Fall Conversation 2022: How Does Cambridge Unionize?

MIT Grad Students

The final program in our year of asking “Who Are Cambridge Workers?” will focus on labor organizing in Cambridge, both past and present. How do Cantabrigians see themselves as workers? How is their identity linked to their work? Do they see themselves as part of a local workers’ community, or do they identify with their profession across geographical boundaries? How has the pandemic and the shift (for some) to remote work affected this sense of community and identity? We will be joined by representatives from the MIT Graduate Students’ Union, the Cambridge Teachers’ Union, and the 1369 Coffeehouse Workers’ Union to hear about their current organizing efforts and the future of unionization in Cambridge and beyond.

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‘Born In Cambridge’ authors plan a walking tour this month of Cambridgeport and its innovations

A white hand holding a copy of “Born in Cambridge” by Karen Weintraub and Michael Kuchta

In their new book, “Born in Cambridge: 400 Years of Ideas and Innovators,” Karen Weintraub and Michael Kuchta argue that “the story of Cambridge reflects the story of America … Major events and trends that affected the nation left fingerprints here, too.” How the city and its residents react to those forces, though, makes for a compelling story of invention, reinvention and adaptation spanning four centuries.

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“The Absolute Majority of the Population”: Women in Twentieth-Century Cambridge

This article was originally published as a chapter in Cambridge in the Twentieth Century, edited by Daphne Abeel, Cambridge Historical Society, 2007.  Inspired by Cambridge Historical Society’s 2020 theme—Who are Cambridge Women?—the author, Eva Moseley, has reviewed the manuscript and made a few updates which are noted in the text that follows. “The Absolute Majority…

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Series II: Cambridgeport

Links to all the Postcard Collection gallery pages and the Finding Aid can be found by clicking here. *Postcard was used.

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