observatory; Harvard School(s); Harvard student(s); Harvard Yard; Lawrence Scientific School; “President’s house” Harvard College Library, see Harvard Library Harvard Cooperative Society (“Coop”), 2:110; 20:56; 41:52, 143, 155
– sites of, 8:39; 18:73; 25:116, 120; 30:16, 18; 39:8. 61; 41:124, 129; 42:80, 83, 117 Harvard Corporation, 11:23n2; 15:17; 38:15, 85, 86
– and Agassiz, 43:62-63, 64
– and archives, 44:131
– – – established (1939), 42:110
– and building(s), 7:65, 66; 34:11
– and “Convention Troops,” 13:37-49 passim, 52, 53n1, 69
– and curriculum, 38:71
– and “detriments,” 38:13
– disciplinary powers of, 9:24-27 passim; 11:62; 38:13
– and Divinity School, 36:61, 69, 71, 72
– Eliot and, 32:83; 33:126, 127
– and Episcopal Theological Seminary, 36:14
– established (1650), 32:112; 42:81
– and Fogg Museum, 27:13, 16-20 passim, 25; 35:73 (see also Fogg Art Museum)
– and history professorship (1839), 44:129
– and Law School, 41:121
– and Medical School, 4:19-21, 24; 38:69-70, 71
– members of (Fellows), 5:109; 22:65; 26:24; 32:79; 37:109; 39:40; 43:12; 44:71
– minutes of meetings of, 11:70
– and presidents, 2:17, 125; 4:90, 91, 92; 26:27, 29; 41:121 (see also Eliot and, above)
– as “publisher,” 44:68, 69, 72-77, 79-80
– Records, 10:26n1, 28n1
– student petition to (1798), 11:35
– sued for breach of trust (1805), 29:70
– Dr. Waterhouse and, 4:5-24 passim; 38:70-75 passim; 43: 129, 133
– and women students, 36:25-27, 30, 32
– See also Harvard Overseers Harvard Crimson, see Periodicals (Harvard) Harvard Divinity School (organized 1816), 3:46; 4:29; 33:115; 37:76; 38:30n12
– Andover affiliated with, 36:69-73; 41:29
– and Episcopal Theological School, 36:14, 71 (see also Episcopal Theological School)
– funding of, 36:60, 73
– librarian/Library of, 12:68; 44:21-22
– paper on (1956), 36:53-74
– professors at, 10;182; 20:58; 23:57; 26:22, 30-31; 33:43, 51, 113, 150, 151, 153; 35:116; 36:58-73 passim; 41:21; 44:16, 27, 121, 152
– separation from College rumored, 4:93
– Students at, 4:27; 23:58, 89; 25:97; 26:29; 32:89; 33:113, 153; 37:80, 81; 44:127
– women in, 36:30 Harvard Dramatic Club, 38:62. See also Club(s) (at Harvard); Theatre Harvard Faculty Club, see Club(s) (at Harvard) Harvard Faculty Records, see Harvard College/University Harvard Fellows, see Fellows’ Orchard; Harvard Corporation Harvard Glee Club, see Music (at Harvard) Harvard Graduate School, 3:114; 4:84; 34:16; 35:121
– of Arts and Sciences, 23:42
– of Design, 38:131
– of Education, 44:150
– first (1782), 37:69 (see also Harvard Medical School)
– and Graduate Center (architecture of), 35:120
– Graduate Department created (1872), 36:29 Harvard graduates, Biographical Sketches of, see Harvard College/University Harvard Graduates’ Magazine, see Periodicals (Harvard) Harvard Grammar School, see School(s) Harvard Gymnasium, see Hemenway Gymnasium Harvard Hall (Harvard), 3:26; 8:33; 15:32; 20:53; 22:102; 27:34; 29:19-23 passim, 27; 42:7, 120; 43:62; 44:25
– built (1672-82), 7:64, 69
– burned (1764) and rebuilt, 23:21; 27:30-31, 32; 36:78; 42:81
– buttery in, 11:39n2; 29:20
– college bell on top of, 29:19-20, 27; 44:23
– as College Library, 14:20; 27:30-31; 29:20; 33:145n4; 42:81 (see also Harvard Library)
– Prof. Coolidge enters by window, 43:19
– in Historic District, 39:73
– Longfellow’s sketch of, 25:26 (and illus.)
– militia draws provisions from (1775), 18:69
– as “Philosophy Chamber” (Waterhouse lectures in), 4:9; 29:20-21, 30
– site of, 3:53; 41:120 Harvard house (Stratford, England), 6:16 Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission, 38:125-26 Harvard Law Review, see Periodicals (Harvard) Harvard Law School, 23:46; 34:9; 36:65; 37:79
– buildings of, 4:30; 26:39
– – – “College House Nos. 1 and 2,” 8:33, 36; 41:117, 118 (illus. #1 following), 119-20, 121; 42:118 (see also Austin Hall [Harvard]; Dane Hall [Harvard; old location])
– – – construction of, 1:49; 38:49
– – – “Four Oldest Houses” (1969 paper), 41:117-31; 42:118n1
– as “Dane Law School,” see Dane Hall (Harvard; old location)
– establishment of, 33:92
– examinations at, 41:124, 125
– faculty at, 4:86, 89; 5:105; 7:31-32; 10:176; 14:104; 18:37; 20:150; 21:59, 63, 67, 69, 70; 22:108; 26:22, 28, 29; 33:53; 34:8, 55, 82, 88; 37:13; 39:40; 44:92, 99
– graduates of, 10:181, 191; 11:20n1; 12:23; 21:106; 23:34, 61, 67; 26:112; 29:7; 32:101, 125; 33:47; 34:8; 39:8-9; 44:87
– – – Chafee “trial” by, 34:13
– History of (Warren), 41:118n1, 123n6, 129n8
– library of (1817-83), 41:121-29 passim
– “Lincoln’s Inn” Club of, 20:62; 26:106n78
– locations of, 1:62; 21:61; 29:69; 30:16, 26; 32:67; 33:39; 41:26
– old court house and, 39:61 (see also Court House[s])
– railroad station in front of, see Railroad(s) (Harvard Branch)
– women in, 36:30; 44:152
– women guests at (1930s), 41:148 Harvard Library, 11:44n4; 15:11n1; 37:96
– acquisitions of (1869-1929), 27:37-38
– benefactors of, 9:43n1; 12:34; 27:31; 33:33, 91-92, 154; 42:21
– burning of, see Harvard Hall (Harvard)
– Cambridge Book Club records in, 28:107 (see also Club[s])
– Catalogue, 33:30
– change in administration of, 26:24-26; 41:156
– diaries in possession of, 11:70-74 passim; 21:91
– Divinity School, 12:68; 44:21, 22
– drawings in possession of, 21:20n1
– Dunster Papers in, 3:12; 26:67n7
– “Four Decades of” (1942 paper), 27:29-41
– Gore Hall as, see Gore Hall (Harvard)
– Gray Collection in, 18:40; 27:18 (see also Gray family and Gray Collection and Fund)
– Harvard Hall as, see Harvard Hall (Harvard)
– Law School (1817-83), 41:121-29 passim
– librarians and staff of, 8:49, 52-53, 10:179; 38:24; 43:17
– – – Cogswell (Joseph Green). 2:119; 4:22n1
– – – Coolidge (Archibald C.), 27:32, 36, 38
– – – Currier (T. Franklin), 35:60
– – – Deane (Rev. Samuel), 11:69
– – – Gee (Joshua J.), 44:67
– – – Holyoke (Edward), 11:70
– – – Metcalf (1939-40), 27:39
– – – Potter (author of Library of Harvard), 27:33, 39
– – – Robie (Dr. Thomas), 11:71
– – – Smith (late 1700s), 4:9
– (see also Briggs, Walter B.; Folsom, Rev. Charles; Harris, Thaddeus William; Holyoke, Rev. Edward; Lane, William Coolidge; Norton, Rev. [Prof.] Andrews; Peirce, Benjamin [Sr.]; Sibley, John Langdon; Winship, George Parker; Winsor, Justin; Winthrop, Judge James)
– lighting of/electricity installed in, 27:33; 43:35
– Longfellow titles in, 2:52
– maps in, 39:79n2 (see also Maps and plans)
– Medical School (Countway), see Harvard Medical School
– photographs of personages associated with, 27:8
– rare book section, 5:8; 35:70
– size of:
– – – 1680, 11:63
– – – 1740s, 21:98
– – – 1784, 11:68-69
– – – 1798 (deficiencies of), 4:11
– – – 1893-1928, 21:72-73
– student use of (1798), 11:34, 36
– Waterhouse and, 4:26, 30; 38:72
– Widener Library built (1915), 27:31
– See also Houghton Library; Lamont Library; Library(ies); Widener Library Harvard Medical Inspector, 26:106n78 Harvard Medical School, 11:42; 33:46; 34:9; 36:65; 44:108
– of China, 24:11
– classes held in Holden Chapel, see Holden Chapel (Harvard)
– Countway Library of, 43:132, 134n14; 44:77n22, 174n6
– established (1783), 4:6, 24; 38:69-71
– examinations at, 17:62
– faculty at, 26:22, 28; 41:64, 65, 75; 44:172
– – – Holmes, 4:45-59 passim; 41:62, 73
– – – Waterhouse, see Dr. Waterhouse and, below
– graduates of, 6:78; 7:79, 80; 10:174; 25:126; 38:83; 43:154
– – – at 1909 CHS meeting, 4:38
– murder (Webster case) at, 28:93; 41:62-71 passim, 75-79 passim, 87
– new, grand opening of (1846), 41:71-72
– size of, 43:129
– Dr. Waterhouse and, 4:6, 19, 21, 24; 29:17, 20; 38:70-73, 75-76 (see also Waterhouse, Dr. Benjamin)
– women in, 36:25, 30
– women guests at (1930s), 41:148
– See also Medicine, practice of Harvard Memorial Church
– inscription (honoring Dr. Peabody) on tablet in, 26:17; 33:26-27
– Isham Library in, 41:102
– Radcliffe Sanctuary in, 41:151
– Soldiers’ Memorial at, 25:118 (see also Soldiers’ Monument[s]) Harvard Memorial Society, see Society(ies) (organizations) Harvard Musical Association, see Music (societies) Harvard Observatory
– directors of, 3:114-15; 20:98; 22:46; 33:52; 41:164
– founders and founding of, 18:42n1; 33:15-19, 55
– – – paper on (1938), 25:75-85; 33:16n26, 55
– original site of, 18:42n1; 26:102n71; 33:15-19, 21, 29, 55
– present site of, 7:75; 11:49n1; 14:49n2; 18:42n1; 20:93-94; 22:78; 25:20n1; 27:90; 31:44, 49, 52, 56; 33:19, 55, 57; 37:16; 38:119; 44:10
– See also Astronomy Harvard Overseers, 32:83; 33:119; 34:13; 44:80
– and Agassiz appointment, 43:54, 60
– and Professors Bond (father and son), 25:77, 85; 33:18
– under College Charter, 32:112
– and “Convention Troops,” 13:38-40 passim, 45-47, 50, 52
– – – Records concerning, 13:40n2, 43n2, 45n2, 48n1
– and Divinity School, 36:73
– and Edward Everett (as professor), 11:23
– First Board of (1636), 32:66, 109; 42:81; 43:114
– members of, 2:28, 117; 5:109; 10:183; 11:70; 26:15; 30:42; 37:11; 43:13. 30, 114; 44:70
– – – clergymen, preach at Appleton Chapel, 18:44
– – – McKenzie (Alexander), 1:34; 3:35; 10:181; 43:121
– – – Wyman (Morrill, Sr. and Jr.), 10:192; 39:45
– and presidents, 2:125; 4:91; 14:102; 26:29
– and Radcliffe, 36:27, 30, 32n17
– and slavery issue, 23:86
– student discipline by, 26:105 (see also Harvard student[s])
– and tutorial system, 11:34n2
– and Dr. Waterhouse, 4:18
– woman as chairman of, 44:156
– See also Harvard Corporation Harvard presidents, Harvard professors, see Harvard College/University Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, 41:91, 103
– founded (1808) as Pierian Sodality, 30:24; 32:80, 83, 86-87, 89-90; 41:91-96, 99, 102
– See also Music Harvard School(s)
– of Architecture, 18:34; 23:46; 27:17, 24, 25; 33:57; 35:73 (see also Architecture)
– of Business Administration, 27:25; 34:9, 11; 37:110; 39:147n6; 40:37; 42:75
– – – Baker Library, see Library(ies)
– – – site of, 22:103; 39s24
– – – women guests at (1930s), 41:148
– – – women students at, 44:151
– of Design, 41:131; 42:45; 43:18, 91; 44:103, 135
– of Education, 39:76; 42:45
– of Landscape Architecture, 23:46; 43:23
– Summer School, 35:117; 37:109
– See also Harvard Divinity School; Harvard Graduate School; Harvard Law School; Harvard Medical School Harvard Square, 2:44; 14:34, 41, 42, 45, 64, 65, 66; 17:46; 18:40; 26:94n63; 37:9; 41:11, 124, 161; 44:161
– architecture on, 26:40; 30:18, 19-22 passim; 41:119
– bridge to, see Bridge(s)
– businesses on (1800s), 1:82; 9:30; 15:31, 33, 38; 18:24; 21:62; 30:11 (illus. facing), 13-27; 44:77
– as center of “Old Cambridge” or “Village,” 3:47; 8:30-40; 10:10; 14:36, 39; 15:40; 17:62, 68; 20:55, 93, 135; 22:106; 24:28; 28:62; 30:11-12; 32:7, 67; 33:8, 21, 38; 39:117 (see also as “Market-place,” below)
– “characters” encountered on, 44:25 (see also Cambridge “characters”)
– College House in, see College House
– county offices removed from (1816), see East Cambridge
– Court House(s) on or near, see Court House(s) (Cambridge)
– Day[e] house site on, 3:17
– early settlement of, 6:33; 22:62, 65, 70, 97; 29:68
– “Excommunication in” (1943 paper), 29:68-81
– hay scales in, see Agriculture and horticulture
– as Historic District, 2:112; 42:37, 42, 45
– “In the ’70s and ’80s” (1944 paper), 30:11-27
– as “Market-place,” 1:19, 21, 22; 11:23; 30:11 (and illus. facing)
– meeting house in, 14:72; 21:10; 33:8; 43:84 (see also Meetinghouse sites) milestone near, see Milestone(s)
– Old Burying Ground at, see Burying ground(s)
– plan of, 14:77; 30:24 (illus. following)
– Post Office in, see Post Office
– pump in center of, see Water supply
– street railway to, 20:54; 30:11 (illus. facing); 34:69; 35:17; 39:80-106 passim; 44:11
– – – begins service (1856), 7:59-60; 39:82-84 passim; 42:8, 89
– – – electrified, 34:76; 42:11
– – – fares and schedules on, 15:32; 39:87-89; 41:137; 42:88
– – – horse cars/omnibus preceding, 17:68; 25:131; 26:114; 39:80, 116; 41:16n1 (see also Omnibuses)
– subway/rapid transit to, 39:133; 42:90, 91, 92-93 (see also Subway)
– traffic in:
– – – Prof. Kittredge and, 32:53-54; 44:25
– – – noise of (1878-79), 41:126
– Unitarian Church in, see First Church and Parish, Unitarian-Universalist Harvard Square Business Men’s Association, 20:16; 37:92-93, 96, 100; 42:90-91 Harvard Stadium, 39:133; 44:91, 92, 106. See also Sports and games Harvard Street (Brighton), 14:38 Harvard Street (Brookline), 14:38 Harvard Street (Cambridge), 1:57; 16:95; 18:40; 26:16; 30:74; 35:87; 36:114; 39:20, 82
– architecture on, 16:22; 26:37, 38, 40 (illus. #7 following), 34:30; 42:46; 43:40
– businesses on (1800s), 15:35; 41:41, 106
– Cambridge Community Center on, 35:28 (see also Margaret Fuller House)
– “Dana-Palmer” (Foster, Peabody) house on corner of, 20:60; 26:15 (see also Dana houses [#10])
– Grammar School on, see School(s)
– highway to bridges along, 14:38, 52; 35:81
– laid out, 14:59-60, 65; 16:63, 87; 18:27
– “Little Bridge” at junction of, 7:58 (see also Bridge[s])
– marshland near, 1:12; 22:67
– meetinghouses on, 16:86; 20:65; 34:29 (see also Meetinghouse sites)
– named, 14:63
– – – former names of, 14:34; 16:45
– residents of, 10:177; 13:123; 34:99
– Town House on, 36:101; 39:113; 42:83 (see also Town House[s])
– See also Massachusetts Avenue Harvard Street (Cambridge) Unitarian Church, 20:65 Harvard Street (Charlestown), 33:150, 151 Harvard student(s)
– age of, 23:27; 25:103, 125; 32:80n1; 33:25
– Allston as, 29:13-33, 35
– at Allston’s funeral, 29:65
– arsenal guarded by, see Arsenal (Cambridge)
– and “Banks Brigade,” “admission” to, 17:65-66
– bath house built for, 31:27; 37:13
– Biographical Sketches of, see Harvard College/University
– “blue books” of, 41:107
– boarding- and lodging-houses for, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses
– and “Buck’s Progress” (Allston), 29:21-23
– bust of Sparks commissioned by, 44:134
– and “buttery,” see Harvard College/University
– church receptions for, 44:107, 114
– and coeducation, see women as, below
– Cuban (following Spanish-American War), 31:12-13
– disaffection of, 4:22; 9:25
– discipline of, 9:24-27 passim; 11:47-48n1, 62; 33:122-23, 127, 129
– – – corporal punishment, 3:14; 32:67
– (see also expulsion of, below; Fines and penalties)
– Divinity School, see Harvard Divinity School
– expulsion of, 11:62; 32:87; 33:133; 34:47; 38:13
– – – Dana brothers, 26:95, 105
– – – and songs of farewell, 18:35
– Law School graduates, see Harvard Law School
– living conditions (1880s and 1900) of, 22:95, 102-3; 34:39-40
– – – House Plan introduced, 34:10-11, 13-16, 17
– (see also Food)
– Loyalists among, 33:63-64, 65, 92
– manners of, see Manners
– married, 22:95
– “Med-Fac,” 43:77
– Medical School graduates, see Harvard Medical School
– Negroes as, 42:111-13
– and parietal regulations, 41:141
– – – 1860s, 21:18
– – – 1905-06 (first printed), 41:143
– – – 1932, 41:148
– – – 1968, 41:155
– petition for recess (1798), 11:35
– pranks of, 33:39; 35:61; 43:77; 44:25-26
– rebellions/disorders by:
– – – 1600s, 22:85
– – – c. 1800, 11:38, 44. 47-48, 50-51
– – – 1807, “Rotten Cabbage Rebellion,” 9:24-27; 26:95
– – – 1823, 11:26
– – – 1830s, 23:54; 26:105; 37:78
– – – 1847 (bomb exploded), 4:36
– – – 1968-69 (sit-ins, strike), 40:8; 42:66; 44:153-54 (and illus. #14 preceding)
– in Revolutionary War, see Harvard College/University
– and “Rhinehart” cry, 27:34
– social precedence of, see Social class
– and “Sweet Auburn,” 34:78; 44:178
– Terry’s memory of records of, 44:26
– as volunteer faculty at Prospect Union, 40:139-41
– women as, 4:50-51; 34:70; 36:23-39 passim; 43:91; 44:132, 151-56 (see also Education; Radcliffe College) Harvard Summer School, see Harvard School(s) Harvard Trust building (Central Square), 38:124 Harvard Trust Company, see Banks and trust companies Harvard Union, 33:36; 35:113 Harvard Unitarian Church (Charlestown), 33:146, 150, 151, 153. See also Unitarian Church Harvard University Band, Harvard University Choir, see Music (at Harvard) Harvard University Museum of Comparative Zoology, see Agassiz Museum Harvard University Press, 15:22; 26:14; 37:110, 111, 112; 44:35, 72, 82-83, 85
– founded (1913), 44:63, 78, 82
– Garden St. building, 38:116; 44:83
– Quincy St. building, 23:24, 47-48; 26:40 (illus. #11 following)
– See also Printers; Publishers; University Press “Harvard-Washington Corps,” see Harvard College/University (military companies of) Harvard Wind Ensemble, see Music (at Harvard) Harvard Yard, 41:19, 109
– architecture of, see Architecture
– bicycling (for girls) forbidden in (1950s), 41:151
– “dangers” of (1890s), 36:45
– development of:
– – – 1811-12, 7:64
– – – 1900-1930, 22:102-3
– fences and gates of, see Fences and walls
– Historic District includes, 39:73; 42:34, 41
– historic sites identified and marked (1906, 1908), 1:63, 66; 3:53-55
– Hooker house site in, 6:22; 10:99 (and illus. facing) (see also Wigglesworth house)
– meetinghouses in, see Appleton Chapel (Harvard); Holden Chapel (Harvard); Harvard Memorial Church; Meetinghouse sites
– Old Parsonage in, see Parsonage(s)
– origin of, 43:43
– plan(s) of, 3:30, 54 (insert following), 55; 30:24 (illus. following); 33:7n1; 42: 116
– pump (and water supply) in, see Water supply
– Radcliffe girls in, 41:151; 44:155, 156
– trees of and planted in, see Trees
– in 1600s, 6:22, 23; 8:33; 21:80; 22:62, 63-64, 76; 32:67
– in 1700s, 6:21; 17:54; 22:88; 29:23 in
– 1800s, 1:19; 5:108; 6:23; 9:32n1; 18:28; 20:53; 21:104; 25:121; 26:102; 30:12-13, 16, 24 (illus. following), 25; 41:124
– in 1900s, 18:27 Harvey, Martha, see Wellington, Mrs. Isaac [3d] Harvey Radio Company, 34:123 Harvey Street, 20:125, 132 Harwich, Massachusetts: slave/Negro population in (1754, 1765), 10:63n1 Hasey, Abraham (college carpenter, 1750s), 10:23, 24, 25, 42 Hasey, Mrs. Abraham (Jemima Felch), 10:24n3 Hasey, Rev. Isaac (Harvard 1762), 10:24n3 Haskell, Caleb (of Newburyport; b. 1723): diary of (1775-76), 11:76 Haskins, Prof. Charles Homer (1870-1937; historian), 35:122; 41:26, 29 Haskins, Mrs. Charles Homer (Clare Allen), 41:26, 29 Haskins, Herman (graduate student, 1922), 40:146, 147 Haskins, Minnie (schoolgirl, 1870s), 32:38 Haskins, Ruth, see Emerson, Mrs. (Rev.) William Hassell, Richard (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 14:98 Hastings, Daniel (glass manufacturer, c. 1820), 16:94; 19:35; 36:96 Hastings, Edmund T. (1789-1861; merchant), 7:62
– and Harvard Branch Railroad, 38:29, 30, 33, 34, 39n34, 47, 49 Hastings, Frances Elizabeth, see Fuller, Mrs. William Henry Hastings, Hannah, see Cooper, Mrs. Samuel Hastings, John (tanner; d. 1657), 6:20[?]; 14:98; 21:83; 31:25 Hastings, John (officer billeted on, 1770s), 13:44, 50 Hastings, Jonathan, Jr. (1709-1783; college steward), 5:57; 14:104; 24:60; 30:68
– house of, see Hastings house(s) Hastings, Jonathan [3d] (1751-1831; son of above), 10:177; 14:104
– house of, see “Larches, The”/”Larchwood” Hastings, Joseph Stacey (1789-1872; alderman), 22:24 Hastings, Lewis Morey (City Engineer), 17:101; 18:27
– papers by:
– – – “An Historical Account of Some Bridges over the Charles River” (1912), 7:51-63
– – – “The Streets of Cambridge” (1919), 14:31-78; 16:87; 26:56n90, 61; 29:35n5; 31:27n9; 39:86n26; 42:79n2, 94; 43:151; 44:71n11 Hastings, Mary Oliver, see Longstreth, Mrs. Morris Hastings, Oliver (1791-1870; lumber dealer), 10:180; 15:38
– and Harvard Branch Railroad, 38:26-30 passim, 33, 34, 38n32, 39, 44, 47
– house of, see Hastings house(s) Hastings, Mrs. Oliver (Huldah Holmes [Tribou], second wife), 10:180 Hastings, Samuel (c. 1630-1705; gunsmith), 31:25 Hastings, Seth (1722-1817; landowner), 16:38-39; 22:73 Hastings, Mrs. Seth (Hannah Soden; later Mrs. William Howe), 16:38-39 Hastings, Deacon Walter (landowner, Harvard benefactor; d. 1705), 6:20; 33:40, 151 Hastings, Warren (of England; 1732-1818): trial of, 22:34-35 Hastings, William Soden (1798-1842; congressman), 16:39 Hastings, Mr. (carpenter, 1827), 2:21 Hastings, Etheridge & Bliss, 16:38 Hastings Avenue, 36:8; 37:18 Hastings family, 6:34; 10:115; 22:27, 74; 32:34 Hastings Hall, see Walter Hastings Hall (Harvard) Hastings house(s)
– Jonathan Hastings (Hastings-Holmes house), 14:65; 16:80
– – – architecture of, 6:24, 25; 16:22; 29:19; 41: 120
– – – 1775 (Gen. Ward’s headquarters), 1:63; 18:74; 37:47, 56 (see also Military headquarters)
– – – 1807 (Judge Wendell buys), 9:23n4, 28
– – – 1809 (Parsonage, O. W. Holmes birthplace), 1:63; 4:39, 40, 41; 14:65; 23:67; 25:104, 120; 29:19; 33:40; 41:120
– – – 1883 (sold to Harvard and torn down), 1:49; 6:19; 25:67
– Jonathan Hastings [3d], see “Larches, The”/”Larchwood”
– Oliver Hastings (101 Brattle St.), 26:40 (illus. #6 following), 41; 31:56; 36:9, 17; 43:44 Hastings Square, 43:145 Hasty pudding, see Food Hasty Pudding Building (1912), 8:38 Hasty Pudding Club, see Club(s) (at Harvard) Hatch, Philomena (witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:79 Hatch (at Episcopal Theological School, c. 1900), 36:17 Hatfield, Massachusetts: anti-government convention at (1786), 15:27 Hathaway, Alvin Bourne (bank president, 1920-50), 41:46-48, 50, 54 Hathaway, Mrs. Alvin Bourne, 41:47 Hats, see Clothing “Hatty” (Lanman family cook), 42:20, 22. See also Servants/”hired help” Haugh, see also How; Howe; Howes Haugh, Atherton (landowner; d. 1650), 14:40; 16:33; 22:69, 70; 26:68 Haugh, Mrs. Atherton (daughter of Deane Winthrop), 3:16 Haugh, Atherton (great-grandson of above; landowner, 1699), 16:76 Haugh, Samuel (landowner; d. 1699), 14:40; 16:76 Haugh farm, 9:72; 16:33, 53 Haugh (Graves-Haugh) house site, see Graves, Thomas Haugh’s Neck: slate from, 17:32. See also Graves’ Neck Haven, Catherine, see Hilliard, Catherine Haven Haven, Judge Samuel (of Dedham; Lechmere rights conveyed to, 1799), 9:7, 23n2; 16:89, 90, 91; 27:51n25, 52, 61, 64, 65, 66, 91 Haven, Mrs. Samuel (Elizabeth [“Betsy”] Foster; niece of Andrew Craigie), 9:7, 23; 16:89; 21:102; 25:52; 27:51, 52, 57, 64, 67n61, 88, 91
– as owner of Vassall property, 21:103, 104; 23:56; 27:65 Haven, Samuel Foster (b. c. 1807; American Antiquarian Society librarian, 1860s), 9:23; 27:56n35, 57, 63, 64, 65n57, 67 Haven Papers, 27:66n58 “Havenhurst,” see Hayes house Haverford College (Pennsylvania), 35:95 Haverhill, Massachusetts, 6:57, 64, 70; 13:82; 21:41, 43, 47; 25:68 Hawkins, Sir John (1532-1595; English adventurer), 33:134 Hawkins, Richard (of Springfield, 1919), 14:124 Hawkins, Gen. Rush E., 3:18n1 Hawkins’ garage (University Road), 41:49 Hawthorn Street, 1:16, 60; 21:109; 23:46; 42:87
– architecture on, 30:15; 43:159, 160 (illus. #2 following), 168, 169
– Casino opposite end of, 31:32; 39:127
– James house on corner of (96 Brattle), see James, Thomas Potts
– laid out and named, 23:73; 31:30-31, 38; 32:30
– Vassall house on corner of (94 Brattle), see Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall)
– willows on, 16:114; 22:97 Hawthorne, Nathaniel (1804-1864; novelist), 10:183; 14:20; 26:75; 27:67n61; 29:42; 31:31; 32:90
– at Brook Farm, 23:63
– -Longfellow letters, 33:161
– in Saturday Club, 2:75; 4:61; 41:57
– writings of, 7:27-28; 10:159; 15:21; 19:15, 23; 26:81n41; 35:39; 37:79 Hawthorne, Mrs. Nathaniel (Sophia Peabody), 27:67n61; 29:39, 41 Hawthorne, Rose, see Alphonsa, Mother Hawthorne, William (of Salem, c. 1660), 24:75 Hay, Leonard (Harvard 1908; benefactor), 27:37 Hay, Mrs. Richard (Anna Adams), 11:13n2 Hay, haying, hay scales, see Agriculture and horticulture Hayden, Charles, Memorial Library (MIT), 42:61. See also Library(ies) Hayden, Sophia G. (architect), 34:75, 76; 43:156, 158 Hayes, A. A., Jr. (“proprietor” of boys’ newspaper, 1852), 20:86 Hayes, Miss Carrie (daughter of John L.), 32:102; 35:17, 18, 19, 21 Hayes, Hammond V. (at Bell laboratories, 1940s), 34:114; 43:168 Hayes, Harvey (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Hayes, John Lord (1812-1887; lawyer), 13:87; 25:129n1; 32:101-2; 35:17
– house of (“Havenhurst”), see Hayes house Hayes, Mrs. John Lord (Caroline S. Ladd), 32:101 Hayes, Maj.-Gen. Joseph (Harvard 1855), 6:14; 33:48 Hayes, Rutherford B. (1822-1893; U.S. president 1876-80), 14:8; 20:35; 24:99; 33:83; 41:124 Hayes, Miss Susan Lord (daughter of John L.), 32:102; 35:18, 19 Hayes, William Allen (son of John L.), 17:6; 32:102 Hayes family, 13:87; 32:102 Hayes house (“Havenhurst”), 17:6; 25:129n1; 32:101-3; 35:17-18
– Mason St. house exchanged for, 13:87 Hayes-Cavanaugh, Doris: “Early Glass Making in East Cambridge” (1926 paper), 19:32-45 Hayman, Elizabeth, see Brattle, Mrs. [Rev.] William (first wife) Hayman, Maj. Nathaniel (late 1600s), 22:86 Hayman, Mrs. Nathaniel (Elizabeth Allen), 22:86 Haymarket riot (Chicago, 1886), 40:156 Haymarket Square (Boston), 30:81; 34:70; 39:30, 87 Haymarket Square (Cambridgeport), 29:36; 35:81. See also Agriculture and horticulture; Central Square Haynes, Prof. Henry W. (historian, 1880s), 40:106 Haynes, Gov. John ( 1594[?]-1653/54 ), 10:91, 96, 100, 102; 14:96; 15:26; 44:42, 45, 58-59
– English background of, 14:87-88
– lot assigned to, 16:75; 22:61, 76 (Map 1), 77; 44:61
– site of house, 1:58; 3:12, 15, 51; 6:22; 38:92; 44:58 Haynes, Mrs. John (Mary Thornton, first wife), 14:88 Haynes, Mrs. John (Mabel Harlakenden, second wife), 14:88, 96; 15:24, 25, 26; 23:91 Haynes, Mary (Mrs. Samuel Jenks), 9:7-8 Haynes, Mary Thornton, see Haynes, Mrs. John (first wife) Haynes, Samuel (of Boston, c. 1740), 9:8 Haynes, William (writer, 1940s), 34:54n6 Haynes family, 14:80 Haynes house and site, see Haynes, Gov. John Hayward, Miss Almira (YWCA benefactor, late 1800s), 36:44 Hayward, Arthur (author, early 1900s), 19:44 Hayward, Prof. James (m. 1826), 25:110; 28:112; 41:32 Hayward, Mrs. James, see Frisbie, Mrs. Levi Hayward, James (surveyor, 1830s), 14:65, 69-70, 73, 77, 78; 26:53n51, 56n93, 62; 33:15n22 Hayward, Judith Phippen, see Phippen, Judith Hayward, Thomas (landowner, c. 1635), 22:78 Hayward Street, 14:65 Haywood, James (landowner, 1830s and 1840s), 20:134 Hazen, Alan (cousin of Dean John H. Wright; engineer, mid-1800s), 23:46 Head, Joseph (Harvard 1804), 21:110 “Headquarters,” military, see Military headquarters Healey, see also Healy He[a]ley, William (laborer, convicted of crime, 1752), 10:65-67 Healey Street, 41:166 Health
– burial reform and, 44:171, 173-74
– Cambridge “very healthy” (1815-20), 11:20; 18:18n1
– Massachusetts Board of, 20:106; 35:87; 39:33, 35, 40, 123, 128; 41:11
– pollution and, 39:33-34, 122-23
– public, care for, 22:28 (see also Charity)
– ventilation and, 41:126
– – – of horse cars, 39:83
– – – of Hospital, 39:47, 49
– – – of schoolhouses, 13:98, 101
– – – Wyman’s treatise on, 16:117; 20:104; 39:47
– See also Disease; Medicine, practice of; Sewers; Water supply; Welfare, public Healy, see also Healey Healy, George Peter Alexander (1813-1894; painter), 10:160; 44:134 Heard, see also Hurd Heard, John (of Ipswich; preservation of house of), 25:68 Heard, John (Irving St. resident, 1941-49), 41:35 Heard, Mrs. John (Rosamond Gregor), 41:35; 44:112-13 Heard, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan (Brattle St. residents, 1936), 24:7 Heate, Thomas (landowner, 1635), 22:76 (Map 1) “Heater piece,” see “Deltas” Heath, Miss Edith deC.: houses of (c. 1910), 43:168 Heath, Edwin J. (of Pennsylvania, 1940s), 27:86n96 Heath, Gen. William (1737-1814), 5:30; 6:34; 10:51n3; 18:65; 30:63, 64; 37:47, 48
– and “Convention Troops,” 13:19-56 passim, 61, 64-76 passim; 21:101
– journal of (1777-78), 13:52n1, 74n1; 18:65 Heating, 3:102, 103; 16:22; 23:44, 25:128; 31:33; 34:61; 37:71
– carrying fire for, 36:75
– central, 42:22
– – – architecture and, 20:57; 26:45; 37:69
– – – of Cambridge Hospital, 39:47
– – – lack of, 20:57; 36:105
– of churches, 32:51 by
– coal, see Coal
– cost of:
– – – 1800, 16:41
– – – 1930s (MIT), 42:57
– by Franklin stove, 34:60
– gas, 32:46; 42:10
– of Harvard buildings, 34:39; 41:129
– of Hospital (1880s), 39:47
– of hot water, 34:59
– of hotels, 37:37, 42
– with peat, 32:96
– of schools, 13:91, 92, 93
– – – allowance for fire-building, 13:101
– See also Firewood; Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Hebrew, knowledge of, see Language(s) (classical, knowledge of) Hedge, see also Hedges Hedge, Miss Charlotte (schoolmistress, 1870s), 32:41 Hedge, Rev. [Prof.] Frederic H. (1805-1890), 11:48n1; 25:116, 121; 36:27, 63 Hedge, Prof. Levi (1766-1844; philosopher), 4:87; 11:31, 35n2, 48, 49, 50; 29:73, 79; 36:59; 37:77 Hedge, Mrs. Levi (Mary Kneeland), 11:30; 20:92 Hedge, Miss Mary (schoolmistress, mid-1800s), 6:22; 9:65
– given as “Hodge,” 5:108 Hedge, Mary Kneeland, see Hedge, Mrs. Levi Hedges, see also Hedge Hedges, Ethel C. (historian, 1933), 24:68n3 Hedges (shrubbery), see Agriculture and horticulture Hegermann-Lindencrone, Countess d’ (Lily Greenough [Mrs. Charles Moulton]), 32:92; 33:44
– letter from autobiography of (quoted), 35:53-55 Heilman, William C. (in Choral Society, c. 1900), 32:89; 41:99 Heinecke, Gustav (businessman, 1883), 42:73 Helburn, Mr. and Mrs. J. Willard (Irving St. residents, 1922-25), 41:34 Helburn, Willard (Bryant St. resident, 1926-35), 41:36 Helburn, Mrs. Willard (Margaret Mason), 41:36 Hellburn, Mr. and Mrs. (at church reception, 1906), 44:118 Hellrigl, Miss (German teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1880s), 32:42 “Hell’s Half Acre,” 39:24 Helmholtz, Hermann (1821-1894; physicist), 23:42 Helverson, Rev. Ralph N. (Francis Ave. resident, 1960s), 41:30 Hemans, Mrs. Felicia Browne (1793-1835? hymn-writer), 31:53; 32:85 Hemenway, see also Hemmenway Hemenway, Mrs. Harriet Lawrence, 44:145 Hemenway Gymnasium, 35:113; 44:145
– buildings formerly on site of, 1:49, 63; 18:30, 74; 20:123; 25:120
– historic sites near, 5:26; 32:59; 35:30
– new ( 1969), 41: 128
– See also Sports and games Hemlock Gorge, 39:35 Hemmenway, see also Hemenway Hemmenway, Hannah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Hemmenway, Rufus (classmate of O. W. Holmes, c. 1820), 16:65 Henck, John Benjamin (1815-1903; surveyor), 14:73; 38:30n12 Henderson, Dorothy (schoolgirl): “Longfellow’s Poems on Cambridge and Greater Boston” (1917 prize essay), 12:46-50 Henderson, Ernest F. (hotel owner, 1930s), 37:38-39, 40 Henderson, Mrs. Ernest F., 39:137 Henderson, Mrs. Gerard C. (Mary Taussig; Irving St. resident, 1960s), 41:26, 35 Henderson, Prof. Lawrence J. (1930s), 34:17; 35:117 Henderson, Lois (schoolgirl; 1920 Longfellow prize runner-up), 15:4 Henderson, Robert G. (Boat Club, 1931), 39:137 Henderson, Mrs. (Vassall creditor, 1758), 10:38n3 Hendricks, Capt. William (1775), 11:77, 78 Henley, Henry (of England, c. 1600), 7:69 Henley, Mary, see Holworthy, Mrs. Matthew (first wife) Henley, Robert (of England, c. 1600), 7:68, 69 Henley, Susanna, see Holworthy, Lady Matthew (third wife) Henley, Captain (1770s), 13:30 Henley, Colonel (1770s), 13:34 Henny, Josiah (of Penobscot, 1785), 5:95n1 Henry III (1207-1272; king of England), 23:83 Henry IV (1553-1610; king of France and Navarre), 30:29, 30 Henry VIII (1491-1547; king of England), 13:50; 14:82, 86, 94, 102; 32:55; 33:136; 40:61 Henry, prince of Prussia (18th c.): and American “monarchy,” 40:15, 16, 18, 19 Henry, prince of Prussia (19th c.): visits Cambridge, 23:45; 33:128 Henry Street, 35:83; 41:166 Henschel, Sir George (1850-1934; orchestra conductor), 32:93 Henshaw, C. H. (Traill St. resident, before 1898), 43:169 Henshaw, Henry Wetherbee (1850-1930; ornithologist), 24:84, 85, 86, 93, 97; 30:85; 35:14 Henshaw, Mrs. John (daughter of Rufus Allyn), 21:64
– houses of (c. 1900), 43:159, 168 Henshaw, Samuel (Museum director, 1904-27), 43:18, 30 Henshaw, Col. William (1735-1820): orderly book kept by (1775), 11:79, 80; 30:57n Henshaw (Harvard student, 1760), 10:25-26n5 Henshaw, Miss (Sparks St. resident, 1890s), 41:167 Hentz, Nicholas M. (entomologist, mid-1800s), 38:83 Heraldry, see Coats of arms Herbaria, see Botany Herbert, George (1593-1633; English poet), 4:58; 33:30 Hercules (ship)
– 1635, 14:99
– 1770s, 5:59 Herford, Rev. Brooke (late 1800s), 34:44 Heritage Trail brochure, 42:37. See also Walking tours Herkomer, Sir Hubert von (1849-1914; English painter), 34:72 Herrick, Rev. E. C. (of Charlestown; later head of Andover-Newton Theological School), 33:151 Herrick, Robert F. (Boston businessman, 1898), 40:29 Herrick, Mrs. (friend of Mrs. James Russell Lowell (2d)), 33:77 Herrick family, 14:80 Herries, Robert (East India Co. stockholder, 1773), 39:153 Herron, Rev. George D. (1862-1925; socialist), 40:159 Hersey, Dr. Abner (Harvard benefactor, 1730s), 38:70 Hersey, Dr. Ezekial (Harvard 1728; benefactor), 38:70 Hersey Professorship, 4:21; 38:70; 43:129, 133, 134 Hesseltine, Amos (landowner, 1835), 22:75 “Hessian” troops, 19:53. See also “Convention Troops” Hewes, see also Hughes Hewes, Robert (New Hampshire glass maker, 1780), 19:34 Hewes, Miss (teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1890s), 32:44 Hewitt, Erastus H.: “Robert Frost of Brewster Village” (1965 paper), 40:84-93 Hewson, Thomas T. (botanist, 1820), 43:138 Hiam, Peter (Fayerweather St. resident, 1960s), 43:27 Hiam-Edmonds boundary (former Fayerweather estate), 43:12 (see also Ruggles-Fayerweather house) Hickling, Susanna, see Willard, Mrs. Joseph [Jr.] Hicks, John (carpenter; m. 1721), 8:34 Hicks, John (1725-1775; patriot), 1:64, 65; 8:34; 20:110-18; 23:19
– house of, 1:57; 6:25; 20:110-24; 27:99; 41:20; 42:117
– photographs of interior, 22:115 Hicks, Mrs. John (Elizabeth Nutting, 1726-1825), 20:110-11, 112, 113-15 Hicks, John (b. 1750; printer), 20:112, 114 Hicks, Dr. Jonathan (1752-1826), 20:112 Hicks, Joseph (freeholder, 1733), 17:95 Hicks, Louise Day (politician, 1970s), 42:135 Hicks, Mr. and Mrs. T. M. (Kirkland St. residents, 1921), 41:34 Hicks, Zechariah (settler, d. 1702): descendants of, 19:88; 22:119 Hicks, Zechariah (schoolmaster, 1708-1760), 20:110-11 Hicks, Zechariah (1755-1842; saddler), 20:112 Hicks, Mrs. (accommodations for British troops in house of, 1777), 13:44, 50 Hicks house, see Hicks, John (1725-1775) Hide, see Hyde/Hide Higginson, Anna (1817), 2:21, 22, 26-31 passim Higginson, Elizabeth (1827), 2:27, 28, 31 Higginson, Rev. Francis (1586-1630), 7:17; 10:87; 16:75; 33:141; 37:76, 89 Higginson, Francis J. (1827), 2:21, 26-31 passim; 11:31; 25:110; 28:112 Higginson, Maj. Henry Lee (1834-1919; banker), 16:125; 17:43; 33:124, 129; 35:38, 46, 51; 44:145
– and Boston Symphony Orchestra, 27:13; 32:93; 41:93, 168; 42:9
– Eliot letter to, 32:93-95
– Life of (Perry), 35:39
– and MIT, 42:50, 51, 54 Higginson, Mrs. Henry Lee (Ida Agassiz), 2:74; 18:35; 27:13; 33:114; 35:35-44 passim, 51; 43:61 Higginson, Louisa (daughter of following; 1827), 2:25, 27, 29 Higginson, Louisa Storrow, see Higginson, Mrs. Stephen [Jr.] (second wife) Higginson, Margaret W., see Barney, Mrs. Margaret W. Higginson Higginson, Martha Storrow (second wife of Rev. Ichabod Nichols), 2:27, 30, 31; 7:80; 23:81 Higginson, Mary Elizabeth Channing, see Higginson, Mrs. Thomas Wentworth (first wife) Higginson, Mary P. Thacher, see Higginson, Mrs. Thomas Wentworth (second wife) Higginson, Stephen (1743-1828; grandfather of Thomas W.), 37:76, 89
– and Shays’s Rebellion, 40:13, 15, 19-21 Higginson, Stephen [Jr.] (father of Thomas W.), 2:25, 27, 31, 32; 3:107; 9:9, 25; 28:63, 111, 112; 43:74
– as Harvard steward, 2:20; 28:110; 37:76
– house built for (1822), 2:20; 25:129; 28:110, 111; 41:32 Higginson, Mrs. Stephen [Jr.] (Louisa Storrow, second wife), 1:50; 3:107; 9:17; 28:21, 63, 110; 37:76
– letters of:
– – – to foster mother (1801), 1:48-49; 22:90
– – – to son Stephen (1827-28), 2:20-32 Higginson, Stephen [3d] (d. before 1839), 4:34; 25:110; 28:112
– mother’s letters to (1827-28), 2:20-32 Higginson, Thacher (1827), 2:23-29 passim Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentworth (1823-1911), 1:70; 4:31; 6:38, 39; 22:90; 23:46; 28:12; 31:56, 59; 38:76; 40:106, 144; 42:119
– addresses and papers by:
– – – Agassiz 100th anniversary (1907), 2:77-78, 108
– – – Bartlett reminiscences (1906), 1:78-82
– – – “Cambridge Eighty Years Since” (1906), 2:20-32
– – – Cambridge 275th anniversary (1905), 1:48-53
– – – “A Dinner with Dr. Holmes” (1909), 4:42-44
– – – Longfellow 100th anniversary (1907), 2:51-53, 107
– “Antebellum Years” of (1958 paper about), 37:75-89
– birthplace of, 1:14, 63; 25:129; 41:32
– as CHS founder, 32:116
– CHS honor of (1911), 7:5-30
– as “citizen and neighbor,” 7:22-26; 20:29
– in Civil War, leads Negro troops, 1:48; 2:78; 6:78; 7:11, 12, 28, 30; 34:103; 37:89
– diary of, 28:63; 37:78, 79-80
– and Harper’s Ferry raid, 7:14-15; 37:88-89
– as “helper of woman’s cause,” 7:17-22, 28-29; 37:75, 82
– as historiographer, 7:11, 27
– house of, 1:65; 26:47; 31:52, 55, 167
– letters honoring, 7:9-10
– and Manual Training School, 34:103
– and Miss Markham’s school, 41:161; 42:124 (see also School[s])
– obituary of, 6:77-78
– as orator, 20:36; 37:75, 78, 87
– personal appearance of, 37:77
– political career of, 7:5-8, 10, 11-16; 13:9; 20:28-32, 44-51 passim; 37:82, 83-89
– as preacher, 37:81-83, 86-87, 89
– schooling of, 5:25n2; 17:59; 22:93; 25:92; 33:44; 37:24, 77; 38:86
– and secret Craigie letters, 27:70n68
– and slavery, 6:77; 7:13-16, 25, 26; 20:28-29; 23:84, 85; 26:113; 37:75-76, 79, 80-89
– as teacher, 37:79, 80, 83
– as “W” in mother’s letters (of 1827-28), 2:21-32 passim
– writings of, 1:75; 20:88; 26:53n51, 56nn85, 87, 61; 29:41n30; 37:75; 43:125
– – – Cheerful Yesterdays, 7:13, 28, 29; 25:92
– – – as “man of letters” (1911 paper about), 7:26-30
– – – quoted, 7:20; 20:131, 132; 25:51-52n47, 56n60; 28:21, 109, 110-11; 31:53, 54-55; 33:155; 34:41, 102-3; 37:36, 77-78, 83-87 passim; 39:88-89, 91, 114 Higginson, Mrs. Thomas Wentworth (Mary Elizabeth Channing, first wife; d. 1877), 6:77; 37:80 Higginson, Mrs. Thomas Wentworth (Mary P. Thacher, second wife), 6:78; 31:48; 41:161; 42:124 Higginson, Waldo (surveyor, 1840s), 2:23-29 passim; 14:73 Higginson, Wentworth, see Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Dr. (brother of Thomas W.), 1:50 Higginson, Mr. (presents champagne to Pierian Sodality, 1836), 32:87 High Street, see Highland Street Higham, see Hiam Highland Street, 22:52; 42:129
– architecture on, 26:40 (illus. #9 following); 43:11, 168
– known as High Street, 41:160; 43:10
– reservoir at corner of, 24:88; 25:119; 43:9, 13
– residents of, 12:40; 16:8; 17:15; 19:8; 20:21; 35:20; 36:95; 41:164; 43:9-13 passim, 16-30 passim
– trees on, 33:95, 99 Highways, see Streets and highways Hildeburn, Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. (c. 1900), 19:46-47 Hildeburn, Joseph Emlin Howell (mid-1800s), 19:47n Hildeburn, Mrs. Joseph Emlin Howell (Rosina Margaretta Riché), 19:47n Hildreth, Alice Westgate (1940s), 37:73, 74 Hildreth, Dr. John L. (1870s), 20:106; 33:46; 38:123; 39:48 Hildreth, Richard (d. c. 1693), 22:20
– descendants of, 5:52 Hildreth, Richard (1807-1865; historian), 5:89n6 Hildreth, Mr. (friend of Charles Folsom, c. 1812), 25:97 Hill, see also Hills Hill, Deacon Aaron (1730-1793; mason), 3:110; 9:6; 10:71, 85; 13:22n1, 50; 17:47, 48; 20:97; 23:19
– site of house, 1:59; 25:128; 27:63; 31:56; 32:7 Hill, Mrs. Aaron (Susanna Tainter), 9:6 Hill, Dr. Aaron, Jr., 9:6, 35n1; 25:25n7 Hill, Mrs. Aaron, Jr. (Harriet Quincy), 9:6, 22, 31, 33; 29:72 Hill, Abigail (widow of slave). 10:73n3. See also Vassall family Hill, Abraham (d. 1670): descendants of, 22:119 Hill, Abraham (1688-1754), 9:6 Hill, Mrs. Abraham (Prudence Hancock; d. 1775), 9:6 Hill, Abraham (c. 1734-1812), 8:21 Hill, Mrs. Abraham (Susanna Wellington), 8:21 Hill, Adams S. (Boat Club, 1947), 39:140 Hill, Prof. Adams Sherman (late 1800s), 33:128; 34:42, 46, 55; 37:109; 43:16, 30 Hill, Anna (b. 1797; Mrs. Rufus Johnson), 9:6 Hill, Carrie Choate, see Seagrave, Mrs. C. Burnside Hill, Prof. Edward Burlingame (grandson of Rev. Thomas; composer), 19:5; 32:88; 41:98, 99 Hill, Mrs. Edward Burlingame, 19:5 Hill, Frank A. (1841-1903; educator), 35:96-97 Hill, F. Stanhope (newspaperman, 1880s), 20:86, 88; 36:114 Hill, Hannah (of England), see Church, Mrs. Benjamin [Jr.] Hill, Hannah Brackett, see Phillips, Mrs. Willard (first wile) Hill, Harriet, see Phillips, Mrs. Willard (second wife) Hill, Henry (Boston merchant, 1700s), 9:39n1 Hill, Henry (landowner, c. 1800), 16:46, 86 Hill, Prof. Henry Barker (1849-1903; son of Rev. Thomas), 18:43 Hill, Mrs. John, see Remington, Anna Hill, Jonathan (1714-1775; mason), 6:20 Hill, Mrs. Jonathan (b. 1726; Lydia Kidder [Cooper]), 6:20 Hill, Jonathan Cooper (d. 1820), 6:20-21 Hill, Joseph (1727): descendants of, 5:54 Hill, Lydia, see Fogg, Mrs. Jeremiah Hill, Lydia Kidder [Cooper], see Hill, Mrs. Jonathan Hill, Mary Timmins Quincy (1813-1902; Mrs. Benjamin Pollard Winslow), 9:35n1 Hill, Ralph, and Ralph, Jr. (1654), 9:76 Hill, Samuel (c. 1732-1798; carpenter), 10:31n1 Hill, Mrs. Samuel (Sarah Cutler), 10:31n1 Hill, Mrs. Sherman (Reservoir St. resident, 1970s), 43:15 Hill, Sophia (1787-1817), 9:6, 28 Hill, Squier (officer under Capt. Knowlton, 1775), 5:26n1 Hill, Miss Susanna (1760-1830), 9:6, 7, 11, 12
– letters to Mrs. Jenks from (1807-13), 9:12-37; 21:102-3; 27:63, 64n54; 29:72 Hill, Susanna (1799-1869; Mrs. John P. Todd), 9:6-7; 25:25
– house of, 20:97-98
– Longfellow’s sketch of, 25:26 (illus. facing)
– poem by, 25:58-59 Hill, Susanna Tainter, see Hill, Mrs. Aaron Hill, Susanna Wellington, see Hill, Mrs. Abraham [3d] Hill, Rev. Thomas (1818-1891; Harvard president 1862-68), 14:21; 20:53; 22:15, 46; 28:115; 30:85, 88; 33:25; 41:98 Hill, Thomas Quincy (1790-1813), 9:35, 37 Hill, Mrs. Thomas Quincy (Lucretia Catherine Timmins Callahan), 9:35n1, 37 Hill, Valentine (landowner, c. 1650), 21:42 Hill, Rev. William (1795), 27:60, 79 Hill, William (apothecary, early 1800s), 8:38 Hill, Zachariah (1737-1812), 8:23 Hill, Mrs. Zachariah (Rebecca Wellington), 8:23 Hill (Harvard student, 1760), 10:30n1 Hill family, 6:21
– site of house, 9:6, 7 (see also Hill, Deacon Aaron) Hill & Stearns (livery stable), 15:33 Hillard, see also Hilliard Hillard, George Stillman (1808-1879; lawyer), 7:32; 10:145; 33:19n29
– as district attorney, 10:191
– as friend of Longfellow, 25:36; 28:56, 67, 77, 78, 79
– quoted, 25:104; 29:44 Hillard, Mrs. George Stillman (Susan Tracy Dwight Howe), 25:123, 127, 134, 136, 140 Hillard, Willard & Hyde (law firm), 10:191 Hillel House, see International Student House Hilles, Mrs. Susan Morse, and Hilles Library, 44:153. See also Library(ies) Hillhouse, James (1754-1832; Connecticut lawyer, politician), 44:174, 176 Hilliard, see also Hillard Hilliard, Judge Abraham (1778-1855), 2:29; 9:9, 10, 18, 19, 23; 11:29, 30; 21:103 Hilliard, Mrs. Abraham, 21:103 Hilliard, Mrs. Catherine Dexter, 27:67, 87n96 Hilliard, Mrs. Catherine Haven (daughter-in-law of Deacon William), 27:64n54, 67 Hilliard, Charles (1770s; son of Rev. Timothy), 22:88 Hilliard, Edmund Bayfield (of Boston, c. 1940), 25:52n49; 27:76n82, 86n96, 88 Hilliard, Elizabeth (1800-1826), 27:67n60 Hilliard, Harriet[t] (Mrs. William Dandridge Peck), 9:7, 9, 10, 15-35 passim, 65; 11:28; 21:103; 29:72; 38:77, 79
– as “Cambridge Pudding Stick,” 23:55
– letters to Mrs. Jenks from (1806-07), 9:11-12, 17-18; 22:89 Hilliard, Iredell (of North Carolina, 1940s), 27:89 Hilliard, Joseph (of Kensington, N.H.; father of Rev. Timothy), 22:88 Hilliard, Joseph (b. c. 1774; son of Rev. Timothy), 22:88 Hilliard, Miss Katharine H. (c. 1940), 27:87n96, 89 Hilliard, Miss Margaret B. (c. 1940), 27:87n96 Hilliard, Mary, see Sales, Mrs. Francis Hilliard, Mary Foster, see Hilliard, Mrs. Timothy Hilliard, Sarah Anne, see Little, Mrs. Charles C. Hilliard, Sarah Lovering Hilliard, see Hilliard, Mrs. [Deacon] William Hilliard, Rev. Timothy (1746-1790; Harvard tutor before 1778), 6:23; 9:10; 22:88-89; 29:70; 31:64; 38:76; 43:119, 124; 44:70 Hilliard, Mrs. Timothy (Mary Foster; d. 1817), 9:7-24 passim, 31, 32n1, 33, 35, 65; 22:88-89 Hilliard, Timothy, Jr. (b. c. 1776), 44:70 Hilliard, Deacon William (1778-1836), 9:10, 19, 23, 30, 33; 15:21; 21:103; 22:88; 27:63; 29:72; 38:83; 44:70-71
– children die in epidemic, 27:64
– and church controversy, 2:29; 4:29; 29:71; 43:120; 44:69
– dismissal as deacon requested by wife, 29:73-75
– firms established by (bookselling, printing, publishing):
– – – Cummings & Hilliard, 44:77
– – – Hilliard & Brown, 44:77, 84
– – – Hilliard & Company, 44:77
– – – Hilliard & Gray, 1:22
– – – Hilliard & Metcalf, 15:18-19; 38:71; 44:76, 78-79, 84
– house site (No. 60 Brattle St.), 3:52; 9:10, 30n3; 29:71; 37:13; 44:71
– “Narrative of…Harvard College…Disorders,” 9:26-27
– portrait of, 27:64n54; 29:8-9
– street named for, 14:65; 25:120; 44:71 (see also Hilliard Street)
– “University Press” of, 1:22; 15:16, 18, 23; 27:64n54; 29:70; 38:83; 44:72-81 (see also University Book Store; University Press) Hilliard, Mrs. [Deacon] William (Sarah Levering Hilliard), 9:20, 23, 33, 37, 65; 21:103; 29:70, 72
– excommunication of, 29:73-78, 81
– portrait of, 27:64n54; 29:8-9 Hilliard, Mr. (treasurer of Cambridge Bank, c. 1800), 16:130 Hilliard, Mrs., boardinghouse of, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Hilliard family, 22:27, 88 Hilliard house, see Hilliard, Deacon William Hilliard Street, 3:52; 9:10, 30n3; 14:65; 15:16; 29:71; 41:136; 43:166; 44:71. See also Appian Way Hilliard & Brown, Hilliard & Company, Hilliard & Gray, Hilliard & Metcalf, see Milliard, Deacon William (firms established by) Hills, see also Hill Hills, Mrs. (in Cambridge Book Club, 1033), 28:115 Hillside Avenue, 38:115, 116, 117, 118. See also Foxcroft Street Hillyer, Robert (1895-1961; poet), 41:105 Hilton, J. M. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:42 Hinckley, Eleanor Holmes (playwright, c. 1920), 32:48; 38:57; 40:119 Hinckley, Katharine, see Sheldon, Mrs. Edward Stevens Hinckley, Mary, see Lanman, Mrs. Charles Rockwell Hincks, Gen. E. W. (bank stockholder, 1890), 41:41 Hinds, Alice and Helen (art students, 1880s), 34:73, 74 Hine, Mrs. Thomas, see Lanman, Faith Hingham, Massachusetts (Bare Cove), 21:29, 31, 36, 43, 46; 37:62
– settlement of (c. 1636), 20:98; 23:83; 25:97 Hinkley, see Hinckley Hipkiss, Edwin J. (curator at Boston Museum, 1930s, 1940s), 21:6; 33:59n8 Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), see National Park Service Historic District Study Committee, 39:71-77; 42:31; 43:82, 88 Historic Districts Act (Massachusetts), 39:72; 42:31, 32, 88-89 Historic Guide to Cambridge, see History, Cambridge Historic preservation
– of Fort Washington, 23:10, 99; 43:143-46
– Historic Districts recommended and established, 39:73-74; 42:34-47
– – – Brattle St. proposed as, 43:33, 36-38
– of houses and locations, 30:15; 43:37
– – – CHS and, see Cambridge Historical Society
– – – Cambridge Tribune recommends (1923), 17:100
– and Committee (Tercentenary) on Historic Houses, 21:10; 26:7, 54n65, 55n67, 61; 27:98-101
– – – discussed, 6:16-17, 19:83-84; 20:102, 124; 25:65-69
– – – by Harvard, 20:123; 25:67; 33:34-36; 42:45; 43:90-91, 94; 44:135
– – – Massachusetts, outside Cambridge, 25:67-68
– – – papers on, 6:16-17, 25:65-69
– – – and restoration, see Hooper-Lee-Nichols house
– (see also Houses, meetinghouses, etc.)
– identification and marking of historic sites, 3:17; 18:47-48; 32:96; 33:8n5, 37, 61; 37:51; 39:7; 43:70, 76, 80, 87, 113
– – – Civil War “patriotism” and, 18:54
– – – Committee on, 42:34, 37, 47
– – – Hooper-Lee-Nichols house, 16:133; 37:69-71
– – – proposed, 2:36; 20:11; 23:8; 39:73; 42:32, 35; 43:81, 92
– – – reports on (1906, 1908, 1930), 1:55-67; 3:50-56; 21:10
– – – “Viking,” see Leif Ericsson
– (see also Milestone[s])
– laws concerning, 13:8n1; 39:72; 42:40, 41, 42, 46-47; 43:88-89
– of Margaret Fuller House, 17:12
– of Middlesex County Court files, see of records, below
– National Trust for, 42:32; 43:91; 44:37
– official plans for, see Cambridge Historical Commission
– of old burying ground, see Burying ground(s)
– of old Court House (discussed, 1922), 16:11, 133, 135
– of parkland, 31:32; 39:136
– of photographs, 2:112
– of records, 9:47-49; 19:82
– – – Middlesex County Court files, 23:16; 24:7
– societies for, see Historical Society(ies); Society(ies) (organizations)
– of tools, weapons, clothing, etc., 2:112
– of windmills ( 1911), 6:17
– WPA projects of, see WPA projects
– writings (of Cambridge interest) concerning, 43:92
– See also Parks Historic Sites Commission, Boston, 39:28n14, 77 Historic Sites Committee, Cambridge, 39:60, 77 Historical Commission, see Cambridge Historical Commission Historical Society(ies)
– Bay State Historical League, 15:58
– Colonial Society of Massachusetts:
– – – Publications of, 10:110n, 186; 11:40n3; 24:80n32; 27:47nl3; 38:7, 13-19nn5-23 passim
– – – Transactions of, 7:65, 68; 16:14; 21:119; 33:65n29; 36:54n2
– diaries owned by, 10:19n2, 32n1, 39n1; 11:70-83 passim (see also Diaries and journals)
– New England Historic-Genealogical, 8:20n1; 16:18; 17:44; 23:27; 34:97n1; 37:20; 40:100
– – – diaries in possession of, 11:71, 72, 82, 83
– – – Register of, 3:83; 5:63n5; 10:9n1, 10n2, 14nl, 24n3, 60n1, 61n2, 75n1; 15:24n1; 16:21, 69, 93; 24:64; 26:66n4; 28:12n; 34:99n3; 41:45
– papers about:
– – – “Certain Defects in Publications of” (Ford, 1910), 5:5-20
– – – “Local, History and the” (Turner, 1911), 6:41, 44
– – – “Local, Cooperation between Schools and” (Worthen, 1938), 25:70-74
– Pennsylvania, Memoirs of, 44:126
– Shepard (of First Church), 10:184; 32:115
– Sparks’s opinion of, 44:125-27
– See also Cambridge Historical Society; Massachusetts Historical Society; Society(ies) (organizations); entries for other individual state and town societies History
– American Revolutionary, see Revolutionary War
– Cape Cod, 5:17
– Connecticut, 27:75n80
– “conspiracy theory” of, 39:155, 161-62; 40:11
– “devil theory” of, 39:161; 40:7-8, 11, 12, 22
– distortion of, 5:84n5
– Harvard, see Harvard College/University
– Harvard establishes professorship in, 33:128-29
– of Massachusetts (Hutchinson), 16:71
– of New England, see New England
– state, see entries for individual states
– town, 44:124 (see also History, Cambridge; entries for individual towns) History, Cambridge
– Architectural, Survey of, 44:135
– Bits of (Batchelder), 16:74, 75, 78; 33:62n23, 63n26; 37:27
– of Brattle St., Mrs. Gozzaldi’s views on, 35:111; 39:78
– Cambridge Fifty Years a City (Davis, ed.),40:42; 42:74, 93
– Cambridge in the Centennial (City Council), 43:149
– Cambridge of 1776, The (Oilman, ed.), 10:10n2, 48n2, 68n1, 71n1, 73n1; 18:50; 21:91n1, 107; 43:150
– Cambridge of 1896, The (Stevens et al-), 6:27-28; 18:18n1, 36n2, 46n1; 20:131; 25:130, 132; 36:98n3; 38:29; 39:57nn2, 3, 70; 40:23, 29; 42:88, 94; 43:150
– Cambridge Thirty Years Ago (1854) (Lowell), 1:22, 70; 16:110-11, 114, 123; 26:103; 29:13n1; 32:28, 42:94; 43:150
– Cambridgeport, 16:29-68; 35:79-89
– – – title page, 16:27 (illus.)
– “catechism” on, 19:10-11
– Committee on Cambridge Ancestors, 19:88
– diaries, journals, “Commonplace Books,” scrapbooks reflecting, see Diaries and journals
– gaps in, 42:81
– Historic Guide to Cambridge (Hannah Winthrop Chapter DAR; Gozzaldi, ed.)
– – – cited, 3:51; 10:10n2, 57n3, 58n3; 11:13n2; 13:60n3, 65n1; 16:72; 19:10, 46; 23:74; 26:49nn3-4, 51-53nn24-53 passim, 54-59nn58-126 passim, 61; 27:49n19; 31:27n8, 33n13; 33:9n7, 62n24; 36:93n1; 37:26; 39:62nn8, 11; 42:94; 43:70n3, 150
– – – error in, 17:54; 25:86-87
– – – illustration in, 17:36
– – – quoted, 21:100-101; 39:57, 58; 42:80
– “Historical Associations of Charlestown and” (1950 paper), 33:134-55
– History of Cambridge (A. Holmes), 16:84; 23:67; 43:119, 125, 147-48
– History of Cambridge, 1630-1877 (Paige)
– – – cited, 2:14; 5:39, 42, 55-57nn, 68n2; 7:59-63 passim, 71, 76; 8:14n1, 16, 21; 9:71; 10:17-71nn passim, 101; 13:89; 14:33n1, 54n1, 57, 71n2, 72; 16:18, 72:77 passim, 85, 86, 94, 110, 111; 18:17n1, 49; 19:10; 21:25; 22:13n1, 61; 24:71n7, 78, 79n31; 26:49-51nn2-30 passim, 55-59nn75-130 passim, 61; 27:62n51; 28:30n2, 31; 29:68; 35:93; 37:26, 73; 39:57; 40:126nn8, 11, 135n32; 43:126, 142, 147-50 passim; 44:69n8
– – – error in, 21:83n1
– – – index to, see Index
– – – quoted, 1:117 2:33; 3:113; 5:41, 76n5; 10:12n3; 14:51; 17:48-49; 21:29, 34; 22:27-28; 24:52; 25:88; 30:39; 31:22-24 passim; 33:68; 34:29; 36:78; 39:60-65 passim; 40:28; 43:75, 148
– History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1913, A (S. A. Eliot), 39:62n8; 41:46; 42:94; 43:21, 147-50 passim
– Horsford’s influence on, 40:108-9
– identification and marking of historic sites, see Historic preservation
– “limits” placed on, 43:33-34
– local government (1932 paper), 22:17-28
– and maps, see Maps and plans
– math theses as source of, 41:119; 42:117-18
– Old Cambridge and New (Amory), 14:59n1
– popular, need for, 21:11
– scrapbooks reflecting, see Diaries and journals
– “Slide-Show on” (1975), 43:147
– studied in public schools, 1:33; 12:53; 19:9-10; 25:73; 39:60, 72
– Wright Collection dealing with, 37:91-106, 127-28 History of New England (Palfrey), 25:105 Hitchcock, Prof. Edward (1793-1864; geologist), 17:30, 32-33, 34 Hitchcock, Henry-Russell (writer, 1936), 41:127 Hitchcock, Lambert (of Connecticut; 1795-1852), 21:54 Hitching posts, see Horses (as transportation) Hitler, Adolf (1889-1945; German leader), 35:108; 40:150 Hitt, Thomas (English background of, 1600s), 14:103 Hoadley, Prof, and Mrs. Leigh (Scott St. residents, 1934-50), 41:38 Hoar, see also Horr Hoar, Judge Ebenezer Rockwood (1816-1895), 2:75; 3:36; 4:62; 7:32; 10:189; 28:87; 33:51; 35:39 Hoar, Elizabeth (of Concord, mid-1800s), 27:11, 12; 28:24 Hoar, Elizabeth Potter, see Hoar, Mrs. Stedman Hoar, George Frisbie (1826-1904), 1:70; 7:19, 32: 10:189 Hoar, Samuel (1778-1856; of Concord; lawyer), 10:189; 27:11; 40:55 Hoar, Mrs. Samuel, 28:25 Hoar, Sarah Sherman, see Storer, Mrs. Robert Boyd Hoar, Sherman (politician, 1880s), 7:6; 20:30, 45, 46 Hoar, Stedman (1940s), 43:28 Hoer, Mrs. Stedman (Elizabeth [“Betty”] Potter), 43:28 Hoar family, 23:84; 27:11, 12 Hobart, Hobbert, see also Hubbard Hobart, Rev. Nehemiah (c. 1700), 11:60; 22:65 Hobbert, Mrs. (Hill and Jenks family friend, 1807), 9:21 Hobbs Brook Reservoir, 41:9-10, 11, 14, 15; 42:85; 43:8. See also Water supply “Hobgoblin Hall,” 33:60n12. See also Medford, Massachusetts (Royall family and estate in) Hocking, Prof. Ernest (Quincy St. resident, 1920s), 18:40; 44:90 Hocking, Mrs. Ernest (Agnes Boyle O’Reilly), 18:40; 33:155; 41:24; 44:90 Hodgdon, Dr. Richard L. (of Arlington, 1870), 20:109 “Hodge,” Mary, see Hedge, Miss Mary Hodges, Benjamin (Harvard 1804; math thesis of), 26:58n115, 62; 42:118 Hodges, Catherine, see Tower, Mrs. Charles B. Hodges, Dean [Rev.] George (1856-1919), 12:9; 36:13-21 passim
– “Mary Huntington Cooke” (1911 paper), 6:49-53 Hodges, Harry (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:53 Hodges, Margaret Manning, see Choate, Mrs. George Hodges, Dr. Richard M. (Boston surgeon, 1860s), 39:43 Hodges, Rev. Richard Manning (d. 1878), 4:31; 28:105, 115, 118; 33:46
– house of, see Hodges-Tower house Hodges, Mrs. Richard Manning (Elizabeth Quincy Donnison), 5:108 Hodges, Sarah, see Swan, Mrs. Joshua Hodges-Tower house, 4:31; 5:108; 20:94, 101; 21:62 Hodgkins, Lt. Joseph (1775), 18:61 Hodgkinson, Mrs. (actress, 1798), 11:39 Hofer, Prof, and Mrs. Philip (Scott St. residents, 1944-45), 41:39 Hogan, “Billy” (elected to City Council, 1942), 44:92-93, 95 Hogarth, Catherine, see Dickens, Mrs. Charles Hogarth, Georgina (sister of Catherine), 28:87, 99 Hogarth, William (1697-1764; English painter, engraver), 29:21 Hogs, see Animals Hohfield, Mr. (at “Junior Committee” party, 1906), 44:116 Holbrook, Robert (Loyalist in England, 1780s), 19:59 Holbrook, Massachusetts, 21:29, 44 Holcombe, Prof. Arthur N. (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 6:68; 20:99; 21:64; 31:56; 44:89-90 Holden, see also Holten Holden, Dr. Austin (living in Cooper-Austin house, no date given), 38:117 Holden, Edward Singleton (1846-1914; astronomer), 25:84; 33:16n26 Holden, Harley P.: “The Harvard University Archives: A Source of Cambridge History” (1972 paper), 42:110-22 Holden, Justinian (1616-1691; settler), 14:92 Holden, Oliver (1765-1844; composer), 32:86; 33:155 Holden, Richard (settler; d. 1696), 14:92 Holden, Gov. Samuel (England, c. 1740), 21:92 Holden, Mrs. (mother of Dr. Austin Holden), 38:117, 118 Holden Chapel (Harvard), 14:21; 15:32; 20:53; 21:122; 22:102; 23:36; 33:77, 125; 41:120; 42:7, 120
– building of (1744), 7:64
– as court house, 39:60
– in Historic District, 39:73
– lectures given in (1830), 11:31
– medical classes in, 4:9; 7:79; 29:20; 38:70, 72 Holden Green, 41:22, 25, 37; 42:24 Holden Street, 41:22, 23, 24, 25; 42:17
– residents on (1915-69), 41:37-38; 42:25 Holidays, fairs, and festivals,
– All Souls’ Day, 42:134
– Boston Fair (1839), 4:34
– Bunker Hill Day (June 17), 20:24; 31:43; 33:149, 151; 34:62; 39:26; 41:160
– charity fairs, see May Fair, below; Charity
– Christmas, 3:20; 10:64; 11:24; 27:71; 41:42
– – – carolers (“waits”), 41:25; 42:134-35
– – – change in observance of, 2:21, 27
– – – and Christmas parties, 18:35; 25:96; 26:120; 32:44, 46; 42:19, 134; 44:32
– – – “Convention Troops” observe, 13:64
– – – in England (1850’s), 32:15
– – – Puritan observance of, 1:38; 13:64
– – – sales of goods for, 30:24
– – – and school holidays, 13:100; 38:35n21; 41:22, 130
– Commencement week, 13:100 (see also Harvard College/University)
– Easter Day celebrations, 26:120; 27:85-86; 33:24; 41:42; 44:119
– fast days, see Religion
– Fourth of July, 13:100; 23:53; 28:111; 31:43; 34:74; 38:40; 43:118
– – – Dana’s oration at Salem, 26:98
– – – fireworks, 21:118; 22:49; 34:62
– – – Longfellow in England on (1868), 28:98
– – – “revoking” of, 37:87
– Hallowe’en, 43:19-20; 44:107, 180-10
– “Last Day of School,” 42:134, 135
– May Day, 11:55; 13:100; 32:51; 34:65; 42:134
– May Fair (benefiting hospital, 1880), 16:116; 38:122 (see also Charity)
– Memorial Day, 25:56n58; 35:102; 41:134, 169
– New Year’s Day, 2:21, 28, 29; 25:105
– Patriot’s Day (April 19), 15:11
– St. Patrick’s Day, 36:104-5
– school vacations, 13:100
– – – Harvard, 11:46; 13:45-46, 52-53
– – – snow and, 42:28
– (see also Christmas, above)
– summer vacations, See Domestic and family life
– thanksgiving and Thanksgiving Day 1:40; 4:28; 9:34; 11:66;13:45-46, 100; 16:107; 26:120; 28:18, 88, 90; 33:143; 34:50; 41:67, 74
– – – and charity, 18:16, 17
– – – sermon preached for, 37:82
– Twelfth Night,22:100
– See also Celebrations Holland, Mrs. Anna D. (1957), 37:74 Holland Cliffford M. (1883-1924; engineer), 35:107 Holland, Lucy (wife of slave Darby “Vassall”), 10:75. See also Vassall family Holland, Paul (Boston grocery store of, 1840), 41:66 Holland, Rev. William J. (1848-1932; naturalist), 2:81 Holland (Netherlands)
– Adams as ambassador to, see Adams, John
– Dana in, 26:88
– and Dutch East India Company, 39:145-46
– and England (during American Revolution), 3:72-73, 76; 4:23; 5:73, 87
– Harvard visited by pastors from (1680), 3:17; 11:62, 66
– Puritans in, see Puritans and Puritanism
– settlement by, see New Amsterdam (New York)
– Spain and, 33:135
– tea smuggled from, 39:145-46, 149-54 passim, 160 Hollander, Mrs. Sumner (of Boston, 1940s), 29:51n71 Holley, Samuel (d. before 1646), 17:49 Holley, Mrs. Samuel (Elizabeth? later Mrs. John Kendall), 17:49 Hollingsworth, Sumner (book collector, 1880s), 38:104 Hollis, Prof. Ira N. (1856-1930; naval engineer), 29:26n35; 40:145 Hollis, Thomas (Harvard benefactor), 3:54; 7:66; 9:40. See also Hollis Professorship Hollis, Thomas (nephew of above), 9:40 Hollis, Thomas (3d) (1720-1774; benefactor of Colonies and of Harvard), 9:40
– “A Letter from [1766]” (1914 paper on), 9:38-46 Hollis, Thomas Brand (d. 1804), 9:43 Hollis, Mr. (drowned, 1807), 9:24 Hollis Hall (Harvard), 14:21; 15:32; 20:53; 22:102; 27:34; 29:20; 33:77, 125; 34:56; 35:122; 42:7
– architecture of, 35:113, 120; 43:42-43
– as barracks (1775-76), 3:54; 13:37; 23:49
– building of (1763), 3:54; 7:64
– fire in ( 1876), 30:14-15
– T. Fuller, Jr., in (1798-1800), 11:34, 36, 39, 46; 28:15
– in Historic District, 39:73
– Longfellow’s sketch of, 25:26 (illus. following )
– “McKean’s Leap” from, 25:103
– naming of (1764), 3:54; 11:61 Hollis Professorship (founded 1727), 4:9; 6:22; 11:13n5, 31n1, 35n, 41n1, 71; 25:104; 36:56, 58, 59, 65; 38:69, 72 Hollis Street (Boston), 30:49 Hollis Street (Cambridge), 20:135 “Hollow, The,” 31:53 Holly, see also Holley Holly Tree Inn, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Holm, Saxe (pseud.), see Jackson, Helen Hunt Holman, Betsey (c. 1800; Mrs. Mclntire), 6:34 Holman, William (c. 1594-1653; early settler), 14:98 Holmes, Rev. Abiel (1763-1837), 1:50; 4:18; 6:28; 9:7, 26; 11:20, 23n4, 28; 16:65; 38:77
– in Association of Ministers, 16:98
– at Cambridgeport Church celebrations (1807), 16:46, 48, 86
– in church controversy, see as pastor of First Church, below
– death of, 4:29; 29:70
– and death of daughter, 9:35; 11:27
– as historian:
– – – Annals of America, 1:50; 3:113; 5:27; 29:70; 39:110; 43:119, 125
– – – History of Cambridge, 16:84; 23:67; 43:119, 125, 147-48
– houses of, see Hastings house(s) (Jonathan Hastings [Hastings-Holmes house]); Parsonage(s)
– as lecturer, 36:60
– marriages of, 1:49; 22:89, 90-91; 23:91; 29:19n21
– as pastor of First Church, 3:109-11; 9:21; 10:105; 15:17; 16:41; 23:67; 41:120; 43:119, 124, 148
– – – in church controversy, 2:29; 4:41; 11:29, 30-31; 22:91; 29:70, 71; 31:64; 33:12; 43:119-21, 124, 125, 148; 44:69
– – – and excommunication of church members, 29:73-77, 79-81
– quoted, 4:21; 7:59; 25:104, 118; 30:24; 31:27, 54 Holmes, Mrs. Abiel (Mary [“Polly”] Stiles, first wife; 1767-1795), 22:89; 23:91; 29:70 Holmes, Mrs. Abiel (Sarah [“Sally”] Wendell, second wife), 1:49; 3:110; 9:35, 64, 65; 18:30; 22:90-91; 29:19n21; 38:30n12, 31 Holmes, Edward Jackson (grandson of Dr. Oliver W.), 4:38 Holmes, Huldah, see Hastings, Mrs. Oliver (second wife) Holmes, James A. (merchant), 35:88 Holmes, John (b. 1639; moves to Salem 1685), 16:18; 24:64; 37:65, 70 Holmes, Mrs. John (Hannah Thatcher), 16:18 Holmes, John (1812-1899), 1:22, 78; 7:32; 16:126; 18:30; 25:104, 105, 126, 130; 28:109; 30:21; 31:8-9
– on Cambridge and personalities, 8:34; 10:24n2, 34n1, 58n2, 71n1; 13:45n1; 20:58, 92, 127; 27:47n13, 65n56, 90; 36:81, 83; 38:49
– Higginson essay on, 7:27
– Letters of, 11:7n1; 17:53; 27:90; 39:82n13
– Lowell’s friendship with, 1:75, 76, 83, 85; 16:110; 25:135-36
– portrait of, 12:9
– site of house, 25:115, 118; 31:8; 38:49n49 Holmes, John Albert: “The Ancient Fish Weir on Menotomy River” (1910 paper), 5:32-43 Ho[l]mes, Joseph A. (public official, 1830s-1870s), 16:115; 35:87; 38:49; 43:74 Holmes, Joseph A. (A.B., 1854), 38:37n27 Holmes, Lydia (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Holmes, Mary Jackson (Mrs. Usher Parsons), 11:23, 27; 27:67n61 Holmes, Dr. Oliver Wendell (1809-1894), 1:47-48; 2:54, 61, 62, 100; 3:48, 110; 7:32; 10:183; 16:65; 22:107; 23:33, 36; 34:52, 91; 41:59, 98; 42:119; 43:77
– birthplace of, see Hastings house(s) (Jonathan Hastings [Hastings-Holmes house])
– Centenary celebration, 3:109; 4:38-68
– Class Day poem by (1829), see writings of, below
– at Dickens receptions, 28:57, 86, 87, 90, 94, 95
– “Dinner with” (Higginson paper, 1909), 4:42-44
– family of, 4:38; 9:64; 11:20n4; 17:53; 20:58; 23:68; 25:104, 126; 27:67n61; 29:70; 31:8, 64; 36:60, 81; 38:32, 49n49; 43:119
– at Harvard Medical School, 4:45-59 passim; 41:62
– as physician, 4:47-48, 58, 61; 10:78; 16:122-23
– quoted, 1:49, 51; 4:21, 39, 47-68 passim; 10:35n1; 22:85-86, 91; 23:81; 25:54, 114, 138; 26:43, 103; 27:73; 29:14n4, 42; 33:62; 34:83; 35:82; 39:130-31; 41:63, 120, 122; 44:71
– – – on Waterhouse, 29:15n7; 38:76; 43:131
– in Saturday Club, 2:75; 4:54, 61, 62, 68; 35:51; 41:57
– schooling of, 33:13; 35:82; 41:120, 122
– as witness at Webster trial (1850), 41:62, 73, 86
– writings of, 4:45-67 passim; 15:21; 16:110; 19:23; 20:36, 88; 25:105, 117, 119; 26:117; 36:64; 39:130-31; 41:62-63
– – – Class Day poems (1829 and 1886), 12:13, 16, 18, 19; 27:33
– – – “Old Ironsides” parodied (1946), 33:34 Holmes, Mrs. Oliver Wendell (Amelia Lee Jackson), 4:62 Holmes, Justice Oliver Wendell, Jr. (1841-1935), 31:64; 33:119; 35:46; 40:144; 41:62, 125; 43:119
– Eliot paper on (1935), 23:67-71
– quoted, on 250th anniversary of First Church, 23:70-71; 32:114 Holmes, Mrs. Oliver Wendell, Jr. (Fanny Dixwell), 23:67, 69; 33:54 Holmes, Robert (d. 1663), 14:98; 16:18 Holmes, Robert (grandson of above), 16:18 Holmes, Sarah Lathrop (d. 1812), 9:35n2 Holmes, Thomas J. (bibliographer), 38:108, 109 Holmes, “Old Mrs.” (1807), 9:20 Holmes (Pierian Sodality leader), 41:102 Holmes Chapel, 38:120 Holmes Field, 30:14; 31:55; 33:37; 41:26, 129 Holmes houses, see Hastings house(s); Holmes, John (1812-1899); Hooper-Lee-Nichols house; Parsonage(s) Holmes Place, 18:29; 23:67; 30:14; 33:37, 39, 95; 38:31; 43:80
– Baptist Church moved from, 18:30; 21:61
– house sites identified on, 1:62, 63; 6:24; 9:23n4; 30:76
– naming of, 14:65; 32:29
– railroad station on, see Railroad(s) (Harvard Branch) Holmes property, 41:32
– laboratory plans for, 39:90 Holsombach, Elizabeth, see Hall, Mrs. Maxcy Reddick Holt, Dr. Alfred F. (1870s), 20:103, 107; 39:12 Holt, G. (young partner of James Richardson, 1861), 39:10-11 Holt, Samuel (surveyor, 1840s), 14:73 Holt’s (restaurant, 1920s), 41:146. See also Restaurants Holten, see also Holden Holten, Dr. Samuel (1738-1816), 13:39n3, 46 Holworthy, Herbert Fleetwood (of England, c. 1900), 7:69 Holworthy, Sir Matthew (1608-1678), 7:66, 68-69
– portrait of, 7:69, 88 Holworthy, Mrs. Matthew (Mary Henley, first wife), 7:68 Holworthy, Mrs. Matthew (Lucy Jervoice, second wife), 7:68-69 Holworthy, Lady Matthew (Susanna Henley, third wife), 7:69
– portrait of, 7:69, 88 Holworthy, Richard (of England, 1630s), 7:68 Holworthy, Sir Thomas (1681), 3:55 Holworthy Hall (Harvard), 12:13; 15:32; 20:53; 22:102; 25:37; 27:13, 24; 30:12; 33:8; 35:39, 46, 113, 120
– building of (1912 paper on), 7:63-69
– lottery financing, 3:55; 7:65
– naming of, 3:55; 7:66, 68
– Prof. Sophocles as resident in, 12:30, 31, 35, 36; 26:17; 42:121 Holworthy Street, 23:76. See also Kirkland Street Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables, see Hospitals Holyoke, Rev. Edward (1689-1769; Harvard president 1737-69), 1:57; 3:16; 4:21; 6:24; 9:42; 10:43; 27:38; 35:24
– biography of, 24:6
– diary of, 11:60-61, 70; 16:130; 17:53
– as Harvard Librarian (1709-12), 11:70
– street named for, see Holyoke (formerly Crooked) Street Holyoke, Mrs. Edward (Margaret Appleton, second wife), 3:16; 21:96 Holyoke, Dr. Edward Augustus (1728-1829), 16:130
– diary of, while Harvard student (1746), 11:73 Holyoke, John (1734-1753): diary of, while Harvard student (1748), 11:73 Holyoke, Mrs. Mary (Loyalist, of Salem, 1770s), 10:49 Holyoke Center, 39:106; 41:53; 44:64, 78 Holyoke house, see Cooke-Holyoke house Holyoke House (Harvard; built 1874), 15:20; 18:24; 30:23; 41:53 Holyoke Place, 1:57; 6:24; 9:32n1; 12:33; 30:74; 34:69; 43:142 Holyoke (formerly Crooked) Street, 3:51; 8:33; 11:30n1, 32n; 14:47; 20:110; 22:97; 26:59; 41:53, 146
– as boundary, 44:58
– “Daye Press” on, 38:93; 44:64 (see also “Daye Press”)
– First (Congregational) Church built on corner of, see Meetinghouse sites
– first grammar school on, 1:57; 2:14; 3:13, 16; 21:87; 35:91 (see also School[s])
– Holyoke house on, see Cooke-Holyoke house
– laid out, 32:108
– connecting streets laid out, 14:59, 66
– naming of, 8:30; 14:34, 62, 65; 32:27; 33:151
– prison on, 24:71n7
– shops and businesses on (1800s), 1:22; 8:34, 37-38, 39, 40; 15:19-20, 21, 22, 35; 30:27; 41:93; 44:71, 78 Homans, Prof, and Mrs. George C. (Francis Ave. residents, 1960s), 41:28 Homberg family, 42:57 Home for the Aged, see Elderly, care of Home Guard, see Militia Home Protection League (1880s), 13:9, 10 Homer, Elizabeth, see Wellington, Mrs. Jeduthan (second wife) Homer, Miss Eugenia (of Roxbury; b. 1853; educational pioneer), 36:35 Homer, Rev. Jonathan (at Newton; d. 1843), 16:98 Homer, Levi Parsons (music instructor, 1850s), 32:82; 41:96 Homer, Winslow (1836-1910; painter), 27:14; 34:91 Homer house, 31:56 Homes, see Holmes Honeywell, see Hunnewell Hood, Adm. (later Viscount) Samuel (1724-1816), 19:58-59, 62 Hood, Thomas (1799-1845; British poet), 28:76 Hooke, Robert G. (Harvard alumnus, 1946), 33:34n49 Hooke, William (1648; of Taunton), 32:109 Hooker, Anson (b. 1799), 7:81 Hooker, Dr. Anson Parker (b. 1829), 7:81; 20:103, 108 Hooker, Dorothy, see Chester, Mrs. John Hooker, Joanna, see Shepard, Mrs. Thomas (second wife) Hooker, John (mid-1600s; son of Rev. Thomas), 22:81 Hooker, Mary (daughter of Rev. Thomas), 22:81 Hooker, Rev. Samuel (1635-1697; son of Rev. Thomas), 22:81 Hooker, Samuel (b. c. 1640; grandson of Rev. Thomas), 22:83 Hooker, Sarah (daughter of Rev. Thomas), 22:81 Hooker, Rev. Thomas (c. 1586-1647), 6:20; 32:62-63; 42:102, 104, 106; 43:113, 124
– arrival and installation of, 7:74; 10:91, 97-98; 17:97; 44:41, 42, 47-51, 52, 58
– and Braintree Company, 10:90-91, 95, 102-3; 21:79; 32:61
– – – leaves “Newtown(e)” for Hartford (1636), 6:22; 9:71; 10:100-101, 104-5, 110, 114; 15:25; 21:29, 36; 22:81-82, 83; 23:93; 29:69; 30:37; 31:54, 61-62; 32:66; 40:81; 42:80, 103; 43:114; 44:45, 48-56 passim, 61
– – – members of, 1:35, 61; 6:34; 10:102-3; 14:81, 87; 21:44; 31:7; 32:63-64; 43:113
– – – seeks permission for move, 32:63; 40:60, 80-81, 82; 44:53, 56
– Church Discipline, 44:51
– vs. Cotton, see Cotton, Rev. John
– daughters of, 3:10; 22:81; 32:66, 113; 44:45
– English background of, 10:90-96; 14:84-87, 89-91; 22:80-81; 32:61; 40:73; 42:98, 99; 48:50-51
– house built for (1633), see Wigglesworth house
– landholdings of (1630s), 10:99; 22:63, 65, 76 (and Map 1)
– – – Brookline land grant offered to, 44:57
– “Lydia’s conversion” issue and, 40:60, 72-76, 80-82
– Mather biography of, 2:13; 40:72
– notebook of, 22:16
– Tercentenary celebration honoring (1933), 23:96 Hooker, Mrs. Thomas (Susannah), 10:93; 22:80-81; 31:54, 61 Hooker, Sir William Jackson (1785-1865; English botanist), 38:77, 86 Hooker house site, see Boylston Hall; Wiggles-worth house “Hooker’s [Braintree] Company,” see Hooker, Rev. Thomas Hooper, Alice (mid-1800s), 35:39, 40, 41, 49[?] Hooper, Anna (mid-1800s; later Mrs. Lothrop), 35:39 Hooper, Caroline King, see Wyman, Mrs. Edward Hooper, Capt. Edward William (1839-1901; Harvard Treasurer), 35:39, 62; 39:47; 43:13
– house and estate of, 43:13-16, 21-24, 26, 27, 30 Hooper, Mrs. Edward William (Fanny Hudson Chapin), 43:13, 15 Hooper, Elizabeth, see Hooper, Mrs. Richard Hooper, Ellen, see Gurney, Mrs. Ephraim W. Hooper, Ellen Sturgis (niece of above), see Potter, Mrs. John B. Hooper, Fanny (Susan), see Curtis, Mrs. Greely Hooper, Dr. Henry (in practice, 1722), 16:18, 24; 37:20, 66, 71, 73 Hooper, Henry Northey (b. 1799; of “Kettle Cove” [Manchester]), 13:125 Hooper, Mrs. Henry Northey (Priscilla Langdon [Harris]), 13:125 Hooper, Mrs. James R. (of Boston, 1940s), 29:51n69 Hooper, Louisa Chapin, see Thoron, Mrs. Ward Hooper, Louise (Mrs. William), see Stoughton, Louise Hooper, Mabel (“Polly”), see La Farge, Mrs. Bancel Hooper, Marian (“Clover”), see Adams, Mrs. Henry Hooper, Mary (“Molly”), see Warner, Mrs. Roger Hooper, Dr. Richard (d. 1690; father of Dr. Henry), 16:18, 24; 24:64; 37:65, 70 Hooper, Mrs. Richard (Elizabeth; inn keeper after 1693), 16:18; 37:66 Hooper, Robert C. (art collector, 1830s), 29:51n69 Hooper, Dr. Robert William (1810-1885), 35:39; 43:13 Hooper, Mrs. Robert William (Ellen Sturges), 35:39, 46 Hooper, Susan, see Curtis, Mrs. Greely Hooper, William (of Boston, mid-1800s), 24:100 Hooper, Mrs. William, see Stoughton, Louise Hooper, Mr. (Roxbury school of, c. 1870), 36:35. See also School(s) Hooper house (Reservoir St., built 1872), see Hooper, Capt. Edward William Hooper-Lee-Nichols house (built c. 1660; 159 Brattle St.), 1:59; 22:70, 100; 25:121; 43:38
– architecture of, 16:18, 21-23, 24; 33:62; 37:67; 43:39, 40, 50
– – – church railing placed on roof (1860), 16:20; 37:69; 43:39
– as CHS headquarters, 25:68; 37:115-17, 126; 42:81; 43:91; 44:29n1
– – – restoration of, 37:127-30; 39:50-54; 43:89; 44:36-38
– as “Emerson house,” 22:71; 24:21; 26:50; 33:62; 37:69-71, 115; 39:50-54; 44:29-31
– on exhibition (1930), 27:99
– fire in (18th c.), 37:129
– in Historic District, 39:74; 42:34, 41
– as home of John Holmes (before 1685), 16:18; 24:64; 37:65, 70
– Hooper family in, 16:18, 24; 37:20, 65-66, 70, 71
– Lee (Joseph) purchases, owns, enlarges, 6:19; 9:10; 16:19, 32; 17:55, 56, 58; 26:50, 57-58, 60; 37:20-22, 67; 42:81; 43:39; 44:38n5
– – – during Revolution, 13:44, 50; 37:68
– (see also Lee, Judge Joseph)
– “Life in: The Emerson and Dow Years” (1976 paper), 44:29-38
– model of, 26:58
– Nichols/White family comes to, 16:19-20; 37:69-72; 44:29n1, 80n30
– as “oldest” in Cambridge, 16:18, 21; 24:64; 37:69; 43:38 (see also Houses, meetinghouses, etc.)
– papers on, 16:18-20, 21-25; 37:65-74; 44:29-38, 193
– photograph of, 43:31 (illus. #1 following)
– Resident Fellow at (1976-81), 44:62
– trees in front of, 33:98
– Waldo owns, 16:18; 37:21, 66, 70
– wallpaper in, 16:22; 21:56; 37:69, 71-72, 128-29; 39:48-49 (illus. between), 50-54; 44:36-37
– White family in, see Nichols/White family comes to, above Hoosac Tunnel, see Tunnel(s) Hooton [Howton], Elizabeth (Quaker, mid-1600s): persecution of, 24:69-74, 75-81 passim Hooton, Elizabeth (daughter of above), 24:69-73 passim, 74n14 Hooton, Oliver (1637-1687), 24:74n14 Hooton, Samuel (Quaker; m. 1670), 24:74n14, 81-82 Hooton, Mrs. (Sparks St. resident, 1960s), 41:163 Hoover, Herbert (1874-1964; U.S. president 1928-32), 36:120 Hope, John (King’s Botanist, Edinburgh, 1761-86), 43:137 Hope, Thomas and Adrian (Amsterdam merchants, c. 1750), 39:146n6, 153n20 Hope (ship), 42:102 Hope Church property, 20:78 Hope Furnace (Rhode Island), 6:7 Hopkins, Daniel (Council member, 1770s), 13:39n3 Hopkins, Gov. Edward (1600-1657; benefactor of education), 35:94 Hopkins, James C., Jr. (architect, 1960s), 39:75; 42:33 Hopkins, John (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:l02; 14:91; 22:76 (Map 1) Hopkins, Rev. Samuel (1721-1803): and Hopkinsian divinity, 29:70 Hopkins Atlas, see Maps and plans Hopkins Fund and Hopkins Classical School, see School(s) Hopkins Grammar School (New Haven), 35:92 Hopkinson, Charles S.: recalls (1960s) high tides of earlier years, 39:24n4 Hopkinson, Christina, see Baker, Mrs. George Pierce Hopkinson, Elinor (Dramatic Club, 1940s), 38:63 Hopkinson, Frances, see Eliot, Mrs. (Rev.) Samuel Atkins Hopkinson, Frank (Harvard 1859), 3:34 Hopkinson, Grace Mellen, see Eliot, Mrs. Charles William (second wife) Hopkinson, John P. (Boston schoolmaster, mid-1800s), 21:68; 26:33; 43:21
– in Dramatic Club, 38:52, 53, 55
– school of, see School(s) Hopkinson, Mrs. John P., 21:68 Hopkinson, Judge and Mrs. (parents of Grace M.), 32:38 Hopkinton, Massachusetts, 10:44n2; 30:62; 43:169 Hopper, Professor (c. 1920), 27:32 Hoppin, Miss Eliza M. (daughter of Rev. Nicholas Hoppin): quoted on Berkeley St. School, 32:34-35, 36-37, 39 Hoppin, Lily (“Bee” member, 1870s), 17:74, 77, 80 Hoppin, Rev. Nicholas (of Christ Church, 1839-74), 9:66; 13:110; 15:34; 20:99; 23:56, 59; 32:34
– ms. notes by, in Christ Church papers, 10:35n3, 62n6, 74n3
– resignation of, 37:98-99 Hoppin, Mrs. Nicholas, 32:14 Horder, Rev. W. Garrett (English hymnologist, c. 1900), 36:64 Horn Pond (Woburn), Horn Pond Tavern, Horn Pond Raids (1844), 40:47 Hornberger, Theodore (writer, 1945), 38:72 Horner, Matina Souretis (Radcliffe president), 44:154 (and illus. #15 preceding), 156 Horr, see also Hoar Horr, Rev. George E. (1856-1927), 36:70 Horse cars, see Street railway(s) Horses (cavalry), 5:31; 30:61, 65
– Light Horse (1820s, 1850s), 20:127; 23:85 Horses (as transportation), 10:12; 30:60; 36:113; 38:114; 41:8; 42:16, 17
– automobiles replacing (c. 1915), 32:100
– “booby-hut” drawn by, 3:105; 21:111; 30:15; 41:166
– canal boats drawn by, 40:45, 46-47, 48, 50, 54
– care of (charges for, 1791), 10:72
– danger of “furious driving” of, 36:107; 39:83
– disease epidemic among, 34:63; 39:86
– “easing” (passengers walk up hills), 11:12
– ferries and, 7:54, 55
– fire engines (“steamers”) drawn by, 36:81, 83, 84, 111; 44:10-11 (see also Fire[s])
– and first horse bridge in the country (1648), 7:54
– and freight, 30:25, 26-27; 39:115; 40:33; 43:26
– and “hacks,” 30:15; 35:17
– and harness-makers, see and saddlers/harness-makers, below
– hay and grain for, see Agriculture and horticulture
– hitching posts for (at Mount Auburn Cemetery), 34:90; 44:192 (and illus. #2 following)
– and horse block at meetinghouse, 17:92
– and horse cars, see Street railway(s)
– and horse-drawn railway, see Railroad(s)
– intelligence of, 1:19; 39:85
– movers’ use of, 40:118
– prevalence of, 30:25
– and private carriages or sleighs, 1:19; 3:104, 105; 22:49, 54; 26:71; 28:31; 30:25; 34:39, 60; 44:163, 165
– – – breakdown of, 11:37
– – – carriage houses, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– – – children running beside, 24:28
– – – coachmen or stablemen for, see Servants/”hired help”
– – – horse cars vs., 34:59; 39:90-91
– – – James family, 21:111, 112; 23:50
– – – rarity of, 18:37n1, 41; 20:98; 24:27; 25:131; 35:17
– – – Vassall “chariot,” “chace,” etc., 10:12, 26, 32, 33, 56; 26:55
– – – Dr. Wyman’s horse and buggy, 12:25; 39:49
– riding, 11:38; 30:82-83; 32:109
– runaway, 44:131
– and saddlebags, story of lost, 2:23
– and saddlers/harness-makers, 8:33; 16:42; 20:112; 25:132; 40:86
– sale of (to President Eliot), 31:20-21
– Shetland pony (Dana, ridden into house), 26:104; 33:13-14
– six- or eight-horse teams, 4:25; 23:54; 35:80; 37:33
– and sleighing, 3:105; 21:89; 37:36; 39:91
– – – omnibus on runners, 39:79
– – – “punging,” 42:129; 43:12
– – – in Russia, 24:106-7
– – – sleigh overturns, 18:28
– – – weather and, 9:14; 24:30-31; 42:115
– (see also Sports and games)
– and snow removal, 25:133; 32:103; 39:91
– speed of, 24:31, 34 (see also Street railway[s])
– stables for, 18:37n1; 28:31; 33:22, 25; 34:60; 38:50; 41:161; 42:45; 44:139
– – – architecture of, 43:10, 159, 166
– – – horse cars, 8:31; 20:55; 30:23, 25; 32:103; 39:78, 106
– – – livery stables, 15:33; 30:15-16; 39:10; 41:150, 167; 42:130
– – – military hospital in, 14:43
– – – omnibus (moved, made into four houses), 20:94
– – – Vassall/Vassall house, 10:12n1; 21:111
– and stagecoach travel, see Travel/transportation
– and teamsters, 23:52; 29:25; 35:80; 37:33
– transported (from England) by ship, 38:92
– treadmill operated by, 42:71; 44:22
– treatment of, 4:33
– water for, see Water supply Horse-racing, see Sports and games “Horseshoe House” (Nantucket), see Coffin, Jethro Horsewhipping, see Corporal punishment Horsefield, [Moravian Sister] Sally, 27:74n79 Horsford, Cornelia (b. c. 1860), 9:62; 12:7; 18:33; 40:101 Horsford, Prof. Eben Norton (1818-1893; chemist), 18:28-31 passim, 38, 39; 21:123; 22:47; 23:32
– archaeological views of, 3:50, 56n1; 13:6n1; 22:97; 32:99; 40:96-97, 99-109; 43:85
– and Cambridge Book Club, 28:115, 116, 117
– as chemist, 4:81-82; 40:96, 98-99
– house of, see Guyot-Horsford house Horsford, Mrs. Eben Norton (Mary L’Hommedieu Gardiner, first wife), 18:18, 31, 39; 28:117; 40:100
– given as “daughter of Rev. H. F. Harrington,” 34:35 Horsford, Mrs. Eben Norton (Phoebe Dayton Gardiner, second wife), 40:100 Horsford, Gertrude Hubbard (b. c. 1852), 38:52; 40:100 Horsford, Jedediah (of New York; missionary, c. 1815), 40:97 Horsford, Mrs. Jedediah (Charit/ Maria Norton), 40:98 Horsford, Katharine, see Horsford, Miss Mary Katharine Horsford, Lillian, see Farlow, Mrs. William G. Horsford, Miss Mary Gardiner (b. c. 1854), 40:100 Horsford, Miss Mary Katharine (“Kate”; b. c. 1850), 9:62; 12:7; 18:28; 38:52, 53, 56; 40:100; 43:169 Horsford house, see Guyot-Horsford house Horticulture, see Agriculture and horticulture; Botany Horton, Dean [Rev.] Douglas (Francis Ave. resident, 1955-59), 41:31 Horton, Mrs. Douglas (Mildred McAfee), 41:31 Horton, Edwin Johnson (Harvard 1860), 25:137 Horton, Mrs. Edwin Johnson (Elizabeth [“Lizzie”] Spelman Howe; b. 1839), 24:48; 25:127, 128, 137; 34:62 Horton, Elizabeth Howe (b. 1839), see Horton, Mrs. Edwin Johnson Horton, Elizabeth Spelman (b. c. 1865), 25:137 Hosack, Dr. David (1769-1835; botanist), 43:133-34, 137 Hosmer, Dr. Alfred (of Watertown, 1870s), 7:87; 20:109 Hosmer, Rev. Frederick L. (1840-1929), 36:64 Hosmer, Harriet G. (1830-1908; sculptor), 34:91 Hosmer, Prof. James H.: quoted on Agassiz, 35:36 Hosmer, Joseph (on General Court committees, 1777, 1779), 13:20; 16:76 Hosmer, Thomas (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102, 103; 14:100-101; 22:76 (Map 1), 77 Hospitality, see Domestic and family life; Taverns, inns, hotels, boardinghouses; Society (people) Hospitals
– Cambridge, see Cambridge (Mount Auburn) Hospital
– Holy Ghost, for Incurables, 6:32; 11:56; 37:95
– Massachusetts General, 6:32; 7:81; 16:121; 33:53; 36:19; 39:40; 41:63; 43:134, 140
– – – Dr. Holmes appointed to, 4:47; 16:122
– Murphy General, 35:22
– Rainsford Island, 7:80
– Revolutionary, 16:8, 128; 17:100; 37:25 (see also Vassall houses and land [Henry Vassall])
– See also Medicine, practice of Hotels, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Hough, see Haugh; How; Howe; Howes Houghton, Albert (brother of Henry O.; with publishing firm until 1878), 19:19, 21, 29 Houghton, Alberta Manning (CHS member; d. 1931), 15:7; 33:55; 38:55, 61
– as descendant of early settlers, 5:52 Houghton, Amory (founds Union Glass Co., 1851), 36:102 Houghton, Amory (chairman of Corning Glass, 1950s), 36:102 Houghton, Edward R. (publisher, c. 1900), 19:29; 21:69 Houghton, Miss Elizabeth Harris (1858-1915), 33:55; 35:21
– obituary, 11:86-87 Houghton, Henry Oscar (1823-1895), 11:86; 12:67; 15:21; 19:15-29; 33:54; 44:81 Houghton, Mrs. Henry Oscar (Nancy Wyer Manning), 11:86; 12:67; 17:84; 35:95 Houghton, Henry Oscar, Jr. (“Harry”; 1856-1917), 19:28, 29
– obituary, 12:67-68 Houghton, Mrs. Henry Oscar, Jr. (Rose Rysse Gilman), 12:67 Houghton, John (Lancaster settler, 1635), 11:86 Houghton, Justine, see Kershaw, Mrs. Francis S. Houghton, Oscar (publisher; d. c. 1905), 19:30 Houghton, Rosamond, see Dudley, Mrs. William Perry Houghton, Stella, see Scott, Mrs. David Houghton, Virginia (b. 1898; daughter of Henry O.), 12:68 Houghton, William (of Vermont, c. 1800), 12:67 Houghton, Mrs. William (Marilla Clay), 12:67 Houghton, Mr. (Divinity Ave. resident, c. 1900), 1:14 Houghton, H. O., and Company, 19:16; 43:148; 44:84. See also Publishers Houghton estate (1925), 18:46. See also Garden Street houses (No. 58) Houghton house (Massachusetts Ave.), 38:125, 126, 128. See also Whitman-Houghton house Houghton Library, 27:40; 30:42, 66; 33:35; 38:82, 93; 44:71n17, 123, 136
– Higginson Collection at, 37:75n, 86
– See also Harvard Library; Library(ies) Houghton Mifflin Company, 5:110; 12:67; 15:21; 19:15, 19, 22-25 passim, 30; 33:54
– history of (published 1970), 44:69n8, 81
– See also Publishers Houghton Osgood & Company, 19:22 Houghton School, 22:76. See also School(s) “Hourly,” the, see Omnibuses House, see also Howes House, Samuel (landowner, 1642), 14:101 Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– apartment houses, 18:33, 35; 25:128; 28:106; 30:13, 21; 31:29, 57; 32:7; 33:46, 47, 53, 54; 36:9, 113; 37:34; 38:118; 41:34, 137; 43:38; 44:71, 115
– – – “brick block” (Quincy St., built 1880s), 22:48-52 passim
– – – Memorial Drive, 37:13; 42:62
– – – proposed (1959), 39:36
– (see also housing projects; “tenements,” below)
– balconies on, 26:40 (illus. #6 following), 41
– “balloon framing” of, 43:47
– barn(s), 26:56, 59, 73; 43:12, 14; 44:167
– – – barn framing, 43:47
– – – remodeled to house, 43:15, 27
– – – Sparks house, 44:136
– bathtubs/bathrooms in, see Domestic and family life
– beams in, see oak beams in, below
– brick, brick floors, brick ovens in, see floors of; wall construction, below; Brick and brickmaking
– brownstone, 17:67 (see also stone, below)
– building and construction of, see Business and industry
– building and repair costs, see Expenses carriage houses, 3:105; 16:33; 21:111-12; 22:54; 44:163-64, 166, 167, 168 (and illus. #2 following)
– chimneys of, 23:79; 28:30; 31:33; 43:50
– – – central, 16:18, 21; 20:111; 21:78, 112; 33:40; 37:71
– – – and chimney fires, 36:76-77
– – – and chimney sweeps, see Business and industry
– – – laid with oyster shells or clay, see mortar used in, below
– – – wooden, 36:76
– (see also Fire[s]; Heating)
– dating of, by mortar, 16:21 (see also mortar used in, below)
– fireplaces in, 16:23; 20:119; 27:67; 41:162, 165; 42:29
– – – Allston’s studio, 29:37, 40
– – – with coal grates, 16:50; 22:102; 23:26; 25:134; 29:40; 34:39; 41:129
– – – Elmwood, 33:92
– – – Harvard buildings, 22:102; 34:39; 41:129
– – – Hooper-Lee-Nichols house, 37:67, 72-73, 128
– – – iron firebacks in, 25:87
– – – kitchen, 23:79; 25:125; 36:75
– – – tiled, 3:103, 9:6; 25:88-89
– floors of, 21:54-55
– – – brick, 21:113; 37:73
– – – earth and wood-paved, 10:12; 21:113
– – – sand as covering for, 21:54
– – – stenciled, 21:55
– – – variation in level of, 16:22
– “haunted,” see Domestic and family life (and superstitions)
– heating of, see fireplaces in, above; Heating
– historic, report on showing (1929-30), 27:98-101
– historic preservation of, see Historic preservation
– and housing projects, 32:99; 42:57, 62, 64, 65, 66; 43:94
– – – Garden St., 33:55; 35:28; 38:119
– – – Shady Hill and Holden Green, 41:23, 25, 34, 37
– “Identifying the 17th-century House” (1961 paper mentioned, not quoted), 39:167
– ironwork details on, 44:166 (see also balconies on, above)
– kitchens in, see fireplaces in, above; Food (cooking/kitchens)
– lighting of, see Lights and lighting
– locks for, 37:71
– mortar used in, 6:19; 10:12; 16:21; 21:78; 37:71
– moved/moving of, 1:19; 8:35, 38; 13:86; 16:48; 41:38; 43:15, 62, 168, 171
– – – Allston’s studio, 29:36n6
– – – Baptist Church, see Baptist Church (Old Cambridge)
– – – barn, carriage house, omnibus stable, 16:33; 20:94; 43:27
– – – Bates, 30:15, 20
– – – Brewster museum, 22:51
– – – Cambridge Boat Club, see Club(s)
– – – Coolidge Hill, 32:99, 100-101, 103
– – – Dana-Palmer, see Dana houses (#10)
– – – Fenn, 18:44; 33:25; 44:20-22 (see also Quincy Street)
– – – Fresh Pond Hotel, 2:36; 28:31; 37:34
– – – Gray (Asa), see Gray, Dr. (Prof.) Asa
– – – Gray (J. C.; “Larches”), 14:104; 41:165; 43:44
– – – Greenleaf, 31:33-34
– – – Hicks, 20:123; 27:99; 41:30
– – – Historical Commission and, 42:43-44 (see also Historic preservation)
– – – Holmes Chapel, 38:120
– – – Inman, see Inman house
– – – Kirkland St., 18:30; 23:80, 82, 90-93 passim; 25:22n2; 28:105; 42:45; 44:21
– – – Langdell, 23:25, 44, 46
– – – Lechmere, see Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house
– – – meetinghouse (1754), 24:51
– – – Old Court House, 3:52; 8:36; 39:62
– – – Peirce, see Peirce, Prof. Benjamin O.
– – – Quincy St., see Quincy Street
– – – Runkle, 15:6; 33:44; 43:170
– – – schoolhouses, 13:90; 30:75; 44:147
– – – Shaler, see Fenn, above
– – – Sparks, see Quincy Street
– – – Stearns (“Foxcroft”; for New Lecture Hall), 1:15; 25:22n2; 41:20, 33
– – – Winthrop (to Boston, 1630s), 14:82; 30:35
– number of houses (in 1793), 39:110 (see also Population; Population statistics)
– oak beams in, 16:21; 25:88; 37:69
– Old New England Houses, Details from (Howe and Fuller), 43:158, 171
– “oldest” house in Cambridge:
– – – Cooper-Austin (built 1657), 7:77; 14:97; 20:127; 22:98; 27:99; 38:111
– – – Hooper-Lee-Nichols (built c. 1660), 16:18, 21; 24:64; 37:69; 43:38
– ornamentation of, 16:23; 21:50-57 (and illus.), 97; 26:45; 27:58; 39:50; 43:26, 41, 44-49 passim, 160
– – – carving, 23:22; 33:60
– – – frescoes, 21:56; 33:60
– (see also ironwork details on, above; paint used on or in; wallpaper used in, below)
– oyster shells used in mortar, see mortar used in, above
– paint used on or in, 20:102; 21:54, 55-57, 108; 23:22; 26:47
– painted decoration of, see ornamentation of, above
– paneling or wainscoting of, 3:15; 10:14; 16:34; 20:111-12, 124; 21:115, 116; 22:31, 60; 32:101; 37:71; 38:14; 43:24
– – – criticized as “luxury,” 6:21; 15:26; 22:60; 30:36; 44:42, 45
– – – ornamented, 21:55-56 (and illus. following )
– (see also woodwork in, below)
– porches of, 44:165, 166-67
– porte-cochère, 44:166
– preservation of, see Historic preservation
– price of (Hilliard, 1829), 44:71n11
– rate of building, street railway and, 39:116
– rent for, see Expenses
– roofs of:
– – – gambrel, hip, mansard, see Architecture, styles of
– – – rope molding used on, 44:164
– – – thatched, prohibited (1631), 36:77
– shingled, 26:48 (see also Architecture, styles of)
– slave quarters, 10:63, 69; 26:53-60 passim; 33:60
– staircase(s) in, 10:13; 16:22; 18:33; 20:111; 21; 115-18 passim; 23:92; 25:125; 34:61; 43:40, 105, 155; 44:136
– – – hidden, of House of Seven Gables, 6:17
– – – and newel post, 28:31
– stone, 33:49, 66; 35:86; 39:111, 117
– – – brownstone, 17:67
– – – wood resembling, see wooden, below
– stucco, 43:160
– summer cottages, 43:159-60, 166-70 passim
– summerhouses, 21:110; 31:28, 40; 32:97; 33:60, 142; 41:161
– – – Vassall/Craigie, 11:49; 14:49; 18:42n1, 49n1; 25:20 (and illus. facing); 26:53, 54; 27:89-90; 31:56; 33:19, 55
– “tenements,” 10:69; 16:79, 92; 20:133; 28:30, 31; 31:44; 37:32
– “tentes” and “huts” in early settlement, 8:17; 30:34
– towers on, 26:41; 43:51; 44:165, 165, 168 (illus. #3, #5, #6, #10 following)
– underground passages between, 10:14; 13:65; 43:15, 16
– vestibules of, 43:39-40
– wainscoting of, see paneling or wainscoting of, above
– wall construction, 10:13
– – – lined with brick, 33:61n16
– wallpaper used in, 20:111, 121-23; 37:74
– – – landscape, see Hooper-Lee-Nichols house
– – – “nursery tiles,” 42:28
– – – ornamentation resembling, 21:54-56 (and illus. following); 39:50
– windows, 16:22; 20:102; 21:116; 25:30; 28:31; 43:47, 49, 50; 44:165
– – – curved bay, 3:109; 21:114; 22:53; 25:30, 129; 26:40 (illus. #6 following), 41, 47; 43:50; 44:165
– – – dormer, 43:49; 44:164, 168 (illus. #1-#10 passim following)
– – – fanlights, 21:116; 43:49; 44:136
– – – fastenings for, 3:109
– – – glass (1600s), 3:15; 38:14, 15
– – – purple, 25:30
– (see also Glass; Lights and lighting)
– wooden, 6:16; 23:19; 26:47; 43:48, 51
– – – Court Houses, 39:58, 65
– – – factory buildings, 40:35
– – – Harvard buildings, 29:20, 23; 33:8
– – – resembling stone, 26:39, 42, 44; 33:61-62, 92; 43:42
– – – town house, 39:113
– woodwork in, 10:13
– – – painted, 21:54-55 (and illus.)
– (see also paneling or wainscoting of, above)
– zoning ordinances and, see Law(s)
– See also Architecture; Architecture, styles of; Furniture; Meetinghouse sites; entries for individual street names Houston, David F. (1866-1940; businessman), 12:40 Hovey, Charles M. (1810-1887; horticulturist), 38:83
– and Hovey’s Nursery, 34:69; 38:83 Hovey, Charles M. (Boston merchant; witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:77, 80 Hovey, John: Vassall lawsuit against (1740), 16:74 Hovey, Sarah (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:66 Hovey’s (drygoods) store (Boston), 41:80 Hovey’s Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses How, see also Haugh; Howe; Howes How, Anne, see Stone, Mrs. John How, Elder Edward (of Watertown, 1630s), 7:75 How, Tabitha (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65. See also Howes, Miss Tabitha; Howes, Mrs. William (Tabitha) Howard, Arthur L. (Dramatic Club, 1920s), 38:63; 43:11 Howard, Mrs. Arthur L., 43:11 Howard, Caroline, see Gilman, Mrs. Samuel Howard, Charles S. (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:57, 63; 43:11 Howard, Cordelia (child actress, 1860s), 32:34 Howard, Dorothy (daughter of Arthur L.), 43:11 Howard, Miss Emily (of Peterboro, N.H., c. 1910[?]), 43:169 Howard, George (theatrical producer, 1860s), 32:34 Howard, Grace (worker with Indians, c. 1900), 17:86 Howard, Jack (Dramatic Club, 1930s), 38:59; 43:11 Howard, John (friend of Horatio Greenough, 1830s), 23:82 Howard, Miss Mary (nearly 100 years old in 1880s, 34:66 Howard, Samuel (“Indian” in Boston Tea Party, 1773), 13:86 Howard, Mrs. Samuel, 13:86 Howard, Stephen (bridge incorporator, c. 1800), 16:88 Howard, Thomas (philanthropist, 1770s), 4:23 Howard, Prof. William G. (c. 1900), 35:121 Howard, Dr. (Foster brothers live with, 1809), 9:30 Howard, Misses (name “Sweet Auburn Woods”), 13:86 Howard, Mayor (of Salem, c. 1910), 6:58 Howard Athenaeum, later Howard Theatre (Boston), 41:58, 74 Howard Benevolent Society, see Charity Howard Street (Boston), 41:58, 74 Howard’s Flower Shop (1911), 41:143 Howard’s Tavern (Middlesex Village), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Howe, see also Haugh; How; Howes Howe, Amasa (brother [?] of Elias), 14:133 Howe, Archibald Murray (1848-1916; reformer), 3:93; 33:42, 54; 41:41
– Crothers paper on (1917), 12:23-24
– papers by:
– – – “A Letter from Thomas Hollis” (1914), 9:35-46
– – – “The State Arsenal and the Identification of the Cannon on the Cambridge Common” (1911), 6:5-15; 20:99
– and political reform, 20:34, 40, 44, 45, 46
– reads Phillips letters and Quincy journal at 1909 CHS meeting, 4:86, 90 Howe, Mrs. Archibald Murray (Arria Sargent Dixwell; d. 1939), 12:23; 30:11; 33:54 Howe, Clara (1851-1923), 28:106; 31:8; 38:52, 53; 43:154
– as child/schoolgirl, 18:41; 24:48; 25:128, 129, 137; 32:36; 34:66
– school of, 31:54; 32:42-43; 33:41 Howe, Elias, Sr., 14:129, 135 Howe, Elias, Jr. (1819-1867; inventor), 35:83
– birthplace of, 14:124 (illus. following)
– “Inventor of the Sewing Machine” (1919 paper about), 14:122-39
– portrait of, 9:61; 14:139n1 Howe, Mrs. Elias, Jr. (first wife), 14:126, 127, 133, 134 Howe, Mrs. Elias, Jr. (second wife), 14:137 Howe, Elizabeth, see Folsom, Mrs. Norton Howe, Elizabeth Spelman, see Horton, Mrs. Edwin Johnson Howe, Dr. Estes (of Belchertown; d. late 1700s), 25:122, 126 Howe, Mrs. Estes (Susanna Dwight; d. 1785), 25:122 Howe, Dr. Estes (1814-1887; physician to c. 1852, then businessman), 6:10; 24:28; 25:136; 30:13, 21, 22; 32:10; 33:80; 34:60-74 passim; 40:28-29; 42:7-8
– and Cambridge Book Club, 28:115, 117
– and Harvard Branch Railroad, 25:131; 38:26-30 passim, 34, 35, 39, 40, 47-48; 39:81
– house of, see Oxford Street (“No. 1”)
– life of (1939 paper on), 25:122-41; 38:29n10; 42:7; 43:153n1, 165
– marriages of, 24:34, 48; 25:36, 95, 126; 32:7
– portrait of, 12:9
– in Saturday Club, 25:135-36; 43:154
– and street railway, 39:81 Howe, Mrs. Estes (Harriet Maria Spelman, first wife, c. 1814-1843), 25:125, 126-27
– letters from, 24:28-30, 32-34 Howe, Mrs. Estes (Lois Lilley White, second wife), 24:48; 25:134, 135, 136; 32:22; 34:60-68 passim, 74; 40:29; 43:155, 158
– family of, 13:86; 25:128, 137; 32:7; 33:80; 34:71; 38:29; 43:154 Howe, Lord George Augustus (d. 1758), 5:56 Howe, Mrs. George Wright (Rosamond Coolidge), 39:72, 74; 42:33; 44:71n11
– papers by:
– – – “The First Cambridge Historical Commission” (1961/64 paper), 39:71-77; 42:31-32, 35
– – – “The History of Coolidge Hill” (1948), 32:96-103; 43:7n1 Howe, James Murray (1819-1879; of Northampton), 12:23; 25:123, 140; 33:42 Howe, Mrs. James Murray (Harrietta Butler [Clarke]), 12:23; 33:42 Howe, James Murray, Jr. (b. c. 1850), 33:42; 43:169 Howe, Mrs. James Murray, Jr., 43:169 Howe, James Robbins (“Robb”; 1860-1883), 25:137, 140; 34:62, 63, 73, 74 Howe, John (British spy, 1775): diary quoted, 11:65 Howe, Julia Ward (Mrs. Samuel Gridley Howe, 1819-1910), 2:42; 4:44; 7:20, 27, 32; 21:123; 23:46; 28:77, 78; 34:91; 40:144
– quoted, 29:45, 47 Howe, Miss Katharine (at “Junior Committee” party, 1906), 44:116 Howe, Katherine C., see Wheeler, Mrs. Henry Nathan Howe, Miss Katherine McPherson (Plant Club member, 1889), 35:18 Howe, Miss Lois Lilley (1864-1964; architect), 25:113, 137; 27:98, 101; 30:21; 31:7; 39:39; 40:28-29; 41:32, 166
– as architect, 34:75, 76; 43:21, 153-72
– papers by or read by, 43:165, 172
– – – “Autobiography of Edward Sherman Dodge” (1944), 30:72-91
– – – “Bremer Whidden Pond” (minute on death of, 1959), 38:131
– – – “The Cambridge Plant Club” (1953), 35:17-33
– – – “Cambridge Trees” (1950), 33:94-99
– – – “Dr. Estes Howe: A Citizen of Cambridge” (1939), 25:122-41; 38:29n10; 42:7; 43:153n1
– – – “55 Garden Street” (1939), 25:95-96
– – – “Harvard Square in the ‘Seventies and ‘Eighties” (1944), 30:11-27
– – – “The History of Garden Street” (1949), 33:37-57; 43:7n1
– – – “How Cambridge People Used to Travel” (1936), 24:27-48
– – – Introduction to “Centenary of the Cambridge Book Club” (1942), 28:105-8
– – – “Maria Denny Fay’s Letters from England, 1851-1852” (1946), 32:7-24
– – – “Memories of Nineteenth-Century Cambridge” (1952), 34:59-76
– – – “The Story of a Lost Brook” (1945), 31:44, 52-60
– – – “A Tribute to Samuel Atkins Eliot” (1951), 34:125-26 Howe, Lois Lilley White, see Howe, Mrs. Estes (second wife) Howe, Lorinda, see Fulton, Mrs. John A. Howe, Lucy (1830s), 24:28 Howe, Mabel, see Kerrison, Mrs. Philip D. Howe, Mark A. DeWolfe (1864-1960; biographer), 33:80n73, 83n84; 37:111; 41:114
– quoted, 41:105, 116 Howe, Prof. Mark DeWolfe (Highland St. resident, 1970s), 43:25, 30 Howe, Mary Eleanor (b. 1817), 24:28, 34; 30:24; 31:8-9; 34:64
– letters to, 24:28-30, 32-34 Howe, Moses G. (bank official, 1890), 41:41 Howe, Octavius Thorndike (schoolboy, 1860s), 30:85 Howe, Rosamond Coolidge, see Howe, Mrs. George Wright Howe, Mr. S. (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:52 Howe, Judge Samuel (1785-1828), 11:31n2; 25:95, 103, 122, 123, 124-25 Howe, Mrs. [Judge] Samuel (Susan Tracy, first wife; d. 1811), 25:95, 122 Howe, Mrs. [Judge] Samuel (Sarah Lydia Robbins, second wife), 11:31; 25:95, 103, 122, 123, 136, 137; 30:14; 33:42
– boardinghouse of, 24:28; 25:125; 30:14; 33:41
– and Cambridge Book Club, 25:110; 28:112, 117
– letters from, 24:34-48 Howe, Dr. Samuel (1849-1879), 24:48; 25:128, 140; 34:67; 43:154 Howe, Dr. Samuel Gridley (1801-1876), 7:32; 18:16; 22:123; 23:84; 28:74; 37:88 Howe, Mrs. Samuel Gridley, see Howe, Julia Ward Howe, Sarah Lydia (b. 1841; “Sally”; granddaughter of Sarah Lydia Robbins Howe), 24:48; 25:127, 128, 137; 30:15; 31:44; 34:66 Howe, Sarah Lydia Robbins, see Howe, Mrs. [Judge] Samuel (second wife) Howe, Sara(h) Robbins (1826-1916; daughter of Sarah Lydia Robbins Howe), 24:34, 36; 25:103, 125 Howe, Sarah Templeman Coolidge, 25:127 Howe, Stanley (on “Junior Committee,” 1905), 44:106, 108, 116 Howe, Mrs. Stanley (Priscilla Nash), 43:26 Howe, Susan Tracy, see Howe, Mrs. [Judge] Samuel (first wife) Howe, Susan Tracy Dwight, see Hillard, Mrs. George Stillman Howe, [Uriah] Tracy (1811-1888), 24:34, 38; 25:95, 96, 123-27 passim, 134; 33:51 Howe, Mrs. [Uriah] Tracy (Sarah Templeman Coolidge), 25:127 Howe, Tracy, Jr. (b. c. 1836; son of [Uriah] Tracy), 25:127 Howe, Tyler (1800-1880; brother of Elias, Sr.), 14:124, 125, 129 Howe, Uriah, see Howe, [Uriah] Tracy Howe, Mr. W. (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:52 Howe, William (1719-1791), 16:39; 30:66-67 Howe, Mrs. William (Hannah Soden [Hastings]), 16:38-39 Howe, Gen. Sir William (1729-1814), 5:67n3, 70n6, 71n2; 6:10; 13:77; 19:51-55 passim, 64; 22:30, 31, 32; 26:84; 29:69; 37:52
– Burgoyne letters to, 13:26n4, 34n2n, 35, 64n3, 74, 76 How[e], William (handles sale of Vassall property, 1779), 10:55, 85 Howe, William (1803-1852; inventor), 14:124-25, 126 Howe, William Greene (of Chicago, 1871), 25:95 Howe, Mr. (rate collector, 1756), 10:23 Howe, Mr. (accommodations for British officer in house of, 1770s), 13:50 Howe family, 20:93; 28:106; 43:155, 158 Howe & Manning; Howe, Manning & Almy (architects), 43:161-66, 171, 172 Howells, “Johnnie” (c. 1870; son of William D.), 21:61 Howells, Mildred (b. c. 1872; daughter of William D.), 21:62-63 Howells, William Dean (1837-1920; author), 2:56, 73; 7:19; 19:23; 20:58; 28:87; 30:20; 33:23n35; 34:64; 36:27; 39:88n30; 41:98
– house of, 21:62-63; 25:116, 121; 41:165
– as friend of Longfellow, 2:59; 28:94
– Longfellow 100th anniversary address by (1907), 2:60-72, 107
– quoted, 2:57; 3:34; 20:93; 21:63; 27:69n66; 37:89
– unpublished ms. by (given to CHS, 1939), 25:18 Howells, Mrs. William Dean, 21:62, 63 Howells, Winifred (1870s; daughter of William D.), 30:20; 34:64 Howes, see also House; Howe Howes, Miss Anna (Willard family friend, 1816), 11:17 Howes, Miss Elizabeth (Willard family friend, 1816), 11:17 Howes, Miss Tabitha (Willard family friend, 1816), 11:17. See also How, Tabitha Howes, William (c. 1800), 11:17n4 Howes, Mrs. William (Tabitha), 11:17n4 Howie, David H. (bank official, 1930s), 41:48, 50 Howland, Miss Bertha M. (interior decorator; d. 1930), 21:70; 32:31 Howland, Delia (of West Roxbury, 1890s), 41:166 Howland, Richard H. (of Washington, 1960s), 44:37 Howland, William B. (editor, c. 1900), 20:88 Howland, Mrs. William D. (Caroline S.; Francis Ave. resident, 1936-40), 41:32 Howton, see Hooton Hoyt, Charles B. (Harvard benefactor, no date), 27:26 Hoyt, Franklin (editor, c. 1900), 19:29, 30 Hoyt, Rev. James S., and Hoyt controversy (c. 1880), 20:72-73, 74, 77 Hoyt, Miss (“news of,” 1851), 32:14 Hoyt Field, 42:87 Hubbard, see also Hobart Hubbard, Elizabeth, see Stiles, Mrs. Ezra Hubbard, Francis A. (of ITT; d. before 1954), 35:107 Hubbard, Gardiner Greene (1822-1897; lawyer), 14:65; 15:39; 18:41; 28:115, 116; 29:10n; 34:67; 43:44-45
– as entrepreneur, 15:39; 25:130-34 passim, 138-39; 38:29-48 passim; 39:81; 42:8, 11
– house of, see Hubbard house Hubbard, Mrs. Gardiner Greene (Gertrude Mercer), 14:66; 28:117 Hubbard, Col. John (of Connecticut, mid-1700s), 22:89 Hubbard, John H. (apothecary, 1890s), 20:55; 30:24; 41:41 Hubbard, Mabel, see Bell, Mrs. Alexander Graham Hubbard, Mrs. Sarah (1600s), 9:77 Hubbard, Sarah (d. 1804), see Fayerweather, Mrs. [Capt.] Thomas Hubbard, Thomas (of Billerica, d. 1662), 9:76, 77 Hubbard, Thomas (Harvard Treasurer; d. 1773), 17:57 Hubbard, Rev. William (c. 1621-1704; historian) 5:33; 10:97; 40:81 Hubbard, Mrs. (singing class of, mid-1800s), 17:72 Hubbard, Miss (at Berkeley St. School, 1860s), 32:34, 36, 37 Hubbard family, 25:130; 33:99 Hubbard house (146 Brattle St.; later demolished), 18:5; 29:10n; 33:97, 99; 43:31 (illus. #5 following), 44-45, 50 Hubbard Park, 28:115; 33:97; 42:129; 43:12
– laid out, 29:10n; 43:45
– residents of, 12:65; 17:5; 44:119, 121 Hubbard Park Road, 14:65 Hubbard’s (apothecary shop), 25:116, 121 Hubbell, John H. (businessman, 1883), 42:73 Hudleston, F. J. (author, 1927), 22:29n1 Hudson, Charles, see Lexington, Massachusetts (History of) Hudson, Rev. Henry N. (1814-1886; Shakespearean scholar), 23:57 Hudson Street, 20:133 Hudson’s Bay Company, 28:38, 39, 46-53 passim Hughes, see also Hewes Hughes, Ball (English sculptor, 1840s), 34:88 Hughes, David (musicologist, 1960s), 41:102 Hughes, “Mrs.” Elizabeth (1719-1771; “single-woman”), 10:40n4 Hughes’s Foundry (Maryland), 6:7 Huguenots, 31:23; 33:148n6 Hulbert, Archer B. (1873-1933; historian), 27:55n30, 90 Huling, Ray Greene (schoolmaster, c. 1900), 35:97, 99 Hull, Frank (printer, early 1900s), 15:22 Hull, G. Harvey (Boat Club, 1920), 39:132 Hull, Commodore Isaac (1773-1843), 23:27 Hull, John (Boston merchant, late 1600s), 16:30; 22:70 Hull, Mrs. John, see Phip[p]s, Lady William Hull, Josephine (actress), see Sherwood, Josephine Hull, Lewis (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Hull, Mary Spencer, see Phip[p]s, Lady William Hull, Reginald Mott (landowner, early 20th c.), 6:68; 32:100 Hull, Mrs. Reginald Mott, 32:100, 101 Hull, Maj.-Gen. William (1753-1825), 11:43n1 Hull, Massachusetts, 21:22, 78; 31:37. See also Nantasket Hulme, see also Hume Hulme, Kathryn (writer, 1950s), 41:157 Humboldt Street, 38:118 Hume, see also Hulme Hume, Mary, see Maguire, Mrs. John M. Humphrey, see also Humphreys Humphrey, Francis Josiah (Harvard 1832; Class Secretary), 30:21 Humphrey[s], John (in Glover company, 1634), 3:10, 11 Humphrey[s], Mrs. John (Lady Susan; daughter of Earl of Lincoln), 3:10 Humphrey house, 30:19 (illus. facing), 21 Humphrey’s Island (Suntaug Lake), 21:39 Humphreys, see also Humphrey Humphreys, David (1752-1818; statesman, poet), 40:21 Humphreys, Frank L. (biographer, 1917), 40:21n26 Humphreys, John (deputy governor, 1629), 30:34; 33:141; 44:55 Hunnewell, Sophia (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Hunnewell, William (British troops quartered in Charlestown house of, 1770s), 13:24 Hunnewell, William (land annexed to Cambridge, 1818), 20:126, 128 Hunnewell Farm, 26:72n16 Hunt, Ebenezer (friend of Rev. Willard, 1801), 11:13 Hunt, Elizabeth, see Palmer, Mrs. Elizabeth Hunt Hunt, John (landowner, 1761), 37:19 Hunt, Richard Morris (1827-1895; architect), 27:14, 16; 35:57 Hunt, Sarah A., see Wright, Mrs. Edmund Hunt, William Holman (1827-1910; English artist), 27:18 Hunt, William Morris (1824-1879; artist), 10:159; 26:100; 27:14, 16, 18; 35:38 Hunt (Harvard student, 1760), 10:30n1 Hunt, Mr. (“late house” of, 1777), 13:44 Hunt Hall (Harvard), 27:17; 35:57; 43:90-91 Hunter, Mildred, see Brown, Mrs. George Edwin Hunting and Tarboy Line (omnibus, 1840s), 8:37. See also Omnibuses Huntington, Mrs. Archer (Anna Hyatt; sculptress), 41:18, 28, 166 Huntington, Arria Sargent (b. c. 1850), 18:32, 41
– quoted (on father), 33:21-22 Huntington, Charles P. (tutor, 1820s), 25:124 Huntington, Dr. Elisha (1796 1865), 6:50 Huntington, Miss Eliza P. (at Fogg Museum, c. 1900), 27:22 Huntington, Faith, see Fenn, Mrs. William Wallace Huntington, Bishop Frederic Dan (1819-1904), 18:32, 33; 28:115; 33:21-22, 30, 36; 36:13, 14; 38:49
– and church controversy, 18:41-42; 33:23-25; 34:28; 36:62
– letter from, 34:28-29 Huntington, Mrs. Frederic Dan, 33:22 Huntington, Henry (1850s; son of Frederic D.), 18:34, 41 Huntington, Henry E. (1850-1927; philanthropist), see Library(ies) Huntington, James (1822-1901; watchmaker and philanthropist), 6:51; 18:20, 23-26; 20:55; 30:17; 38:121, 124 Huntington, J. L. (descendant of Frederic D. [?], 1940s), 33:22n34 Huntington, Laura (1850s; daughter of Frederic D. ), 18:34 Huntington, Mary, see Cooke, Mary Huntington Huntington, Dr. Oliver (boys’ school of [Cloyne School], at Newport, R.I., mid-1800s), 6:52 Huntington, Ruth (1850s; daughter of Frederic D. ) , 18:41 Huntington, Gov. [of Connecticut) Samuel (1731-1796), 18:23 Huntington, Rev. [Prof.] William Reed (1838-1909), 3:23, 28; 6:50 Huntington (officer in Battle of Bunker Hill), 5:26n1 Huntington, Miss (teacher at Berkeley St. School, late 1800s), 32:38 Huntington Avenue (Boston), 35:68; 41:161; 42:50 Hurd, see also Heard Hurd, James A. (publisher, late 1800s), 19:28 Hurd, M. M. (publisher, late 1800s), 19:18, 19, 21, 28 Hurd, Theodore C. (opposes street railway, 1881), 39:90 Hurd & Houghton (publishers), 19:18, 19, 22, 25, 29. See also Houghton, H. O., and Company Hurlbut, Dean Byron Satterlee (d. 1929), 16:5; 18:36, 39; 19:8; 27:24-25, 33; 28:107, 119; 32:89 Hurlbut, Mrs. Byron Satterlee (Eda Woolson), 24:11
– house of, 19:8; 24:99; 26:47 (see also Stoughton house) Hurley, Gov. Charles (1930s), 44:92 Huron Avenue, 14:34; 22:49; 33:99; 37:9; 38:116; 40:87; 41:158-60 passim, 165; 42:37; 43:12; 44:9, 10, 159, 161, 164, 166, 167
– laid out, 20:57; 22:48
– sites identified on, 10:183; 26:54; 28:30
– trolley line on, 20:55; 39:78, 97, 101n73, 104; 41:61; 42:89, 90; 44:168
– See also Vassall Lane Hurricanes, see Weather Huson, Mrs. (1850s; mother of Mrs. Langdell), 18:34 Huss, John (1369[?]-1415; Czech reformer): followers of, 27:71 Hussey family, 10:49 Hutchins, Lucy C. (probation officer, 1906), 17:23 Hutchins, Rosa (of New Hampshire, c. 1800; Mrs. Foote), 7:104 Hutchins, William B. (bridge incorporator, c. 1800), 16:88 Hutchinson, Ann[e] Marbury (1591-1643; Mrs. William Hutchinson), 4:66; 32:72-74
– descendants of, 7:83; 12:69; 22:85
– trial and banishment of, 5:17; 22:82; 32:74-75, 112; 33:37; 42:80, 104; 43:70, 114 (see also Religion [antinomianism/ Antinomian Controversy]) Hutchinson, Elisha (son of Gov. Thomas; importer, 1770s), 39:150, 151, 155 Hutchinson, Elizabeth, see Apthorp, Mrs. East Hutchinson, Faith (mother of Abijah Savage), 22:85 Hutchinson, Israel (committee member, 1777), 13:21, 24, 28 Hutchinson, Gov. Thomas (1711-1780), 26:60, 79-80; 37:12, 19, 25; 40:126; 41:42
– “Address to,” 3:57; 16:32, 72, 73, 79
– family of, 26:51; 33:66; 39:150
– as historian, 16:71; 33:37n1; 40:81; 43:125
– and “New Ireland,” 5:74-75
– portrait of, 10:159; 26:80, 84
– and tax controversy, 20:116-17; 39:152, 155, 156-57, 162
Hutchinson, Thomas (son of Gov. Thomas; importer, 1770s), 39:150, 151, 155
Hutchinson, William (c. 1600), 22:85
Hutchinson, Mrs. William, see Hutchinson, Ann[e] Marbury
Hutchinson family: land sales by, 5:17
Hutchinson Street, 14:63
Hutton, Laurence (1843-1904; critic), 23:40
Huyler’s, 20:55; 41:146. See also Restaurants
Hyam, see Hiam
Hyatt, Capt. Alpheus (of Washington Home Guard, 1860s), 2:39; 7:81
Hyatt, Rev. Alpheus (Francis Ave. resident, 1891-1903), 41:18, 38
Hyatt, Mrs. Alpheus (Andella), 41:18, 28
Hyatt, Anna (sculptress), see Huntington, Mrs. Archer
Hyde, Dana W. (merchant), 35:88
Hyde, Edward (merchant, c. 1900), 15:34
Hyde, Elizabeth, see Earle, Mrs. Walter F.
Hyde, Mrs. Experience [Dana] (tailoress, mid-1800s), 8:38
Hyde/Hide, Jonathan (1626-1711; of Cambridge), 9:77
Hyde/Hide, Jonathan (b. c. 1655; of Billerica; son of above), 9:76, 77
Hyde/Hide, Mrs. Jonathan (Dorothy Kidder), 9:77
Hyde, Rev. William DeWitt (1858-1917), 34:44
Hyde/Hide, Lt. (at Battle of Bunker Hill), 5:28
Hyde, Miss (teacher at Berkeley St. School, 1890s), 32:46
Hyde Park, Massachusetts, 21:35; 42:50
Hymns and hymn-writers, see Music (church)
Hynes, Mayor [of Boston] John, 44:97

I

Iacoomes, Joel (Harvard 1665), 35:93
Ice and ice-houses, 2:37; 3:105-6; 14:73; 25:20; 26:53; 31:57; 33:60, 34:61; 43:166
– and ice carts, 30:25
– and ice-cutting business, 10:177; 24:89
– – – on Fresh Pond, 2:33, 36-37, 3:101, 105-8 passim; 4:25; 22:107; 24:63, 89; 28:31-32, 34, 38, 41, 43, 53; 33:155; 37:34; 41:44, 48-49 Ice-skating, see Sports and games Ida (brig), 28:42 Idaho, State of, 28:35. See also Fort Hall, Idaho Idaho Historical Society, 28:47 Idle Man, The, see Periodicals (Boston) Idler Club, see Women’s clubs/organizations Illiteracy, see Education “Illuminations,” see Lights and lighting (in celebrations) Ilsley, see Sweet-Ilsley house (Newbury) Immigration, 37:78
– of children, during World War II, 38:127-28
– effect of, 14:70; 39:108, 112, 115-19 passim, 124; 40:143
– “forensic” on (T. Fuller, Jr., 1800), 11:46
– “great wave” of (1630-40), 21:49; 22:17; 25:63; 32:50, 56-58, 62, 65, 66; 33:136-37; 36:54; 38:91; 42:102; 43:112; 44:61
– and politics, 20:28, 51
– See also Labor; Population “Impaled” land, see Fences and walls Impeachment proceedings, see Politics Imports, import duties, see Taxation/taxes (tariff); Trade and commerce Impressment, see Britain Inches, Henderson (concerned with trade, 1770s), 30:55 Incorporation of city, see Cambridge, Massachusetts (organization and charter of) Increase (ship), 7:74, 75 Indemnity Act (England, 1767-72), 39:147, 151. See also Law(s) (English) Independence (American Navy ships)
– 1770s, 5:59
– c. 1835, 23:28 Independent political movements, see Politics Index
– of CHS Proceedings, 12:57; 17:101-2; 42:136
– of Middlesex County Court papers, 25:146
– of Paige’s History of Cambridge, 6:33-40, 42, 43; 8:8; 12:54; 13:114-15; 14:116; 15:9; 16:110; 17:101; 18:77, 79; 39:57; 43:147, 149
– – – preparation of, 6:35-36, 37
– of Proprietors’ and Town Records, 5:47; 14:116
– of Wright Collection, 37:101-6 India trade, see Trade and commerce India Wharf (Boston), 16:62 Indian Bible, see Bible, the Indian College, see Indians (education of) Indian Ridge and Indian Ridge Path, 25:23; 34:84. See also Mount Auburn Cemetery Indians, 39:126
– Aberginian, 33:142
– Apache, 17:87
– “Apostle to,” see Eliot, Rev. John
– Bannock, 28:50
– Bible translation for, see Bible, the
– Blackfoot, 28:43, 45, 47
– Boston Tea Party participants disguised as, see Boston Tea Party
– as Cambridge residents, 20:94; 32:99
– Charles River as “highway” for, 39:25
– and corn, “fishing corn,” 5:33-34; 44:59
– courts for, 7:99; 9:75
– Deerfield captives of, see and Indian wars/invasions, below
– Digger, 17:85
– disease among, 44:43, 45
– disregard for rights of, 33:134
– education of, 17:85-91 passim; 28:33, 50, 51; 35:93
– – – at Harvard (Indian College), 3:17, 18; 7:18; 30:78; 32:68; 35:93; 38:93
– Five Nations, 11:71
– friendship with/evangelization of, 7:97-103 passim; 10:86; 28:35, 47, 48, 49; 33:139; 35:89; 38:91, 92; 40:97; 41:7; 43:113
– – – Eliot and, see Eliot, Rev. John
– (see also trade with, below)
– helpfulness of, 5:33
– Hualapai, 17:86
– and Indian names, 5:42; 21:22-47 passim; 33:139, 142
– and Indian wars/invasions, 7:96-97; 11:70; 16:49; 28:45; 32:75; 34:97; 43:114
– – – Deerfield captives from, 9:48; 10:171; 33:39
– – – King Philip’s, French and Indian, see War(s)
– – – Pequot (1637), 14:44; 42:104, 105
– – – threat of/defense against, 18:31; 21:49; 22:31, 60; 28:43; 31:23; 32:72, 73, 74; 35:29; 39:28; 40:14, 15, 17; 44:43 (see also Fortifications)
– land purchased from, 2:15; 21:32; 33:142
– last Indian book printed in Cambridge (1691), 3:17
– Longfellow and, 28:90
– Massachusetts Indian Association and, 10:175, 23:74
– – – history of Cambridge branch of, 17:84-91
– Mohawk, 21:87
– “Narrowgansett,” 3:17
– Navajo, 17:87-91
– Nonantum, 26:71-72
– Northwestern, British and, 40:11
– in Oregon Territory, 28:39, 45
– path of, 39:26 (see also Charlestown-Watertown road)
– Pequot, 14:44; 42:104, 105
– Seconnet, 30:50
– Seminole, 16:49
– Seneca, 40:97
– Shepard work translated for, 3:81
– Shoshone, 28:50
– Sioux, 17:86
– trade with, 8:18; 19:32; 28:39, 44
– treaties with, 21:87
– wooden figure(s) of:
– – – at Leavitt & Peirce, 41:115-16
– – – at Phip[p]s-Winthrop house, 26:49
– Wyeth expeditions and, 28:43, 45-52 passim Industry, industrialization, industrial parks, industrial revolution, see Business and industry “Information, Please” quiz (1939), 25:113-21 Ingalls, see also Ingols Ingalls, Phineas (1758-1844; of Andover): diary of (1775-76), 11:76 Ingelow, Jean (1820-1897; British poet), 28:97 Ingersoll, Ernest (friend of William Brewster, 1870s), 24:86, 93 Ingersoll, Jonathan (Canal Bridge incorporator, 1807), 16:88 Ingersoll, Martha (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Inglis, Misses Fanny and Lydia: school of (Boston), 21:105; 23:58. See also School(s) Ingols, see also Ingalls Ingols, Emily (daughter of Levi; later Mrs. Norcross), 32:42 Ingols, Levi (mid-1800s), 32:42 Ingols, Mrs. Levi (Emily), 32:42 Ingols, Margaret Rae (1842-1904): and Berkeley St. School, 21:69; 22:56; 32:42-47; 42:130. See also School(s) Ingraham, see also Ingram Ingraham, Mrs. Andrew (Mary E.; Bryant St. resident, 1902-30), 41:18, 36 Ingraham, Mr. and Mrs. Edward (Lowell St. residents, 1936), 24:10 Ingram, see also Ingraham Ingram, Captain (friend of H. Vassall, 1767), 10:31 Ingstad, Helge (Norwegian explorer, 1960s), 40:95 Inheritance, see Wills and testaments Initiative, referendum, and recall, see Politics Inman, Rev. George (of England, late 1700s), 16:78-79; 19:51, 59-68 passim, 71 Inman, Lt. George (1755-1789; nephew of Rev. George), 10:44; 16:79
– diary of, 11:82; 19:51-77, 78-79
– paper on (1926), 19:46-79 Inman, Mrs. George (Mary Badger; later Mrs. Charles Swift), 19:55-78 Inman, Hannah Rowe (Mrs. William Tilden), 19:46n1, 72, 77, 78 Inman, Harry (British navy, 1780s), 19:60, 64, 65 Inman, Mrs. Harry, 19:64, 65 Inman, John (of England, 1780s), 19:66, 67, 68 Inman, Mrs. John, 19:66, 67 Inman, John Freeman (1781-1789), 19:60-71 passim, 74-77 passim Inman, Mary Ann Riché (second wife of Joseph Lewis Cunningham), 19:46n1, 62-70 passim, 74-78 passim Inman, Ralph (Loyalist; d. 1788), 10:31, 32, 39, 41n1, 44; 13:22; 16:78-80, 89; 17:54; 19:47-51 passim, 57-77 passim; 22:66
– and Christ Church, 10:40n2; 16:37, 79; 19:49; 22:77; 23:18; 43:118
– house of, see Inman house
– property confiscated, 14:43; 16:37, 79-80; 22:71
– street named for, 14:43, 54, 65 (see also Inman Street) Inman, Mrs. Ralph (Susanna Speakman, first wife, d. 1761), 16:79; 17:54; 19:48 Inman, Mrs. Ralph (Elizabeth Murray [Smith], second wife), 10:31, 52n3; 14:43; 16:79-80; 19:48-49, 51, 57, 72; 22:67 Inman, Ralph (grandson of above, b. 1779), 19:57, 58 Inman, Miss Sally (daughter of Rev. George [?] ), 19:59-67 passim Inman, Sarah (“Sally,” daughter of Ralph, d. at age of 14), 19:48, 50 Inman, Sarah Coombe, see Riché, Mrs. Charles Swift Inman, Susanna (“Sukey”; Mrs. John Linzee), 16:79; 19:48, 49, 50, 57, 60, 61, 77, 78 Inman, Susanna Speakman, see Inman, Mrs. Ralph (first wife) Inman, Susannah Linzee (Mrs. Thomas Ferguson Livingston), 19:46n1, 70, 72, 77, 78 Inman family, 10:53 Inman house
– damage to (during Revolution), 10:51; 22:67; 31:26
– as hospital or prison (during Revolution), 13:23, 27, 80
– moved (1873? 1889?) to corner of Brookline and Auburn, 1:56; 3:51; 6:24-25; 14:43; 16:79; 19:47
– original site, 1:19, 56; 7:59; 11:17n2; 13:22, 24; 16:81, 83, 89, 95; 17:54; 19:47-48; 22:68; 25:118; 35:80, 81, 89
– as Putnam’s headquarters, see Military headquarters Inman Square, 14:57, 74; 39:91, 103
– in mid-1800s, 1:12; 34:69 Inman Street, 16:65, 90; 35:84, 87; 39:77, 90; 42:33
– naming of, 14:54, 65
– sites identified on, 1:56; 3:51; 14:43-44, 51; 16:79; 35:100 Inman’s Lane, 14:44, 65 Inman’s Woods, 33:148 Inn Street, 14:67. See also Pearl Street Inns, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Inoculation for smallpox, see Disease (smallpox) Insane, the
– commitment of, 17:25, 26
– treatment of, 16:121 (see also Medicine, practice of) Inscription(s): honoring Dr. Peabody (Memorial Church), 26:17; 33:26-27. See also Historic preservation (identification and marking of historic sites); Soldiers’ Monument(s); Tomb(s) and Tombstone(s) Institute of 1770, see Club(s) (at Harvard) Interest rates, see Mortgages and debts International House (Phillips Pl.), 32:38 International Student Center (Chauncy St.), 33:50 International Student House (Hillel House, Bryant St.), 41:36 Intoxication, see Wine and spirits Inventions
– aquatint process, 43:138
– glass-pressing and -processing, 19:38; 36:96, 97, 100
– ice-cutting, 2:36-37; 28:32, 41
– “incubator” of (740 Main St.), 14:129, 130 (illus. facing); 35:84
– “Meigs Railway,” see Street railway(s) (elevated)
– “Natwyethum,” 28:41-42, 43
– palm-leaf processing, 10:185
– sewing machine, 14:124 (illus. facing), 126-38; 19:38; 35:83; 40:23
– steam propulsion, 40:55
– street railway car, 39:95
– telegraph and telephone, see Communication(s)
– Valspar varnish, 43:104
– wheelchair, 38:79
– wireless/radio, 34:114, 115-23
– wood-carving machine, 21:54
– woven hose/rubber, 36:82-83; 40:23-24, 38-41
– See also Business and industry Inventories of possessions, see Domestic and family life Ipswich, Massachusetts (Agawam), 11:72; 13:82; 21:29, 81. 82; 24:76n19; 25:102
– Antiquarian Papers, 18:61n2
– boundaries of, 21:35, 41, 47
– Gov. Dudley removes to, 10:100; 15:25; 21:79; 30:38; 32:110; 44:45
– first church at, 10:99
– Historical Commission of, 43:83n1, 89, 92
– houses of, 20:102; 25:68; 43:167
– – – Cambridge houses compared to, 16:21
– organized as town (1633), 34:97
– ornamented furniture from, 21:51
– population of, 10:6n2; 43:85
– settlement of, 10:172; 21:27; 31:25
– – – abandoned, 21:22
– as shire town, 17:46; 39:58 Ipswich River, 21:39, 44 Ireland, Abraham (1673-1753; surveyor), 14:39n2
– descendants of, 5:53
– See also Ireson, Andrew Ireland, Miss Catherine (schoolmistress, 1880s), 34:71 Ireland, Nathaniel (hardware merchant, builds “Fay House,” c. 1806), 43:43; 44:142 Ireland, Thomas (landowner, 1783), 37:20 Ireland family, 10:115 Ireland (country), 7:96
– England and, 3:68, 71-72, 78; 19:70, 72; 22:32; 23:66
– and Irish population in Cambridge, see Population (foreign-born)
– “potato famine” in, 39:115; 41:57
– and Siege of Londonderry (1688), 13:124
– See also “New Ireland” Ireson, Adeline M.(schoolteacher, 1842-92), 13:108 Ireson, Andrew (surveyor), 7:53. See also Ireland, Abraham Iron foundries, see Business and industry Irving, see also Erving Irving, Pierre (1803-1876; nephew of following), 29:39n19 Irving, Washington (1783-1859; author), 4:63; 18:50n1; 28:37; 40:95
– quoted:
– – – on Washington Allston, 29:38, 39
– – – on Joseph Worcester, 31:58
– – – on Wyeth expedition, 2:35-36; 28:41, 54 Irving, William J. (Boston baker, landowner, 1870s), and houses of, 44:163-64, 165, 166, 168 (and illus. #10 following) Irving Literary Society (Cambridge-port), see Society(ies) (organizations) Irving Place, 36:8 Irving Street, 23:89-90; 33:29; 34:65; 41:16; 42:19, 27; 43:35, 168
– laid out, 17:61
– residents of (1889-1969), 41:34-36; 42:24, 25
– “Shady Hill” homestead on, 6:25; 41:22-23; 42:15 (see also Norton Estate)
– Williston school on, 32:34, 39, 40 (see also School[s]) Irwin, Dean Agnes (1841-1914; of Radcliffe, 1894-1909), 2:45; 8:50; 41:142; 44:144, 146, 147
– obituary, 10:178-79
Irwin, William W. (of Pennsylvania and New York, c. 1800), 10:178
Irwin, Mrs. William W. (Sophia Dallas), 10:178
Isaac, Widow Elizabeth (1635), 22:76 (Map 1)
Isabella II (1830-1904; queen of Spain), 23:59
Isham, Samuel (1855-1914; painter), 30:29
Isham Library, see Library(ies)
Island End River/Creek, 21:27, 29
Italian art: influence of, 29:34, 37-38, 42-43, 48-51. See also Architecture; Arts, the
Italian lessons, see Language(s) (modern European, and instruction in)
Italian population, 36:105; 42:73. See also Population (foreign-born)
Ivers, Francis (carriage manufacturer, 1880s), 20:46
Ivers & Pond (piano builders, 1880s), 32:93
Ives, Brayton (book collector, 1879), 38:104
Ives, Dr. Eli (1778-1861; physician, botanist), 43:138
Ives, Mabel Lorenz (author, 1932), 33:8n4

J

Jabberwocky parody (on Harvard faculty names), 44:26-27
Jackson, Allen (architect, 1908), 43:29
Jackson, Amelia Lee, see Holmes, Mrs. Oliver Wendell
Jackson, Andrew (1767-1845; U.S. president 1828-36), 4:27, 28, 30-31; 25:126; 28:59
Jackson, Arthur L. (choirboy, 1880s), 27:33
Jackson, Mrs. Arthur L. (Pauline Fay): house of, 28:8, 106; 33:96 (illus. facing) (see also Lee, Thomas [3d])
Jackson, Arthur R. (Boat Club, 1914), 39:134
Jackson, Charles T. (1805-1880; chemist, geologist), 35:49; 38:83; 40:57, 58
Jackson, Mrs. Charles T. (Susan), 35:49
Jackson, Dr. Charles T. (Boston dentist, 1850), 41:63
Jackson, Dr. David (1747[?]-1801), 27:50, 59-60, 84
Jackson, Mrs. David (Susan [Eliza?] Kemper), 27:59-60, 84
Jackson, Dorothy (daughter of Prof. Robert T.), 43:11
Jackson, Edward (settler; d. 1681), 14:39, 103
– descendants of, 5:53, 54; 22:119 Jackson, Eleanor (“Bea” member, 1920s), 17:79, 80 Jackson, Emily (daughter of Prof. Robert T.), 43:11 Jackson, Esther, see Bastille, Mrs. John Jackson, Eugenia, see Sharpies, Mrs. Philip P. Jackson, Harriet (schoolgirl, 1850s), 35:46 Jackson, “Harriot” (Holmes family friend, 1801), 1:49 Jackson, Col. Harry (1791), 27:56 Jackson, Helen Hunt (1830-1885; author), 27:69-70; 28:88-89 Jackson, Henry (bridge incorporator, 1792), 16:83 Jackson, Dr. James (1777-1867). 3:20; 16:116, 122; 23:53; 25:126; 43:134, 135 Jackson, John (early settler; bap. 1602), 14: 103 Jackson, John (tavern keeper, 1672-96), 8:33; 37:32 Jackson, Jonathan (U.S. Supervisor, 1798), 3:66; 16:81; 26:89n50
– chosen Harvard treasurer (1807), 9:17 Jackson, Lydia (Mrs. Ralph Waldo Emerson), see Emerson, Mrs. Ralph Waldo (second wife) Jackson, Lydia (Mrs. Joseph Fuller), see Fuller, Mrs. Joseph Jackson, Mary (b. 1713; Mrs. George Moody[?]), 10:48n2 Jackson, Mary (Mrs. Oliver Wendell), see Wendell, Mrs. Oliver Jackson, Mary (Mrs. Christopher R. Eliot), see Eliot, Mrs. Christopher R. Jackson, Mary Ann (Holmes family friend, 1801), 1:49 Jackson, Patrick T. (1780-1847; financier), 20:99; 29:50n65; 40:56 Jackson, Mrs. Patrick T. (daughter of Frederick Gray), 20:95; 26:57nn102, 105, 107 Jackson, Richard (book collector, before 1911), 38:107 Jackson, Prof. Robert Tracy (Harvard 1884; paleontologist), 26:51n20, 61; 33:58n5, 61n14, 65; 43:11 Jackson, Rev. Sheldon (1834-1909), 17:87 Jackson, Susan, see Jackson, Mrs. Charles T. Jackson, Susan [Eliza?] Kemper, see Jackson, Mrs. David Jackson, Thomas (glass company clerk, 1816), 19:35 Jackson, Gen. Thomas J. (“Stonewall”; 1824-1863), 39:19 Jackson, Dr. (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:21 Jackson, Judge (marries great-niece of Judge Joseph Lee), 16:25 Jackson, Professor (Dramatic Club, 1870s), 38:53 Jackson, Professor (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Jackson family, 10:115; 22:27; 38:76 Jackson house, see Jackson, Mrs. Arthur L. Jacobinism (late 1700s), 2:100; 11:38. See also Politics Jacobs, Rev. Bela (d. 1836), 16:64-65 Jacobs, B. F. [Bela Farwell, b. 1819?], 14:43 Jacobs, Miss Sarah S. (schoolgirl, 1820s), 13:92, 106, 108; 16:96 Jacobs (city clerk, mid-1800s), 36:101 Jacques, see also Jaques Jacques (Harvard student, 1807), 9:26 Jacquinot, Professor (at Berkeley St. School, 1870s), 32:41 Jagemann, Prof. Carl Günther von (philologist, c. 1900), 35:114-15, 121; 37:108; 40:145 Jaggar, Tom (1890s), 42:125 Jail(s), 9:33
– Cambridge House of Correction (built 1656), 17:46; 24:71n7, 73, 79
– Charlestown State’s Prison, 25:138; 40:46
– “common gaol,” 13:65
– Concord Reformatory, 25:138; 40:143
– first, site of (Winthrop St.), 1:58; 3:51; 42:80
– and imprisonment of Quakers, 24:69-73 passim, 76-82 passim
– military, during Revolutionary War:
– – – Boston, 30:69
– – – Cambridge, see Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house; Vassall houses and land (Henry Vassall)
– – – Connecticut, 30:56, 68, 69
– military prisoners, during Civil War, 10:18
– moved to East Cambridge, 10:58n2; 14:74; 15:37; 16:92; 17:48; 36:95; 39:64, 111
– See also Crime Jakeman, Miss Carolyn (Houghton Librarian, 1970s), 44:136 Jalap, see Medicine, practice of Jamaica
– removal of colonists to (Cromwell’s proposal), 7:101
– sugar plantations on, 10:25, 27-28, 31-32n2 38, 48n2; 33:63 (see also Business and industry)
– See also West Indies Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, 18:64n3 Jamaica Pond, 41:58; 42:50. See also Ponds and lakes James, Alexander Robertson (son of William), 42:30
– name changed from Francis Tweedy, 42:18 James, Alice (sister of Henry and William), 17:75, 77 James, Alice Gibbens, see James, Mrs. William James, Clarence Gray (b. c. 1860; brother of Mary Isabella [Gozzaldi]), 21:106; 23:72 James, Edward B. (Boston lumber dealer): Lake View Ave. house of, 44:165 James, Prof. Eldon Revare (1875-1949; lawyer), 21:8; 23:10
– minute on death of, 33:156-57 James, Mrs. Eldon Revare, 21:8; 23:10 James, Frances Batchelder (b. c. I860; sister of Mary Isabella [Gozzaldi]), 21:106; 23:72; 44:116 James, Francis Tweedy, see James, Alexander Robertson James, Henry, Sr. (1811-1882), 2:62; 7:32; 18:40; 25:115, 118
– quoted, 29:48 James, Henry, Jr. (1843-1916; novelist), 2:62; 14:27; 19:23; 33:28; 42:18-19, 29-30 James, Henry (son of William; biographer), 33:27n41; 34:39n2 James, Mr. and Mrs. John S. R. (Irving St. residents, 1960s), 41:34 James, Margaret (“pours” at reception, 1905), 44:112 James, Mary Isabella, see Gozzaldi, Mary Isabella James James, Montgomery (b. c. 1860; brother of Mary Isabella [Gozzaldi]), 21:106; 23:72 James, Rev. Thomas (at Charlestown, 1632), 10:89; 33:143, 144 James, Thomas Potts (1803-1882), 21:105-9 passim, 118; 23:59, 60, 61, 72; 31:40, 43
– house built by (96 Brattle), 21:12, 105, 107-8, 109; 22:11; 23:61, 73; 32:30
– – – Mormon church on site of, 41:137 James, Mrs. Thomas Potts (Isabella Batchelder), 21:105-9 passim, 115; 23:49, 61, 72; 31:43; 32:30, 36
– reminiscences by, 23:50-61 James, William (1842-1910; philosopher, psychologist), 2:42; 20:88; 26:28; 33:99; 42:17-18, 30
– as Harvard professor, 23:41; 26:32; 27:34; 33:27-29, 30; 35:116; 37:108; 41:34
– houses of, 18:42; 33:21, 27-29, 36; 42:15, 25 (see also Dana houses [#10])
– library of, 27:37
– philosophy of, 3:35; 22:101; 31:16-17; 33:28, 30; 40:156
– as pupil of Agassiz, 2:74, 101; 35:51
– quoted, 3:35; 21:123; 23:42; 25:116; 33:27, 28 James, Mrs. William (Alice Howe Gibbens), 18:42; 30:16; 41:34, 35; 42:18 James, William, Jr. (b. 1882; artist), 33:28; 41:34 James, Mrs. William, Jr. (Alice Runnels), 41:34 James I (1566-1625; king of England), 7:37; 10:92; 26:63; 32:16, 55, 56; 33:136, 137, 138; 42:99
– and “Book of Sports,” 3:10; 38:91 James II (1633-1701; king of England), 13:124; 16:30; 22:70; 33:63n25 James (ship), 21:42 James Munroe & Company, see Munroe, James James R. Osgood & Company, see Osgood, James R. & Company (publishers) James Street, 15:6; 33:98; 44:139, 153 Jameson, Mrs. Anna Brownell Murphy (1794-1860; British essayist), 29:39-40, 49, 53, 54 Jameson, Jane, see Nichols, Mrs. Thomas [2d] Jameson, Robert (Edinburgh botanist, 1804), 43:137 Jamestown, Virginia, 26:63; 33:135, 138; 44:43. See also Virginia Jandorf, Mrs. Robert (of Window Shop, 1940s), 43:100 “Japanned” furniture, see Furniture (painted decoration of) Jaques, see also Jacques Jaques, Mrs. (of Richardson family), 20:96 Jaques, Miss, boardinghouse of, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Jarcho, Saul (writer, 1972), 43:138 Jarves, see Jarvis Jarvis, see also Jervoice Jarvis, “Becky” (1850s; willows on land of), 18:31 Jarvis, Charles (botanist, c. 1810), 43:137 Jarvis/Jarves, Dem[m]ing (glass maker, c. 1820), 16:94; 19:35-44 passim; 36:96
– two others of same name, 19:36 Jarvis, Elizabeth, see Wyeth, Mrs. Jacob Jarvis, Leonard (landowner, 1792), 14:43, 54, 55: 16:41, 80, 89; 22:75
– government suit against (1797), 16:38, 81-82; 35:81 Jarvis, Leonard (Harvard 1800), 11:43
– and Allston, 29:14-32 passim, 48n57, 52n73 Jarvis, Nathaniel (1731-1812; landowner), 14:65; 17:48; 22:66, 67, 68, 73; 28:31; 31:24, 54 Jarvis, Susanna (landowner, 1826), 17:48 Jarvis (landowner, mid-1800s), 38:30n12 Jarvis Court, 14:64; 38:112. See also Avon Hill Street Jarvis Field, 20:94; 21:24; 30:14; 34:65 Jarvis Street, 14:65, 67; 25:132; 31:24, 55; 41:26 Jay, Justice John (1745-1829), 6:7; 28:22 Jefferson, Thomas (1743-1826; U.S. president 1800-1808), 5:15; 7:45; 30:70; 40:12, 16n16; 44:69
– and architecture, 26:38
– Hooker’s influence on, 32:64
– and Jeffersonian democracy, 20:51; 28:22; 33:74
– opposition to, 16:83
– as president, 16:130; 33:74
– – – appointments by, 7:31; 16:127; 38:76
– – – embargo imposed by, 28:110 (see also Trade and commerce)
– and vaccination, 4:24-25; 16:128; 29:17 (see also Smallpox)
– as vice president, 33:73 Jefferson Physical Laboratory (Harvard), 18:31 Jeffries, Dr. John (1744/45-1819): makes balloon ascension (1784), 16:120-21 Jeffry’s Creek, see Manchester, Massachusetts Jeftes, Henry (of Billerica, 1654), 9:76 Jenkins, Frederick (“Shadrach,” fugitive slave), 10:138-39, 148, 149, 161; 23:84; 37:84 Jenkins, Solomon Martin (of Maryland, 1829), 12:15 Jenks, Henry F. (of Boston, 1886), 27:47n14 Jenks, Capt. John (of Lynn, c. 1700), 9:7 Jenks, John Henry (son of Rev. William; publisher, 1860s), 9:8 Jenks, Joseph (of Lynn, 1643), 9:7 Jenks, Samuel (of Lynn, c. 1740), 9:7 Jenks, Mrs. Samuel (Mary Haynes), 9:7-8 Jenks, Sarah (b. c. 1800; Mrs. William Merritt), 9:7, 8, 12, 13, 17, 18, 31, 36 Jenks, Theodore (b. c. 1815? son of Rev. William; lawyer), 9:7, 8, 14, 18, 21, 31, 34, 36 Jenks, Rev. William (1778-1866), 3:65; 9:7-8, 11:21 passim, 23n3, 26, 29-36 passim Jenks, Mrs. William (Betsey Russell), 9:7, 8
– letters to (1806-13), 9:8-37; 21:102-3; 27:63n52 Jenner, Dr. Edward (1749-1823; English physician), 4:24; 16:118, 127; 29:17; 32:29; 38:73 Jennings, see also Genings Jennings, James Hennen (1854-1920; mining engineer), 12:44 Jennison, Mary E. E. (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Jennison, Robert (d. 1690; witchcraft case concerning), 17:49 Jennison, Samuel (son of above; d. 1701), 17:49 Jennison, Dr. Timothy Lindall (1757-1845), 17:48; 20:97; 38:70
– school kept by brother of, 9:33 Jennison, Miss, dame school of, see School(s) Jennison house site, 25:128; 31:56; 32:7; 33:44 Jerry (streetcar driver, 1890s), 34:76 “Jerry’s Pit” (swimming-hole), 42:72. See also Sports and games Jervoice, see also Jarvis Jervoice, Lucy, see Holworthy, Mrs. Matthew (second wife) Jessie, Marion, see Dunham, Mrs. Dows Jewel, Bishop John (1522-1571), 40:62 Jewelry
– Dana engagement ring (1840), 26:108; 29:57
– of Russian royalty ( 1878), 24:111-12, 121-23, 126, 129
– stores selling, see Retail and food stores
– See also Domestic and family life (inventories of possessions and property); Expenses (account books showing) Jewett, see also Jouett Jewett, Prof, and Mrs. James R. (Margaret Weyerhaeuser; Francis Ave. residents, 1916-48), 20:12; 22:16; 41:31, 34; 42:26 Jewett, Sarah Orne (1849-1909; author), 2:42; 19:23 Jewett (Harvard student suspended, 1798, for “disturbing the public devotions”), 11:38n2 Jewish War Veterans, 43:143 Jews
– and anti-semitism, 30:39; 43:99, 103
– Boston Committee for Refugees, 43:99
– and charity, 18:12, 13
– and Jewish Sabbath, 16:106, 107
– and Judaism, see Religion J. F. Olsson & Co., see Olsson & Co., J. F. J. H. Wyeth & Co., see Wyeth & Co., J. H. Jimmy (“hired hand” of the “White Ghost”), 43:10 Job (Inmans’ Negro servant) 16:80. See also Negroes Job, Sarah Jane, see Melledge, Mrs. James Parker Jocelyn, see Josselyn John (1166-1216; king of England), 32:52 John A. Logan Post 186, GAR, 7:81. See also GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) John Harvard (river boat, c. 1910), 39:134 John Hicks house, see Hicks, John (1725-1775) John of London (ship), 3:12; 27:30; 38:92 John “the orange man,” 21:58; 22:104; 27:34; 34:51-52; 41:168; 42:119. See also Cambridge “characters” John Wilson & Son (printers), see Wilson, John & Son Johns Hopkins University, 23:38; 42:16, 17, 19
– Hospital, 16:117 Johnson, Andrew (1808-1875; U.S. president 1865-68), 39:11 Johnson, Lady Arbella, see Johnson, Mrs. Isaac Johnson, Edward (1598-1672; colonial chronicler), 9:72; 31:23
– Wonder-Working Providence…, 5:34; 30:34; 42:95-96, 105, 106 Johnson, Horace and Seth (Craigie’s business agents, New York, 1790s), 27:61. See also Johnson, Seth Johnson, Howard W. (MIT president, 1967), 42:44, 65, 66; 43:143 Johnson, Isaac (Charlestown settler, 1629), 8:17; 10:88; 13:82; 30:32, 34; 32:107; 33:141, 142 Johnson, Mrs. Isaac (Lady Arbella), 13:82; 30:32, 34; 33:142 Johnson, Prof. Lewis Jerome, 22:26; 44:91-92
– “History and Meaning of the Proposed New Charter for Cambridge” (1911 paper), 6:53-72; 42:91; 44:91n1 Johnson, Louisa Catherine, see Adams, Mrs. John Quincy Johnson, Marmaduke (d. 1674; printer), 6:23; 38:39 Johnson, Mrs. Marmaduke (Ruth Cane), 6:23 Johnson, Maj. Obadiah (1736-1801; of Connecticut): orderly book kept by (1775), 11:80 Johnson, Osgood (1831-1857; schoolmaster), 35:96 Johnson, Philip (modern house of, 1940s), 31:35 Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Roger (Farrar St. residents, no date given), 41:37 Johnson, Mrs. Rufus (Anna Hill), 9:6 Johnson, Dr. Samuel (1709-1784; English lexicographer), 22:38; 23:84; 39:144; 41:128n7 Johnson, Rev. Samuel (1822-1882), 36:64 Johnson, Seth (1753-1820; landowner), 16:89. See also Johnson, Horace and Seth Johnson, Gen. Sir William (1715-1774), 5:22 Johnston Gate (Harvard Yard), 3:53; 30:13; 33:124; 40:115; 42:71; 43:84. See also Fences and walls Johnstone, Gov. William (of England, 1774), 3:57, 58, 64 Jones, Miss Alice (Kirkland St. resident, 1880s), 9:68; 17:84; 21:63; 32:36; 38:53 Jones, Miss Amelia (of New Bedford, 1916), 43:169 Jones, Andrew J. (blacksmith and “carriage repository,” mid-1800s), 15:33; 30:16 Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur (Berkeley St. residents, 1870s), 21:63 Jones, Cheney (director of Children’s Home), 42:134 Jones, Coffin (Boston merchant, mid-1700s), 37:20 Jones, E. Alfred (British author, 1930), 33:67n36 Jones, Edward F. (historian, 1930), 16:73, 78 Jones, Miss Elizabeth (Kirkland St. resident, 1890s), 41:33 Jones, Ephraim (jury foreman, 1752), 10:65 Jones, Grace, see Wardwell, Mrs. Grace Jones Jones, Prof. Howard Mumfcrd (Francis Ave. resident, 1940s), 41:30 Jones, Mrs. Howard Mumford, 41:30; 43:99-100 Jones, John (1600s): descendants of, 19:88 Jones, John C. (bridge incorporator, c. 1800), 16:88 Jones, Capt. John Paul (1747-1792), 5:87 Jones, Mrs. Leonard (Female Humane Society officer, 1860s), 9:66, 68 Jones, Lewis, & Sons (undertakers), 15:51 Jones, Lily (in Dramatic Club, c. 1900), 32:42; 38:53, 57, 60 Jones, Miss Mabel Augusta (schoolgirl, 1870s), 32:31, 41 Jones, Margaret, see Bradbury, Mrs. William Frothingham Jones, Maria, see Fowler, Mrs. Samuel Jones, Miss Martha R. (“Mr.”; confectioner, 1880s), 30:23
– shop of, 20:55; 22:106; 30:11 (illus. facing), 23
– site of house, 1:58
Jones, Pauline (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:42, 43; 38:53; 41:33
Jones, Pomroy (author, 1851), 27:75n81
Jones, R. M. (Quaker historian, 1911), 24:78n26, 80n32
Jones, Victor 0. (Bryant St. resident, 1963-65), 41:36
Jones, Mrs. Victor O. (Elizabeth Sachs Weiss), 41:36
Jones (Harvard student suspended, 1800, for “noise and disorder”), 11:47-48n1
Jones (College janitor, 1870s), 30:14-15
Jones, Mr. (in Dramatic Club, 1872), 38:52
Jones Hill, 17:46; 20:126; 38:120
Jordan, John W. (1840-1921), 27:50n23, 72n74, 83n88
Jordan, Wilbur Kitchener (“Hitch”; Radcliffe president), 44:151, 152 (and illus. #12 following), 156
Jordan, Mrs. William H. (sister of Sarah Alice Worcester), 11:88
Jordan Marsh Company (Boston), 32:98; 42:26
“Joseph’s” restaurant (Boston), 40:91-92. See also Restaurants
Josselyn, John (botanist, writer; d. 1675), 5:33
Jouett, see also Jewett
Jouett, Fred (choirboy, 1880s), 27:33
Journals, see Diaries and journals
Joy, Benjamin (landowner, 1807), 9:23; 16:88
Joyce, Anthony Kennedy (mid-1800s), 19:46n11
Joyce, Mrs. Anthony Kennedy (Louisa Matilda Livingston), 19:46n1
Joyce, T. F. (railroad executive, 1926), 38:23
J. T. & H. G. Smith (architects), 44:168
Jubert, James (d. 1693; gravestone of), 17:36
Judaism, see Religion
Judd, Thomas (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 22:78
July 4, see Holidays, fairs, and festivals
June 17 (Bunker Hill Day), see Holidays, fairs, and festivals
Junior Cambridge Dramatic Club, 43:28. See also Theatre
Junior Committee of Twelve, see First Church and Parish (Unitarian-Universalist)
Jury lists, see Courts, the

K

Kahen, Richard (president of Window Shop, mid-20th c.), 43:105
Kahn (botanist, c. 1800), 43:138
Kallock, Rev. I. S.: R. H. Dana, Jr.’s, defense of, 10:165
Kansas-Nebraska Bill (1854), 7:13-14; 37:85, 87-88
Kaplan, Mr. and Mrs. Justin D. (Francis Ave. residents, 1960s), 41:31
“Kappa Delta” Society, see Society(ies) (organizations )
Karr, Rev. William S. (1870s), 20:72
Katz, Prof, and Mrs. Milton (Farrar St. residents, no date given), 41:37
Kaufman, Martin (author, 1971), 43:133n12
Kay, James Murray (c. 1900), 19:28-29, 30
Kay, Mrs. James Murray (Mary Freeman Prentiss), 32:35, 36
Keach, see Keech
Keayne, Mrs. Benjamin, see Dudley, Sarah
Kebler, Lyman F. (author, 1928), 27:48n18, 90
Keech, Mrs. John (Abigail Stone), 7:76
Keep, Dr. Nathan C. (witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:71-72, 78-79, 86
Keezer, Max (secondhand clothes dealer), 42:119. See also Cambridge “characters”
Keith, Rev. George (c. 1638-1716? of London), 11:58
Keith, Owen S. (printer, 1840s), 15:19; 28:115; 39:62
Keller, Helen (1880-1968), 27:61; 32:98; 44:152 (and illus. #13 following)
Keller, Max (of Episcopal Seminary, late 1800s), 31:13
Kelley, Alfred (of Columbus, Ohio, c. 1850), 10:170
Kelley, Mrs. Alfred (Mary Seymour Welles), 10:170
Kelley, Dr. C. K. (1870s), 20:103
Kelley, Hall Jackson (1790-1874; entrepreneur), 28:33, 39, 40, 51-52
Kelley, Katherine, see Abbott, Mrs. Edward (second wife)
Kelley, Stillman (of Washington Ave., 1880s), 38:118
Kellner, Rev. Maximilian (late 1800s), 21:62
Kellner, Mrs. Maximilian (formerly Mrs. Arthur Brooks), 21:62
Kellogg, Clara Louise (1842-1916; opera singer), 30:27
Kelsey, Louise (schoolgirl, 1860s), 32:36
Kelsey, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:76 (Map 1)
Kelso, Robert (c. 1920): quoted on poor relief, 18:13, 15-16
Kelvin, Lord (William Thomson; 1824-1907; inventor), 34:119
Kemball, see also Kimball
Kemball, Elizabeth, see Straight, Mrs. Thomas
Kemball, Henry (of Watertown, 1630s), 8:20
Kemball, Mrs. Henry (Susanna), 8:20
Kemp, Capt. Joseph I. (of Boston Marine Society, 1940s), 27:86n96
Kemper, Eliza [?], see Jackson, Mrs. David
Kemper, Maria, see Morton, Mrs. John
Kemper, Susan [?], see Jackson, Mrs. David
Kendall, Deacon Edward ?, 22:108
Kendall, “Goody” (accused of witchcraft, late 1600s), 17:48-49, 50
Kendall, J. (runs private school for boys, 1870s, Appian Way), 44:139-40
Kendall, James (Harvard tutor, 1798-99), 11:35n2, 36, 37
Kendall, John (d. before 1661), 17:49
Kendall, Mrs. John (Elizabeth [Holley]), 17:49
Kendal[l], Rev. Samuel (1753-1814? at Weston), 16:97
Kendall Square, 18:19; 34:120; 36:84; 39:101; 41:11; 42:36-37, 65
– generating plant on, 42:9, 10, 12
– Our Neighbors at (1922 publication), 40:42 Kendall’s Brass Band, 40:47. See also Music Kendrick (Newton horticulturist, mid-1800s), 38:83 Kenmore Square (Boston), 39:30 Kennebunk, Maine, see Maine, State of Kennedy, Artemas (baker, 1800s), 15:33 Kennedy, Prof. Charles J. (historian, 1950s), 38:24 Kennedy, F. Lowell (politician, 1910), 6:68 Kennedy, Frank A. (builds Highland St. house, 1863), 43:11, 12, 18 Kennedy, John F. (1917-1963; U.S. president 1960-63), 40:92; 44:94, 95 Kennedy, Joseph P. (1888-1969? politician), 35:112 Kennedy, Robert F. (1925-1968), 44:95 Kennedy, Robert Woods (architect, 1920s), 43:23 Kennedy, Mr. (Boat Club member, 1920s), 39:133 Kennedy Avenue/Road/Lane, 1:59; 42:81; 43:12, 159, 160 (illus. #1 following) “Kennedy Biscuits,” 43:11 Kennedy family (Boston, 1850), 41:60 Kennedy Library and Museum, 41:50; 43:95 Kennelly, Prof. Arthur E. (c. 1930; electronics), 34:122 Kennett, Bishop White (1660-1728; of London), 38:105-6 Kenney, see also Kenny Kenney, M. Joseph (letter of, 1938), 37:74 Kenniston, Mr. (MDC chairman, 1920s), 39:135 Kenny, see also Kenney Kenny, Isaac C. (baker, mid-1800s), 8:38 Kent, Benjamin (lawyer, 1770s), 40:131 Kent, George H. (bookseller; d. c. 1921), 8:34, 39; 15:31
– “Merchants of Old Cambridge in the Early Days” (1912 paper), 8:30-40
– See also University Book Store Kent, Chief Justice James (1763-1847; of New York), 7:34-35, 38-39, 41-50 passim Kent, Samuel (landowner, c. 1800), 20:129 Kent (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:44, 49 Kent County (England), 14:81, 96, 99, 100 (map facing), 103; 15:24; 16:75; 44:58 Kent Street, 14:60, 67 Keokuk (U.S. ironclad, 1863), 10:187 Kerlin, Catharine, see Wilder, Mrs. Amos N. Kerr (slave, mid-1700s), 17:51. See also Slavery Kerrison, Dr. Philip D. (c. 1900), 25:95 Kerrison, Mrs. Philip D. (Mabel Howe), 25:95 Kershaw, Francis S. (of Fine Arts Museum, Boston, c. 1900), 32:89; 33:55; 35:58 Kershaw, Mrs. Francis S. (Justine Houghton; d. c. 1951), 33:55 Kettell, Catherine, see Brewster, Mrs. William Kettell, Charles W.: Lexington house of (built 1901). 43:159, 160 (illus. #3 following), 169 Kettle Cove (Manchester), 13:125 Keyes, Prof. Frederick (Berkeley St. resident, 1930s), 21:69 Keyes, Capt. John (at Battle of Bunker Hill), 5:26n1, 28 Khrushchev, Nikita (1894-1971; Russian premier), 40:92-93 Kidder, Alfred (Brattle St. house built for, 1893), 43:49 Kidder, Prof, and Mrs. Alfred V. (Holden St. residents, 1942-65), 41:38; 44:36 Kidder, Dorothy, see Hyde/Hide, Mrs. Jonathan [2d] Kidder, Francis D. (landowner, 1855), 20:133 Kidder, James (1626-1676; of Billerica), 9:76, 77; 14:103 Kidder, Jerome G. (oil and coal dealer, mid-1800s), 7:105 Kidder, Lydia (b. 1726; Mrs. Walter Cooper, Jr.; later Mrs. Jonathan Hill), 6:20 Kidder, Lydia Prentice, see Kidder, Mrs. Thomas Kidder, Nathaniel (of Medford; sues Nutting, 1771), 5:60-62 Kidder, Thomas (bap. 1698, d. before 1792), 6:20 Kidder, Mrs. Thomas (b. 1703; Lydia Prentice [Cooper]), 6:20 Kidder, Deacon: house of (on present Church St.), 8:34, 36 Kidder family, 6:34 Kidder, Peabody & Co., 23:34 Kidder’s Lane, 14:67; 20:125, 132. See also Rindge Avenue Kiernan (or Cannon), James (furniture maker and dealer, before 1850), 8:39 Kiernan, Thomas and Mary (c. 1800), 10:179 Kiernan, Thomas J. (1837-1914; at Harvard Library), 27:33
– obituary, 10:179 Kiernan, Mrs. Thomas J. (Fannie Grossman), 10:179 Kiernan, William L. (librarian, c. 1900), 10:179 Kilby Street (Boston), 16:81 Kilham, see also Killam Kilham (with Wyeth’s expedition, 1830s), 28:44 Killam, see also Kilham Killam, Edson T., Associates, Inc. (engineers), 39:37 Killiam, Paul (Kirkland Pl. resident, 1930s), 23:81, 82 Killian, James R., Jr. (b. 1904; MIT president, 1948-57), 42:60, 63-64, 66 Killroy, Mathew (British soldier at Boston Massacre, 1770), 40:124 Kilpatrick, Miss (French teacher, 1890s), 35:105 Kim, Earl (composer, 1960s), 41:102 Kimball, see also Kemball Kimball, Aaron (officer, 1775), 11:76 Kimball, Annie, see Peabody, Mrs. Jacob Kimball, Capt. Benjamin (1775), 11:76 Kimball, Benjamin (of “Young Republicans,” 1870s), 20:35 Kimball, Mrs. David (Radcliffe benefactor), 44:145 Kimball, Capt. Ebenezer (tavern keeper, c. 1830), 20:131; 37:33 Kimball, Ella Florence, see Brooks, Mrs. Edwin Chapin Kimball, Henry H. (historian, 1890s), 38:36 Kimball, Isabel, see Whiting, Mrs. Charles F. Kimball, Mary, see Pearson, Mrs. Ora Kimball, Richard (settler, 1634): descendants of, 3:114; 10:183 Kimball, Sidney Fiske (author, 1920s), 33:59n9, 60n12, 62n20 Kimball (Harvard tutor, 1800), 11:47-48 Kimball, Miss (friend [teacher?) of Margaret Fuller, 1820), 28:26 Kindergartens, see School(s) King, Rev. Basil, see King, Rev. William Benjamin Basil King, Caroline, see Wyman, Mrs. Edward King, Clarence (1842-1901; geologist): quoted, 5:14-15 King, Miss Edith (schoolmistress, New York), 42:131, 134 King, Prof. Edward Skinner (1861-1931; astronomer), 31:49 King, Mrs. Edward Skinner: “Story of a Lost Brook” (1945 paper), 31:44-52, 53, 57 King, Moses (boathouses run by, 1800s), 20:56 King, Moses (historian, 1878), 38:50n42 King, Rolf (historian, 1955), 40:96n1 King, Rufus (1755-1827; Federalist), 3:61; 40:9n4, 15, 19-20 King, Rev. Thomas Starr (1824-1864), 33:154; 34:27 King, Rev. William Benjamin Basil (1859-1928), 20:99; 21:62 King, Mrs. William Benjamin Basil, 21:62 King, Mrs. (Hill and Jenks family friend, c. 1810), 9:20 King, Mrs. (Plant Club member, 1890s), 35:22 King Philip’s War, see War(s) King School, 44:103. See also School(s) “King” Street (Boston), 27:44 King’s Chapel (Boston), 25:117; 41:111
– Annals of (Foote), 10:42n2, 47n1, 48n3
– burying ground at, see Burying ground(s)
– changed to Unitarian congregation, 23:27; 41:42
– communion plate given to (1694, 1772), 41:42-43
– design, building, and rebuilding of, 10:42; 23:18, 19, 21; 33:64
– known as “Stone Chapel,” 29:69
– members of, 3:106; 10:7, 23, 42, 45n3; 16:79; 32:80; 36:65, 69; 43:86
– ministers at, 5:75; 11:38-39; 23:27
– organist at, 10:16n1, 23, 42
– pew rent at, 10:42
– volunteer choir at, 32:79-80 King’s College, see Columbia College/University King’s College Chapel (England), 26:42; 27:31; 32:110 King’s Council, see Mandamus Council “King’s Highway,” see Charlestown-Watertown road “King’s Road” (Cambridge to Boston), 10:10 Kingsbury, Nathaniel W. (Fayerweather St. resident, 1970s), 43:11 Kingsley, Chester W. (of Cambridge Water Board, 1865-94), 20:132, 134; 41:8, 9 Kingsley, Lucy, see Porter, Mrs. A. Kingsley Kingsley Park, 2:36; 41:9, 11, 159 Kingston, Massachusetts: Sever house in, 34:68 Kinnaird, Hon. Mrs. Arthur (nurses’ home founded by, 1855), 36:42, 48 Kinnaird, Helen, see Dana, Hon. Mrs. Edmund Kinnaird, Lord, 3:57, 64; 26:83, 95n64 Kinnaird Street, 14:62, 65; 26:95n64; 43:141 Kinnear, John (Scottish carpenter; d. 1928), 44:167
– bequest of, 39:12 Kinsley Iron property, 40:24 Kipling, Rudyard (1856-1936), 24:94
– quoted, 2:73; 26:64n1 Kirchner, Leon (composer, 1960s), 41:102 Kirkland, Rev. John Thornton (1771-1840; Harvard president 1810-29), 4:16, 87; 7:68; 9:33; 11:19, 30, 45n3; 16:65; 25:97; 28:23; 44:131
– approves “flip,” 20:23
– and Divinity School, 36:59, 60, 61, 73; 37:76
– as minister, 9:8, 31; 36:59
– and Observatory, 25:77, 78; 33:15
– resigns, 11:29n4; 41:121
– street named for, 14:62, 66; 23:76; 25:120; 32:27 (see also Kirkland Street)
– and University Press, 44:76, 77, 78, 80
– Waterhouse letters to, 4:17-20
– welcomes Lafayette (1824), 31:64 Kirkland, Mrs. John Thornton (Elizabeth Cabot), 2:25-26; 11:29 Kirkland Court, 23:92, 93 Kirkland Inn, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Kirkland Place, 18:33, 44; 23:15; 30:87; 34:64; 41:16n1, 17n2, 22, 32
– paper on (1935), 23:76-94 Kirkland Street, 2:44; 17:61; 18:20, 32, 41; 22:59; 26:14; 33:39; 38:30n12; 41:22, 36; 42:19; 44:58
– architecture on, 26:39, 40 (and illus. #1, #4, #5 following); 27:17; 41:25
– connecting streets laid out, 14:61, 67; 18:27; 41:23
– as country road/”way to Charlestown,” 1:12; 7:54; 17:46; 22:97; 23:26; 33:38; 39:26; 41:19, 20n3, 32 (see also Charlestown-Watertown road)
– horse-car line on, 23:77; 30:26; 39:92, 95; 42:89 (see also Street railway[s])
– liquor licensing on (1880s), 13:11
– names and naming of, 14:62, 67; 32:27; 41:16n1, 32
– as “Professors’ Row” (mid-1800s), 1:14-15, l6; 3:107; 14:66; 20:93; 23:76; 25:22; 41:32; 44:133
– residents of/houses on, 10:174; 11:31n1; 18:28; 21:63, 106; 23:57, 77, 89-92; 34:64; 36:9; 41:17, 18, 32-34
– – – Child, 23:93; 42:16
– – – Eliot/Norton, 32:79; 42:15, 16
– – – Farrar/Moore, 44:135
– – – Higginson, 1:49; 2:20; 25:129; 41:32
– – – Howe/Peabody, see Foxcroft-Danforth house site; Oxford Street (“No. 1”)
– – – and moving of houses, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc.
– – – Sparks, 25:118; 26:40; 44:133 (see also Quincy Street)
– – – Ware/Nichols, 4:32; 23:81-82, 93 Kirman, John (settler, 1630s), 14:84 Kissam, Dr. Richard (botanist, c. 1800), 43:137 Kitchens
– domestic, see Food (cooking/kitchens)
– Harvard “Buttery,” 29:20 (see also Harvard College/University) Kittery Point, Maine, 6:20. See also Maine, State of Kittredge, Frances, see Wesselhoeft, Frances Kittredge Kittredge, Prof. George Lyman (1860-1941; “Kitty”), 27:34; 32:115; 34:51-53, 55; 35:106, 118, 121; 37:108, 110; 41:135; 44:20
– and Harvard Square traffic, 32:53-54; 44:25 Kittredge, Rev. Henry C. (rector of St. Paul’s School, Concord, N.H.), 35:106; 41:135, 136 Kittredge, Prof. James (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Kluckhohn, Clyde: papers of, 42:119, 122 Knapp, Frank (tobacco store manager, 1950s), 41:110-11, 112 Knapp, Mrs. Frank (Minerva), 41:111 Knapp, John (Harvard 1800): Allston letter to, 29:16 (illus. following), 18n18 Kneeland, Elizabeth (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Kneeland, Lydia (c. 1830; daughter of Dr. William), 11:30 Kneeland, Mary, see Hedge, Mrs. Levi Kneeland, Dr. William (1770s), 3:51; 11:30n2; 13:44; 20:92
– site of house, 1:58; 20:92 Knickerbocker magazine, 25:42. See also Periodicals (General) Knight, Frederick H. (of Corning Glass Co., 1950s), 36:102 Knight, Rhoda May, see Rindge, Mrs. Frederick Hastings Knight, Mrs. William, see Vassall, Anna Knoblock, Edward (playwright, 1920s), 40:112, 113 Knowles, Rev. John (c. 1700), 24:50 Knowlton, Capt. Frederick (of Pittsford, N.Y., before 1916), 43:169 Knowlton, Capt. Thomas (1740-1776): at Battle of Bunker Hill, 5:21, 26-27, 28, 30 Knox, Eliza T. (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Knox, Gen. Henry (1750-1806), 6:5, 9, 10; 19:50; 25:137; 27:56; 37:61; 43:78
– and Shays’s Rebellion, 40:14-18 passim, 20n24, 21
Knox, Mrs. Henry (Lucy Flucker), 19:50
Knox, William (British under-secretary, 1770s), 5:72, 74-75, 77, 85-88 passim, 94
Knudsen, Gene (Dramatic Club, 1941), 38:61
Knyphausen, Gen. William (Baron von; 1716- 1800), 19:56
Koch, Carl (architect. 1937), 43:51
Koehler, Sylvester Rosa (1837-1900; curator of engravings at Fine Arts Museum, Boston), 35:62, 63
Koeper, Prof. Frederick (at University of Illinois, 1960s), 42:35
Kollock Family Genealogy, 19:47n, 79
Kolster, Charles (of Boston; radio inspector, c. 1915), 34:119
Kolster, Frederick (inventor, c. 1910), 34:119
Korean War, see War(s)
Kossuth, Louis (1802-1894; Hungarian revolutionary hero), 23:59-60; 32:12
Koszol, Prof. Andre (of Strassburg, reads paper on Longfellow, 1928), 20:14
Kotchmar, Herman (organist, mid-1800s), 32:91
Koussevitsky, Serge (1874-1951; orchestra conductor), 32:93
Kozol, Jonathan (20th-c. writer, educator), 41:114
Krauel, Richard (historian, c. 1910), 40:18n20
Kresge Auditorium (MIT), 42:63
Kress, Samuel (Harvard benefactor, 1920s), 27:26
Kropotkin, Prince Peter (1842-1921; anarchist), 40:145
Kuhn, Dr. Adam (1741-1817; Philadelphia physician, botanist), 43:137
Kuhn, Eda, see Loeb, Eda Kuhn
Kuznets, Prof, and Mrs. Simon Smith (Francis Ave. residents, 1960s), 41:30

L

Labaree, Prof. Benjamin W. (of Williams College): “The Boston Tea Party and the American Revolution” (1963 paper), 39:144-64
Labor
– abundance/scarcity of, 39:120; 40:54
– bilingual advertisements for (“help wanted”), 42:73, 76
– child, 14:125
– cost of, see Wages and salaries
– “hired help” (cooks, housekeepers, furnace-tenders, coachmen, etc.), see Servants/ “hired help”
– immigrant, 19:18, 34, 41; 36:93, 95-96, 98, 102; 39:112, 117; 40:150; 42:73, 76; 43:22, 73 (see also Population [foreign-born])
– and life insurance, 40:34-35
– Massachusetts Bureau of Labor Statistics, 5:13; 13:15
– and meaning of “servant” in 1600s, 26:69n10
– Negro servants, see Negroes; Slavery
– opposition of, to sewing machine, 14:130-32
– slavery as viewed by, 10:70n5
– unions and unionism, 20:89; 33:128-29; 40:141, 159
– women’s employment, see Women
– and “Working Man’s University,” see Educational Exchange of Greater Boston, Inc. (Prospect Union)
– See also Apprenticeship; Servants/”hired help”; Strike(s) “Labradore tea,” see Tea Lacey, Thomas (businessman, 1900), 42:73 Ladd, Caroline S., see Hayes, Mrs. John Lord Ladd, Herman W. (inventor, 1899), 34:115 Ladd, Judge John S. (1850s), 13:94; 17:22 Ladd, Miss Mary Elizabeth (interior decorator, 1960s), 44:38 Ladies’ Charitable Society, Ladies’ (Female) Humane Society, Ladies’ Samaritan Society, see Charity Ladies’ Companion, see Periodicals (General) La Farge, Mrs. Bancel (Mabel [“Polly”] Hooper), 43:15 Lafayette, Marquis de (1757-1834; statesman), 10:162
– in U.S., 1:64; 3:19; 11:27; 13:58n3; 23:52; 25:122; 27:50; 31:64; 32:28; 33:152; 43:118
– – – wallpaper honoring, 37:72
– – – Washington letter to, 26:87 Lafayette Square, 12:29; 14:53, 54, 66, 129; 22:67, 68, 71-72; 26:101; 35:80, 84; 36:80
– street railway at, 39:82, 91 Lake, Prof. Kirsopp (1872-1946; Bible scholar), 18:34; 36:66, 70 Lake Quinsigamond, 2:16. See also Ponds and lakes Lake Street (Arlington), 5:39 Lake Street (Cambridge), 14:63; 26:99n67 Lake View Avenue, 2:36; 28:31; 30:5; 32:98; 33:99; 37:34
– “Early History, Architecture, and Residents” (1979 paper), 44:159-69 (and maps, illustrations) Lakes, see Ponds and lakes Lamb, Arthur A. (of Readville; moves Boat Club, 1947), 39:139 Lamb, George (mapmaker, 1906), 14:77 Lamb, Prof. Robert (Francis Ave. resident; d. 1952), 41:30 Lamb, Mrs. Robert (Helen Boyden), 41:30 Lamb, Sgt. Roger (of Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 1777), 13:33, 34n2, 50n4 Lamb, Mrs. (of Fales family; Follen St. resident, 1860s), 20:96 Lamb, Mr. (in Hooper-Lee-Nichols house, early 20th c.), 43:20 Lambert, Mrs. William B. (presents papers to CHS, 1919), 14:139 Lambert Avenue, 38:118, 120. See also Upland Road Lamont, Thomas W. (1870-1948; banker), 33:33 Lamont Library, building of, 33:17, 19, 33, 35. See also Harvard Library; Library(ies) Lamps, lamplighter, see Lights and lighting Lamson, Barnabas (settler, 1635; d. c. 1640), 14:95 Lamson, Gardner (Harvard 1877), 32:88 Lamson, John, Joseph, Nathaniel (Boston stonecutters), 35:24 Lamson, Prof, [at MIT] and Mrs. Roy (Francis Ave. residents, 1960s), 41:32 Lancaster, Southworth: “Fire in Cambridge” (1956 paper), 36:75-92 Lancaster, Mrs. Southworth, 33:46 Lancaster, Massachusetts, 7:77; 10:30; 11:22, 26
– founding and settlement of, 1:28-29; 10:190; 11:86
– histories of, 17:33, 42
– stage to, 4:36 Lancaster Avenue (later Street), 38:118, 119, 120 Lancers, the, 1:27; 30:13; 41:169 Land, William G. (T. Hill biographer, 1933), 22:15 Land
– area used by Water Department, 41:10
– Boston land values (1800-1850), 44:173
– British land tenure system (gavelkind), 14:99
– common, “Proprietors” of, 43:69 (see also Cambridge Common)
– grants of, see Land grants
– “impaled,” see Fences and walls
– ownership of:
– – – acres per family (“Newtown[e]”), 44:57, 58-59, 61
– – – by Harvard, see Harvard College/University
– – – and voting, 42:79 (see also Voting)
– prices of, see Prices
– real estate business, see Business and industry
– speculation in, 37:16, 21, 25; 39:118, 121; 42:50, 90; 44:162
– – – by Craigie, 27:54-55, 61-63, 65; 31:26; 37:18 (see also Craigie, Dr. Andrew)
– – – by Dana family, 26:92
– – – failure of (in Cambridgeport), 16:43; 39:111
– – – by E. Howe, 25:137; 43:153, 154
– – – in Maine, 5:60, 61, 75; 27:65
– – – in Nova Scotia, 5:91-92, 93, 96
– (see also East Cambridge Land Company; Lechmere Point Corporation)
– triangular lots of, see “Deltas” Land fill, see Marsh(es) Land grants
– 1620s, 21:19-20, 28-29, 32-47 passim; 33:138-39
– 1630s, 3:10-11, 16; 5:52; 13:85-86; 14:44; 15:26; 17:42; 21:28-29, 32-38 passim; 31:22, 24, 37; 33:145; 39:126; 43:69, 112, 115; 44:53, 54-55, 57-59
– 1640-55, 9:71-78; 14:35; 20:43-47; 21:104; 22:20; 26:69; 37:31; 39:109; 43:115
– 1660s, 2:15-16; 7:100; 26:73; 35:92; 43:69
– 1700, 43:117
– late 1700s, 5:91-92, 95; 14:46; 28:15
– See also Massachusetts General Court/Legislature Landis, Dean James M. (Francis Ave. resident, 1937-46), 41:28, 110; 44:92 Landis, Mrs. James M., 41:28 Landor, Walter Savage (1775-1864; English poet), 27:26; 28:76 Landscape architects/gardening, see Agriculture and horticulture Landscape wallpaper, see Houses, meetinghouses, etc. Lane, Rev. Benjamin I. (late 1800s), 15:34 Lane, C. Chester (of Harvard Press, c. 1920), 37:111 Lane, Gardner M. (bank official, 1890), 31:12; 41:43 Lane, Prof. George Martin (1823-1897; classicist), 1:70; 12:33; 18:39; 20:96; 23:32; 26:21, 22; 28:112n; 30:15; 34:42
– ballad by, 25:117
– and German scholarship, 2:119
– houses of, 18:44; 22:46 Lane, Mrs. George Martin (daughter of Rev. H. F. Harrington), 28:117; 34:35 Lane, Guy (Scott St. resident, 1929-34), 41:38 Lane, Mrs. Guy (Mary Rivers), 41:38 Lane, Capt. James (m. 1763), 8:22 Lane, Mrs. James, see Adams, Chary Lane, Josiah (1782-1876; Vassal1-Craigie House resident, 1828-33), 21:104 Lane, Mrs. Josiah (Nancy Wilder), 21:104 Lane, Miss Susan Minot (d. 1893), 10:171; 33:39 Lane, Thomas (Harvard 1851), 21:104 Lane, William Coolidge (1859-1931; Harvard Librarian), 8:53; 27:34, 37, 38
– obituary, 21:72-75
– papers by:
– – – “The Building of Holworthy Hall” (1912), 7:63-69
– – – “Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse and Harvard University” (1909), 4:5-22; 29:15n7
– – – “Nehemiah Walter’s Elegy on Elijah Corlet” (1906), 2:13-20
– reads (1922) Adams letters (1784, 1785), 16:14 Lane, Mrs. William Coolidge (Bertha Peabody), 21:75 Lane, William Homer (father of William C.), 21:72 Lane, Mrs. William Homer (Caroline Matilda Coolidge), 21:72 Lane, Misses (sisters of George Martin Lane), 28:112n Lang, Malcolm (Harvard 1902; choirmaster), 32:88 Langdell, Dean Christopher Columbus (1826-1906), 5:105; 10:176; 18:34; 26:22, 28-30; 33:25; 34:8, 38; 41:125-30 passim Langdell, Mrs. Christopher Columbus (daughter of Mrs. Huson), 18:34; 23:45 Langdell Hall (Harvard), 18:31; 34:90; 41:130 Langdell house, 23:45
– moving of (c. 1900), 23:25, 44, 46 Langdon, Charlotte Augusta, see Sibley, Mrs. John Langdon Langdon, John (landowner, c. 1700), 14:40; 16:33, 76; 22:70 Langdon, Katherine (Hill and Jenks family friend, c. 1800), 9:13, 14, 20 Langdon, Priscilla, see Hooper, Mrs. Henry Northey Langdon, Rev. Samuel (1723-1797; Harvard president 1773-80), 13:38, 40; 18:74; 37:56, 118
– leads prayer before Battle of Bunker Hill, 1:63; 4:41; 5:26; 16:80; 23:76; 33:148; 37:51; 42:82; 43:72
– street named for, 14:62, 66; 25:120; 32:27 Langdon, Mrs. (sister of William Eustis; c. 1800), 9:14, 28, 34 Langdon, Miss (older sister of Katherine?), 9:20 Langdon family, 10:189 Langdon Street, 14:62, 66; 32:27 Langfeld, Prof. Herbert and Mrs. (Florence) (Bryant St. residents, 1911-23), 41:36 Langley, Prof. John Williams (1841-1918; at University of Michigan), 4:82 Langmaid, Dr. Samuel (Harvard 1859; Boston physician and musician), 3:36; 32:87 Language(s)
– bilingual (French-English) help-wanted advertisements, 42:73, 76
– “British English” (1850s), 32:14
– of children (to elders), 32:28 (see also Society [people] [and manners])
– classical, knowledge of, 4:79; 10:176, 182, 191; 11:63; 18:39; 23:33-34; 30:38, 49; 32:102; 33:81; 35:103, 104, 114; 38:78
– – – by day-laborer, 1:13
– – – diary kept in Latin, 31:63
– – – Greek writings introduced into Harvard, 2:124; 3:26-28
– – – Hebrew, 10:25
– – – Latin epitaphs, 2:13; 17:101; 25:106
– – – Latin grammar, see Schoolbooks
– – – Latin orations, “11:40, 59-60; 12:15, 17, 18, 21; 29:30, 31-32
– – – “Latin week” and “Greek week” (at Harvard), 11:35n, 36, 42
– – – “Law Latin,” 17:18
– – – by preachers, 3:85; 36:54, 55
– – – by printers, 8:40; 15:17-19, 35; 44:65, 68
– – – by schoolboys and girls, 1:51; 2:17; 11:49; 21:110, 119; 28:26, 27; 30:30; 31:41; 32:37; 33:104; 34:67; 36:33, 35; 42:133
– – – teachers/teaching of, 2:116-24 passim; 3:27; 7:104; 9:31; 10:25; 11:34-35; 12:32-33, 37; 13:93, 94; 22:108-9, 110; 25:92, 102; 29:21; 30:30, 85; 32:38, 45, 46; 33:20, 100-101; 34:42, 45; 35:46, 47-48, 94, 97-98, 105, 122; 36:55, 56, 59, 67; 40:144; 44:68, 73
– and court interpreters, 17:25
– French, German, Italian, Spanish, see modern European, and instruction in, below
– Indian, works translated into, 3:81 (see also Bible, the)
– modern European, and instruction in, 1:17; 4:85; 10:192; 11:38; 14:6, 7; 18:33; 25:26, 27, 102; 26:21; 28:26, 27; 32:37-45 passim; 33:46; 34:66, 71; 35:39, 41, 49, 53-54, 114; 40:144; 44:76
– – – lack of knowledge of, 11:63
– – – “wickedness” of French, 25:27; 27:66
– and “origin of swearing” (Dr. Holmes on), 4:44
– Russian (J. Q. Adams learns), 26:88 (see also Russia)
– slang, 10:23; 32:14, 37, 41; 33:131; 42:17 Langworthy, Rev. Isaac (Congregational Librarian, 1879), 38:104 Lanman, Prof. Charles Rockwell (Farrar St. resident, 1890-1939), 23:41; 35:119-20; 41:37; 42:14-30 passim, 119, 122; 44: 112 Lanman, Mrs. Charles Rockwell (Mary Hinckley), 41:37; 42:14, 17, 24-29 passim Lanman, Esther, see Cushman, Mrs. Robert A. Lanman, Faith (Mrs. Thomas Hine; later, second wife of Aldrich Durant), 41:37, 133; 42:29 Lanman, Dr. Thomas Hinckley (b. 1891), 41:133, 135; 42:18-19, 29 Lanman-Farrar St. Trust, 41:37 Lansdowne Street, 43:142 Lantern slides, see Photography La Piana, Prof. George (theologian, 1930s), 21:63; 36:66 La Piana, Miss (sister of George), 21:63 Larch/Larchwood Road, 14:104, 106; 24:9; 25:17; 27:99 “Larches, The”/”Larchwood” (William and John C. Gray estate), 14:104-6, 113; 32:99; 41:158; 44:163
– architecture of, 6:25; 14:105; 32:100; 33:62; 43:43-44
– building of, 10:177; 14:104; 16:38
– on original site, 14:104; 41:165
– photograph of, 43:31 (illus. #3 following) Larkin, Sophia (Avon Home matron, 1874), 38:121 “Larry” (Dean Everett’s dog), 36:67 Larz Anderson Bridge, see Bridge(s) Laski, Harold (1893-1950; political scientist), 34:13 Latham, Gary (landowner; d. 1685), 14:103; 21:82 Lathrop, see also Lothrop Lathrop, John (Council member, 1770s), 13:39n3 Lathrop, Rev. John (c. 1800), 11:45; 15:16, 17 Lathrop, Juliet P., see Wellington, Mrs. Joseph Dix Lathrop, Rose Hawthorne, see Alphonsa, Mother Latin, see Language(s) (classical, knowledge of) Lattimer, Mrs. Ezra (Adelia Louisa Wellington), 8:27 Laud, Archbishop William (1573-1645)
– and charter, 44:46, 55
– persecutes nonconformists, 3:79; 10:93-94; 14:85, 86, 91, 103; 22:81; 31:62; 33:137; 38:91; 42:100-103 passim; 43:111; 44:55 Laurens, Henry (1724-1792; president of Continental Congress), 22:32 Laurens, John (1754-1782; soldier, diplomat), 10:51n2; 13:74, 76 Lavash, A. (carpenter, 1940s), 30:16 Lavicourt, John (m. 1768), 10:31-32n1 Lavicourt, Mrs. John, see Vassall, Lucy Law, Emerson W. (clerk of court, ret. 1910), 17:22, 23 Law, Reverend (Barbados, 1637), 40:81 Law (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:45 Law(s)
– apprenticeship in study of, 36:57
– “Bill Board” (1928), 35:22
– “Blue Laws,” 32:77
– “Body of Liberties” (1641), see Massachusetts, below
– for choice of minister (1695), 16:98
– Confiscation Acts (1776), 10:54n2 (see also Loyalists)
– Conspirators Act (1779), 16:78
– copyright, 21:123; 28:75
– and Dana (R. H., Jr.) as lawyer, 10:142-58 passim
– and early education, 13:89, 94; 32:69
– Enabling Act (1960s), 39:72, 74; 43:89
– Enclosure Act (1830), 43:74-75
– English, 7:33-49 passim
– – – in colonies, 7:37-38, 41, 43, 102; 17:17-20; 30:40; 33:59; 39:160
– – – forbidding glass workers to come to U.S. (c. 1840), 36:96
– – – Puritan view of, 7:37, 48-49
– – – and trade, 39:147-48, 151-55 passim, 158, 159-64 (see also Stamp Act)
– excise duty imposed by, 16:81 (see also Stamp Act)
– Federal Reserve Act, 12:41
– fines for breaking, see Fines and penalties
– fire ordinances, 36:75, 77
– and first law school in country (Litchfield, Connecticut), 25:122
– free textbook (1884), 13:102
– Fugitive Slave, see Slavery
– historic preservation, see Historic preservation
– and the Indians, see Indians
– International (Wheaton), Dana’s notes to, 10:155, 165; 26:117
– and law firms, 10:182, 191; 15:35
– – – Boston (1849-50), 41:60
– and law library (East Cambridge), 39:67
– and lawsuits, 20:93; 26:79; 28:16; 40:55, 56, 130
– – – Boston Massacre and, see Boston Massacre
– – – costs of, see Expenses
– – – for debts/failure to deliver goods, 5:61-62; 16:86-87; 18:25; 27:77
– – – for defamation of character, 16:73-74; 21:95; 37:14
– – – demanding freedom for slaves, see Slavery
– – – to determine ownership of church property (First Parish, 1831), 43:120
– – – against Harvard (1805), 29:70
– – – Harvard-Andover (1920s), 36:72, 73
– – – against internal revenue inspector, see Jarvis, Leonard [1st]
– – – for land damages or trespass, 14:49, 57, 59, 74; 16:82; 37:18
– – – litigation within family, 3:12-13, 16; 21:91; 24:7; 27:66; 39:59
– – – Puritan, 33:140
– – – railroad bridge, 20:130
– – – for refusal to pay or collect town taxes, 20:116-17
– – – Vassall family, 10:20, 21, 38, 46n1; 16:73-74; 21:95; 37:14
– and lawyer’s fee (D. Webster), 40:55-56
– and legal status of colonial churches, 10:105-13
– liquor licensing, see Wine and spirits
– Massachusetts:
– – – compiled (1823), 41:64
– – – foundation of (“Body of Liberties,” 1641), 30:40
– Massachusetts Province (1690s-1779), 5:68n4; 10:51n1, 54n2; 13:24n1; 16:78, 81, 98; 17:93-95
– and parish powers, 16:98; 17:96
– and Police Courts, 17:20-23
– prohibiting pasturing cows in streets (1846), 39:114
– prohibiting printing press outside Cambridge (1664), 44:66
– Province, see Massachusetts Province, above
– and Sabbath observance, 16:101-9; 32:26; 33: 141
– Sewall (Judge Jonathan) and (1966 paper on), 40:123-36
– and “Slavery Cases,” see Slavery
– Special, Enacted…for the City of Cambridge, 1701-1890, 43:74n10
– Story (Judge) and (1912 paper on), 7:33-50
– and street railway lines, 39:88, 97
– turnpike corporation, 14:49, 50 (see also Streets and highways [construction of])
– and women’s clothing, 30:23
– zoning ordinances, 23:91; 42:15, 35, 45, 91
– – – “germ of,” 36:76
– See also Court(s), the; Crime; Execution(s); Fines and penalties; Harvard Law School; Land grants; Massachusetts General Court/Legislature; Wills and testaments Law and Order League, 13:10, 12 Law Enforcement Association, 13:12 Lawley Shipyard (1947), 39:139. See also Business and industry (shipbuilding) Lawn, the, Lawn Avenue, 34:84, 87. See also Mount Auburn Cemetery Lawrence, Abbott (1792-1835; manufacturer, philanthropist), 2:86; 23:84; 34:79; 44:179
– declines Cabinet post, 4:88
– and Lawrence Scientific School, 4:79-80; 43:60 Lawrence, Mrs. Abbott, 32:21, 23 Lawrence, Amos Adams (1814-1886; philanthropist), 32:101; 36:10, 21 Lawrence, G. (at Harvard, 1850s), 3:26 Lawrence, Harriet, see Hemenway, Harriet Lawrence Lawrence, Helen, see Brooks, Mrs. John Graham Lawrence, Samuel (“head of firm,” 1840s), 3:20 Lawrence, Bishop William (1850-1941), 2:108; 4:79; 20:88; 36:70; 40:145
– as Casino member (1890s), 31:32
– and Episcopal Theological School, 36:10, 13, 16, 18, 21
– – – as Dean (1880s), 7:22; 36:9, 17
– and Fogg Museum, 27:25; 35:73, 74
– as preacher, 34:41, 44
– remarks by (1915) on Richard Henry Dana, 10:123-26, 132-33, 142, 158 Lawrence (1801 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:37, 42, 52 Lawrence, Massachusetts, 21:43; 34:26, 27, 29 Lawrence Academy (Groton), 33:153 Lawrence Building (Boston), 23:82 Lawrence family, 3:20; 14:80 Lawrence Hall (Episcopal Theological School), 36:8-9; 42:39 Lawrence Scientific School, 18:31, 35; 38:30n12; 41:32
– Agassiz (Louis) appointed to, 4:81; 5:109; 43:54, 60
– founded, 4:79-86
– instructors at, 4:81, 82-86; 27:15; 40:98
– Shaler as Dean of, 12:42, 44
– students at, 4:82-86; 7:79; 8:51; 12:44; 14:46
– – – Agassiz (Alexander), 5:109; 35:38 Lawrence Street, 14:63; 26:99n67 Lawson, Thomas W. (1851-1925; speculator), 36:101-2 Lawsuits, see Law(s) Lawton, Stanley H. (president of Avon Home), 38:129 Leach, Prof. Abby (1855-1918; educational pioneer), 8:50; 36:39; 44:140 League of Nations, 21:70; 33:122; 34:12 League of Women Voters, see Women’s clubs/ organizations League to Enforce Peace, 34:12 Leahy, Dan (politician, 1928), 44:88 Leake, John (Trinity Church vault of, 1779), 19:58 Leake, “Aunt” (of Mrs. George Inman), 19:57 Leamon, Rev. John H. (at Shepard Church, 1940-62), 43:122-23, 124 Learned, Col. Ebenezer (1728-1801), 37:62
– orderly book kept by (1775-76), 11:80 Learned family, 23:86 Learned’s Tavern, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Leavitt, Andrew (of Amherst, N.H., 1775), 18:67 Leavitt, Erasmus Darwin [Sr.], 11:87 Leavitt, Mrs. Erasmus Darwin [Sr.] (Almira Fay), 11:87 Leavitt, Erasmus Darwin Jr., 33:50; 41:43
– obituary, 11:87 Leavitt, Mrs. Erasmus Darwin [Jr.] (Annie Elizabeth Pettit), 11:87 Leavitt, Fred (tobacco merchant, d. c. 1922), 41:41, 106-11 passim, 114 Leavitt, George A. & Co. (New York book auctioneers), 38:87 Leavitt, Margaret (Garden St. resident, c. 1915), 11:87; 33:50 Leavitt, Mary, see Wesselhoeft, Mrs. Walter [William?] (second wife) Leavitt & Brock, 41:105 Leavitt & Peirce: history of, 41:105-16 Lebanon, Maine: first minister of, 10:24n3. See also Maine, State of Lebanon, New York, warm springs, 33:58 Lechford, Thomas (d. 1642): “Note Book” of, 5:17 Lechmere, Anthony (Loyalist, 1770s), 19:48, 59 “Lechmere,” James (slave), 10:70n5. See also Slavery Lechmere, Judge Richard (d. 1814), 10:41n1, 44; 14:40; 16:33, 73; 17:57; 19:59; 33:67; 37:21
– house of, see Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel
– house property confiscated, 16:76, 89, 91; 37:19
– slavery suit against (James v. Lechmere), 16:32, 73; 40:132-33 Lechmere, Mrs. Richard (Mary Phip[p]s), 10:33; 14:40; 15:41; 16:18-19, 32; 17:56, 57; 22:70; 25:87; 26:50; 33:76n61; 37:19, 24, 67; 40:135
– reversionary rights of, 16:89, 91 Lechmere, Thomas (1770s), 16:73; 26:50 Lechmere, Mrs. Thomas (Ann Winthrop), 16:73 Lechmere Bank, see Banks and trust companies Lechmere Canal, see Canal(s) Lechmere family, 10:53; 28:23 Lechmere Point, 1:12; 22:68; 31:23; 36:104
– bridge from, see Bridge(s) (Craigie [Canal])
– British landing at, 1:66; 14:36; 39:28; 42:82
– dam at, see Charles River Dam
– dedication of (1827), 2:27
– development of (early 1800s), 14:57; 34:99; 39:63, 110; 42:83, 88; 43:73 (see also East Cambridge; Lechmere Point Corporation)
– fortification of (1775-76), 14:40; 36:94; 39:29; 43:143
– houses on (c. 1800), 7:59; 16:48, 53, 54
– naming of, 16:33
– See also “Graves’ Neck” Lechmere Point Corporation, 7:60; 14:57, 58, 64, 67, 68, 72; 16:91-92, 94; 36:94; 39:64, 111-12; 42:83 Lechmere Square, 14:57; 34:30; 39:102, 104; 42:91 Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house (149, now 145 Brattle St.), 16:21; 25:121; 27:59; 33:97; 40:126
– Lechmere builds (1762), 15:27, 41; 16:32; 17:56; 26:50; 37:19, 22; 42:81
– original site (Brattle and Sparks), 1:59; 9:22n1; 16:32; 26:57
– present site (Brattle and Riedesel Ave.), 3:46; 6:25; 15:27; 17:56; 26:57; 37:26; 43:51
– – – in Historic District, 39:74
– as “prison” (1777-78), 3:46; 13:31-32; 15:27; 17:56; 25:87; 26:57; 32:27; 37:20, 67-68
– – – confiscated (1777), 13:44, 49; 16:34; 37:19-20
– subsequent owners:
– – – Brewster (purchased 1845), 1:59; 15:27; 16:32; 22:70; 24:85; 43:51
– – – Foster (1820s), 15:27
– – – Lee (Thomas) family (purchased 1779), 9:22n1; 37:19, 20
– – – Sewall (purchased 1771), 15:27; 24:85; 37:19; 40:126 (see also confiscated, above) Le Clerc, Miss (French teacher, 1859), 35:46-47, 49 Lecture Day (church), 24:76; 29:75 Lectures, see Education Leddra, William (Quaker, executed 1661), 24:75 Ledyard, Lewis (m. 1906), 44:119 Ledyard, Mrs. Lewis (Ruth Emery), 44:119 Lee, Arthur (1740-1792; diplomat), 30:59; 39:157n27 Lee, Capt. and Mrs. Benjamin: in Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house (c. 1807), 9:22; 37:20 Lee, Gen. Charles (1731-1782), 18:49, 59-64 passim, 74; 30:64, 65; 37:54-55, 56
– given as “Richard,” 22:30
– headquarters of (“Hobgoblin Hall”), 33:60n12 Lee, Rev. Daniel (with Wyeth expedition, 1830s), 28:48 Lee, Deborah, see Carpenter, Mrs. Deborah Lee Lee, Elizabeth (in Female Humane Society, 1800s), 9:65 Lee, Francis (great-nephew of Judge Joseph), 16:25 Lee, George (great-nephew of Judge Joseph), 16:25 Lee, George Gardner (naval officer; d. 1816), 16:25 Lee, Mrs. George Gardner (daughter of Dr. Sawyer of Newburyport; author), 16:25 Lee, Gen. Henry (1756-1818; “Light-Horse Harry”), 40:11n8, 21n27 Lee, Henry (political economist, c. 1800), 16:25 Lee, Henry (author, 1875), 27:68n63 Lee, Henry (reformer, 1882), 20:40 Lee, Col. Henry (1886), 27:33 Lee, Rev. Jason (1803-1845), 28:48, 50, 51 Lee, Judge Joseph (1710/11-1802), 10:19, 41n1, 44; 15:41; 16:18, 71, 89; 22:77; 37:24, 70; 43:39, 118
– article (1922) on house of (cited), 44:38n5
– estate of, 37:20-22, 23, 66-68, 71, 72; 39:74; 42:81
– – – model of, 26:49, 58
– Loyalist sympathies of, 10:45; 16:32, 71-72; 17:57; 33:38; 37:21-22; 43:71
– – – leaves Cambridge during war, 13:22, 44; 16:19, 24; 26:60; 37:20, 21, 68
– See also Hooper-Lee-Nichols house Lee, Mrs. [Judge] Joseph (Rebecca Phip[p]s), 15:41; 16:18-19, 32, 89; 17:55, 56; 22:70; 25:87; 26:50; 37:21, 24, 67 Lee, Joseph (nephew of Judge Joseph), 16:25; 37:22, 25 Lee, Mrs. Joseph (sister of George Cabot), 16:25 Lee, Joseph (great-nephew of Judge Joseph), 16:25 Lee, Joseph (letter to Mrs. Emerson, 1925), 37:74 Lee, “Light-Horse Harry,” see Lee, Gen. Henry Lee, Louisa, see Waterhouse, Mrs. Benjamin (second wife) Lee, Nathaniel C. (landowner), 14:71; 16:25[?]
– street named for, 14:66 (see also Lee Street) Lee, Gen. “Richard,” see Lee, Gen. Charles Lee, Richard Henry (1731-1794; lawyer, statesman), 44:127 Lee, Gen. Robert E. (1807-1870), 10:134; 23:60; 30:35; 41:134 Lee, Thomas (1673-1766; Boston shipbuilder), 16:18, 24, 71; 34:21, 66 Lee, Mrs. Thomas (Deborah Flint), 16:18, 71 Lee, Thomas, Jr. (son of shipbuilder Thomas, brother of Judge Joseph; Harvard 1722), 16:24; 20:96 Lee, Thomas [3d] (nephew of Judge Joseph; house built for, 1799)
– “English Thomas” distinguished from, 37:20, 21-22
– house of (Choate-Jackson, 153 Brattle), 6:25; 11:20; 28:8, 106; 33:96 (illus. facing), 97, 98; 34:75; 37:21, 22; 43:40, 43
– – – given as “Judge Joseph Lee house,” 39:74 Lee, Thomas (great-nephew of Judge Joseph), 16:25 Lee, Mrs. Thomas (sister of Rev. Joseph Buckminster), 16:25 Lee, Thomas (of Connecticut; “English Thomas”; 1737-1797), 37:21-22
– buys Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house (1779), 9:22n1; 37:19, 20 Lee, Mrs. Thomas, 37:20 Lee, Thomas (nephew of “English Thomas’): in Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house, 37:20 Lee, Maj. William: orderly book kept by (1775), 11:80 Lee, William H. (editor, c. 1900), 20:89 Lee, Col. (1770s), 5:25; 13:33 Lee, Col. (of Marblehead, 1820s), 37:72 Lee, Miss (great-niece of Judge Joseph; marries Judge Jackson), 16:25 Lee, Mrs. (friend of Harriet Hilliard, 1810), 9:32 Lee, Mrs. (Higginson family friend, 1828), 2:29 Lee family, 22:100 Lee house(s): Marblehead, 16:22; 25:68; 37:72. See also Hooper-Lee-Nichols house; Lee, Thomas [3d] Lee Street, 14:66; 16:37, 64, 95; 34:29; 35:96, 97; 39:113 Lee Street Church/Society (Cambridgeport; organized 1846), 34:19, 29-34 Leech, see Leach Leete family, 14:80 Legal Aid Bureau (Harvard), 41:129 Legate, Burton (schoolmaster, 1880s), 26:33 Lehman family, 27:26 Lehman Hall (Harvard), 25:116; 29:69; 30:16; 42:80; 43:87, 115 Leicester Academy (1801), 11:33, 53 Leichtentritt, Hugo (Harvard lecturer, c. 1950), 41:101 Leif Ericsson, 22:97; 32:99; 39:125, 142-43; 40:94, 96-97, 100-108 passim; 43:85
– and “Norse amphitheatre,” 3:56; 13:65n5
– and Norse memorials, 1:52; 3:50, 55; 34:35; 40:100, 104-7 passim
– and Norse settlement, 13:6n1; 40:94-108 passim Leighton, Thomas (father of William; glass worker), 36:96 Leighton, William (c. 1790-1868; glass manufacturer), 36:96 Leighton Court, 36:98 Leininger, Joseph E. (Vice-Dean of Law School, 1960s), 41:131 Leland, Sgt. Daniel T. S. (1864), 7:81 Lely, Sir Peter (1618-1680; portrait painter), 7:69, 88 Lenox, James (1800-1880; book collector), 38:105, 106 Lenox, Massachusetts, see Tanglewood Lenox Hotel (Boston), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Lenses, see Astronomy Leonard, Rev. Abiel (1775), 5:28 Leonard, Daniel (1740-1829): and “New Ireland,” 5:74, 87 Leonard, Miss Margaret (teacher, 1890s), 32:46 Leonard, Mrs. (Higginson family friend, 1828), 2:31 Leppinwell, Michael (settler, 1630s), 14:96 Lesley, Miss (Sunday School teacher, 1905), 44:112 Letchford, see Lechford le Tombe, M. (French Consul in Boston, 1790s), 38:74 Lettieri, Benny (mover, 1920s), 40:118 Lettsom, John Coakley (London botanist, 1790s), 4:8; 38:73-74; 43:128, 130, 131n7, 134-35 Leven, Robert (in 47 Workshop, 1920s), 40:120 Lever Brothers Company, 34:99; 42:64 Leverett, Daniel (father of George V.), 13:123 Leverett, Mrs. Daniel (Charlotte Betteley), 13:123 Leverett, George Vasmer (1846-1917; lawyer), 9:62; 20:40
– obituary, 13:123 Leverett, Mrs. George Vasmer (Mary E. L. Tebbetts), 13:123 Leverett, I. (Christ Church meeting moderator, 1717), 3:112 Leverett, Gov. John (1616-1679), 21:42. See also Leverett, John (1662-1724) Leverett, John (1662-1724; Harvard president 1708-24), 32:113; 36:56; 38:7, 11
– diary of, 11:70
– doctor attending, 16:18; 37:20, 66, 73
– given as “Gov.” John, 11:71
– installation of, 11:59-60
– site of house, 1:63; 6:22 (see also Boylston Hall; Wigglesworth house) Leverett, Mrs. John (Margaret Rogers [Berry], first wife, d. 1720), 32:113 Leverett, Sarah (1700-1727; later Mrs. Edward Wigglesworth), 11:71 Leverett, Thomas (elected elder of First Church, 1630s), 10:97 Leverett family, 10:115 Leverett House (Harvard), 35:120 Leverett Street (Boston), 16:88; 39:64, 87 Levering, Joseph M. (1849-1908; historian), 27:82n87 Levi, Doris: Belle of Radcliffe (1979), 44:193 Levin, Prof. H. T. (Kirkland Pl. resident, 1969), 41:17n2 Levitt, Prof. Theodore (Business School, 1960s), 40:37 Lewando family, 21:61 Lewis, Ezekiel (“gentleman” of Boston, 1770s), 17:56; 37:23 Lewis, Mrs. Ezekiel (Susanna Ruggles), 17:56; 37:23 Lewis, George W. (bank president, 1856), 20:132 Lewis, Henry (furnaceman, 1870s), 30:26 Lewis, Matthew Gregory (“Monk”; 1775-1818; English dramatist), 29:56 Lewis, Meriwether (1774-1809; explorer), 2:34; 28:33, 37, 39 Lewis, Paul J. (landscape architect): “The Historical Development of Cambridge Common” (1974 paper), 43:67-82, 151 Lewis, Polly, see Cunningham, Mrs. Andrew Lewis, Susanna Hickling, see Willard, Mrs. Joseph [Jr.] Lewis, Susanna Ruggles, see Lewis, Mrs. Ezekiel Lewis, William (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:76 (Map 1) Lewis, Dr. Winslow, Jr. (witness in Webster case, 1850), 41:71 Lewis family, 20:94 Lexington, Massachusetts, 8:23, 24; 16:98; 21:62, 87; 22:20; 30:87
– accommodations for British troops sought on road to, 13:54
– architecture in, 43:159, 160 (illus. #3 following), 168, 169
– boundaries of, 8:20; 21:34; 39:109
– as “Cambridge Farms,” see included in “Newtown[e],” below
– and Cambridge water supply, 41:10; 42:85
– Cambridge YWCA in, 36:48
– early roads to, 14:35, 50; 17:48; 20:126; 22:101; 37:29
– History of (Hudson), 8:14n1, 16, 21; 40:134nn30, 31
– included in “Newtown[e],” 9:71, 75; 14:35; 21:34; 22:98; 25:70-71; 31:61; 44:57
– – – as “Cambridge Farms,” 5:52; 7:76; 14:71, 94; 17:93; 20:126; 37:29; 39:109; 42:79; 43:117
– incorporated (1713), 7:55; 14:36; 17:93; 42:79; 43:117
– Munroe Tavern in (1770s), 19:35; 37:72
– shares bridge cost (c. 1713), 7:55; 25:70
– slave/Negro population in (1754, 1765), 10:63n1
– street railway to, 39:99, 103 Lexington Avenue, 24:50; 44:115, 161, 166, 167 Lexington & Boston St. Railway Company, see Street railway(s) Lexington and Concord, Battles of, 10:47, 189; 18:52; 19:35; 20:117; 30:58-59, 70; 33:92; 37:12, 45; 39:159; 43:71, 89, 141
– British soldiers in, 1:66; 6:33-34; 14:36, 40; 19:51; 20:91, 113-14, 118; 22:71; 33:38; 36:93; 37:31, 32, 46; 39:7, 28
– casualties in and on return from, 20:114; 33:41; 39:7
– Connecticut men in, 5:23
– diary accounts of, 11:76, 77; 42:120
– warning of, 13:85; 14:36; 23:49; 30:56-57; 42:82 Lexington Historical Society, 25:67, 68, 113; 40: 132n26 Libbey, Edward (1854-1925; glass manufacturer), 36:97, 100 Libbey, William L. (glass manufacturer; d. 1883), 19:44; 36:97 Libbey Glass Company, 16:94 Liberal party (1840s), Liberal Republican party (1870s), 20:34; 37:80. See also Political parties; Politics Liberalism, see Politics “Liberty Bowl” (by Paul Revere), 33:59 Liberty Hall party, 12:67. See also Political parties Liberty Street, 14:68; 37:18. See also Willard Street “Liberty Tree,” see Trees Library(ies)
– American Antiquarian Society, 5:8
– Andover-Harvard Theological, 36:69, 73
– Arlington Public, 11:82
– Baker (Harvard Business School), 38:23, 38n32, 49n48
– and book clubs, see Club(s)
– Boston Medical, 4:50; 7:85
– Boston Public, 5:8; 13:19n1; 26:24; 30:89; 33:154; 34:72; 35:75n; 41:116, 157
– – – diaries in possession of, 11:76, 79, 80, 81
– Brown, John Carter (Brown University), 5:8; 38:100-109 passim
– Cambridge Public, see Cambridge Public Library
– Children’s (at First Church, Unitarian-Universalist), 44:114
– Christ Church, and Library Association, 10:84 (caption facing); 23:74
– Church Library Society, 11:86
– Clements, William L. (Michigan), 38:87, 100, 104
– Concord Public, 25:136
– Congregational, 38:87, 100, 104-5
– of Congress, 5:7; 21:73; 23:78; 24:87; 27:36; 42:38
– – – diaries and letters in possession of, 11:71, 79, 80; 13:18n1, 33n4, 73n2, 76n
– Countway, see Harvard Medical School
– “Dana,” 26:98 (see also Cambridge Public Library)
– Divinity, 12:68; 44:21, 22
– Episcopal Theological Seminary, 36:9
– Harvard, see Harvard Library
– Hayden (Charles) Memorial (MIT), 42:61
– Hilles, see Radcliffe, below
– Houghton, see Houghton Library
– Huntington, Henry E. (California), 38:100, 105-6, 109
– Isham (Memorial Church), 41:102
– Kennedy, 41:50; 43:95
– Lamont, see Lamont Library
– law, 39:67; 41:121-29 passim
– Loyalist, confiscation of, 44:68
– Massachusetts Historical Society, see Massachusetts Historical Society
– Massachusetts State, 38:38n32
– Mercantile (New York, 1867), 28:87
– New York Public, 5:57-95(notes) passim; 10:50n1; 13:61n4; 27:36; 38:100, 106
– Newburyport Public, 37:75n
– personal:
– – – Bartlett, 1:77, 80, 87
– – – Belcher, 21:93-94
– – – Blackstone, 27:30; 33:140
– – – Bowie, 27:37
– – – Church (Benjamin, Sr.), 30:49, 70
– – – Mrs. Craigie, 25:56; 27:67, 89
– – – Dana (Chief Justice Francis), 26:91
– – – Farlow, 24:84
– – – Felton, 27:37
– – – Francis (Dr. Converse), 20:98
– – – Harvard, see Harvard, Rev. John
– – – Holmes (Abiel), 1:50
– – – Houghton (H. 0.), 33:54-55
– – – James (William), 27:37
– – – Lanman, 42:21
– – – Longfellow, 27:37
– – – Lowell (J. R.), 15:45; 27:37
– – – Mather (Increase, Cotton, Samuel), 33:91; 38:102, 108
– – – Norton, 26:34; 27:37
– – – Palmer, 27:37
– – – presented to Harvard, 7:69; 27:12, 37-38
– – – Story, 41:123
– – – Vassall, 10:13, 17, 83-85; 21:97-98; 26:55
– – – Walker, 33:154
– – – Waterhouse, 43:134n14
– Portland (Maine) Public, 11:67, 73
– public, construction of, 39:120 (see also Cambridge Public Library)
– Radcliffe, 31:33; 43:154; 44:143, 147, 152 (illus. #7 following), 153
– – – Hilles, 44:153
– – – Schlesinger, 41:141; 44:148, 151, 153, 154, 156
– Redwood (Newport, R.I.), 43:30, 127
– Scheide (Princeton), 38:100, 105-8 passim
– Schlesinger, see Radcliffe, above
– Smith College, 37:75n
– Sutro (San Francisco), 43:132
– Ternaux, Henri, 38:102, 104
– University of Virginia, 38:100, 108
– Widener, see Widener Library
– William Salt (Stafford, England), 39:145n2, 158n29
– See also Books; Booksellers; Museum(s); Periodicals; Printers; Publishers Library Hall Association (political organization, c. 1900), 20:16; 37:93-94, 95, 97, 103. See also Politics Lienemann-Jenks, Miss Louise A. (Boston bookshop proprietress, 1914), 9:37 Life insurance (for employees), see Labor Life magazine, 39:12. See also Periodicals (General) Light Horse, see Horses (cavalry) “Light-Horse Harry,” see Lee, Gen. Henry Lightly, Joseph (alleged murderer, executed 1764), 17:53 Lights and lighting
– candles and candlemaking, 1l:39n3, 60; 15:36; 21:93; 23:23, 46; 25:130; 28:18; 30:9-10; 34:69; 37:37; 42:7
– – – costs, 10:22; 38:9, 16
– – – commercial, 39:120
– – – fat for, 44:60
– in celebrations (“illuminations”):
– – – of Burgoyne’s surrender (1777), 13:20
– – – of College grounds (at Quincy inauguration, 1829), 4:92
– – – at end of Civil War, 17:70
– – – at end of War of 1812, 16:58
– – – at Harvard Bicentennial (1836), 4:27
– – – of king’s birthday (by “Convention Troops,” 1778), 13:61
– – – of Washington’s birthday (1799), 11:39
– of Charles River Bridge (17E6), 41:160
– in Christ Church, 23:22-23; 42:8-9
– electric, 20:57; 34:67-68; 41:158; 42:9, 10-13, 26, 29; 43:35 (see also Cambridge Electric Light Company; Electricity)
– gas, 4:85; 21:113; 22:102; 23:23, 91; 25:134; 27:34; 30:17; 33:49; 41:126, 158; 42:26, 28; 43:35
– – – first use of, 42:8
– – – and gas house, 31:29; 39:126; 42:8
– – – gas pipes laid (Brattle St.), 21:109; 31:37
– – – in hotels, 37:37
– (see also Cambridge Gas Light Company)
– in Harvard buildings, 22:102; 27:33, 34; 41:126; 43:35
– of hotels, 37:37, 42
– of houses, 21:113, 116, 117; 23:44
– kerosene, 34:40; 37:37; 42:9
– and lamp manufacture, see Business and industry
– of streets and highways, 20:91; 22:28; 34:68; 41:7-8; 42:8, 9, 10, 12
– – – by lamplighter, 17:67-68; 18:31; 21:58; 41:169
– whale oil for, 21:113; 22:23; 25:130; 42:7, 8 Lillie, Rupert B. (historian, 1940s), 27:89; 33:62
– “The Gardens and Homes of the Loyalists” (1940 paper), 26:49-62; 37:27
– map prepared by, 26:69, 70 (illus.)
– presents models of four Brattle St. Revolutionary houses to CHS (1978), 44:193 Lilly, Robert (publisher, c. 1800), 25:91 Lincoln, Abraham (1809-1865; U.S. president 1860-65), 1:41; 3:49, 70n1; 4:39; 7:18; 10:144, 161; 13:124; 20:51, 98; 26:121; 32:102; 34:19, 66; 42:113
– and Civil War, 10:151, 153, 154; 17:69; 39:10, 11, 15, 22
– death of, 17:70; 22:92; 23:31
– election of, 10:136, 153; 25:137; 39:8, 9
– Gettysburg Address by, 33:152; 36:7-8
– and kidnap plot, 34:113
– J. R. Lowell on, 14:23-24; 20:37; 33:78
– quoted, 3:70n1
– statue of, on Common, 33:39; 44:18 Lincoln, Mrs. Abraham (Mary Todd), 42:113 Lincoln, Ann (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:21 Lincoln, Gen. Benjamin (1733-1810), 15:28; 40:16n15 Lincoln, Mrs. Benjamin (Mary Otis [Ware]), see Otis, Mary Lincoln, Benjamin, Jr., 9:10, 23; 21:103 Lincoln, Florence (playwright, 1911), 40:111 Lincoln, James Otis (son of Mrs. Benjamin), 9:10, 17, 23 Lincoln, Levi (1749-1820; legislator), 11:33; 16:49 Lincoln, Gov. Levi (1782-1868), 16:49; 36:80 Lincoln, Mary Otis, see Otis, Mary Lincoln, Nathan (music teacher; d. 1896), 13:104; 30:79, 85 Lincoln, Robert Todd (1843-1926; diplomat), 42:113 Lincoln, Solomon (classmate of Alexander McKenzie, 1850s), 3:36; 18:38 Lincoln, “Tad” (Thomas), 23:72 Lincoln, Earl of, 3:10; 30:32
– sister of, see Johnson, Mrs. Isaac (Lady Arbella) Lincoln, Countess of, 30:32
– Dudley’s letter to, see Dudley, Gov. Thomas Lincoln, Massachusetts, 10:31n1, 34; 16:98; 21:34, 38; 43:169
– as “Cambridge Farms,” 7:76
– and Cambridge water supply, 41:10; 42:85; 43:8 “Lincoln Club,” see Women’s clubs/organizations Lincoln Lane, 43:10, 30 Lincoln Street (Boston), 34:116 Lincoln’s Inn (Law School club), see Harvard Law School Lind, Jenny (1820-1887; singer), 23:88-89 “Lindbergh Avenue” (renaming of streets proposed, 1928), 20:14 Linden Street, 1:56; 8:35, 38; 17:55; 41:41 Linden-Ward, Blanche: “Putting the Past in Place: The Making of Mount Auburn Cemetery” (1979 paper), 44:171-91 Linley, Isabella (of Berkeley St. School Association, 1940s), 32:30 Linn Village, see Reading, Massachusetts Linnaean Society (Boston), 38:86; 43:139 Linnaean Street, 13:98; 14:46, 70; 20:94, 126, 127; 22:78; 23:78; 33:45, 51, 52, 95; 38:111-19 passim; 41:145, 161; 44:10
– architecture on, 41:132, 137; 42:39
– as boundary, 15:24; 17:46; 18:46; 22:79, 98; 29:68; 33:37; 35:29
– cattle fence built at, 31:53; 43:69
– Cooper-Frost-Austin house on, see Cooper-Frost-Austin house
– as “Love Lane,” 13:60; 14:45, 66; 38:111
– naming of, 14:45, 66; 25:115, 119; 32:25-26; 38:111 Linnaeus, Carolus (1707-1778; botanist), and Linnaean system, 4:13; 14:45, 66; 25:119; 32:26; 33:56, 97; 38:72, 77, 111; 43:128, 131, 136 Linzee, Capt. John (Royal Navy), 16:79; 19:50-51, 52, 57, 60, 61, 76 Linzee, Mrs. John, see Inman, Susanna Linzee, [British] Adm. Samuel Hood (c. 1800), 16:79; 19:51 Linzee, Sarah Inman (first wife of Joseph Lewis Cunningham; d. 1825), 19:78 Linzee, Susanna (“Sukey”), see Inman, Susanna Linzee, Susannah Inman (Mrs. Joseph Tilden), 19:60, 72, 78 Lion (ship), 14:81 Lions, see also Lyons Lions, Zelda (of Prospect Union), 40:147, 158
– “The Beginnings of the Union” (1966 paper), 40:139-54 Lippincott, Abia Swift, see Gilman, Mrs. Winthrop Sargent Liquor licensing and sales, see Wine and spirits Litchfield, Rev. Paul (1752-1817): diary of, while Harvard student (1775), 11:74 Litchfield, Connecticut: first law school in country in, 25:122 Litchmore, see Lechmere Literacy, see Education Literary World (c. 1900), 10:170. See also Periodicals (General) Lithgoe, Miss (friend of Joseph Willard, 1816), 11:17 Littauer Building (Harvard), 25:116; 41:128, 129 Little, Arthur (Boston architect, 1890s), 43:49 Little, Mr. and Mrs. Bertram K. (Brattle St. residents, 1930), 21:9 Little, Charles C. (1799-1869; publisher), 11:31; 25:130; 37:22; 38:83; 39:81; 42:8; 44:69 Little, Mrs. Charles C. (Sarah Anne Milliard), 11:31; 22:47 Little, Capt. George (1754-1809), 5:85 Little, Dr. Henry (physician, botanist, c. 1810), 43:137 Little, Colonel (1775), 18:65 Little (Harvard student suspended, 1798, for “disturbing the public devotions”), 11:38n2 Little, Mrs. (Dana family friend, mid-1800s), 17:72 Little, Brown and Company, 11:31; 15:31; 19:16-17; 22:75-76; 29:70; 38:83; 39:81n9; 44:77n24. See also Publishers Little family, 22:27 Little’s block (Dunster St., 1870s), 30:23 “Little Bridge,” see Bridge(s) “Little Cambridge,” see Brighton, Massachusetts “Little Common,” 43:75. See also Cambridge Common; “Deltas” “Little Neck,” 14:35, 60. See also “Neck, the” Little River, 5:42 Littlefield, Ephraim (in Webster case, 1850), 41:67, 73-74, 86 Littlefield, George Emery (historian, c. 1900), 3:6, 13; 6:22; 38:99, 109 Littlehale, Ednah Dow, see Cheney, Mrs. Seth W. Livermore, Anna Bridge, see Wellington, Mrs. Oliver Livermore, Rev. Arthur Browne (1915), 10:18n2 Livermore, George (1809-1865; merchant), 13:91, 112; 21:63 Livermore, Mrs. George, 21:63 Livermore, Gladys (on “Junior Committee,” 1905), 44:111, 117 Livermore, Isaac (b. 1797; businessman, on Hospital board), 16:115; 35:85; 39:39-40, 45, 81 Livermore, John (businessman, late 1800s), 25:130; 42:8 Livermore, Miss Katharine (schoolgirl, 1890s): quoted on Berkeley St. School, 32:42-45, 46 Livermore, Miss Lesley (schoolgirl, 1890s), 32:43 Livermore, Mrs. Mary Ashton Rice (1820-1905; feminist), 7:20; 40:144 Livermore, Deacon Nathaniel (1772-1862), 16:42, 48, 85 Livermore (1801 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:49, 51, 52 Livermore (with Wyeth’s expedition, 1830s), 28:44 Livermore, Colonel (speaks in favor of MIT, 1911), 42:53 Livery stables, see Horses (as transportation) Livestock, see Animals Living costs, see Expenses; Prices Livingston, Albert Henry (b. 1818), 19:46n1 Livingston, Mrs. Albert Henry (Frances Edna Culpepper), 19:46n1 Livingston, Althea Linzee, see Cadwalader, Mrs. Isaac Guest Livingston, Emma Maria Stevens, see Bibby, Mrs. John Cornelius Livingston, Mrs. Flora V. (Harvard benefactor, early 20th c.), 27:38 Livingston, James (publisher, c. 1900), 20:88 Livingston, James Crauford (1812-1839), 19:46n1 Livingston, Louisa Matilda, see Joyce, Mrs. Anthony Kennedy Livingston, Margaretta Susan, see Cooper, Mrs. George Duncan Livingston, Oscar Frederick (b. 1824), 19:46n1 Livingston, Mrs. Oscar Frederick (Emma Baldwin [Ferris], first wife), 19:46n1 Livingston, Mrs. Oscar Frederick (Leta Nichols, second wife), 19:46n1 Livingston, Robert Cambridge (late 1700s), 19:78 Livingston, Mrs. Robert Cambridge (Alice Swift), 19:78 Livingston, Thomas Ferguson (early 1800s), 19:46n1, 78 Livingston, Mrs. Thomas Ferguson, see Inman, Susannah Linzee Livingston, Walter Ferguson (1815-1877), 19:46n1 Lloyd, Arthur (editor, c. 1900), 20:86 Locke, A. E. (businessman, 1900), 42:73 Locke, Albert (of Ashby, 1829), 12:15 Locke, Arthur (Harvard 1905; choirmaster), 32:88 Locke, Elizabeth, see Harrington, Mrs. Henry Francis Locke, Frances Sargent, see Osgood, Frances Sargent Locke Locke, Irving (Dramatic Club, 1940s), 38:57, 63 Locke, Rev. Samuel (A.B. 1755; Harvard president 1769-73), 13:84 Locke, Warren Andrew (organist, chorister, 1882-1910), 27:33; 32:84, 88, 91; 41:27, 96, 137 Locke, Mrs. Warren Andrew (Madeleine Weiderman), 41:27 Locke family, 10:115 Locke-Obers (restaurant), 27:34 Locke-Thomas-Smith house, 23:93 Lockhart family, 36:95 Lockwood, Edmund (settler, 1630s), 14:84 Lockwood, Stephen (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:36 Locust Field, 22:67 Lodge, Constance (daughter of Henry C.), see Williams, Mrs. Constance Lodge Lodge, George Cabot (1873-1909; “Bay”; poet), 23:37 Lodge, Giles (Harvard 1825), 23:27 Lodge, Henry Cabot (1850-1924; politician), 18:50n1; 20:34, 46, 50; 21:122; 23:32-35 passim, 39, 41, 63; 34:91 Lodge, Mrs. Henry Cabot (Anna [“Nannie”] Davis), 23:34, 39, 41 Lodge, John (at 47 Workshop, 1920s), 40:117 Lodge family, 23:35, 38 Loeb, Eda Kuhn: music library named for, 41:102 Loeb, James (1867-1933; art connoisseur), 27:20, 21, 23 Loeb Classical Library, 44:78 Loeb Theatre, see Theatre (Harvard) Logan, Gen. John A. (1826-1886; politician), 20:46. See also GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) Lomasney brothers (politicians, 1880s), 20:45, 46 Lombard, Esther, see Mann, Mrs. George C. Lombard, Mrs. (Berkeley St. resident, 1870s), 21:59 “London, Edom” (slave), 10:74n4. See also Slavery London Company, 7:96; 21:19; 25:62; 33:138. See also Virginia Londonderry, Ireland, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, 13:124 Long, G. Burton, 42:76
– “The Romance of Brick” (1971 paper), 42:67-76 Long, John D. (1838-1915; lawyer, legislator), 34:52 Long Island, New York
– Battle of, 19:52
– Henry Vassall visits (1755), 10:27 Long Island Head (Boston Harbor), 28:41 Long Island Historical Society, 11:63n1 Long Island Sound, 39:147 Long Marsh, see Marsh(es) Long Room Club (1760s), see Club(s) Long Street, 14:34, 68. See also Winthrop Street Long Wharf (Boston), 16:43; 23:85; 37:86 Longfellow, Alexander (brother of H. W.), 28:57, 68 Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth (nephew of H. W.; architect), 41:158, 164; 43:49; 44:143, 145, 146
– firm of (Longfellow, Alden & Harlow), 34:108; 39:121 Longfellow, Alice Mary, 2:42, 108; 9:60; 14:113; 20:14; 27:83, 90, 91; 44:143
– at Berkeley St. School, 32:34, 36
– in Dramatic Club, 38:52, 53, 54
– London journal of, 28:97, 98, 99-100
– meets Dickens, 28:88, 89, 95-100 passim
– notes and Chronicles of, 25:22n1, 54n54, 57n63; 27:58n39, 59n40, 68
– on Radcliffe committee (1878) and at Radcliffe, 6:52; 44:141
– Radcliffe building named for, 33:29; 44:150
– reads paper (1915) on Longfellow house, 10:85
– two Rolls Royces of, 44:33 Longfellow, Annie (sister of H. W.), see Pierce, Mrs. Anne Longfellow Longfellow, Annie Allegra (daughter of H. W.), see Thorp, Mrs. Joseph G. Longfellow, Charles (b. c. 1850; eldest son of H. W.), 28:101 Longfellow, Edith, see Dana, Mrs. Richard Henry [3d] Longfellow, Ernest Wadsworth (1845-1921; painter; son of H. W.), 11:55; 22:47; 28:87, 88; 31:31, 32, 35; 39:126, 136
– houses of, 21:68, 69; 31:31 Longfellow, Mrs. Ernest Wadsworth (Harriet Spel[l]man), 11:55; 22:47n1; 28:88; 32:36 Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth (1807-1882), 7:26, 32; 10:183; 21:123; 32:27, 28; 33:154; 34:52, 113; 35:36, 47; 40:102; 41:98; 42:119
– Allston quoted on engagement of, 29:57
– at Atlantic Club dinner (1859), 4:42, 43-44
– and Atlantic Monthly, 33:83; 41:62
– biography of, see Longfellow, Rev. Samuel
– as Bowdoin professor (1829-35), 25:107-8; 33:12
– bust of, 28:58
– Centenary Medal, 2:107 (see also Longfellow Prize Medal)
– Centennial addresses and letters honoring (1907), 2:43-73; 3:91; 14:20; 32:ll6
– chair made for (from “spreading chestnut tree”), 2:52; 3:44; 12:49; 18:7; 22:106; 34:35
– and Craigie House (as lodger, owner), see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House
– and Dickens, 28:55-104; 29:46
– drawings by, 25:26 (illus. facing), 40 (illus. facing), 48 (illus. facing); 28:66 (illus. following), 31:frontispiece (illus.), 59
– essays honoring, see Longfellow Prize Medal
– in Europe and England, 1:15; 2:100; 25:21, 23, 30; 28:69-77, 97-103
– family of, 3:37; 28:97-101; 32:34; 44:141, 143
– at “Foxcroft House” (as lodger), 1:15; 41:33
– “and France” (1928 paper mentioned), 20:14
– as Harvard professor, 1:70; 2:54-55; 4:47; 14:6; 15:37; 25:19-57 passim, 108-9; 26:21, 105n75; 28:55, 59, 87, 115; 29:42-43; 33:80, 83; 37:77; 38:54
– – – and Agassiz School, 35:54-55
– journal of, see Diaries and journals
– land owned by and by heirs, 21:58, 107, 109, 112; 26:50; 31:38, 55; 32:39; 37:16; 39:127
– letters of, see writings of, below
– library of, 27:37
– Lowell (J. R.) quoted on, 14:25; 33:82-83
– portraits and photographs of, 25:42 (and illus. following); 28:55 (illus. facing), 57, 58, 94 (illus. facing); 34:22
– publishers of, see writings of, below
– in Saturday Club, 2:75, 102, 105; 28:90; 41:57; 43:154
– tomb Of, 25:23; 34:91
– and “Village Blacksmith,” see Blacksmith(s)
– and woman suffrage, 7:19
– writings of, 1:19; 2:62-72, 77, 99, 130; 7:27; 18:47, 78; 20:58; 26:101n70, 110n82; 27:70, 73-74; 28:56, 61, 62, 68, 75-84 passim; 29:42-43; 33:23, 161; 34:22; 36:20; 44:141
– – – commemorating Cambridge (prize essays on), 3:43-47; 12:46-50 (see also Longfellow Prize Medal)
– – – criticized, 26:97-98; 28:102
– – – journal, see Diaries and journals
– – – letters, 25:23, 24, 30-57 passim; 26:99n68; 28:59-80 passim, 81-87 passim, 90-92 passim, 102-3; 29:48, 56n90, 67; 33:161; 39:173
– – – Notebook, see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House (Longfellow and)
– – – publishers of, 15:21; 19:23; 20:88; 25:108
– – – quoted, 2:62, 66, 67, 72; 3:44-47 passim; 6:17-18; 9:50-56 passim; 11:54; 12:46-49 passim; 14:42; 15:27; 22:47; 24:85; 25:21-29 passim; 26:71-72, 113n87; 27:73; 28:56, 61, 62, 68, 76-84 passim; 29:43; 33:20, 23; 35:52-53 Longfellow, Mrs. Henry Wadsworth (Mary Storer Potter, first wife; d. c. 1835), 25:23, 32, 107 Longfellow, Mrs. Henry Wadsworth (Frances E. Appleton [“Fanny”], second wife), 11:54; 26:111; 31:58, 59; 33:83, 35:43
– courtship and marriage of, 21:105; 25:28-30, 44, 48n41; 28:83-84; 29:57
– Craigie House bought for, 22:100; 37:18
– death of (1860), 11:55; 26:119; 28:89 Longfellow, Mary (sister of H. W.), see Greenleaf, Mrs. James Longfellow, Mary Potter (wife of H. W.), see Longfellow, Mrs. Henry Wadsworth (first wife) Longfellow, Rev. Samuel (1819-1892; brother of H. W.), 6:28; 14:113; 20:58; 21:106; 22:110; 23:58; 28:63, 87; 41:157
– hymns/hymnbook by, 22:107; 36:64
– Longfellow biography by, 3:37, 39n1; 4:42; 25:27, 36n28 Longfellow, Stephen (great-great-grandfather of H. W.), 25:41 Longfellow, Stephen (1776-1849; father of H. W.)
– son’s letters to, 25:23, 24, 30, 34, 38-57 passim; 28:59-60, 67
– wife’s letters to, 25:49 Longfellow, Mrs. Stephen (mother of H. W.), 25:48-49
– son’s letter to (1840), 25:43n36 Longfellow, Stephen (brother of H. W.), 8:51; 25:40 Longfellow, Mrs. Stephen (Marianne Preble), 8:51 Longfellow, Wadsworth, see Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow, William Pitt Preble (1836-1913; architect): obituary, 8:51-52 Longfellow, Mrs. William Pitt Preble (Emily Daniell), 8:52 Longfellow, Alden & Harlow (architects), see Longfellow, Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow Bridge, see Bridge(s) Longfellow family, 38:51; 41:40; 43:18 Longfellow Hall (Radcliffe), 33:29; 44:150 Longfellow Historic District, 39:73-74; 42:34, 35 “Longfellow House,” see Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House Longfellow Meadows, 39:24. See also Soldiers’ Field Longfellow Memorial Association, 5:111; 7:105; 37:94 Longfellow Monument, 16:114 Longfellow Park, 1:59, 12:11; 17:10; 39:73, 135, 136; 43:37
– marsh surrounding, 16:115; 37:10, 15
– palisade near, 21:24; 30:36; 31:24
– as Vassall estate boundary, 10:11; 21:96, 109; 23:73; 26:54; 31:25, 38; 37:15 Longfellow Prize Medal, 2:107; 11:86; 15:9, 15
– awarded (7 times, 1908-20), 3:37-49, 91, 93; 5:46-47; 6:44, 46; 9:50; 10:116-22; 12:46-50; 15:4
– withdrawn, 16:132 Longfellow School, see School(s) Longstreth, Dr. Morris (of Philadelphia; Harvard 1866), 10:180 Longstreth, Mrs. Morris (Mary Oliver Hastings, 1845-1914), 17:80
– obituary, 10:180 Longwood Avenue (Boston), 42:50 Longy School of Music, see Music (schools of) Loomis, Judge (of Bedford, 1914), 9:75 Lord, Prof, and Mrs. Albert B. (Francis Ave. residents, 1950s), 41:29 Lord, Daniel (1795-1868; New York lawyer), 10:135 Lord, Richard (of Hooker’s Company, 1636), 10:102; 14:91; 22:60, 76 (Map 1) Lorenz, see Laurens Loring, Augustus P. (Harvard agent, c. 1900), 20: 120 Loring, Caleb (distiller, c. 1780), 21:91 Loring, Charles (Navy, late 1800s), 23:86 Loring, Charles Greely (Boston lawyer, mid-1800s), 4:88; 10:139; 23:83 Loring, Mrs. Charles Greely, 36:35 Loring, Edward (of Boston, mid-1700s), 23:83 Loring, Mrs. Edward (Frances Greely), 23:83 Loring, Judge Edward Greely (1802-1890), 10:150, 165; 23:82, 83-86, 92 Loring, Mrs. Edward Greely (Harriet Boott), 23:83 Loring, Dr. Edward Greely, Jr. (1837-1888), 23:86 Loring, Elizabeth, see Wellington, Mrs. Jeduthan (second wife) Loring, Frank (son of Judge Edward, 1800s), 23:92 Loring, Dr. George B. (1817-1891), 29:42n37 Loring, Hattie (schoolgirl, mid-1800s), 18:43 Loring, Josiah Quincy (of Boston, 1829), 23:16 Loring, Sir Nigel (1340), 23:83 Loring, Piers (13th c.), 23:83 Loring, Bishop Robert (1279), 23:83 Loring, Deacon Thomas (1634), 23:83 Loring, Wright (consul in Philippines, late 1800s), 23:86 Loring, Mr. (building supervisor, 1840s), 36:99 Loss, Prof. Louis (1970s), 44:99 Lossing, Benson J. (1813-1891; wood engraver), 18:54 “Lost Brook,” “Lost River,” see Craigie Street (Cambridge) Lothrop, see also Lathrop Lothrop, Mrs. Anna Hooper (schoolgirl, mid-1800s), 35:39 Lothrop, Miss Cordelia (French teacher, c. 1890), 35:114 Lothrop, Rev. Samuel K. (Harvard 1828), 2:26; 10:76; 16:65 Lothrop, Thornton K. (estate of, 1940s), 29:50n67 Lotteries, see Finances and fund-raising Louis, see Lewis Louis XIV (1638-1715; king of France), 43:84-85 Louis Pasteur Avenue (Boston), 42:50 Louisburg Square (Boston), 27:24; 33:139; 35:113 Lounsberry, Alice (writer, 1941), 33:63n25 Love, Elizabeth, see Orth, Mrs. Charles D. Love, Prof, and Mrs. James Lee (Francis Ave. residents, 1906-11), 41:30, 31 Love, J. Spencer (industrialist, 1950s), 35:107 Love family, 41:18 “Love Lane,” see Linnaean Street. See also Sparks Street (as “Lover’s Lane”) Lovejoy, Elijah P. (1802-1837; Abolitionist martyr), 10:134 Lovejoy, Frank (MIT 1894; businessman), 42:53 Lovejoy, Frederick A. (Scott St. resident, 1943-44), 41:39 Lovejoy, Mrs. Frederick A. (Jeanette Peabody), 41:39 Lovekin, Mrs. Osgood S. (Boat Club, 1931), 39:137 Lovell, James (1737-1814; politician), 26:85-86 Lovell, John [?] (1710-1778; schoolmaster, Loyalist), 10:26 “Lover’s Lane,” see Sparks Street. See also Linnaean Street (as “Love Lane”) Lovering, Cora and Effie (schoolgirls, 1860s), 32:36 Lovering, Henry B. (politician, 1880s), 20:40 Lovering, Prof. Joseph (1813-1892), 3:33; 18:42n1; 20:60; 25:117; 26:14, 21; 32:34; 33:9n8, 17n27, 18, 151 Lovering, Mrs. Joseph, 38:121 Lovering house, 26:39, 40 (illus. #1 following) Lovett, Robert W., 44:68n7, 77n24
– “The Harvard Branch Railroad, 1849-1855” (1959 paper), 38:23-50; 39:80; 41:26n6 Low, John (surveyor, c. 1845), 14:73 Lowell, Abbott Lawrence (1856-1943; Harvard president 1909-33), 18:43; 21:105; 31:12
– Agassiz 100th anniversary address by (1907), 2:84-87; 43:58n3
– family of, 2:84; 34:7
– life of (1951 paper on), 34:7-18
– as president of Harvard, 4:86; 21:73; 27:34; 28:115; 35:119; 40:117-18; 41:109; 42:50, 51; 44:23
– – – and Divinity School, 36:70, 71-72
– – – and Fenn house (moving of), 44:20-21, 22
– – – and Fogg Museum, 27:13; 34:9; 35:66, 74
– – – inauguration of, 4:79; 5:45
– – – and music, 41:97, 98
– – – reforms by, 22:103; 34:9-11, 13-17; 41:110; 44:149, 155
– – – and Sacco-Vanzetti case, 34:12
– as professor, 34:9
– writings of, 34:9; 39:49 Lowell, Mrs. Abbott Lawrence, 9:62; 18:43; 34:17, 18 Lowell, Amy (1874-1925; poet), 27:37; 33:78; 34:7, 91
– bookplate of, 38:82 Lowell, Anna (daughter of C. R.; schoolgirl, 1850s), 18:38; 35:46 Lowell, Blanche (b. c. 1845; daughter of J. R.), 23:64 Lowell, Rev. Charles (father of J. R.), 25:38; 33:79, 80; 35:50-51; 44:179
– Elmwood as home of, 15:44; 16:39; 23:64; 33:68, 76; 37:23, 26 (see also Elmwood [Cambridge]) Lowell, Mrs. Charles (of Traill Spence family), 23:64; 33:80 Lowell, Charles Russell (Quincy St. resident, 1850s), 18:38, 39; 28:115; 35:46 Lowell, Mrs. Charles Russell, 18:38, 39; 35:39, 46 Lowell, Col. Charles Russell, Jr. (d. in Civil War, 1860s), 18:38; 35:39 Lowell, F. C. (American Academy meets at house of, 1849), 4:88 Lowell, Francis Cabot (Harvard 1876; lawyer), 27:38; 34:8 Lowell, Dr. Freeman L. (d. 1924), 38:23 Lowell, Hattie (Harriet), see Putnam, Mrs. George W. Lowell, James Jackson (1837-1862; d. in Civil War), 18:38; 20:86; 33:92; 35:45, 46, 48, 50, 51 Lowell, James Russell (1819-1891; poet), 2:61, 62, 63, 100; 3:48; 4:47; 7:32; 20:58; 23:57, 60; 25:130; 29:34n1, 47n53, 67n113; 32:27; 34:91; 35:36; 38:49, 76; 40:144
– as ambassador, 1:83; 14:8, 24, 27; 15:44; 20:37-38, 55; 23:62, 65-66; 32:29; 33:83
– appearance and personality of, 4:43; 15:45; 23:61-66; 32:18; 33:78; 42:119
– at Atlantic Club dinner (1859), 4:42, 43, 44
– and Atlantic Monthly, 4:57; 14:8, 23; 33:80; 41:62
– bust of, 14:19
– Cambridge Thirty Years Ago (1854), see History, Cambridge
– Centennial addresses and poem honoring (1919), 14:5-29
– and civil service reform, 20:34, 37-38
– Dickens and, 28:87, 90, 93
– as editor, 4:57; 10:183; 14:8, 23-24; 33:80
– at Elmwood, see Elmwood (Cambridge)
– family of, 5:29; 14:68; 15:44; 32:35; 33:79; 34:66; 35:45, 46, 50, 51; 38:29; 41:32
– – – British cousins, 32:9, 16, 18
– Fireside Travels, see writings of, below
– friendships of:
– – – with Bartlett, 1:80-84 passim
– – – with Longfellow, 2:43; 14:25; 33:82-83
– as Harvard professor, 1:70; 3:34; 14:5-11, 21, 24-25; 25:135; 26:21, 22, 35-36; 33:80, 83, 91, 92; 34:60; 36:27; 41: 124
– – – and Agassiz School, 35:54
– as Harvard student, see as schoolboy, and schooling of, below
– Holmes (John) letter to ( 1869), 36:81
– Holmes (O. W.) quoted on, 25:114, 117
– letters and essays of, see writings of, below
– library of, 27:37
– opposes widening of Brattle St., 14:42
– as orator, 27:32-33; 43:77
– portrait of, 12:9
– publishers of, see writings of, below
– quoted, 11:56-57; 16:121-22; 25:92-93; 33:77, 78; 44:18
– – – on America, 7:17; 14:19-28 passim
– – – on British writers, 33:82
– – – on Cambridge/Cambridgeport, 1:41; 15:30; 20:55, 93; 25:51n47; 29:78; 30:18; 33:76, 78, 80-81, 97, 98; 35:80, 82; 37:33; 39:61
– – – on Cambridge personalities, 1:18, 75, 76, 84; 2:43; 3:29-30; 25:114, 117, 119, 128; 26:99, 103-4; 28:35; 29:13, 15, 17-18nl4, 38, 42, 46; 32:90; 33:12-13, 20
– – – on Harvard, 14:6-11 passim; 20:132; 33:8, 76
– – – on manners and hospitality, 32:28; 33:81-82
– – – on Puritanism, 1:38; 30:29
– – – on willows and elms, 31:30, 32, 38; 33:76; 39:129-30
– recollections (by acquaintances) of, 1:15; 23:61-66 (see also appearance and personality of, above)
– in Saturday Club, 2:75; 25:136; 28:90; 41:57; 43:154
– as schoolboy, and schooling of, 1:52; 5:25n2; 15:44; 17:59; 22:93; 25:92; 33:13; 35:82; 37:24
– – – at Harvard (Class of 1838), 4:31; 25:26, 29n1, 38, 87; 29:28; 33:92
– and slavery issue, 25:127, 137; 33:81
– willows made famous by, 18:55; 21:112 (see also quoted, above; Trees [willow])
– writings of:
– – – Biglow Papers, 14:22-23; 18:36n2; 20:37; 22:106; 25:137; 26:104; 33:81
– – – Commemoration Ode, 14:10, 21, 22, 24; 20:37; 33:77-78
– – – Fireside Travels, 27:64; 29:13n1, 15n6, 17n14, 38n16, 46n49; 37:33
– – – letters and essays, 25:92-93; 29:13n1, 38n16; 33:78, 81-82, 92
– – – Ode to water supply (1848), 41:58
– – – publishers of, 15:21; 19:23; 20:88
– – – verses on Longfellow, 2:43
– (see also quoted, above; History, Cambridge) Lowell, Mrs. James Russell (Maria White, first wife; d. 1853), 5:29; 13:86; 15:44; 23:57, 62, 63-64; 25:127-28, 129, 135; 32:9; 33:78-83 passim; 37:22; 43:154 Lowell, Mrs. James Russell (Frances Dunlap, second wife; d. 1885), 15:44; 25:135, 137; 33:77, 80, 83 Lowell, John (Harvard Fellow, 1697), 22:65 Lowell, Judge John (1743-1802; grandfather of J. R.), 3:57; 11:40; 15:44 Lowell, John (1769-1840; son of above), 34:77; 38:82; 44:176 Lowell, John Amory (1798-1881; son of above), 4:88; 26:27; 29:51n71; 41:60
– and Louis Agassiz, 2:84-91 passim; 43:54, 58, 59, 60 Lowell, Lawrence, see Lowell, Abbott Lawrence Lowell, Mabel (daughter of J. R.; Mrs. Burnett), 15:44, 45; 17:73; 25:135, 137; 32:35, 36; 33:79, 80, 84; 35:50, 51 Lowell, Rebecca (sister of J. R.), 33:79 Lowell, Rev. Robert Traill Spence (1816-1891; brother of J. R.), 27:12 Lowell, Miss Sarah Champney (J. R.’s “Aunt Sally”), 23:64; 25:51n47
– Longfellow and, 25:38-49 passim Lowell, Mr. (superintends building of Stoughton Hall, 1811), 7:64 Lowell, Miss (Higginson family friend, 1827), 2:25 Lowell, Mrs. (mother of Abbott L.)
– as schoolgirl (c. 1830), 21:105
– school in house of (c. 1880), 34:7 Lowell, Mrs. (runs boardinghouse, 1850s), 27:13. See also Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Lowell, Massachusetts, 6:50; 23:52-56 passim; 39:29, 60, 103; 40:44
– Boston & Lowell Railroad, see Railroad(s)
– mills at, 14:126; 23:49, 50; 40:49, 56
– turnpike to, 20:128 Lowell family tomb, 44:192 (and illus. #5 following ) Lowell Historic District (Cambridge), 39:74; 42:34, 35, 44 Lowell Historical Society (Lowell), 18:68n1 Lowell house(s): Quincy St., 27:12-13. See also Dudley-Lowell house; Elmwood (Cambridge) Lowell House (Harvard), 35:120; 43:142 Lowell Institute, 2:84, 85, 86, 91, 108; 14:6; 23:65; 35:35, 47n1 Lowell Institute of Design (Boston), 34:72 Lowell Institute Lectures, 2:100; 3:34; 23:40; 33:80; 38:84; 43:121
– Agassiz and, 2:85-86, 88, 101; 43:59, 60 Lowell Lecture Hall, see New Lecture Hall Lowell Lectures, see Lowell Institute Lectures Lowell Park, 5:109; 39:74; 43:36, 37 Lowell Street, 16:32; 24:10; 28:115; 32:29, 99; 37:10, 15, 18; 39:87; 41:165, 168
– trees on, 33:95, 97 (and illus. facing), 98 Lower Port, see Cambridgeport Lowes, Prof. John Livingston (Francis Ave. resident, 1925-27), 34:17; 41:27 Lowes, Mrs. John Livingston, 41:27 Lownes, George (of Pennsylvania, c. 1700), 24:81 Lownes, Mrs. George (daughter of Benanuel Bowers), 24:81 Loyalists, 5:25; 10:5-85; 17:54-56; 18:56; 33:139
– as aristocracy, see Social class
– as Christ Church members, see Christ Church (Episcopal)
– Commission on Claims of (1785), 5:57-65 (notes) passim, 67, 68n3, 73-90 (notes) passim, 94-95
– in England, 10:48, 50n4, 59; 15:42; 16:39; 17:57; 19:58-76; 20:96; 21:120; 22:71; 26:84; 29:16; 33:67, 68; 37:12, 19, 20, 25
– exodus and confiscation of property of, 10:47, 51; 13:17, 24-25, 43, 84; 14:71n2; 16:76, 81; 22:71; 26:60; 29:69; 33:92; 35:80; 37:12, 23; 41:20; 43:43, 84, 86; 44:68, 160
– – – compensation for, 5:68n3, 94
– (see also Borland, John; Inman, Ralph; Lechmere, Judge Richard; Lee, Judge Joseph; Nutting, John [Sr.]; Oliver, Lt.-Gov. Thomas; Phip[p]s (later Bo[a]rdman) farm; Sewall, Judge Jonathan; Vassall family)
– family relationships among, 10:9-10n2, 14-15n1; 19:48; 22:70-71, 100; 25:87-88; 26:49; 33:59, 60, 90; 37:19, 21, 24, 67
– “Gardens and Homes of” (1940 paper on), 26:49-62; 37:27
– at Harvard, 33:63-64, 65, 92
– histories of (Stark, Jones), 16:72, 73, 78; 33:92n107
– houses of, 10:6n1 (see also Apthorp-Borland house [“Bishop’s Palace”]; Hooper-Lee-Nichols house; Inman house; Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel house; Vassall houses and land)
– on Nantucket, see Nantucket, Massachusetts
– in Nova Scotia, 5:68-71, 90-93, 95-97; 30:70; 44:33
– Nutting (John) and, 5:63-98 passim
– patriot activity against, 5:63, 84n5; 10:7, 159; 13:22, 44; 15:42; 16:19, 24, 39; 17:57; 20:92; 21:88, 99, 119-20; 24:85; 26:58, 80-81; 30:49, 55, 58; 33:38, 66-73 passim; 37:12, 15-25 passim, 68; 43:71, 84-88 passim
– (see also exodus and confiscation of property of, above; Boston Tea Party)
– portraits of, 9:61; 10:frontispiece (illus.), 8, 13n2, 15n4, 16, 44 (illus. facing), 45, 56, 159; 12:77; 17:56; 21:101; 22:118; 23:96; 26:52, 80, 84
– publications of, 30:50
– and Shays’s Rebellion, 40:8-13, 15, 22
– and slavery, 40:131-32; 43:86 (see also Royall family; Slavery; Vassall family)
– social life of, 10:18-19, 28-29, 44; 15:42; 16:23, 74, 78, 79; 17:56-57; 19:49-50; 21:94, 97, 25:88; 26:57; 28:23; 30:62; 31:25; 32:25; 33:69, 90; 37:67-68, 71
– and Sons of Liberty meetings, 30:52
– as summer residents, 10:13n1
– and “Tory conservatism” of Elmwood, 15:45; 33:92
– and Tory sympathies, 17:60; 20:112, 118; 25:102; 30:49, 70; 40:11
– Washington and, 4:35
– wealth of, see Economic conditions
– wills and testaments of, 10:15n4, 16n3, 20, 21n3, 34, 36, 40n4, 50, 61; 16:80; 21:121; 30:49, 70; 33:65
– See also Church, Dr. Benjamin [Jr.]; George III; Mandamus Council; Tory Row Lucas, Miss E. Louise (Radcliffe 1921; Fogg Librarian), 35:74 Luce, John D. Henley (m. 1886; financier), 23:29, 34, 37, 40-41 Luce, Mrs. John D. Henley (Louisa Davis), 23:29, 34, 36, 37, 40-41 Luce, Robert (politician, 1930s), 44:93 Luce, Adm. Stephen B. (1827-1917), 23:29, 30, 40 Ludewig, Hermann (historian, 1840s), 44:124 Ludlow, Roger (1590-after 1664), 8:17; 44:44, 52 Luffman, John (traveler, 1760s), 33:61 Luke, Joseph (slave?), 10:66-67 Lumber, see Business and industry; Trees Lund, see also Lunt Lund, F. B. (choir member, 1880s), 27:33 Lunenberg, Massachusetts, 42:116 Lunt, see also Lund Lunt, Alfred (1893-1977; actor), 40:111 Lunt, Era (company commander, 1775), 18:65 Lunt, Paul (1747-1824; of Newburyport): diary of (1775), 11:76; 18:65 Lurie, Edward (Agassiz biographer), 43:54, 59, 63nn4-9 passim Lurtsema, Robert J. (radio commentator, 1970s), 43:147 Luscomb, O. Kerro (electronics manufacturer, c. 1910), 34:118, 119 Luther, Martin (1483-1546; leader of Protestant Reformation), 7:36; 33:136 Lutheran Church, 36:68. See also Religion Luxford, James (landowner, 1640s), 3:13 Lyceum Hall, 30:25
– architecture of, 1:21; 26:40
– bookstore in, 15:33
– as dancing school/ballroom, 11:55; 20:55; 26:40; 30:18, 20, 79, 80; 32:39
– lectures and concerts at, 1:52; 32:87; 41:94
– as meeting-place, 6:29; 30:80; 36:28; 39:8, 62
– Post Office in, 17:68
– as schoolhouse, 13:98
– site of, 1:21; 8:33, 39; 20:93; 22:106; 25:120; 39:60, 61 Lyde, Byfield, 21:90 Lyde, Mrs. Byfield (Sarah Belcher; b. 1709), 21:90 Lydenberg, Harry M. (Harvard 1896; N.Y. Librarian), 27:36 Lydia (Hancock’s schooner, 1754), 39:146-47n6; 40:125 “Lydia’s conversion” issue, see Religion Lyell, Sir Charles (1797-1875; British geologist), 2:85, 88-91 passim; 35:35; 43:58; 44:186n23 Lyman, Clarissa, see Richards, Mrs. William Lyman, Mrs. Francis Ogden ([Ruth] Charlotte Dana, d. 1903), 10:160; 17:66, 72 Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Frank (Reservoir St. residents, after 1924), 43:17 Lyman, Judge Joseph (c. 1800), 25:123 Lyman, Mrs. Joseph (Anne Jean Robbins, second wife), 25:123 Lyman, Mrs. Joseph (Susan Bulfinch Coolidge; d. c. 1900), 3:102, 108, 109 Lyman, Richard (of England, 1600s [?]), 23:90 Lyman, Samuel (letter of, 1786), 40:16n15 Lyman, Theodore (1792-1849; philanthropist), 42:117 Lyman, Theodore [Jr.] (1833-1897; zoologist), 20:40; 26:22-23
– quoted on Agassiz, 43:56, 61n7 Lyman, Mrs. Theodore (Jr.) (sister of Anna Russell), 26:23 Lyman, Prof. Theodore (1940s), 26:22 Lyman, Mr. (friend of Higginsons and of William Wells), 1827), 2:24; 22:93 Lyman, Mr. (Howe family friend, 1830s), 24:28, 29 Lyman, Misses, school of, see School(s) Lynch, John D. (drugstore, 1960s), 39:15 Lynde, Judge Benjamin (1700-1781), 17:52; 40:126n10 Lynde, Benjamin, Jr., 40:126n10 Lynde, Joseph (on meetinghouse committee, 1692), 24:49 Lynde Street, 30:89 Lyndon, Alice (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:36 Lynn, Massachusetts (Saugus), 6:57, 64, 70; 16:104; 21:36; 32:109; 39:15; 42:108
– boundaries of, 21:31, 33, 38-40, 41, 42, 48
– first church at, 10:99; 43:124
– founding/settlement of, 21:22, 24, 41; 32:111
– investors from, 40:30, 34
– and “Linn village,” see Reading, Massachusetts
– windmill at/moved to, 3:11; 31:38
Lynnfield, Massachustts, 21:39, 40
Lyon, see also Lyons
Lyon, Prof. David Gordon (1852-1935; orientalist), 23:43; 36:65, 66, 67; 41:38
Lyon, Mrs. David Gordon, 41:38
Lyon, Lord (British minister at Washington, 1860), 21:122
Lyons, see also Lions; Lyon
Lyons, Hugh M. (on Historic Commission, 1960s), 39:72, 75; 42:33
Lyons, Israel [Thomas?] (English scholar, 1760s), 44:68, 73n17
Lyons, Louis (1950s), 41:110
Lyons, Thomas, see Lyons, Israel

M

McAfee, Mildred, see Morton, Mrs. Douglas
MacArthur, Gen. Douglas (1880-1964), 33:40
McCagg, Louis (Harvard 1884), 32:88
McCall, Gov. Samuel W. (1851-1923), 42:119
– “Public Career of Thomas Wentworth Higginson” (1911 address), 7:11-16 McCarthy, John (Law School “bookboy,” 1883-1940s), 41:129 McClalland, Miss (Kirkland St. resident, 1930s), 23:80 McClarry, John (ship captain [?]; c. 1760), 23:20 McClellan Club, see Women’s clubs/organizations McClennan, Alan (city planning director, 1960s), 39:75; 42:33 McClennen, Mrs. and Mrs. Edward F. (Lake View Ave. residents, 1944), 30:5 McClure, Capt. Sir Robert J. LeM. (1807-1873; Arctic explorer), 33:135 McColgan’s drug store, 20:133. See also Medicine, practice of McCord, David (b. 1897; poet), 36:23; 37:111; 41:114, 115
– quoted, 41:166 McCormick, Mrs. Stanley Dexter (MIT 1907; benefactor), 42:65 McCormick Hall (MIT), 42:65 McCowen, Oliver H. (of Baltimore), 10:8n1 McCowen, Mrs. Oliver H. (Elizabeth Vassall Prentiss; owner of Vassall portraits, 1914), 10:8n1, 22n1 McCoy, Sgt. William: diary of (1775), 11:79 McCrehan house (Rindge Ave.), 20:128 McCurtin, Daniel (of Pennsylvania): diary of (1775-76), 11:76 McDaniel, Judge Samuel (early 1900s), 17:23 McDaniel, Prof. Walton Brooks (1950s), 35:106 McDonald, Alexander (landowner, 1886), 14:63 “McDonner, Mr.” (c. 1800), 16:54, 93 McDonough, Anna (landowner, c. 1811), 16:93 MacDougall, Mrs. Elizabeth (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:33, 36, 42 McDougall, Prof, and Mrs. William (Francis Ave. residents, 1922-25), 41:27 McDuffie, Caroline Elizabeth, see Sherman, Mrs. Charles W. M[a]cDuffie, John (1828-1916; “grand old man” of Cambridge): obituary, 13:124-25 M[a]cDuffie, Mrs. John (Hannah Elizabeth Giv-ens), 13:124, 125 MacDuffie, John (of MacDuffie School, Springfield; son of above), 13:124; 44:142 MacDuffie, Mrs. John (Abby Parsons), 44:142 MacDuffie, Rufus (brother of John [2d]), 13:125 MacDuffie School (Springfield), see MacDuffie, John [2d] Mace, Daniel (tavern keeper, c. 1850), 20:133-34. See also Mace Hotel Mace, Mrs. Daniel (Mary), 20:134 Mace Hotel, 37:36. See also Mace, Daniel McElroy, P. J. (glass manufacturer, 1920s), 19:44 McFadden, Miss Elizabeth (playwright, 1912), 40:111-12 McFadden, Miss Frances (Reservoir St. resident, 1950s), 43:23 McFadden, Hamilton (actor), 38:57 MacFadden, Mrs. Robert A. (Edith H.; Francis Ave. resident, 1917-23), 41:31 MacFarland, Grenville S. (editor, c. 1900), 20:89 MacFarlane, Miss Elizabeth (Reservoir St. resident, 1933), 22:14 McGiffert, Mrs. A. C., Jr. (Elisabeth Eliot), 43:22n5 McGinness, William H. (Water Dept. superintendent, 1947-67), 41:12 McGregor, Tracy W. (book collector, 1930s), 38:104, 108 MacGregor, Mr. (Boston friend of Emerson family, 1856), 35:42 Machado, Salome, see Warren, Mrs. Minton McIlwain, Prof, and Mrs. Charles H. (Francis Ave. residents, 1919-38), 41:28, 29 McIntire, Miss Blanche (student, late 1800s), 35:98 McIntire, Judge Charles J., 22:25; 36:95, 98; 39:62
– “Why I Started the Index to Paige’s History of Cambridge” (1911 paper), 6:33-40 McIntire, Ezra (Constitutional Convention member, late 1700s), 6:36 McIntire, Dr. Herbert (Garden St. resident, 1887-1930), 33:42; 38:123; 43:169 McIntire, Samuel (1757-1811; wood carver of Salem), 14:105 McIntire, Thomas, Jr. (clerk of court; d. 1881), 17:22 McIntire, Mrs. (Betsey Holman; mother of Judge Charles J.), 6:34 McIntosh, see also Mackintosh McIntosh, Mrs., see Appleton, Mary McIntyre, see McIntire Mackay, see also McKay; MacKaye Mackay, Amelia, see Goodwin, Mrs. Hersey Bradford Mackay, Barnard (builds Follen St. house, mid-1800s), 10:175; 20:99 Mackay, Frances (sister of Amelia and Barnard), 10:175 Mackay/Mackey, Munco (bridge builder, late 1700s), 7:58; 16:39, 83 Mackay, William (Vassall creditor, of Boston, 1788). 10:59n1 McKay, see also Mackay; MacKaye McKay, Donald: and McKay’s shipyard, 35:112; 37:107 McKay, Gordon (1821-1903; Harvard benefactor), 10:132; 40:23
– and McKay Fund, 4:84; 12:43-44; 36:71 McKay, Thomas (with Hudson’s Bay Company, 1830s), 28:50 McKay Sewing Machine Co., 23:39 McKay’s shipyard, see McKay, Donald MacKaye, see also Mackay; McKay MacKaye, Percy (1875-1956; poet, playwright), 40:112, 113
– “The Returning” (honoring J. R. Lowell), 14:12-18 McKean, Amy, see McKean, Mrs. Joseph McKean, David (Scottish mine official, Nova Scotia, c. 1865), 25:139 McKean, Elizabeth, see Worcester, Mrs. Joseph Emerson McKean, Henry Swasey (1810-1857; Harvard tutor), 25:104-5, 110; 28:112 McKean, Prof. “John,” see McKean, Rev. [Prof.] Joseph McKean, Rev. [Prof.] Joseph (1776-1818), 9:16, 18, 20, 33; 25:102, 103-4
– given as “Dr. John,” 28:112 McKean, Mrs. Joseph (Amy Swasey), 9:65; 25:103 McKean, Sarah Manning, see McKean, Mrs. William McKean, [Susanne) Sarah, see Folsom, Mrs. Charles McKean, William (Boston merchant; d. 1820), 25:102-3 McKean, Mrs. William (Sarah Manning), 25:102 McKean family: “Charles Folsom and” (1939 paper), 25:97-112 “McKean’s Leap” (from Hollis Hall, Harvard), 25:103 McKelvey, Mrs. Charles W. (early 20th c.), 27:26 McKenzie, Rev. Alexander (1830-1914), 2:29; 20:72, 88; 34:41, 44; 43:121-25 passim
– addresses and papers by, 33:8n3
– – – Cambridge anniversary address (1905), 1:35-40
– – – “Some Cambridge Men…” (1908), 3:19-36
– biography of (Calkins), 23:12; 43:122, 125
– and Cambridge Hospital, 16:115; 35:86; 39:40
– on Harvard Board of Overseers, 1:34; 3:35; 10:181; 43:121
– and “no-license” cause, 10:181; 13:9, 14; 20:75
– obituary, 10:180-81
– parsonage of, 33:45
– at street railway hearing (1881), 39:89-90 McKenzie, Mrs. Alexander (Ellen Holman Eveleth), 10:181 McKenzie, Arthur (city treasurer, 1940s), 44:94 McKenzie, Capt. Daniel (c. 1800; father of Rev. Alexander), 10:180 McKenzie, Mrs. Daniel (Phoebe Mayhew Smith), 10:180 McKenzie, Prof. Kenneth (of Yale, 1915), 10:181 McKenzie, Miss Margaret (daughter of Rev. Alexander), 10:181 “Mackerel year,” see Weather (1816) Mackey, see Mackay/Mackey McKim, Mead & White (architects), 34:11; 44:145 McKinley, William (1843-1901; U.S. president 1896-1901), 21:74 Mackintosh, see also McIntosh Mackintosh, Deacon Peter (of Lee St. Society; d. 1848), 34:29 Mackintosh, Mrs. (1860s), see Harrington, Fanny Mackintosh family, 34:19 MacLachlan, Prof, and Mrs. James A. (Irving St. residents, 1958-60), 41:34 McLaughlin, see also McLoughlin McLaughlin, J. L. (Harvard tutor, 1870s), 34:100 Maclaurin, Richard C. (1870-1919; MIT president 1909-19), 42:49-54, 55, 57 McLean, John (Boston merchant; establishes Chair at Harvard, 1839), 44:129 MacLean, Mary Elizabeth, see Nutting, Mrs. James Walton MacLean, Miss Minnie C. (“beautician,” 1912), 41:144 McLean, Nathaniel Collins (law student lodger at Mrs. Craigie’s; d. 1905), 25:21, 23 McLean Hospital (Somerville), 16:121 McLean Professorship, see McLean, John Macleish, Archibald (b. 1892; poet), 23:47 MacLeod, Mr. and Mrs. Fred (Francis Ave. residents, 1912-22), 41:29 MacLeod, Mabel, see Hammond, Mrs. Franklin T. Maclise, Daniel (1811-1870; British painter), 28:72, 73, 81, 83 McLoughlin, see also McLaughlin McLoughlin, Dr. John (1784-1857), 28:46-53 passim McMillan (law student, 1870s), 38:52, 53 McMurtrie, James (of Philadelphia, 1831), 29:36n7 MacNair, Rev. William M., 20:77
– “One Hundred Years of Church Life” (1927 paper), 20:63-83 MacNair, Mrs. William M., 20:80 McNamee, Mayor (1903), 41:139 McNeil, Capt. Daniel (1780s), 5:58n3, 97n1 Macomber, George A., 41:51; 42:44
– “Rambling Notes on the Cambridge Trust Company; or Tales of a Wayside Bank” (1968 paper), 41:40-54 Macomber, Mrs. George A. (Ella Sewell Sling-luff), 41:51 MacPherson, Cordelia (“Dilly”; daughter of following), 37:39 MacPherson, Warren (hotel owner, 1930s), 37:38, 39 Macready, William Charles (1793-1873; British actor), 28:72, 73, 81, 96 McTammany, John (inventor, 1870s), 14:129 MacVane, Professor (lectures at Prospect Union, c. 1900), 40:145 Macy, Anne Sullivan (1866-1936; teacher), 32:98 Macy, William F. (author, 1929), 27:46n12 Maddock, Henry (d. 1679), 8:20 Maddock, Mrs. Henry, see Wellington, Mary Madison, James (1751-1836; U.S. president 1808-16), 10:178; 26:89n53; 27:55; 28:22; 33:75; 38:76; 40:11n8
– portrait of (hidden during War of 1812), 23:58 Madison, Mrs. James (Dolley), 23:58 Madison Street, 33:56; 38:116 Magazine Beach Park, 43:142 Magazine Street, 1:56; 13:110; 14:44-45, 60-61, 66, 67, 72; 16:64; 18:18n2; 22:73; 25:115, 117; 26:99n67, 118; 30:80; 35:83; 39:20, 90
– – – Allston studio and house on corner of, 1:65; 11:32n; 25:119; 29:36n6; 35:82 (see also Allston, Washington) Magazines, powder, see Powder magazines Magazines and newspapers, see Periodicals Magee, Mrs., student boardinghouse of, see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Maginnis & Walsh (architects), 43:18 Magna C[h]arta, see Charter Magnalia Christi Americana, see Mather, Cotton Magoun, Aaron B. (schoolmaster, mid-1800s), 30:78, 79 Magoun, Prof. Francis Peabody (Harvard 1916), 43:24, 30 Magoun, Mrs. Francis Peabody (Margaret Boy-den), 43:24 Magoun, Francis Peabody, 3d, 43:24 Magoun, Gretchen, see Rothrauff, Mrs. Guido Magoun, Jean Bartholow, see Farnsworth, Mrs. Ward Magoun, William Cowper Boyden (b. c. 1930), 43:24 Magruder, Mrs. Calvert (Anita Ward; schoolgirl, early 20th c.), 43:20 Maguire, Charles A., and Associates (engineers), 39:37 Maguire, Prof. John (Law School, 1923), 41:130 Maguire, Mrs. John M. (Mary Hume; Radcliffe historian, 1950s): “The Curtain-Raiser to the Founding of Radcliffe College” (1955 paper), 36:23-39 Mahoney, Henry J. (“Harry”; editor, late 1800s), 20:89; 36:104, 115 Mahoney, Thomas H. D. (Historical Commission, 1960s), 42:34 Mail, see Post Office Main Street (Cambridge), 2:112; 19:20; 30:27; 36:44; 39:20
– architecture on, 26:37, 38, 40 (illus. #3 following), 41, 44
– and bridges:
– – – “Little Bridge,” 7:58
– – – West Boston, 14:49n1, 52, 53-54; 39:121; 42:83
– businesses/shops on:
– – – 1800s, 8:37; 10:177; 16:85; 35:87; 39:8; 41:93
– – – 1920s, 34:118
– Fire Department on, 36:80, 84
– hostelries on (1700s), 37:33
– importance of (to town development), 35:80, 81; 39:117; 40:27
– “incubator of invention” on, 14:129, 130 (illus. facing); 35:84 (see also Inventions)
– laid out, 14:53r56
– – – connecting streets laid out, 14:43-44, 45, 65, 68; 16:87
– portion named Massachusetts Avenue, 20:91; 30:25
– renaming proposed (1928), 20:14
– sites identified on, 16:38, 65 (see also City Hall [Cambridge])
– street railway on, 14:56; 20:54; 34:69; 39:82, 87, 92-96 passim, 100; 42:89; 44:139
– urban renewal on, 42:64
– See also Massachusetts Avenue (Cambridge) Main Street (Charlestown), 14:33 Main Street (Watertown), 25:128 Maine, Sir Henry (1822-1888; English jurist), 7:40 Maine, State of, 23:49, 56; 32:91
– brickmaking in, 42:73, 74 (see also Brick and brickmaking)
– canal in, 40:50
– Constitution of, 12:68
– Craigie property in, 27:65, 87, 90
– firewood from, 5:59n10; 44:79
– “first literary character in the district of,” 9:13
– Gorges’s land in, 10:172; 44:54, 56
– “hibernization” of, 5:76n3
– histories of, 5:79-95 (notes) passim
– land speculation in, 5:60, 61, 75; 27:65
– lumber shipped from, 5:59; 40:29, 50
– as Massachusetts province, 5:79; 23:27
– and Penobscot Expedition (1779), 3:74; 5:78-86, 89, 93-95
– settlement of, 5:74n2; 33:135, 138; 44:43
– Sortwell mansion in (Wiscasset), 43:25
– stencil hallway in New Gloucester [?] Waldoboro [?], 21:56 (and illus. following )
– Trolley Museum in (Kennebunkport), 39:106-7
– vacations in, 23:32; 24:92; 25:85, 124; 30:81-84, 87; 36:116; 37:109; 43:26
– – – Eliot family, 14:8; 26:28; 33:119-20, 121; 42:20
– Wallingford house in (Kennebunk), 39:53; 44:36
– See also Bowdoin College; entries for individual towns Maine, U.S.S. (battleship, 1898), 41:169 Maisters, see Masters Majestic Theatre (Boston), 33:129-30. See also Theatre Makepeace, Royal (1772-1855; real estate speculator), 7:59; 14:50; 16:43-44, 85, 86 Makepeace, Mrs. Royal (Rebecca K. Ritchie [Vose]), 16:40-41 Malcom, Capt. David (1760s), 30:53 Malden, Massachusetts (Mystic Side), 16:104; 17:32; 18:57; 21:27, 30, 34, 35, 41, 42; 34:122
– Fire Department, 25:46
– History of (Corey), 21:32-33, 35 Male Humane Society, see Charity Mall, the (Brattle Square), 14:59n1 Malloch, Misses (Kirkland St. residents, 1930s), 23:80 Malvern Avenue, 39:15 Manassas Avenue, 22:49 Manchester, England: Dana family origin in, 26:64-67, 100 Manchester, Massachusetts (Jeffry’s Creek), 13:125; 21:40, 42, 47; 26:90n55, 100 Mandamus Council, 16:73; 20:118; 37:19; 43:86
– Oliver and Lee appointed to, resign from (1774), 15:42; 16:19, 39, 71; 21:119, 120; 26:50, 58; 33:66-67; 37:21, 25, 68; 43:71, 85
– See also Loyalists Mann, Benjamin (son of Horace; “Entomologicon” of, late 1800s), 20:96 Mann, George C. (son of Horace), 21:59 Mann, Mrs. George C. (Esther Lombard), 21:59 Mann, Horace (1796-1859; educator), 10:128, 145; 21:59; 23:84; 28:21; 34:26-27 Mann, Mrs. Horace (Mary T. Peabody, second wife), 20:96 Mann, William (of Shepard congregation, 1630s), 10:103; 22:78 Mann Brothers (shoestore, 1870s), 30:22 Manners, Emily (London author, 1914), 24:69n5, 74nn14, 15, 81n34 Manners
– breach of:
– – – by children, 30:36, 75; 32:28
– – – collegiate, 31:9; 33:129; 34:8, 49-50; 39:88-89
– – – and contempt of court, 32:28; 39:61
– – – dancing in public as, see Dancing
– – – by parents toward teachers, 13:100
– collegiate, 2:128; 41:142-55 passim; 44:155 (see also breach of, above)
– formal, 16:23; 32:94
– Sabbath observance and, 16:106 (see also Religion)
– social standing and etiquette, 13:82 (see also Social class)
– on street railway, 17:67; 20:55; 31:7-8; 32:25; 34:76; 39:88-89, 90; 44:12
– teaching of/guide to, 35:54; 40:35; 43:116
– of troops (1770s), 11:65
– upbringing and, 22:93
– and wearing of new dress, 41:2
– See also Domestic and family life; Society (people) Manning, Edward (landowner, 1742), 22:73 Manning, Eleanor (architect), see O’Connor, Eleanor Manning Manning, Jacob (shoemaker, early 1800s), 20:92 Manning, Dr. Joseph (of Ipswich, 1770s), 25:102 Manning, Nancy Wyer, see Houghton, Mrs. Henry Oscar Manning, Samuel (1644-1711; Billerica landowner), 9:76, 77 Manning, Samuel (landowner, 1770s), 22:75 Manning, Dr. Samuel (1778-1822), 11:17n1, 23 Manning, Mrs. Samuel, see Warland, Elizabeth Manning, Samuel (landowner, 1835), 22:75 Manning, Sarah, see McKean, Mrs. William Manning, Warren (landscape architect, 1930s), 35:22 Manning, William (c. 1614-1691; settler), 9:77; 11:86; 14:91; 22:76 (Map 1)
– descendants of, 5:52, 54; 19:88 Manning, William (1767-1849; printer and publisher), 12:67 Manning, Mrs. William H. (of Westport, N.Y., c. 1910[?]), 43:169 Manning Association (Billerica), 9:77 Manning family and property, 10:115; 22:74, 75 Mansard-roof houses, see Architecture, styles of Mansfield, Daniel (schoolmaster, 1842-86), 13:97, 108; 16:124; 30:79 Mansfield, Lord (Chief Justice, 1756), 7:37, 42 Mansfield, Richard (1854-1907; actor), 41:139 Mansfield (1800 classmate of T. Fuller, Jr.), 11:44 “Mansion, the,” see Cooke-Holyoke house Mansion House
– Elmwood known as, 33:72, 90, 92; 37:16 (see also Elmwood [Cambridge])
– inn (Boston, 1770s; East Cambridge, late 1800s), see Taverns, inns, hotels, and boardinghouses Manson, Miss, kindergarten of, see School(s) Manual Training School, see School(s) Maple Avenue, 16:90; 43:141, 142 Maps and plans
– atlases (Cambridge):
– – – Bromley (1894), 44:163, 164, 167, 168 (Map 5 following)
– – – Hopkins (1873), 26:55n70, 57nh100, 108, 58n120, 59nn125, 132, 61; 41:18; 44:163, 164, 168 (Map 3 following)
– – – Hopkins (1886), 44:163, 164, 166, 168 (Map 4 following)
– – – real estate (19th and 20th c.), 42:43; 43:13
– Billerica grants (before 1655), 9:73-74 (illus.)
– Boston, 14:77, 78; 26:53n47, 57-58nn104-24 passim, 61
– Boston Bay (1776), 14:39n1
– Boston Public Garden, 41:56
– of brickyards and clay pits, 42:68-69 (illus.), 73
– of burying grounds:
– – – Mount Auburn, see Mount Auburn Cemetery
– – – “old,” Garden St., 19:81; 22:13n1; 35:24
– – – Revolutionary hospital, 17:100
– Cambridge (“Newtown[e]”) allotments:
– – – 1630s and 1640s, 8:20 (illus. following); 14:77; 22:76 (illus. following), 78 (illus. following); 26:56n93; 31:23; 39:126; 43:96 (illus. #1 and #2 following); 44:45, 57-61
– – – 1759, 14:77, 78; 16:75, 77 (illus.)
– – – 1770s, 28:30; 43:96 (illus. #3 following)
– – – 1780s, 22:73
– – – 1830s, 14:77, 78; 26:59n134; 28:30
– Cambridge fortifications (1775, 1776), 43:144 (illus. facing), 145 (illus. facing)
– Cambridge Horse Railroad (1862), 39:96 (illus. following)
– Cambridge streets, 14:39n1, 40-41 (and illus.), 43-44, 46, 58, 68 (illus. following), 69-78; 18:36n2; 31:31, 54; 33:15; 38:111, 119; 39:73, 92; 41:142, 160; 42:76, 94, 116; 43:94, 151
– – – in Allston’s time (1796-1843), 29:48 (illus. following)
– – – by Pelham, 14:41n1, 43, 77; 26:51-52; 43:142, 145 (illus. facing)
– (see also city, below)
– Cambridgeport:
– – – 1759 (Phip[p]s farm), 16:77 (illus.)
– – – 1824, 14:72; 16:82, 88, 95
– – – 1838, 43:144
– of Charles River (1300-1964), 39:17 (illus. facing)
– of Charles River Embankment, 39:112 (illus. facing)
– of Christ Church, 23:21-22
– city, 42:36, 43
– – – 1850-86, 15:38; 41*18; 42:86 (illus.); passim
– (see also atlases; Cambridge streets, above)
– of Coolidge estate, 44:163, 168 (Maps 1 and 2 following)
– of Craigie estate, 14:72; 25:20; 27:89; 31:frontispiece (illus.), 59
– of Dana holdings, 16:82; 22:72; 26:69, 70 (illus.); 33:9n11
– of Dickens dinner party table (1868), 28:95 (illus. facing)
– East Cambridge (1873), 34:99n2 (see also of Lechmere Point, below)
– of English counties (Essex, Suffolk, Kent), 14:86 (illus. facing), 92 (illus. facing), 100 (illus. facing)
– exhibited (various dates) during Tercentenary (1930), 27:100
– grid plans (1630s, 1870), 44:41, 44, 45, 58, 60, 161
– of Hartford, Connecticut (1630s), 44:61
– of Harvard Branch Railroad, 38:31 (illus.)
– of Harvard Square, 14:77; 30:24 (illus. following )
– of Harvard Yard, see Harvard Yard
– of historic districts, 39:71, 75; 42:32, 37, 42
– of Hooper estate (Reservoir St.), 43:16
– of Lake View Ave. area, 44:163, 168 (Maps 3-5 following)
– of Lechmere Point (1811), 39:65 (illus. facing)
– of Massachusetts (eastern), showing growth (1630-42), 21:21-48 passim (and illus.)
– of Mount Auburn Cemetery, see Mount Auburn Cemetery
– of New England, by Capt. John Smith (1614), 25:120; 39:24
– of “Newtown[e],” see Cambridge (“Newtown[e]”) allotments, above
– of “parole limits” (1777), 13:80 (illus. following)
– railroad, 20:129; 38:31; 39:79n2
– real estate atlases, see atlases, above
– reservoir shown on, 42:85n5; 43:16 (illus. following)
– of Reservoir St. house (1870s), 43:13, 14
– “Top of the Hill” (1850-86 and 1916), 43:16 (illus. following)
– and topography, 44:159-60
– – – alterations of, at Mount Auburn, 44:190, 192 (and illus. #1 following)
– – – “Topographical Development…1793-1896” (1963 paper), 39:108-24; 42:49; 43:73nn7, 8, 74
– of “Tory Row” estates, 37:9 (illus. following), 10-24 passim
– of “Vinland,” 13:6n1; 40:94, 97, 105-6, 107 (see also Leif Ericsson)
– and walking tours, 42:37, 94; 43:151
– Ware Field and Fish Weir, Menotomy River, 5:37 (illus. ), 40
– Watertown (c. 1640), 8:20 (illus. following)
– See also Geology Marble Harbo